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Defense Acquisition Challenge Annual Report

VIEWS: 133 PAGES: 51

									Annual Report To Congress: Defense Acquisition Challenge Program Fiscal Year 2005
June 2006
Office of the Under Secretary of Defense (Acquisition, Technology and Logistics)

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TABLE OF CONTENTS Foreword Defense Acquisition Challenge (DAC) - Program Overview............................................. 5 DAC Program Benefits ....................................................................................................... 7 Projects Completed in FY 2005 ........................................................................................ 10 Army .............................................................................................................................. 11 Navy / Marine Corps ...................................................................................................... 12 Air Force ........................................................................................................................ 14 Special Operations Command........................................................................................ 15 Projects Continuing in FY 2005 ....................................................................................... 17 Army .............................................................................................................................. 18 Navy / Marine Corps ...................................................................................................... 19 Air Force ........................................................................................................................ 21 Special Operations Command........................................................................................ 22 Projects Initiated in FY 2005 ............................................................................................ 23 Army .............................................................................................................................. 24 Navy / Marine Corps ...................................................................................................... 24 Air Force ........................................................................................................................ 25 Special Operations Command........................................................................................ 27 Projects Selected for FY 2006 .......................................................................................... 29 Army .............................................................................................................................. 30 Navy / Marine Corps ...................................................................................................... 31 Air Force ........................................................................................................................ 33 Special Operations Command........................................................................................ 35 Appendix A. Participation in the DAC Program ............................................................. 37 Appendix B. Equipment Selected for Procurement as a Result of the DAC Program .... 41 Appendix C. Examples of DAC-Evaluated Equipment Supporting U.S. Military Operations ................................................................................................. 43 Appendix D. Abbreviations & Acronyms........................................................................ 45

TABLES AND FIGURES Project Status: Table 1……….. DAC Projects Completed in FY 2005 ................................................................10 Table 2…….…. DAC Projects Continuing in FY 2005…. ...........................................................17 Table 3……..… DAC Projects Initiated in FY 2005 ....................................................................23 Table 4……….. DAC Projects Selected for FY 2006 ...................................................................29 Participation Status: Figure A-1….… By Company & Location (FY 2003 - 2005)… ...................................................38 Figure A-2….… By Company & Location (FY 2006) ..................................................................39 Table A-1…..… By DoD Activities (FY 2003 - 2005) .................................................................40 Equipment Selected for Procurement (Based on FY 2003 - 2005 Projects): Table B-1…..… Army ...................................................................................................................42 Table B-2…..… Navy / Marine Corps ...........................................................................................42 Table B-3…..… Air Force .............................................................................................................42 Table B-4…..… Special Operations Command.............................................................................42

Overview

Defense Acquisition Challenge Program FY 2005

DEFENSE ACQUISITION CHALLENGE (DAC) – PROGRAM OVERVIEW The Defense Acquisition Challenge (DAC) Program provides opportunities to increase the introduction of innovative and cost-saving technology into acquisition programs of the Department of Defense. The program provides funds for the test and evaluation of technologies and products that have the potential to improve current acquisition programs at the component, subsystem, or system level. Any person or activity within or outside the DoD has the opportunity to propose alternatives, known as ―Challenge Proposals‖, which would improve performance, affordability, manufacturability, or operational capability of that acquisition program. Direction and oversight of DAC is provided by the Office of the Deputy Under Secretary of Defense/Advanced Systems and Concepts (ODUSD/AS&C) Comparative Testing Office (CTO). DAC is managed and executed by the Military Services and SOCOM. DAC has a one-year proposal selection cycle initiated with a published Broad Agency Announcement (BAA) for draft proposals and culminating with final proposals submitted by program mangers to compete for funding. The CTO and subject matter experts across the Office of the Under Secretary of Defense (Acquisition, Technology, and Logistics) evaluate and prioritize candidate proposals for funding, with highest priority given to proposals that commit to procure should testing be successful. The sponsoring organization conducts the technology/project evaluation and procures those items that meet their requirement. DAC increases opportunities for domestic vendors to enter the DoD acquisition process. The program inserts innovative and cost-saving technologies into current acquisition programs at the component, subsystem, or system level. DAC carries the additional DoD/National Security benefit of an expanded industrial base for defense acquisition. It is significant to note that to date approximately 70 percent of the projects awarded are with technology providers at the small or mid-sized enterprise level, although business size is not part of the evaluation criteria.

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Overview

Defense Acquisition Challenge Program FY 2005

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Highlights

Defense Acquisition Challenge Program FY 2005 DAC PROGRAM BENEFITS

Summary of DAC Achievements DAC was assigned to ODUSD(AS&C) in March 2003. Within nine months, the CTO facilitated implementation from initial legislation to contracting of testing products. A secure e-business process with safeguards for handling proprietary information was established to manage proposal submissions in response to the BAA, proposal evaluation, project status notification to submitters and program managers, and project management. To enable program management, DoD leveraged existing Service infrastructure and business practices from the established Foreign Comparative Testing Program. DAC projects cover a broad range of technologies that responds to the diverse warfighter needs of the Military Services and SOCOM. The program has multiple objectives:       Introducing and improving new operational capabilities. Offering leading edge/leap-ahead technologies with cross-cutting applications. Creating new opportunities for U.S. industry teaming. Assisting to bridge the technology gap for DoD acquisition programs. Facilitating rapid fielding of critical equipment for the Global War on Terrorism. Measuring progress, including: Risk reduction for technology insertion, cost avoidance, avoiding new research and development expenditures, speeding transition of mature technology to programs of record (PoR), and tracking returnon-investment.

The evaluation of late-stage, mature technologies and commercial items suitable for military requirements reduces expenditures for research and development. DAC’s focus on a clear path to procurement quickly puts needed equipment into the hands of America’s warfighters. Testing a commercial item already in production or mature technology nearing market application can lower the unit procurement cost for both the U.S. defense and commercial industry. The importance of responding rapidly to our nation’s immediate warfighting and peacekeeping requirements has remained the central concern of the DoD. Examples of DAC technologies that were deployed during warfighting operations that help critical operational needs identified from Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) lessons learned are:  Spraycool™ Counter Targeting System / Weapon Surveillance System (CTS / WSS) - Enables counter targeting sensor electronics to operate in ground vehicles in extreme heat and blowing sand environments. - Four systems were deployed to Iraq in summer of 2004, including three units supporting the Persistent Threat Detection System, used to conduct surveillance and defend against Man-Portable Air Defense Systems (MANPADs) and mortar attacks. An additional test bed system was deployed at Redstone Arsenal, Alabama.

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Highlights -

Defense Acquisition Challenge Program FY 2005 The infrared (IR) detection technology is a primary component of Pacific Command’s OVERWATCH Advanced Concept Technology Demonstration. Spraycool™ reduced risk and speeded transition of a follow-on gate array technology, further reducing the weight and size for cooling electronic systems.

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Enhanced Gunfire Detection System (EGDS) - A spiral development is underway by SOCOM to build upon the already successful Foreign Comparative Testing program which established an acoustic detection capability for snipers. This enhanced system, being competed with seven domestic vendors, adds sensors and processors and automated processing elements to locate a threat prior to the sniper’s first shot. A prototype system has already been fielded. - Feedback from the 116th Brigade Combat Team Logistics Assistance Representative (April 2005): It was reported that one week after the EGDS was set up in an operational high risk area of Iraq, rounds were fired by insurgent snipers at soldiers in the camp. The EGDS performed as advertised and identified distance and bearing of the fire. Subsequent search of location resulted in the capture of insurgents and weapons. No U.S. soldiers were injured. Automated Enhanced Position Location Reporting System (EPLRS) and Quality of Service (QoS) Planners for the Systems Planning Engineering and Evaluation Device (SPEED) - Two parallel DAC projects automated the planning processes for EPLRS networks and dedicated QoS to specific communication network assets. This reduced the communications planning time for a tactical deployment from one day to 20 minutes by enabling faster insertion of SPEED v10.0 software application. SPEED was designed to provide communicators with a standard set of tools that can be used to perform radio link engineering. - The Marine Corps deployed a tactical release of SPEED v10.0, including the EPLRS and QoS modules, to 900 users in support of the Marine Expeditionary Force (MEF) II Iraqi deployment in the fall of 2005. - Awaiting Navy / USMC qualification for full release to all SPEED users. Enhancements to Fly Away Satellite Communications (SATCOM) - Since the summer of 2003, the Fly Away SATCOM System has been used in the mountains of Afghanistan and the deserts of Iraq. - Operational testing of the new built-in test capability and improved earth station identification/improved FA-150 1.5 meter antenna is being accomplished by SOF elements for overseas user evaluation. - Further user evaluation testing of the 1.5 meter ―auto-locate‖ function was conducted by SOF elements in Iraq and created an overwhelming buy-in, leading to a USMC procurement of five additional systems.

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Highlights 

Defense Acquisition Challenge Program FY 2005

Mini Combat Trauma Patient Simulation System (Mini CTPS) - Improves the skills of combat medical personnel, deployed forward, in mass casualty and triage which leads to quicker assessments of battlefield casualties to increase warfighter survivability. Over 400 medics have been trained with this simulation system. MK-46 Machine Gun Semi – Rigid Ammunition Containers - Semi-rigid carriers provide quieter ammo carry under covert conditions and are more durable than previously standard containers. Used by SOF world-wide to protect linked ammunition for the M249 Squad Automatic Weapon. Dismounted Infantry Virtual Simulation for Military Operations in Urban Terrain (MOUT) - Virtual MOUT training system that immerses the warfighter in a networked simulation. The 101st Army Airborne Division used the system at Ft. Campbell for the training of Soldiers rotating to Iraq. Weapons Shock Profile Database - Developed a digital live fire profile for small arms Special Operations Forces (SOF) weapon systems, including the profiles that aid testing and qualification of new weapons accessories in use today at the Naval Surface Warfare Center, Crane, Indiana. Common Tactical Picture Ground Mobile and Air Based Command and Control System - Provides first-ever on-the-move technology for the USMC expeditionary assault vehicle, deployed to Iraq in fall 2004.

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Participation in DAC Response from U.S. vendors/industry and DoD acquisition programs to DAC has been exceptional for a pilot program. Participation demonstrated a clear need from both government and industry for an avenue to consider emerging technologies without risking discretionary program research and development funds. Although only in its fourth year, DAC program funding has supported 64 projects to date, including the 19 new initiatives approved for FY 2006. A Broad Agency Announcement was initiated in January 2005 with the following results:      424 draft proposals were submitted by industry and government agencies with proposed technologies and products ranging from studies to near off the shelf capabilities. All draft proposals were evaluated and prioritized based on potential and were reviewed by acquisition Programs of Record. 74 draft proposals were ―Accepted‖ by Program Managers. 53 final proposals were submitted by Program Managers to compete for funding. 19 new start projects have been selected for FY 2006 new start funding.

A total of 33 projects (19 new-starts, 14 continuing) are funded in FY 2006 for an approximate value of $33.533 million. 9

Projects Completed

Defense Acquisition Challenge Program FY 2005 PROJECTS COMPLETED IN FY 2005

Listed below in Table 1 are prior year projects that have completed testing and evaluation under the DAC program. Of the 16 completed projects:  14 met Service or U.S. Special Operations Command testing requirements. - Six projects tested successfully and are being procured; - Seven have tested successfully and are awaiting procurement decisions; - One project met requirements, with the test article placed in use by the Army, but no additional procurements are planned.  Two projects were terminated due to failure to satisfy testing requirements or the PoR revised priorities and the technologies were no longer needed or deemed viable. Table 1. DAC PROJECTS COMPLETED IN FY 2005
Service / Agency Army (3 Projects) Project Title
 Dismounted Infantry Virtual Simulation for Military Operations in Urban Terrain  Mini-Combat Trauma Patient Simulation System  Portable Continuity of Operations Communications Appliance  Automated Enhanced Performance Location Reporting System Planner  Quality of Service Planner  Common Tactical Ground Picture  Enhanced Optical System for Rolling Airframe Missile  Ship Hull Inspection & Harbor Security Autonomous Underwater Vehicle  Vacuum Arc Deposition Plating Process  Integrated Schedule / Process for Global Hawk  Speech Recognition Technology for Airborne Warning and Control System  Second Generation Rail Interface System for M-4 Carbines  Collapsible Gunstock for SOF Machine Guns  Embedded Integrated Broadcast Service Receiver  Enhancements for Flyaway Satellite Communications  Host Weapons Shock Profile Database

Status
 Met Requirements / Test Article Being Used, Additional Buys Not Planned  Met Requirements / Being Procured & Deployed  Met Requirements / APD*  Met Requirements / Being Procured & Deployed  Met Requirements / Being Procured & Deployed  Met Requirements / APD  Components Met Requirements / APD  Met Requirements / APD  Did Not Meet Requirements / Terminated  Met Requirements / Being Procured  Did Not Meet Requirements & Alternative Technology Used by PoR / Terminated  Met Requirements / APD  Met Requirements / APD  Met Requirements /Being Procured & Deployed  Met Requirements / APD  Met Requirements / Being Procured & Deployed

Navy / Marine Corps (6 Projects)

Air Force (2 Projects)

Special Operations Command (5 Projects)

*APD - Awaiting Procurement Decision

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Projects Completed

Defense Acquisition Challenge Program FY 2005

ARMY
Dismounted Infantry Virtual Simulation for Military Operation in Urban Terrain (MOUT) Sponsor: Army PEO Simulation, Training and Instrumentation Vendor: Advanced Interactive Systems, Reality by Design, Orlando, Florida Evaluated a virtual training system for technology insertion into three major acquisition programs: (1) Integrated MOU Training System; (2) Virtual Emergency Response Training System; and (3) Soldier Combined Arms Tactical Trainer. This dual-use technology can be used to immerse a war fighter or emergency responder into a networked simulation, providing a training capability for homeland security, urban operations, and detection of weapons of mass destruction (WMD). Virtual simulation is critical to supplement the increasing ―real world‖ demand for MOUT training (including terrain, physical facilities, and funding). Testing was done by SOCOM Operations Directorate for Test and Evaluation with coordination by Army CECOM and the user field units. Status: Closed out, met requirements, and placed in use as testbed. Mini Combat Trauma Patient Simulation System (CTPS) Sponsor: Army PEO Simulation, Training and Instrumentation Vendors: Medical Education Technologies Inc., Sarasota, Florida Mini CTPS tested successfully and is meeting an immediate training need for improved forward training for mass casualty and triage. The simulation improves assessment of battlefield casualties, increasing soldier survivability. Current military operations require increased trauma and stabilization skills, autonomy due to longer evacuation times, and smaller minimal care ward footprint. Capabilities include: 1) simulating, replicating, and assessing battlefield injuries by type and category such as hemorrhaging, fractures, amputations, and burns; 2) monitoring the movement of casualties on the battlefield; 3) capturing the time of patient diagnosis and treatment; and 4) comparing interventions and outcomes at each military healthcare service delivery level. Over 400 medics have been trained deployed to theater, with testing conducted by Southeastern Regional Medical Command, Ft. Gordon, Georgia. Status: Closed out, utilized to improve skills of deploying medics in mass casualty and triage, providing quicker assessments of battlefield casualties and increased survivability. Portable Continuity of Operations Communication Appliance Sponsor: Army Chief Information Officer/DoD COOP Integrated Network (DCIN) Vendor: Circadence Corp., Denver, Colorado Communication is critical among senior officials and essential secondary personnel during emergency situations where the principal operational base becomes unavailable. Web Assured Response Protocol (WARP) powers the Portable Continuity of Operations Communication Appliance (PCOCA).
C2 CDR SITE 2 C²N COB DR2
COOP Sites COOP Sites

NIPRNET SIPRNET

COOP Sites
COOP
Sites

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Projects Completed

Defense Acquisition Challenge Program FY 2005

PCOCA delivers data during periods of high network congestion, when traversing multiple networks, and in environments where there is extreme packet loss, high latency, or enormous bandwidth contention. The system provides a continuity of operations solution with rapid deployment that establishes communication with both the primary and back-up servers and provides seamless quality of service to critical users during an emergency, regardless of where they are located. Testing was completed at the Test & Integration Center Ft. Huachuca, AZ, and the Battle Lab at Ft. Gordon, GA. Status: Closed out, awaiting procurement decision.

NAVY / MARINE CORPS
Automated Enhanced Performance Location Reporting System (EPLRS) Planner and Quality of Service (QoS) Planner Sponsor: USMC PM Communications Vendor: Northrop Grumman Information Technology, Winter Park, Florida EPLRS radios used by the USMC provide a large part of the digital backbone for the tactical network at the regimental unit level and below. Reports from Iraq indicate manual, complex planning for EPLRS has reached critical time-performance. This inserts automated planning software into the System, Planning, Engineering and Evaluation Device (SPEED) application, improving system responsiveness. SPEED was designed to provide communicators with a standard set of tools that can be used to perform radio link engineering. The end result is the elimination of the current system's complexity, coupled with a significant improvement in the responsiveness of the EPLRS system for the joint and coalition battlefield. QoS was conducted in parallel with the EPLRS planner to further improve network service, including dedicated bandwidth, control of jitter and latency, and improve loss characteristics. The QoS planner enhances the capability of radio frequency path engineering and ensures quality performance for EPLRS and Joint Tactical Radio System. SPEED QoS enables the communications planner to rapidly and accurately manage information flow and data priority on the joint/coalition battlefield, reducing a full day of planning to as little as 20 minutes. Testing of both the EPLRS planner and QoS was accomplished at the Northrop Grumman facility and the Marine Corps Tactical Systems Support Activity, Quantico, VA. Status: Both projects deployed to 900 users in II MEF, Iraq (Fall 2005). Common Tactical Ground Picture Sponsor: USMC Direct Reporting PM, Expeditionary Fighting Vehicle (EFV) Vendor: Isothermal Systems Inc., Liberty Lake, Washington Inserts cutting edge "spray cooling" technology into the USMC's EFV Common Tactical Picture (CTP) system to provide the commander tactical command and control (C2) while on-the-move. The EFV is the first ground vehicle to provide the warfighter tactical on-the-move C2. Ground mobile C2 has never been achieved given the extremely harsh

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Projects Completed

Defense Acquisition Challenge Program FY 2005

environment (thermal, shock, vibration, immersion, etc.) in which the high-performance C2 computer hardware must survive. Spraycool™ enables the insertion of commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) computer hardware into the ground vehicle platform, enhancing the capability of the C2 systems to operate in cold weather or harsh environments, and facilitating the first-ever on-themove situational awareness of blue and red forces for USMC tactical units on the joint/coalition battlefield. Testing occurred at Marine Corps Warfighting Laboratory, Quantico VA. Status: Awaiting closeout and procurement decision. Enhanced Optical System for Rolling Airframe Missile (RAM) Sponsor: Navy PEO (IWS3) RAM/CIWS Project Office Vendors: Envisioneering, Alexandria, Virginia Exotic Materials, Murrieta, California Crystal Systems, Salem, Massachusetts Precise Surface Finishing, Murrieta, California Dexter Magnetic Technologies, Fremont, California Janos Technology, Townsend, Vermont Optical Coating Corporation, Natick, Massachusetts Optimum Optical Systems Inc., Camarillo, California Scarrott Metallurgical, Los Angeles, California Schmitt Measurements Systems Inc., Portland, Oregon Telic Optics Inc., North Billercia, Massachusetts The RAM is the world’s premiere lightweight, quick-reaction, ship self-defense missile system. The current optical system uses nickel-plated titanium to refract light from the dome into the optics. Enhanced RAM replaces the current optics assembly and production dome with a new sapphire material and adds additional technology upgrades that improves the all-weather operational capability, improving performance, manufacturability, and provides several million dollars in cost avoidance. Additional benefits include an expanded domestic production base and potential application to other military systems. Testing of components completed, but awaiting final integration tests by Navy and Raytheon Missile Systems, Tucson, AZ. Status: Closed out, all components met testing requirements, awaiting procurement decision. Ship Hull Inspection and Harbor Security Autonomous Underwater Vehicle Sponsor: Navy PEO Littoral and Mine Warfare, PMS Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) Vendor: Lockheed Martin Perry Technologies, Riviera Beach, Florida This Unmanned Underwater Vehicle (UUV) System contains high resolution sensors to autonomously support EOD and littoral mine warfare operations, expediting the search for and inspection of potentially hazardous materials. It provides the capability to evaluate ship berthings, piers, and ship hulls for explosives or WMD. The system is a portable (56 inches long, 26 inches wide, 12 inches high, and 128 pounds), un-tethered UUV with unique inspection sensors, navigation capabilities, and supporting hardware and software. This provides an autonomous capability to inspect more than 90 percent of a ship hull, reducing manpower requirements and operator risks while increasing the effectiveness in performing force protection and homeland defense missions. Testing was conducted at Navy EOD Technology Division. Status: Met requirements, awaiting procurement decision.

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Projects Completed

Defense Acquisition Challenge Program FY 2005

Vacuum Arc Deposition Plating Process Sponsor: USMC Warfighting Laboratory Vendor: Alpen Technology Group Inc., Brownsboro, Alabama Tested capability of Vacuum Arc Vapor Deposition (VAVD) technology to accurately plate new material for eroded USMC 60mm and 81mm mortar tubes, with a goal of extending tube life and significantly improving life cycle costs. VAVD utilizes NASA-patented plating technology enabling more efficient coating as thin as 300 angstroms, replacing existing plating in worn areas, restoring the infantry mortar tubes to a serviceable, combat-ready condition. Testing was conducted at Naval Surface Warfare Center Dahlgren, VA. Status: Closed out, did not meet requirements.

AIR FORCE (AF)
Spiral 1

Integrated Schedule / Process for Global Hawk Sponsor: AF Global Hawk Program Office Vendor: Dayton Aerospace Inc., Dayton, Ohio
Date: 6/30/98 9:12:03 AM Number of Samples: 1000 Unique ID: 437 Name: System CDR conducted
P r o b a b ilit y C o u n t

Spiral 2 Spiral 3 Spiral n

Completion Std Deviation: 7.8d 95% Confidence Interval: 0.5d Each bar represents 3d.

Utilized COTS software scheduling applications to develop a standard process that enables integration of multiple spirals in a development program. A search of capabilities indicated that neither industry nor Government program offices have developed an effective means of implementing integrated scheduling techniques into the spiral development process. Off-the-shelf schedule applications were used combined with existing Monte Carlo scheduling techniques to develop a new methodology for integrated schedulingSimulations Enable On-Going Critical Path Analyses to be of spiralSpiral Development Schedule Risks Quantified as Part of the acquisition programs. Further refinements across other platforms will enable defense organizations to apply a more disciplined process for scheduling spiral development programs. Testing was conducted by Dayton Aerospace, Wright Patterson Air Force Base (AFB), OH. Status: Closed out, met requirements, procured by Global Hawk project office.
160 144 128 112 1.0 0.9 0.8 0.7 0.6 0.5 0.4 0.3 0.2 0.1

Completion Probability Table Date 10/13/99 10/15/99 10/19/99 10/21/99 10/22/99 10/25/99 10/26/99 10/27/99 10/28/99 10/29/99

96 80 64 48 32 16

Prob 0.05 0.10 0.15 0.20 0.25 0.30 0.35 0.40 0.45 0.50

Prob 0.55 0.60 0.65 0.70 0.75 0.80 0.85 0.90 0.95 1.00

Date 11/1/99 11/2/99 11/3/99 11/4/99 11/8/99 11/9/99 11/10/99 11/15/99 11/17/99 12/13/99

S a m

9/29/99

10/29/99

12/13/99

Completion Date

Speech Recognition Technology for Airborne Warning and Control System (AWACS) Sponsor: AF E-3 (AWACS) Vendor: Sytronics, Inc., Dayton, Ohio Speech recognition software provides the operator with the ability to control and configure the primary AWACS display, rapidly access necessary information, and perform multiple manual functions, all with one voice command, while still keeping eyes on the primary display. Speech recognition has the potential to decrease operator response rate 40 percent with 97 percent accuracy, exceeding manual data entry responses reducing operator workload. Testing was conducted at E-3 Airborne Warning and Control System AWACS Integration Division Hanscom AFB, MA. Status: Closed out, terminated by Air Force Requirements Review Board.

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u la t iv e

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Projects Completed

Defense Acquisition Challenge Program FY 2005

SPECIAL OPERATIONS COMMAND
Second Generation Rail Interface System for M-4 Carbines Sponsor: SOCOM Special Operations Peculiar Modifications (SOPMOD) Multiple U.S. Vendors (Source Selection Sensitive) The SOF-variant M-4 carbine uses a rail mount system that loses alignment during normal use. An improved rail interface system used with the Enhanced Grenade Launcher Module (EGLM) improves rigidity and accuracy. This rigid system allows a free floating carbine barrel that facilitates cleaning/maintenance of the area between the carbine barrel and the body of the EGLM. This design is more rugged than the current interface, and is easier for the field operator to maintain. Testing was conducted at the Special Operations Peculiar Modification (SOPMOD) Quality Assurance Test Site, Naval Special Warfare Center, Crane, IN. Status: Completed, awaiting procurement decision. Collapsible Gunstock for SOF Machine Guns Sponsor: SOCOM PEO-Special Programs and NAVSPECWARCOM - SEALS Vendor: FN Manufacturing, Columbia, South Carolina The collapsible gunstock increases ergonomics for the MK46 and MK49 machine guns. The adjustable stock provides adjustability, ambidextrous use and allows use of a sling. A collapsible stock enhances the ability of the SOF warfighter to operate in confined spaces in urban warfare operations, close quarters battle, and in vehicles. One stock design interfaces with both MK46 and MK48, reducing the logistics burden. Testing was conducted by Naval Special Warfare Center, Crane, IN. Status: Completed, awaiting procurement decision. Embedded National Tactical Receiver (ENTR) Sponsor: SOCOM PEO-Information and Intelligence Systems Vendor: L3 Communications, Telemetry West, San Diego, California ENTR replaces legacy integrated broadcast service receivers, such as Multi Mission Advanced Tactical Terminal (MATT) by significantly reducing the size, weight, and costs. It can decrypt up to 4 independent IBS channels, providing the tactical warfighter with near real-time, intelligence data reception capability for situational awareness and threat detection and avoidance. The receiver can be embedded directly into host systems (e.g., radios, laptops, and workstations), allowing the tactical warfighter realtime intelligence information for threat avoidance, detection, targeting, blue force tracking, and personnel recovery. Testing was conducted by SPAWAR Systems Center, San Diego, CA; the Air Force Materiel Command; the Joint Interoperability Test Command, Ft. Huachuca, AZ; and the Air Force Operational Test and Evaluation Center. Status: Completed, met requirements and being procured.

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Projects Completed

Defense Acquisition Challenge Program FY 2005

Enhancements for Flyaway Satellite Communications (SATCOM) Sponsor: SOCOM PEO Intelligence and Information Systems/Special Projects (IIS/SP) Vendor: SWE-DISH Satellite Systems Inc, Washington DC Provides critical operational enhancements to the Fly-Away SATCOM (FASC) terminals, enabling faster world-wide deployments, higher transmittal and reception, high bandwidth / performance, ease-of-use, and Ka Band communication satellite integration. FASC is a family of small, lightweight man-portable (.9m and 1.5m) satellite dishes currently capable of providing turnkey, high bandwidth, satellite communication solutions in the Ku, X and C bands. These systems provide secure communications (live video/audio streaming, broadband transmission, and automated setup) without sacrificing the identity or location of U.S. forces. Enhancements also include improved tracking for inclined satellites, improved satellite acquisition using digital video broadcast carrier recognition, and built-in-test and training. Testing was conducted by Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center, Charleston, SC. Status: Completed, awaiting close out report and procurement. Host Weapons Shock Profile Database Sponsor: SOCOM Special Operations Peculiar Modifications (SOPMOD) Vendor: Bruel and Kjaer Testing Support, Norcross, Georgia In an effort to limit the costs associated with maintenance and live-fire testing in developmental, endurance and special initiatives testing, this database was tested to develop a digital live-fire profile for each weapon system in the SOF arsenal. Profiles are replicated to reproduce the effects of firing each weapon when testing accessories (e.g., night vision scopes, thermal sights, etc.). Use of digital profiles decreases testing and maintenance costs for SOCOM weapon systems, eliminating the expenditure of ammunition and destruction of weapons and will save of thousands of man-hours during future testing. This profile database is expandable to any weapon system. Testing was conducted by Naval Special Warfare Center, Crane, IN. Status: Completed, individual weapons shock profiles are currently being employed by NSWC-Crane for SOF weapons and accessories testing.

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Projects Continuing

Defense Acquisition Challenge Program FY 2005 PROJECTS CONTINUING INTO FY 2005

Fourteen projects initiated in previous fiscal years (2003 and 2004) have not completed testing and remain open. Table 2 lists the DAC projects that continued testing and evaluation during FY 2005.

Table 2. DAC PROJECTS CONTINUING INTO FY 2005 Service / Agency Army (5 Projects) Project Title  Enhanced Simulation for Training and Testing (2003 New Start)  Secure Army Wireless Intercommunications System (2003 New Start)  SprayCool™ for Counter Targeting System for Counter Sniper Detection (2003 New Start)  Transcritical Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Environmental Control System (2003 New Start)  X-Cor as a Replacement for Conventional Honeycomb (2004 New Start)  Friction Stir Processing for Virginia Class Submarines (2004 New Start)  Low Cost Aerogel Insulation for Shipboard Fire and Thermal Protection (2003 New Start)  Miniature Controlled Receive Pattern Antenna (2003 Start)  Wavelength Division Multiplexing (WDM) Fiber Optic Global Positioning System (GPS) Anti-Jam Antenna (2003 New Start)  Integrated Defensive Countermeasures Alternative (2003 New Start)  ―On Aircraft‖ Laser Additive Repair of Titanium Components (2004 New Start)  Restore Effective Survival in Shock (2004 New Start)  Enhanced Gunfire Detection System (2003 New Start)  Precision Parachute Delivery System (2004 New Start)

Navy / Marine Corps (4 Projects)

Air Force (3 Projects)

Special Operations Command (2 Projects)

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Projects Continuing ARMY

Defense Acquisition Challenge Program FY 2005

Enhanced Simulation Capabilities for Testing and Training Sponsor: PEO Simulation, Training and Instrumentation (STRI) Vendor: Circadence Corporation, Boulder, Colorado Current distributed interactive simulations (DIS) cannot be used in large-scale scenarios with real-time requirements. Goal is to use COTS technology to eliminate rewrites of existing simulations and provide a software architecture that brings network management to legacy DIS simulations. A conductor platform will enable large-scale scenarios to be integrated with real-time requirements and provides an ability for field units to participate in simulation. Testing will be conducted by PEO STRI, Redstone Arsenal, AL. Though initiated in FY 2003, the effort was put on hold until the second quarter 2005 pending outcome of Phase 1 testing in Portable Continuity of Operations. Secure Army Wireless Intercommunications System (AWIS) Sponsor: Army PEO Soldier/PM Air Warrior Vendor: Telephonics Corp., Farmingdale, New York Current unencrypted communication systems can compromise security. AWIS is a secure wireless intercom system for close range communications capability for aviation operations. AWIS will be modified to include encryption via approved embedded integrated circuits and /or firmware, expanding usage of the intercommunication system to sensitive operating areas and providing compatibility with planned secure wireless communications systems among joint TWIS services applications. This decreases the risk of mission compromise and increases mission effectiveness and soldier safety objectives by eliminating interception of communication between aircrews and ground stations. Testing is being conducted by National Security Agency, Army’s PEO Soldier / PM Air Warrior, and Telephonics Corp., Farmingdale, NY. SprayCool™ for Counter Targeting System for Counter Sniper Detection Sponsor: Army Intelligence and Security Command Vendor: Isothermal Systems Research Corp., Liberty Lake, Washington Evaluate a new technology impacting spiral development of the Counter Targeting System (CTS) for counter sniper detection. The IR detection is a primary component of Pacific Command’s Advanced Concept Technology Demonstration OVERWATCH. CTS utilizes an IR sensor at high frame rates to detect sniper, mortar, rocket propelled grenade, and large caliber weapons fire. This system will assist in near real-time targeting and situational awareness for direct support of combat troops in operations such as Iraq and Afghanistan. Spraycool™ technology provides weight and volume savings over traditional air cooled systems allows the system to operate in harsh environments of high temperature, high humidity, and dust with increased reliability. Spraycool™ reduces CTS

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Projects Continuing

Defense Acquisition Challenge Program FY 2005

weight 80 percent, from 335 pounds to less than 100 pounds. Four units were deployed to OIF during Summer 2004 in support of the Persistent Threat Detection System. An additional test bed system is at Redstone Arsenal, AL. Testing is being conducted by Army Intelligence and Security Command, Ft. Belvoir, VA. Transcritical Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Environmental Control System Sponsor: Army PM-Light Tactical Vehicles, PEO Combat Support and Combat Services Vendor: Modine Manufacturing, Harrodsburg, Kentucky Replacing harmful synthetic refrigerants is vital to the U.S. Army to meet international environmental protocols to allow vehicles to operate worldwide. Use of CO2 as a refrigerant is vital to sustain the higher-performing Environment Control Units (ECUs) for up-armored and standard High Mobility Multi-Purpose Wheeled Vehicles (HMMWVs) receiving field armoring kits. Other benefits include: 1) reduction of greenhouse gas emissions; 2) reduced logistic footprints by eliminating costly EPAcompliant refrigerant recovery operations and associated training; and 3) use of a smaller size, reduced weight system vital to the legacy fleet, including the Future Tactical Truck System and the Future Combat System. Testing is being done at Ft. Belvoir, VA and in Death Valley, CA. X-Cor as a Replacement for Conventional Honeycomb Sponsor: Army Aviation Vendor: Aztex, Inc., Waltham, Massachusetts X-Cor™ is a lightweight, damage-tolerant core material that replaces conventional metal or honeycomb in aerospace structures. X-Cor™ provides an estimated 29 percent weight reduction and a 45-60 percent cost avoidance versus the baseline aluminum Blackhawk tail cone. Reduced weight increases helicopter performance, particularly in vertical lift/rise capability, which greatly increases aircraft survivability and capacity. Additionally, conventional metal structures are subject to corrosion. With X-Cor™, weight reduction and elimination of corrosion issues are obtained by using a truss network comprised of small-diameter composite rods. Testing is being conducted by PEO Army Aviation.

NAVY / MARINE CORPS
Friction Stir Processing (FSP) for Virginia Class Submarines Sponsor: PMS 450 Submarine Acquisition Office Vendors: General Tool Company, Cincinnati, Ohio MTS Corporation, Eden Prairie, Minnesota Casting defects can limit the structural integrity of propellers due to porosity and cracks. Conventional weld repair has become a significant part of the manufacturing and repair process and is laborintensive with no guarantee at the conclusion of the process that the propeller will be serviceable. FSP is an evolving technology that improves cast surface quality

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Defense Acquisition Challenge Program FY 2005

and strengthen nickel aluminum bronze by altering the microstructure via thermo-mechanical working. FSP allows rapid repair of surface and subsurface casting defects, improves the surface layer mechanical properties, and may substitute for conventional welding. Substituting FSP for conventional welding saves manufacturing time and cost while increasing strength and quality of the processed area. Testing is being conducted at the Naval Surface Warfare Center, Philadelphia, PA. Low Cost Aerogel Insulation for Shipboard Fire and Thermal Protection Sponsor: Navy PM for Auxiliaries, Recoverability, Materials Vendor: Aspen Aerogel, Marlborough, Massachusetts The next generation ship requires topside weight reduction to meet increasing demands on performance and the desire for additional weapons and electronics. This conflicts with added safety and survivability specifications requiring fire protection for steel and composite structures. An option is consideration of a parasitic fire barrier / thermal insulation materials that are significantly lighter than current fire barrier materials (StuctoGard™ and Dendamix™). With more than 300,000 square feet of fire barrier insulation estimated for the DD(X), the use of a flexible aerogel blanket could yield a 4-fold weight reduction while aiding in suppression of IR signature and blast mitigation. Full scale testing conducted by Northrop Grumman Ship Systems. Miniature Controlled Receive Pattern Antenna (MCRPA) Sponsor: Navy PEO C4I, PMW/PMA-169 Vendor: Titan Aerospace Electronics, Greenbelt, Maryland Provide GPS anti-jam capability for Navy platforms with size and weight restrictions for antennas. The Navy and Marine Corps employ GPS navigation and targeting subsystems on a major portion of their sea, air and land-based weapon systems. Anti-jamming / anti-spoofing capabilities of military GPS user equipment is critical to mission completion in a battlefield environment. Given that some platforms cannot support an increased antenna footprint and installation of an antenna electronics box (e.g., UH-1Y, AH-1Z helicopters and small subs, MCRPA provides a ruggedized antenna and antenna electronics package within a small footprint, light weight, and low cost. Testing is being conducted in Baltimore, MD and Patuxent River Naval Air Station, MD. Wavelength Division Multiplexing (WDM) Fiber Optic GPS Anti-Jam Antenna Sponsor: SPAWAR PEO C4I and Space (PMW/A-156) Vendors: Gould Fiber Optics, Millersville, Maryland Optiwork, Freemont, California JDS Uniphase Corporation, San Jose, California Tempo Research, Camarillo, California Fiber-Span, Piscataway, New Jersey Current shipboard anti-jam configurations have electronics-intensive antenna electronics installed high on the mast which is inaccessible for maintenance if an electronic failure occurs during operational periods, potentially impacting transmission of mission-critical GPS data to the platform systems. The present integration concept for ships where the distance (cable run) between the antenna assembly and the GPS receiver (up to 700 feet) uses a fiber optic interface to send the processed GPS radio frequency signal in order to minimize cable losses from the antenna electronics to the GPS receiver below decks. The WDM

20

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Defense Acquisition Challenge Program FY 2005

antenna assembly enables transmission of multiple signals through a single optic fiber, and relocates the GPS antenna electronics from the mast to below-deck sheltered spaces where it is protected from weather and available for maintenance, upgrades, and repair. Benefits include reduced RF cable losses, reduced topside weight, and less electromagnetic interference. Testing is being conducted at SPAWAR Systems Center, San Diego, CA.

AIR FORCE (AF)
Integrated Defensive Countermeasures Alternative Sponsor: AF Towed Decoy Project Office Vendor: Raytheon Space and Airborne Systems, Goleta, California Fiber optic towed decoys are towed behind military aircraft to lure missiles away from the aircraft when engaged by hostile radar guided surface-to-air missiles. This project will evaluate an alternative Fiber Optic Towed Decoy (FOTD) technology that incorporates towline thermal hardening for increased resistance to heat from engine plume during deployment throughout the flight envelope. Towed flight testing will be done to ensure the FOTD deploys throughout required flight envelope and is stable and durable in tow. Integration testing is being conducted at the F-18 facility, Pt. Mugu, CA., with configuration testing on F-15 aircraft at Eglin AFB, FL. “On Aircraft” Laser Additive Repair of Titanium Components Sponsor: AF B-2 Systems Program Office Vendor: Triton Systems Inc., Chelmsford, Massachusetts Objective is improve mission readiness of the B-2 by testing and implementing a laser additive repair process for cracked/damaged titanium aft deck surfaces. This solution allows for ―on aircraft‖ field repairs, vice removal or replacement of large, complex parts at depot level. The enabling technology is an evolving manufacturing process that automates milling out and then filling of cracks with micro-welded titanium alloy to restore the structural integrity of the damaged surface. Benefits include restoration of stealth properties and extended operational life of aircraft structures. Testing is being conducted by Triton Systems in conjunction with Northrop Grumman and the Air Vehicle Division, B-2 System Program Office. Restore Effective Survival in Shock (RESUS) Sponsor: AF 311 HSW, Brooks AFB, Texas Vendor: BIOPURE Corporation, Cambridge, Massachusetts
Hemopure Packed Red Blood Cells

Objective is to save lives of wounded combat troops. With 90 percent of combat deaths occurring prior to evacuation to a forward surgical theater, decreasing combat morbidity and mortality is focused on optimizing pre-evacuation resuscitation. This initiative tests a bovine polymerized hemoglobin for the prehospital resuscitation of casualties in hemorrhagic shock, which accounts for an estimated 60 percent of salvageable combat casualties. This product, known as ―hemopure‖, is a low-volume, low weight, room temperature stable substitute for blood transfusions. It circulates directly in

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Defense Acquisition Challenge Program FY 2005

plasma when infused, increasing oxygen diffusion to the body’s tissue and is compatible with all blood types, can be stored for three years without refrigeration, and is pathogen-free. Testing is being conducted by Aeromedical Systems Branch, Brooks AFB, TX and Naval Medical Research Center, MD.

SPECIAL OPERATIONS COMMAND
Enhanced Gunfire Detection System Sponsor: SOCOM/Army Close Combat Systems Program Office Vendors: Titan Corporation, Arlington, VA Matcom Inc., Reston, VA FLIR Systems, North Billercia, MA Indigo Systems, Portland, OR Coherent Logix, Louisville, CO Wavefront Research Inc., Bethlehem, PA Northrop Grumman, Troy, MI Evaluate system enhancements (i.e., addition of sensors and processors) which have the potential to significantly improve the accuracy and capability of the Gunfire Detection System (GDS), with a goal to locate a sniper prior to the sniper’s first shot. This technology will be implemented through the integration of selected sensors in the baseline GDS, and through the inclusion of automatic processing software. The set of additional sensors under evaluation includes laser augmentation devices, hyperspectral imagers, and unattended ground sensors. Testing is being conducted at Lehnin Military Operations in Urban Terrain Test Facility, Germany. Precision Parachute Delivery System (PPDS) Sponsor: SOCOM PEO-Special Programs and Army Special Operations Command Vendor: Prescott Products, San Antonio, Texas SOF parachutists have little ability to navigate to a target unless the target is seen when exiting the aircraft. PPDS is a high altitude-low opening / high altitude-high opening helmet system that includes a heads-up display navigation aid and integrated oxygen system. The system guides the parachutist during the descent to a precise touchdown point, minimizing detection in a wide range of environmental conditions. This project is also demonstrating a compact guidance, navigation and control system that use global positioning system navigation for the precision autonomous aerial delivery of re-supply bundles and airborne troops. This program provides the capability and the confidence to accomplish the aerial deployment phase of the mission safely and accurately, while minimizing detection. Testing is being conducted by Airdrop / Aerial Delivery Directorate, Natick Soldier Center, Natick, MA.

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Projects Initiated (2005)

Defense Acquisition Challenge Program FY 2005

PROJECTS INITIATED IN FY 2005
Fifteen DAC projects were initiated in FY 2005. The projects listed in Table 3 were approved in October 2004 to be funded as new starts at the beginning of the fiscal year.

Table 3. PROJECTS INITIATED IN FY 2005 Service / Agency Army (1 Project) Navy / Marine Corps (3 Projects) Project Title  Superior Surface Treatment Techniques for Adherent Bore Coatings  Affordable Net-Shape Stiffener Forming Technology for F/A-18E/F  Composite Twisted Rudder  SprayCoolTM Technology for Close-In Weapon System (CIWS) Power Amplifier  Enhanced Military Readiness, Safety, and Personal Bearing through Pseudofolliculitis Barbae Treatment  Global Transponder Improvement Using COTS Digital Video Broadcasting  Improved Durability F100 Exhaust Nozzle Divergent Seals  Low Frequency Synthetic Instrument Measurement and Stimulus System  Qualification of Conformal Fabric  Quiet-Eyes Low-Cost Directed Infrared Countermeasures Laser-Pointer Tracker Demonstration      Battery-Free Remote Sensing Field Interrogation Support Tool Infrared-Thermal Friendly Force Identifier Miniature Day/Night Sight Integration Maritime Diesel Engine Nickel Boron Coating

Air Force (6 Projects)

Special Operations Command (5 Projects)

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Projects Initiated (2005) ARMY

Defense Acquisition Challenge Program FY 2005

Superior Surface Treatment Techniques for Adherent Bore Coatings Sponsor: OPM Lethality, Picatinny, New Jersey Vendor: Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, Texas Evaluate the process of applying innovative surface treatment and plasma engineering technology to improve the deposition process of protective coatings for gun bores. This protects the gun barrels against high temperature wear and erosion, resulting in service life extension and increased performance when using higher energy, high lethality ammo. Environmentally, this eliminates hexavalent chromium and other toxic / hazardous chemicals used in manufacture today. Applications include the M1A1 Abrams Tank, Future Combat Systems, Navy Advanced Gun System, etc. Testing will be conducted by Unit of Action Maneuver Battle Lab, Fort Knox, KY.

NAVY / MARINE CORPS
Affordable Net Shape Stiffener Forming Technology for F/A-18E/F Sponsor: Naval Air Systems Command Vendor: Foster-Miller, Waltham, Massachusetts Objective is to improve the affordability of the Navy F/A-18E/F by automating the forming process for composite hat stiffeners in the airframe structure, thereby reducing the cost and facilitating transition for skin-stringer type airframe construction. The current high cost of skinstringer construction often drives design engineers to choose less robust structural solutions such as sandwich designs. This more robust structure would provide longer-term life cycle cost avoidance, requiring less maintenance for logistical support. This effort builds upon technology developed under both the DoD Small Business Innovation Research program and the OSD Small and Disadvantaged Business Challenge Program. Testing is at NAVAIR, Patuxent River, MD. Composite Twisted Rudder Sponsor: Naval Sea Systems Command Vendor: Structural Composites Inc., Melbourne, Florida Test, build, qualify and install a shipset of composite rudders on a DDG-51 class ship to demonstrate improved survivability and reduced acquisition and life cycle cost. This evaluates a new design, ala a ―twisted‖ shape for combatant rudders, to reduce cavitation erosion problems and improve fuel efficiency. The twisted rudder geometry is difficult to build and maintain using traditional welded steel construction. Compared to traditional steel rudders, composite rudders are expected to resist corrosion, increase survivability, posses a hydrodynamically smoother surface, reduce overall ship weight, and reduce acoustic and magnetic signature. Since the current DD(X) design calls for fielding a composite rudder, testing and fielding a DDG-51 shipset for atsea operational demonstration is expected to mitigate risk for transition.

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Projects Initiated (2005)

Defense Acquisition Challenge Program FY 2005

SprayCoolTM Technology for Close-In Weapon System (CIWS) Power Amplifier Sponsor: Naval Sea Systems Command Vendor: Isothermal Systems Research (ISR), Inc., Liberty Lake, Washington This converts the CIWS power amplifier section from an aircooled system to a Spraycool™ solution to efficiently dissipate heat and improve system reliability. Spraycool™ encloses the electronic circuitry cards in hermitically sealed aluminum housing with a closed-loop cooling system. This allows flexibility in using COTS circuit card replacements, offers weight and volume savings, and enhances system operation in harsh environments (high temperature, high humidity, and dust). In products delivered for the U-2 and Global Hawk, Spraycool™ reduced the electronics chassis footprint and increased the meantime between failures of each device from 2800 to 9800 hours. Testing will be performed by NAVSEA PEO-IWS and Raytheon, Missile Systems. Note: ISR won the DoD Value Engineering award for cost reductions targeted for the Marine Corps’ EFV.

AIR FORCE (AF)
Enhanced Military Readiness, Safety, and Personnel Bearing through Pseudofolliculitis Barbae (PFB) Treatment Sponsor: AF Surgeon General, Dermatology Vendor: ISW Group, St. Louis, Missouri PFB is an inflammatory / dermatologic skin disease which affects combat readiness, personal safety, unit cohesion, and military morale. Although anyone who shaves can be affected by PFB, it disproportionately impacts those of African descent or Hispanic origin, potentially affecting up to 400,000 active duty males. PFB ranges from minor skin irritation to severe skin lesions which can act as portals for biological or chemical agents, and if left untreated, can result in infection and scar formation. Effective treatment by a topical agent would improved readiness and safety, avoiding costs associated with shaving clinics, doctor office visits, and other treatments. Testing is being conducted by the AF Surgeon Generals Dermatology Consultants and the Brooks AFB, TX, Dermatology Department. Global Transponder Improvement Using COTS Digital Video Broadcasting (DVB) Sponsor: AF Global Broadcast Service (GBS) Joint Program Office Vendor: ECC Inc. Brooklyn Heights, Ohio Evaluate the transition of GBS waveform from the current air interface that uses legacy DVB - Satellite (DVB-S) technology to a new commercial standard DVB-S2 (Version 2). DVB-S2 uses COTS products that are forecasted to increase satellite transponder throughput by at least 30 percent in the Ka and Ku bands, enabling decreases in transponder costs (up to $58 million in annual cost avoidance), and the ability to provide advanced services such as high definition video and broadband data. Secondly, fewer transponders would be needed to satisfy mission requirements, reducing the number of commercial teleport sites required and their associated connectivity costs. A new standard also provides more efficient code rate optimization and modulation for specific terminals and enables service to smaller terminals. Testing is at Defense Information Systems Agencies Uplink Facility.

25

Projects Initiated (2005)

Defense Acquisition Challenge Program FY 2005

Improved Durability F100 Exhaust Nozzle Divergent Seals Sponsor: AF, ASC/LPP Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio Vendor: Snecma U.S., Walton, Kentucky The F100 engine powering both the F-15 and F-16 aircraft has a design life of 4300 total accumulated cycles (TAC) and is scheduled to remain in service beyond 2015. A critical engine component, metal exhaust nozzle divergent seals, are lasting on average 600 TACs. As the engines accumulate TAC’s, the degradation to metallic seals increases. Replacement of metallic seals with a ceramic matrix composite (CMC) divergent seal has been demonstrated to meet and exceed the full engine design life. This activity completes ground and flight testing to qualify CMC divergent seals as the full-life preferred spares for the F100 nozzle. Tests are being conducted at Mountain Home AFB, Idaho, and McEntire AFB, South Carolina. Synthetic Instrument Measurement and Stimulus Low Frequency (SIMSS-LF) System Sponsor: AF F-16 System Group Vendor: BAE Systems Mission Solutions, San Diego, California Assess the effectiveness of the SIMSS-LF system in improving the testing of aircraft avionics and electronic attack pods during deployed and home base operations. This system consolidates existing signal conditioning functions and incorporates COTS analog to digital converters and Digital Signal Processing (DSP) cards to measure electrical signals from direct current to ten megahertz, with amplitudes from microvolt to kilovolts. The hardware reduction resulting from replacement of traditional measurement instruments with a single DSP-based system increases the reliability and availability of the test equipment for the warfighter. Additionally, the unit can be updated via software, vice hardware changes, greatly improving station availability and reducing the need for station downtime. This increases aircraft availability and reduces station enhancement costs during aircraft avionics changes. Testing is being conducted by the 16th Electronic Warfare Squadron at Eglin AFB, FL. Qualification of Conformal Fabrics Sponsor: AF Research Laboratory, Air Vehicles Directorate Vendor: Pepin Associates, Greenville, Maine Assess a precursor material forming process that enables lower cost design and fabrication of complex contoured parts using composite materials. Currently complex composite designs are not widely used in airframes due to the high fabrication expense. This new weaving process enables composite material to be formed into complex shapes without significant sacrifice of the high mechanical properties required for aerospace grade structures. Testing is being conducted at Boeing Company, St. Louis, MO.

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Projects Initiated (2005)

Defense Acquisition Challenge Program FY 2005

Quiet Eyes™ Low-Cost Directed Infrared Countermeasures (DIRCM) Laser-PointerTracker Demonstration Sponsor: AF Large Aircraft Infrared Countermeasures Systems (LAIRCM) Vendor: Raytheon Missile Systems, Tucson, Arizona Quiet EyesTM Aircraft Missile
Defense Micro-Turret

Testing will be conducted to demonstrate a low cost IR countermeasures micro-turret for LAIRCM requirements. The micro-turret, a variant of the AIM-9X guidance unit, 1. 2. 3. will provide cost, size, weight, and reliability improvements over the existing turret. The unit in production is fifth generation IR, employing an advanced image-based acquisition and tracking system. Cost avoidances are predicted based on leveraging the lower cost guidance units (more than 3500 seeker assemblies Low Cost, Reliable Aircraft Self-Protection Low Cost, Reliable Aircraft SelfSelf-Protection have been delivered with reliability exceeding 5,000 hours). The AIM-9X guidance unit will be modified and the Quiet Eyes™ micro-turret will be integrated with a multi-band mid wave IR laser to demonstrate pointing accuracy, stability, gimbal rates, optical cross-talk, laser power, wavelengths, and beam quality. The LAIRCM System Squadron and AFRL are conducting tests at specialized test facilities at Wright-Patterson AFB, OH.
verage arning Co Missile W
Jamming Radiation
Detect & Declare Hand-off & Slew Track & Jam

POINTER
AIM-9X

CONTROLLER
AIM-9X

Multi-Band Infrared Laser

U.S. SPECIAL OPERATIONS COMMAND
Battery-Free Remote Sensing Sponsor: SOCOM, PEO Intelligence and Info Systems Vendor: Ambient Control Systems, El Cajon, California Test and evaluate a solar-based energy management system for use in unattended ground sensors. A smaller, ruggedized package is needed to satisfy SOF requirements for smaller size, lighter weight, and higher output power. The system consists of a high-energy photovoltaic solar cell, energy storage, and energy conversion units. Impact is to SOCOM’s Joint Threat Warning System and the Special Operations Tactical Video System. Testing is at SOCOM in coordination with Army CECOM and the user field units. Field Interrogation Support Tool (FIST) Sponsor: SOCOM PEO - Intelligence and Information Systems Vendors: Concurrent Tech Corp., Johnstown, Pennsylvania NITV Federal services, West Palm Beach, Florida Evaluate a tool for use in conducting interpersonal operations and interrogation in a combat environment. SOF, other military, and personnel involved in law enforcement require a system that can automatically determine, with a high degree of accuracy and reliability, truthfulness or deception while conducting interpersonal operations and interrogation in combat, tactical, field and operational settings. FIST will make use of proven software currently used in the Computer Voice Stress AnalyzerTM hosted on a laptop for processing voice. Testing will be conducted by SOCOM in conjunction with Army CECOM and the Marine Corps. Note: Testing was cancelled at the request of the Deputy Under Secretary of Defense for Counterintelligence and Security. The project was terminated.

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Projects Initiated (2005)

Defense Acquisition Challenge Program FY 2005

Infrared-Thermal Friendly Force Identifier (IR-TFFI) Sponsor: SOCOM, PEO Special Programs Vendors: Night Vision Equipment Company, Allentown, Pennsylvania Wilcox Industries Corporation, Newington, New Hampshire Falcon Systems Engineering, Crofton, Maryland Current mechanisms to distinguish dismounted operators as friend and foe are not sufficient to meet evolving battlefield situations. This project tests and evaluates a compact lightweight beacon that enables differentiation of friendly forces versus foe when viewed through current IR and thermal sensors. The beacon will be programmable and adjustable for use in multiple situations and easily attachable to various types of existing SOF equipment. The system will 1) increase survivability of the SOF operator; 2) reduce the likelihood of ―friendly fire‖ incidents; 3) be recognizable by U.S. military sighting devices; 4) utilize standard issue batteries and LED light technology for long life and low battery power consumption; and 5) utilize COTS technology to minimize cost and technical risk. Testing is being conducted at an Army Special Operations R&D Support Element. Miniature Day / Night Sight (MDNS) Integration Sponsor: SOCOM PEO - Special Programs Vendors: EoTech, Ann Arbor, Michigan, Trijicon, Wixom, Michigan Raytheon, Richardson, Texas Northrop Grumman Litton EOS, Garland, Texas & Tempe, Arizona Insight Technologies, Londonderry, New Hampshire Enhance SOF weapons capabilities for carbines, rifles and machine guns by integrating existing equipment with improved components that will provide a fully integrated, modular MDNS system. It includes components and sub-systems from several vendor for various missions, including fire control, target acquisition, and aiming (e.g., thermal and image-intensified clipon night vision devices, a second generation backup iron sight and rail interface system, and enhanced combat optical sight for close quarter battle). Goal is to improve and combine these capabilities into one fully integrated modular system with compatible standardized interfaces to achieve maximum combat effectiveness. Testing will be performed at Naval Special Warfare Center, Crane, IN. Maritime Diesel Engine Nickel Boron Coating Sponsor: SOCOM PEO - Special Programs Vendors: Engine Tech, Ocala, Florida Universal Chemical Technologies, Stuart, Florida Evaluate a nickel boron coating process to extend the service life of diesel engines and increasing the power to weight ratio while extending the propulsion system’s lifecycle. Goals include improving performance by 8–10 percent, increasing maintenance intervals by 150 percent, and increasing the engine service life by 125 percent. Testing is being conducted by Naval Surface Warfare Center, Dahlgren, VA.

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Projects Selected (2006)

Defense Acquisition Challenge Program FY 2005

PROJECTS SELECTED FOR FY 2006
Nineteen DAC projects were selected for FY 2006. The projects listed in Table 4 were approved in September 2005 to be funded as new starts at the beginning of the fiscal year.

Table 4. PROJECTS SELECTED FOR FY 2006 FUNDING Service / Agency Army (5 Projects) Project Title  External Aircraft Rescue Hoist for the Army Black Hawk Helicopter  Modular Land Warrior Fuel Cell Power System  Ruggedized Radio Frequency Identification Tags with Highly Flexible Antenna  Super-Capacitor Power Source for Gun Launched Munitions  Topical Paromomycin for the Treatment of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis  7.62mm & 9mm Reduced Environmental Hazard Ammunition  High Performance Standard Advanced Dewar Assembly  Mine Neutralization by Explosive Ordnance Disposal Teams in Very Shallow Water  Tactical Remote Sensor Systems Monitoring Station Modernization  Titanium Encapsulated Silicon Carbide Skirt Armor for Expeditionary Fighting Vehicle  Improved Infrared Missile Self-Protection System for the F-15 Aircraft  Communications and Networking for a Deployable Internet  Extended 1553 Databus Graceful Degradation  Nickel Nanostrand Coating for Improved Lightning Strike Protection  Compact Broadband Remote Antenna Intelligence and Information Systems Enhancements  Covert Eyes 3-Dimensional Video Camera  Electronic Intelligence Receiver  Green Light Aiming Laser for Special Operational Forces Small Arms  Specific Emitter Identification Insertion Vehicle

Navy / Marine Corps (5 Projects)

Air Force (4 Projects)

Special Operations Command (5 Projects)

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Projects Selected (2006) ARMY

Defense Acquisition Challenge Program FY 2005

External Aircraft Rescue Hoist for the Army Black Hawk Helicopter Sponsor: Army Utility Helicopter Project Office Vendor: Goodrich Corp., Diamond Bar, CA and Breeze-Eastern, Union, NJ Test and install an improved external aircraft rescue hoist that utilizes state-of-the-art motors with improved braking capabilities. Goal is to enhance the HH-60M medical evacuation helicopter with a hoist system that offers superior operational performance, higher reliability and lower total life cycle cost over the hoist that is currently being considered. A comparative qualification test will be conducted with a single hoist down-selected for operational testing and subsequent airworthiness release assessment and HH-60M fielding. Testing is being conducted by the Army Aviation Technical Test Center, Ft. Rucker Alabama. Estimated cost avoidances: Procurement ($10 million) and life cycle Operations and Support (O&S) is $60 million. Modular Land Warrior Fuel Cell Power System Sponsor: Army PM Soldier Warrior Vendor: DuPont, Wilmington, DE
Power Out to Land Warrior Soldier System 0…60+W (80 W peak)

Provide the warfighter with a small, advanced, high-power, lightweight, wearable power source (a direct methanol fuel cell power system) for use in military operations. The device will have embedded circuitry enabling batteries to be recharged while being worn. Uses include soldier-carried electronic systems (radios, navigation systems, hand-held battlefield command and Fuel Cell: 0 to 40 W (20W nominal), <2 lb 2.2 pounds control systems and weapon sensors). Additional benefits Fuel Cell Power System Connected to Land Warrior Battery include reduction of the soldier’s weight load, enhancing mission duration and improving soldier lethality. Testing is by Army Communications Electronics Research, Development and Engineering Center, Ft. Monmouth, New Jersey. Estimated cost avoidances: RDT&E ($45 million) and O&S ($193 million). Ruggedized Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) Tags with Highly Flexible Antenna Sponsor: PEO Soldier – PM Soldier Warrior Vendor: Vivid Systems, Canton, MS Test soldier-usable RFID tags with read/write capability that are designed for use in harsh environments and flexible enough to be used on both textiles and metals. These tags and their associated reader / writer will be tested and evaluated for military environment use on the Army M4 modular weapon, AN/PRC-148 Multi-Band Inter/Intra Team Radio, and other soldier equipment items. These tags are rugged data carriers that have the capability of being read swiftly from long distances, and are suitable for applications where exposure to temperature and weather extremes may occur. One type of tag will be tested that has a memory lifespan of 10 years and can be rewritten 100,000 times. Testing will be conducted by the Army New Equipment Training Facility Haymarket, VA. Estimated cost avoidances: RDT&E ($22 million), O&S ($10 million per year).

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Projects Selected (2006)

Defense Acquisition Challenge Program FY 2005

Super-Capacitor Power Source for Gun Launched Munitions Sponsor: Army ARDEC (PM for Excalibur) Picatinny Arsenal Vendor: Raytheon, Tucson, AZ and Maxwell Technologies, San Diego, CA When an artillery mission is scrubbed in Iraq, certain shells must be pulled out of operational capability due to battery life limitation. For example, the Excalibur projectile must be discarded or fired within fifteen days after the projectile has been initialized with GPS and target location data due to the limited lithium reserve battery operating life. This initiative tests a super-capacitor power source (effectively a hybrid between a battery and a capacitor) to increase gun-launched artillery survival by leveraging COTS super capacitors being used today in laptop computers and cell phones. This could provide the warfighter with an operationally versatile artillery projectile at significant cost avoidance and speed technology transition into other munitions. Added benefits include increased reliability, parts count reduction, and elimination of the pyrotechnic primer required to activate the current reserve cell battery. Testing is at the Army Field Artillery Command, Ft. Sill, Oklahoma. Estimated cost avoidances: RDT&E ($1.4 million), O&S ($1.1 million), and procurement ($5.4 million). Topical Paromomycin for the Treatment of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis (CL) Sponsor: Army Medical Materiel Development Activity Vendor: TEVA Pharmaceuticals North America, North Wales, PA This initiative tests Topical Paromomycin, a new drug to treat CL, a serious disfiguring and parasitic disease that has affected over 1,000 of our deployed troops. CL typically presents as ulcerous skin lesions that develop over weeks to months after a person is bitten by an infected sand fly. The current treatment requires daily injections (over 10-20 days) of a drug that has serious side-effects and must be strictly administered under medical surveillance. This requires infected soldiers to be evacuated out of theater to either Walter Reed or Brook Army Medical Center. The average cost per patient for is $17,000 for hospitalization and treatment with approximately 60 lost duty days. Topical Paromomycin treats infected soldiers on station, allowing them to heal while remaining at their posts. Testing will conducted by Army Medical Research and Material Command.

NAVY / MARINE CORPS
7.62mm and 9mm Reduced Environmental Hazard Ammunition (REHA) Sponsor: USMC PM AMMO, MCB Quantico, VA Vendor: Alliant Tech, Toone, TN; Kilgore, Marion, IL; Winchester, Independence, MO; Remington, Lonoke, AR; Elk River Corp., Knoxville, TN Precision Ammunition, Tampa, FL In FY05, Marines fired more than 15 million lead rounds at U.S. outdoor training ranges. These ranges incur exorbitant costs in remediation due to this lead contamination. Objective is to reduce range clean-up costs and reduce lifecycle cost of the 7.62mm and 9mm cartridges by testing REHA rounds that are produced with environmentally safe components that meet or

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Projects Selected (2006)

Defense Acquisition Challenge Program FY 2005

exceed the ballistic performance of the current lead cartridges. REHA cartridges are expected to be commensurately priced with lead cartridges pending achievement of comparable production rates. This provides the warfighter with a lead-free, training and combat cartridge that will alleviate the high costs of range clean-up. Testing is being conducted by the USMC Operational Test and Evaluation Activity and NSWC Crane, Indiana. Estimated cost avoidances: RDT&E ($8.8 million), O&S (exceeds $46 million). High Performance Standard Advanced Dewar Assembly (HP SADA-II) Sponsor: USMC PM Tanks, MCB Quantico, VA Vendor: Raytheon Corporation, McKinney, Texas The increasingly complex visual obscurants being used by the enemy in Iraq is driving a need to improve thermal sighting systems. The SADA is the key component of a thermal sighting system used for night vision, IR search and track, and thermal targeting. To defeat these threats, the PM Tanks will test the HP SADA-II in the USMC Main Battle Tank (MBT) Firepower Enhancement Program (FEP). This SADA is expected to provide a 20 percent range improvement over current MBT FEP capabilities for long range threat detection, combat identification, and engagement of targets under all battlefield conditions. These improvements directly translate into greater situational awareness for the tank crew, improved lethality and survivability, and reduction in fratricide and collateral damage incidents. Testing will be conducted at several locations, including Raytheon’s test bed in McKinney, Texas; Aberdeen Test Center, Aberdeen, MD; at the Yuma Test Center, Yuma, AZ; and at the Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center, Twentynine Palms, CA. Estimated cost avoidance: RDT&E ($5.0 million). Mine Neutralization by EOD Teams in Very Shallow Water (VSW) Sponsor: Navy Program Executive Office - Littoral Mine Warfare and Program Management Ship – Explosive Ordnance Disposal, Indianhead, MD Vendor: EDO Corporation, N. Amityville, NY Provide an evolutionary approach for an effective, efficient, low risk method for providing mine neutralization - initially from a manned surface and spiraling to an Unmanned Surface Vehicle (USV). The planned USV will be a Rigid Hull Inflatable Boat (RHIB) currently in use by Navy Special Clearance Team One (NSCT-1), using a developed and proven fleet mine neutralizer system for the relocation, identification and disposal of sea mines and other ordnance found at sea. The Unmanned Mine Neutralization System provides the added advantage of taking the diver out of the loop via remote control of the RHIB. An autonomous underwater vehicle mission will save valuable resources in shallow water mine neutralization. Testing will be conducted by the Naval Surface Warfare Center (Panama City and Indian Head), with NSCT-1 and Commander, Operational Test and Evaluation Force participation. Estimated cost avoidances: RDT&E ($6 million), manufacturing ($3 million), procurement ($3 million) and O&S ($600 thousand).

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Projects Selected (2006)

Defense Acquisition Challenge Program FY 2005

Tactical Remote Sensor Systems (TRSS) Monitoring Station Modernization Sponsor: MARCORSYSCOM PM Intel Systems Vendor: Nova Engineering, Cincinnati, OH TRSS is composed of a number of unique pieces of communications equipment, predominantly receivers, transmitters, antenna switches, etc. The physical attributes of the legacy hardware make ―mobile’ sensor monitoring a practical impossibility due the number of configuration items and their associated sizes, weights, and power requirements. This testing of smaller hardware configuration will enable the USMC to adapt its sensor monitoring system to lighter, more mobile platforms that can be deployed and operated ―on the move‖. Additionally, the supportability of the legacy systems is at risk due to an inability to procure out of production parts, and when produced, the small lot sizes can only be fabricated in special builds at high unit costs. The user evaluation will be conducted in Twentynine Palms, CA. Estimated cost avoidances: RDT&E ($15 million) and O&S / lifecycle ($98 million). Titanium Encapsulated Silicon Carbide Skirt Armor for EFV Sponsor: DRPM, AAAV (EFV PM, Woodbridge, VA) Vendor: General Dynamics, Woodbridge, VA and Cercom Inc., Vista, CA To concurrently satisfy weight requirements and protect the vehicle and crew, the EFV utilizes a lightweight composite skirt armor to shield the lower half of the vehicle. Large composite tiles adhered to aluminum substrates form a lightweight skirt armor system. This design is incurring delamination from salt water corrosion, impacting system durability and degrading armor capability and operator safety. This tests a titanium encapsulated skirt armor, composed of small silicon carbide armor tiles linked together in a net shape and encapsulated with several layers of titanium. This design will allow the skirt armor to sustain multiple hits in the same area while maintaining protection, offering significant weight reduction (5 percent system reduction), and prevents corrosion from salt water. Testing will be conducted by the Army Research Lab, Ft. Belvoir, Virginia, and the Live Fire Testing at Aberdeen Proving Grounds, Maryland. Estimated cost avoidances are: RDT&E ($2.5 million), manufacturing ($14.2 million), and O&S ($42 million).

AIR FORCE (AF)
Improved IR Missile Self-Protection System for the F-15 Aircraft Sponsor: AF, ASC/VF, WPAFB, OH Vendor: BAE North America, Austin, TX and Boeing Company, St Louis, MO This supports an improved self protection countermeasure dispenser (CMD) for F-15 aircraft against air-to-air and surface-to-air missiles. The current CMD is operational on the Air National Guard F-15A/B. The dispenser and missile launcher improvements undergoing testing will provide hardware and software interfaces that will increase aircrew situational awareness, enhance self protection, and reduce pilot workload. Testing is at the Boeing System Integration Lab, St. Louis, MO. Estimated cost avoidance is $3.6 million (procurement).

33

Projects Selected (2006)

Defense Acquisition Challenge Program FY 2005

Communications and Networking for a Deployable Internet Sponsor: AF Research Laboratory, AFC2ISRC/SCY Vendor: Northrop-Grumman, Melbourne, FL A new technology, known as Interim Capability for Airborne Networking (ICAN), will allow legacy voice communication networks already installed on operational aircraft to be used to transmit, receive, or pass internet protocol message traffic, such as text messages and imagery between airframe platforms and ground based personnel. This project updates and migrates ICAN software into the DoD standard Joint Tactical Radio System (JTRS) software communications architecture and provides JTRS-compliant message traffic four years ahead of the current schedule. The Joint Surveillance Target Attack Radar System Special Projects Office and Air Force Test and Evaluation Center (Detachment 1) will perform test flights. Projected cost avoidances: RDT&E ($8.3 million) and O&S ($10-20 million). Extended 1553 Databus-Graceful Degradation Sponsor: Agile Combat Systems Support Wing, WPAFB, OH Vendor: Dayton Aerospace, Inc., Dayton, OH
Executive System Accuracy Stability Stability Temporal High Utilization

Conduct qualification testing for an innovative scheduling and control system for use in planned Extended 1553 databus weapons platforms to assure accurate, efficient, and reliable operations under degraded conditions. This supports the Air Force upgrade of Mil-Std-1553B local area network, providing hundreds of times greater performance by adding the increased capability and functionality needed to support future operational capability aircraft upgrades (e.g., netcentric warfare), while avoiding major aircraft re-design and retrofit costs (i.e. insertion of fiberoptics) . This could significantly reduce future software development and support costs by minimizing the time aircraft must be taken out of service for upgrades. Estimated cost avoidances: RDT&E ($15 million), and procurement ($1.6 million per aircraft). Nickel Nanostrand Coating for Improved Lightning Strike Protection Sponsor: A F Research Laboratory, MLBP/MLBCO, WPAFB, OH Vendor: Metal Matrix Composites, Midway, UT Demonstrate a new class of highly conductive paints and lightning strike protection systems using nickel nanostrand materials, which create greater conductivity in paints, coatings, and composites, and replaces heavy metal mesh materials used in applications to date. By treating the surface of a composite with these conductive paints, a lightning strike and its resulting damage are kept at or near the surface of the aircraft, damaging the paint but not the composite. Advantages include lower installation costs, reduced weight, allowance for greater payloads, easier and quicker repair, and increased mission safety. Testing will be at a combination of Boeing and Air Force facilities. Estimated cost avoidances: RDT&E ($4-10 million), manufacturing ($10-20 million), and procurement ($35 million).

34

Projects Selected (2006)

Defense Acquisition Challenge Program FY 2005

U.S. SPECIAL OPERATIONS COMMAND Compact Broadband Remote Antenna (CoBRA) Intelligence and Information Systems Enhancements Sponsor: SOCOM PEO Intelligence and Information Systems Vendor: SWE-DISH Satellite Systems Inc., Reston, VA Tests portable satellite communications enhancements that provide SOF and other military users with an improved, more robust communications capability that lowers CoBRA’s operational cost. This allows for use of multiple satellites with higher data transmission rates, reducing SOF dependence on commercial satellites for secure transmissions and provides military users with increased flexibility and greater efficiency in completing their missions. Estimated cost avoidances: RDT&E and manufacturing ($10 million), procurement ($2.5 million) and O&S $1 million). Covert Eyes 3-Dimensional (3-D) Video Camera Sponsor: Special Operations Tactical Video System (SOTVS), PM Reconnaissance and Surveillance, PEO-Intelligence and Information Systems Vendor: Geo-Spatial Technologies, Inc., Lorton, VA Advanced Scientific Concepts, Inc., Santa Barbara, CA. Test and evaluate a multi-purpose, high-resolution, 3-D Flash Laser System that enables SOF to acquire and view targets through vegetation, window blinds, smoke, and tinted windows during daylight or total darkness. This system serves as both a camera and camcorder, supporting standoff ranges of up to 250 meters. It will allow the viewer to rotate, pan, zoom and examine a subject from any viewing angle, in real-time. Projected cost avoidances: RDT&E ($10 million) and O&S ($2.8 million). Electronic Intelligence (ELINT) Receiver Sponsor: SOCOM Program Manager for Intelligence (PEO IIS-PMI) Vendor: Mid-Atlantic RF Systems, Forest Hill, MD Test and evaluate a threat warning receiver that detects threat radar signals emitted from enemy missiles, maritime craft, helicopters and surveillance aircraft, which represent a potential threat to SOF personnel / maritime craft. The data derived from this receiver, known as ELINT, provides a substantial detection capability not currently available to the SOF. Because of the small size and weight, the receiver will fit into existing SOF vests and can be used in both stand-alone and as an integrated component of the SOF Joint Threat Warning System. Paramount to the safety of SOF is the ability to determine and react immediately whenever counter-detection by hostile forces has occurred. Initial review of the

35

Projects Selected (2006)

Defense Acquisition Challenge Program FY 2005

technical specifications for ELINT indicates that it has substantially increased sensitivity to detect these threatening signals within the radar spectrum. Testing will be conducted by SOCOM and the Navy Space and Warfare Systems Center Charleston, SC personnel. Estimated cost avoidances: RDT&E ($5 million), manufacturing ($2 million), procurement ($5 million), and O&S ($1 million). Green Light Aiming Laser for SOF Small Arms Sponsor: SOCOM PEO SOF Warrior Vendor: Insight Technology, Londberry, NH; Aimpoint, Alpharetta, GA B.E. Meyers and Company, Redman, WA Evaluate a green light laser aiming devices as a superior replacement to the existing red light laser aiming device for small arms/weapons for Special Operations Forces. Green light lasers are closer to the center of the spectrum of human vision, they provide much better contrast than red lasers when used against green and black objects, and provide superior visibility in bright sunlight on green and black targets. These lasers have the potential to provide up to 200 meters longer distance in range operation than current red light lasers, significantly enhancing SOF survivability in combat operations. Testing will be conducted at NSWC Crane, Indiana. Estimated cost avoidances: RDT&E ($4 million), manufacturing ($4 million), and procurement / O&S ($2.5 million). Specific Emitter Identification Insertion Vehicle Sponsor: SOCOM PEO Rotary Wing Aviation Vendor: ITT Industries (Avionics), Clifton, NJ Objective is the simultaneous integration of the digital Specific Emitter Identification (SEI) into the ALQ-211. The ALQ-211 Suite of Integrated Radio Frequency Countermeasures (SIRFC) program is developing an analog receiver with plans for a FY 2007-2008 upgrade to digital. A digital receiver is necessary in order to integrate the SEI into the SIRFC receiver. Automating the SEI within the ALQ-211 SIRFC System improves system threat identification performance and reduces the recurring SIRFC ship-set cost. This leads to more effective jamming, improving aircraft self-protection and enhancing aircrew survivability and mission success. Testing will be at Tactical Applications Program Office, Ft. Eustis, VA. Projected cost avoidances are: RDT&E ($5 million), production ($38.5 million), and procurement ($19.5 million).

36

Appendix A

Defense Acquisition Challenge Program FY 2005

APPENDIX A PARTICIPATION IN THE DAC PROGRAM

37

Appendix A

Defense Acquisition Challenge Program FY 2005

PARTICIPATION BY COMPANY AND LOCATION (2003-2005 AWARDS)
(Figure A-1)
Alabama Alpen Technology Group, Brownsboro Arizona Raytheon Missile Systems, Tucson EOS, Tempe California Exotic Materials, Murrieta Precise Surface Finishing, Murrieta Dexter Magnetic Technologies, Fremont Optimum Optical Systems, Camarillo Scarrott Metallurgical, Los Angeles Optiwork, Freemont JDS Uniphase, San Jose Tempo Research, Camarillo L-3 Commo TelemetryWest, San Diego , Raytheon Space and Airborne, Goleta SureFireLLC, Fountain Valley Ambient Control System, El Cajon BAE Systems, San Diego Maine Pepin Associates, Greenville Maryland Gould Fiber Optics, Millersville Titan Corporation, Greenbelt Massachusetts Crystal Systems, Salem Optical Coating Corp, Natick Telic Optics, North Billerica Aspen Aerogel, Marlborough BIOPURE, Cambridge Aztex, Waltham Triton Systems, Chelmsford FLIR Systems, North Billerica Foster Miller, Waltham Michigan Northrop Grumman, Troy Trijicon Wixom , EO Tech, Ann Arbor Minnesota MTS Corporation, Eden Prairie Missouri ISW Group, St.Louis ISW GROUP R&D, Creve Coeur New Hampshire Insight Technology, Londonderry

New Jersey Fiber Span, Piscataway Army ARDEC BenetLabs, Watervliet New York Telephonics Corp, Farmingdale Ohio Dayton Aerospace, Dayton Syntronics, Dayton General Tool Co, Cincinnati US AFRL, WPAFB ECC Inc., Brooklyn Heights Oregon Schmitt Measurement Systems, Portland Indigo Systems, Portland Pennsylvania Wavefront Research, Bethlehem Concurrent Tech Corp., Johnstown South Carolina FN Manufacturing, Columbia

Colorado Circandence Corporation, Boulder Coherent Logix, Louisville Florida Medical Education Technologies, Sarasota Advanced Integrated Systems, Orlando Lockheed Martin Perry Tech., Riviera Beach Northrop Grumman IT, Winter Park Structural Composites Inc., Melbourne Universal Chemical Technologies, Inc., Stuart Engine Tech, Ocala Georgia Bruel &Kjaer Testing Support, Norcross Kentucky Modine Manufacturing, Harrodsburg

Texas PrescottPrdts San Antonio ., Raytheon, Richardson Litton, Garland Utah LazerBrite Salt Lake City , Vermont Janos Technology, Townshed Virginia Envisioneering,Alexandria Titan Corp, Arlington Matcom Inc, Reston Washington Isothermal Sys. Inc, Clarkston ISR Inc., Liberty Lake Washington DC SWE-dish Satellites

38

Appendix A

Defense Acquisition Challenge Program FY 2005

PARTICIPATION BY COMPANY AND LOCATION (2006 AWARDS)
(Figure A-2)
Arizona  Raytheon, Tucson

Arkansas  Remington, Lonoke
California  Goodrich Corp, Diamond Bar  Cercom Inc., Vista  Maxwell Technologies, San Diego  Advanced Scientific, Santa Barbara Delaware  DuPont, Wilmington Florida  Precision Ammunition, Tampa  Northrop -Grumman, Melbourne Georgia  Aimpoint , Alpharetta Illinois  Kilgore, Marion Maryland  Mid-Atlantic RF Systems, Forest Hill • Triton Systems, Chelmsford Mississippi  Vivid Systems, LLC, Canton Missouri  Boeing Company, St Louis  Winchester, Independence New Hampshire  Insight Technology, Londberry New Jersey  Breeze -Eastern, Union  ITT Industries (Avionics), Clifton New York  EDO Corp, N. Amityville Ohio  Nova Engineering, Cincinnati  Dayton Aerospace Inc., Dayton
39

Tennessee  Elk River Corp., Knoxville  Alliant Tech, Toone Texas  BAE North America, Austin  Raytheon, McKinney Utah  Metal Matrix Composites, Midway Virginia  General Dynamics, Woodbridge  SweDish Systems, Inc., Reston  Geo -Spatial Tech, Inc., Lorton

Appendix A

Defense Acquisition Challenge Program FY 2005

DoD PARTICIPATION IN THE DAC PROGRAM
The principal objective of the DAC Program is to equip the U.S. warfighter with the world’s best equipment by evaluating non-developmental items produced by vendors which have potential to satisfy U.S. defense requirements more quickly and economically. Program successes ultimately results when the Services and SOCOM plan for and procure items that meet their requirements and are of best value. Table A-1 lists the participation of each of the Services and SOCOM in the DAC Program through the end of FY 2005. Table A-1. DoD PARTICIPATION IN THE DAC PROGRAM (FY 2003 – 2005) Completed Projects Meeting Testing Requirement 3 5 1 5 14 Completed Projects Resulting in Procurement 1 1 2 1 2 6 Projects Continuing / Projects Initiated in FY 2005 5/1 4/3 3/6 2/5 14 / 15

Sponsor

Total Projects FY 20032005 9 13 11 12 45

Projects Completed in 2005 3 6 2 5 16

Army Navy and Marine Corps Air Force SOCOM Totals

From projects initiated from FY 2003 – 2005:    36 percent have been completed (16 of 45) 87 percent of those completed met Service / Agency testing requirements (14 of 16) 43 percent of those completed and satisfying testing requirements are being procured (6 of 14)

1

Number represents projects sponsored by the Services or Special Operations Command that resulted in procurements through the end of FY 2005.

40

Appendix C

Defense Acquisition Challenge Program FY 2005

APPENDIX B EQUIPMENT SELECTED FOR PROCUREMENT AS A RESULT OF THE DAC PROGRAM

41

Appendix C

Defense Acquisition Challenge Program FY 2005

Table B-1. EQUIPMENT SELECTED FOR PROCUREMENT ARMY (FY 2003 - 2005) Equipment Mini-Combat Trauma Patient Simulation System SprayCool Counter Targeting System 1 Company Medical Education Technologies Inc. Isothermal Systems Research Location Sarasota, FL Liberty Lake, WA Year 2003 2003

Table B-2. EQUIPMENT SELECTED FOR PROCUREMENT NAVY / MARINE CORPS (FY 2003 - FY 2005) Equipment Automated EPLRS Planner SPEED QoS Company Northrop Grumman Northrop Grumman Location Winter Park, FL Winter Park, FL Year 2003 2003

Table B-3. EQUIPMENT SELECTED FOR PROCUREMENT AIR FORCE (FY 2003 - FY 2005) Equipment Integrated Scheduling for Global Hawk Company Dayton Aerospace Location Dayton, OH Year 2004

Table B-4. EQUIPMENT SELECTED FOR PROCUREMENT SPECIAL OPERATIONS COMMAND (FY 2003 - FY 2005) Equipment SOPMOD Shock Profile Database Embedded Integrated Broadcast Service (EIBS) Receiver Company Bruel and Kjaer Testing Support L3 Communications Telemetry West Location Norcross, GA San Diego, CA Year 2003 2003

1 Ongoing project – initial units tested and fielded to Iraq.

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Appendix C

Defense Acquisition Challenge Program FY 2005

APPENDIX C EXAMPLES OF DAC-EVALUATED EQUIPMENT SUPPORTING U.S. MILITARY OPERATIONS

43

Appendix C

Defense Acquisition Challenge Program FY 2005 EXAMPLES OF DAC-EVALUATED EQUIPMENT SUPPORTING U.S. MILITARY OPERATIONS

Operation: Project: Company: Location: Description:

Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) SprayCool Counter-Targeting System Isothermal Research Inc. Liberty Lake WA The fluid cooled CPU’s were used extensively and with great success by security forces for protection of fixed installations. Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) Enhancements to Fly Away Satellite Communications (SATCOM) Swe-Dish Inc. Reston, VA Since the summer of 2003, the Fly Away SATCOM System has been used in the mountains of Afghanistan and the deserts of Iraq with unsurpassed successes. Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) MK-46 Machine Gun Semi – Rigid Ammunition Containers FN Herstal Reston, VA Semi-rigid carriers provide quieter ammo carry under covert conditions and are more durable than previously standard containers. Used by SOF world-wide to protect linked ammunition for the M249 Squad Automatic Weapons. Operation Enduring Freedom / Operation Iraqi Freedom Mini-Combat Trauma Simulation System Medical Education Technologies, INC. Sarasota, FL System improves skills of combat medical personnel, deployed forward, in mass casualty and triage which leads to quicker assessments of battlefield casualties to increase warfighter survivability. Over 400 medics have been trained with this simulation system. Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom Enhanced Gunfire Detection Various Various This enhanced system, being worked with seven domestic vendors, adds sensors and processors and automated processing cements to locate a threat prior to the sniper’s first shot. A prototype system has already been fielded. In an e-mail dated April 29, 2005 from the 116th Brigade Combat Team Logistics Assistance Representative, it was reported that one week after the EGDS was set up in an operational high risk area of Iraq; rounds were fired by insurgent snipers at soldiers in the camp. The EGDS performed as advertised and identified distance and bearing of the fire. Subsequent search of location resulted in the capture of insurgents and weapons—no soldiers were injured.

Operation: Project: Company: Location: Description:

Operation: Project: Company: Location: Description:

Operation: Project: Company: Location: Description:

Operation: Project: Company: Location: Description:

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Appendix D

Defense Acquisition Challenge Program FY 2005

APPENDIX D ABBREVIATIONS & ACRONYMS

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Appendix D

Defense Acquisition Challenge Program FY 2005 GLOSSARY OF ABBREVIATIONS AND ACRONYMS

AAAV ACM AE AF AFB AFRL AH-1Z APD AS&C AT&L AWACS AWIS BAA C2 CATT CECOM CD CL CMC CMD CO2 CoBRA COMOPTEVFOR COTS CTO CTP CTPS CTS DAC DCIN DD(X) DDG DIRCM DIS DoD DSP DUSD DVB-S EA EFV EGDS EGLM EIR ELINT EMS EOD EPA EPLRS FASS

Advanced Amphibious Assault Vehicle Adaptive Coding and Modulation Antenna Electronics Air Force Air Force Base Air Force Research Laboratory Attack Helicopter Awaiting Procurement Decision Advanced Systems and Concepts Acquisition, Technology and Logistics Airborne Warning and Control System Airborne Wireless Intercommunications System Broad Agency Announcement Combatant Commander Combined Arms Tactical Trainer Communications Electronics Command Continuous / Discontinuous Cutaneous Leishmaniasis Ceramic Matrix Composite Countermeasure Dispenser Carbon Dioxide Compact Broad Band Antenna Commander Operational Test and Evaluation Force Commercial Off-The-Shelf Comparative Testing Office Common Tactical Picture Combat Trauma Patient Simulation Counter Targeting System Defense Acquisition Challenge Program DoD Cooperative Integrated Network U.S. Navy Destroyer (Class Not Yet Identified) U.S. Navy Destroyer Directed Infrared Counter Measures Distributed Interactive Simulation Department of Defense Digital Signal Processing Deputy Undersecretary of Defense Digital Video Broadcast-Satellite Electronic Attack Expeditionary Fighting Vehicle Enhanced Gunfire Detection System Enhanced Grenade Launcher Module Embedded Integrated Receiver Electronic Intelligence Energy Management System Explosive Ordnance Disposal Environmental Protection Agency Enhanced Performance Location Reporting System Flyaway SATCOM System

46

Appendix D
FCB FEP FIST FOTD FSP FTTS FY GBS GN&C GPS GSK HAHO HALO HEPT HMMWV HPSADA II IBS ICAN IIS/SP I-MTS IP IPIM IR IR-TFFI ISR JTRS JTWS LAIRCM LED LPD LRU MATT MBT MCRPA MDNS MEDEVAC MOTS MOUT NAVAIR NAVSEA NDI NSCT-1 NSWC OIF ORD OSD O&S PCOCA PEO PFB PM

Defense Acquisition Challenge Program FY 2005
Functional Capability Board Firepower Enhancement Program Field Interrogation Support Tool Fiber Optic Towed Decoy Friction Stir Process Future Tactical Truck System Fiscal Year Global Broadcast Service Guidance Navigation and Control Global Positioning System Ground SIGINT Kit High Altitude High Opening High Altitude Low Opening High Energy Photovoltaic Highly Mobile Multi-purpose Wheeled Vehicle High Performance Standard Advanced Dewar II Integrated Broadcast Service Interim Capability for Airborne Networking Intelligence and Information System/Special Projects Integrated MOUT Training System Information Protocol Integrated Pointer/Illuminating Module Infrared Infrared Thermal Friendly Force Identifier Isothermal Systems Research Joint Tactical Radio System Joint Threat Warning System Large Aircraft IR Countermeasures System Light Emitting Diode U.S. Navy Amphibious Assault Ship Lower Replaceable Unit Mission Advanced Tactical Terminal Main Battle Tank Miniature Controlled Receive Pattern Antenna Miniature Day/Night Sight Medical Evacuation Military-off-the-shelf Military Operations in Urban Terrain Naval Air Systems Command Naval Sea Systems Command Non Developmental Item Navy Special Clearance Team - 1 Navy Surface Warfare Center Operation Iraqi Freedom Operational Requirements Document Office of the Secretary of Defense Operations and Support Portable Continuity Operations Communications Appliance Program Executive Office Pseudofolliculitis Barbae Program Manager

47

Appendix D
PPDS PVI QoS RAM REHA RESUS RFID RHIB RPG R&D SATCOM SCATT SEI SIGINT SIMSS-LF SIMSS-RF SIRFC SOCOM SOF SOPMOD SOTVS SPAWAR SPO SPEED TAC TESA TRSS UGS UH-1Y U.S. USMC USV UUC VAVD VBL III VEN VERTS WAPR WDM WMD

Defense Acquisition Challenge Program FY 2005
Precision Parachute Delivery System Pilot Vehicle Interface Quality of Speed Rolling Airframe Missile Reduced Environmental Hazard Ammunition Restore Effective Survival in Shock Radio Frequency Identification Rigid Hull Inflatable Boat Rocket Propelled Grenade Research and Development Satellite Communications Soldier Combined Arms Tactical Trainer Specific Emitter Identification Signal Intelligence Synthetic Instrument Measurement and Stimulus Low Frequency Synthetic Instrument Measurement and Stimulus Reduced Frequency Suite of Radio Frequency Countermeasures United States Special Operations Command Special Operating Forces SOCOM Special Operations Peculiar Modifications Special Operations Tactical Video System Space and Warfare Systems Command System Program Office System Planning Engineering and Evaluation Total Accumulated Cycles Titanium Encapsulated Skirt Armor Tactical Remote Monitoring System Unattended Ground Sensors Utility Helicopter United States United States Marine Corps Unmanned Surface Vehicle Unmanned Underwater Vehicle Vacuum Arc Vapor Deposition Visible Bright Light, Third Generation Variable Exhaust Nozzles Virtual Emergency Response Training System Web Assured Response Protocol Wavelength Division Multiplexing Weapons of Mass Destruction

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Defense Acquisition Challenge Program FY 2005

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