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					  Mapping provision in West London
  A draft report to the London Development Agency
  and the West London Alliance



   October 2006




  ECOTEC

 6-8 Marshalsea Road
  London
  SE1 1HL
  United Kingdom

  T   +44 (0)20 7089 5550
  F   +44 (0)20 7089 5559
      www.ecotec.com
1.    Introduction
      In August 2006, the West London Alliance commissioned ECOTEC Research &
      Consulting Ltd to collate and analyse existing information on current service provision that
      helps West London residents who are not in employment to get into work. This report
      presents the findings from the study. It is based on an analysis of information collected
      from government agencies and service providers between September and mid-October
      2006. The report aims to provide timely, accurate and accessible information on current
      service provision in West London to:

      ► inform the preparation of a Business Plan for the West London Working City Strategy
        Pathfinder; and
      ► provide a baseline position against which the Pathfinder’s work can be assessed.


1.1   Background and context

      In April 2006, the Government announced plans for a Pathfinder project in West London to
      tackle worklessness and increase employment. ‘West London Working’ is part of a wider
      national Cities Strategy programme and aims to deliver a significant improvement in the
      working age employment rate, particularly for disadvantaged groups, and to reduce child
      poverty by 2012. More specifically, the West London Working Pathfinder sets out to:

      ► increase the overall employment rate in West London by 4 percentage points by 2012;
      ► concentrate increases in employment amongst those people who are less likely to be in
        work1; and
      ► ensure that 15,000-22,000 children are better off in 2012 because their parents have
        entered employment2.


      To achieve these objectives, West London Working plans to transform the design and
      implementation of existing delivery structures so that they better meet the needs of local
      people and employers. This report provides an overview of current service provision in
      West London to help inform decisions on where, how and why provision can be
      transformed to better meet the needs of the West London area.



      1
        People who are less likely to be in work include: lone parents; people from black and minority ethnic (BME) groups;
      people with disabilities; older people; those with the lowest qualifications; and people living in local authority wards with
      the poorest initial labour market position.
      2
        Strategic Vision and Objectives, Draft 1 of the West London Working Business Plan.


                                                             A1
1.2   Study aims and objectives

      The overall aim of the study was to deliver:

            "a baseline position of current service provision for helping people not in employment in
            West London get into work.3"

      To achieve a comprehensive baseline position, the study needed to collect details on a
      range of aspects of current provision, including:

       the resources used;
       details of the nature and focus of each service (including what is delivered, when, how,
        where, to whom and why);
       management and quality standards in place;
       outputs and outcome information (including performance indicators, targets and data);
        and
       future plans.


1.3   The scope of the study

      At the outset of the study, a number of parameters were set for what could and could not
      be covered in the time available to ensure that a cohesive report could be prepared quickly
      and in time to feed into the Pathfinder’s business planning process. The study’s main
      focus was on publicly-funded service provision that is specifically geared to helping people
      into work. The study was not primarily concerned with:

       training that is not work-related;
       provision concerned with skills development to enable progression in work;
       mainstream childcare provision, such as nurseries and childminders, that is not explicitly
        connected to a labour market programme or project; and
       private-sector funded provision, such as activity funded by employers or recruitment
        agencies.


      During the course of the study, local stakeholders of the West London Working City
      Strategy Pathfinder highlighted further areas of activity that they felt will be key to the
      success of the Pathfinder, including:

       Further Education (FE) Colleges;

      3
          Pg 1, West London Working Invitation to Quote.


                                                           A2
         outreach work;
         schools;
         childcare provision;
         debt advice agencies and local legal centres;
         the Probation Service; and
         activity in the health sector.


      While all of these areas play a vital role in helping people move towards or into work, it
      was not possible to collect detailed information on all of this activity in the time available for
      this study.


1.4   Presentation and interpretation of the data, and its coverage

      ECOTEC sought to collect as much existing information on service provision as possible
      from government agencies and service providers over six weeks, between September and
      mid-October 2006. Data was collected through literature reviews, internet searches, email
      correspondence, telephone interviews and detailed visits to a small number of
      organisations. The data collected was available in a range of formats and its coverage
      varied considerably. ECOTEC re-organised the data into a standardised template to
      facilitate analysis and interpretation. A copy of the completed template has been provided
      to the West London Alliance as part of the Technical Annex [Draft Note: The Technical
      Annex is being finalised and will follow shortly]. Figure 1 provides an overview of the
      main gaps in the data collected. This is discussed further in Chapter 4.

      Figure 1. The study’s coverage
      Gaps in data


      Organisations were not readily able to provide some of the information required for the study for a
      number of reasons. In some cases, programme or project managers did not hold such information and
      were not always able to free up the resources needed to compile the requested information in the time
      available. In other cases, organisations were reluctant to release the information due to concerns
      around its commercial sensitivity or confidentiality. Information missing from the study includes:

          input cost of the service / project / programme;
          unit cost of the service / project / programme;
          staff employed by function to deliver the service / project / programme;
          the skills level of staff and training provided for staff in the service / project / programme; and
          client management systems in place.


      In addition, few organisations were able to provide ward-level information on the targeting of their
      services and so the findings in the report are presented at a borough level.



                                                        A3
      Some adjustments were required to the data that was collected, as follows:

       Information held by some organisations suggested that their programme(s) or project(s)
        targeted several groups of people or geographic areas, and offered a range of services.
        Where this was the case, programmes and projects were multi-coded against multiple
        categories. As a result, the combined number of projects working with each target
        group is greater than the actual number of projects. This also applies to the combined
        number of projects working in each borough and the combined number of projects
        offering each type of provision.
       Where projects worked across a number of London boroughs, the total project
        value was divided by the total number of boroughs targeted (i.e. total funding was
        evenly divided between boroughs, and each project was counted once in each
        borough). This may lead to over and under-estimations of the value and number of
        projects allocated to any one borough.
       Where projects were recorded as working with more than one target group or delivering
        more than one service, the total project value was assigned to each target group or type
        of service. This will over-estimate the value of a particular type of activity or work with a
        certain group, but it also allows the study to provide an indication of the relative scale of
        different activity found in West London.


      Where appropriate, figures are rounded to the nearest whole % and whole pound (for
      monetary values). Therefore, in some tables, figures may not sum to 100% due to
      rounding. An asterisk (*) indicates values of less than 0.5% and a dash (-) indicates where
      data was not available.


1.5   Report structure

      The remainder of the report is structured as follows:

       Chapter 2 provides an overview of the main funds, agencies and programmes found in
        West London;
       Chapter 3 outlines the type of provision available;
       Chapter 4 discusses the performance targets, indicators and monitoring procedures
        used by organisations in West London; and
       Chapter 5 presents the conclusions and recommendations stemming from the findings.

      A Technical Annex accompanies the report, and provides full data tables, graphs and
      maps to accompany the key findings presented below. The Technical Annex is available


                                               A4
electronically from the West London Alliance [Draft Note: This Annex is being finalised
and will follow shortly].




                                      A5
2.    An Overview of Funds, Agencies & Programmes
      In 2006/07, more than £40 million was invested in provision specifically geared to help
      West London residents into work. A further £150 million was channelled by LSC London
      West into learning and skills provision in the sub-region. This chapter outlines the main
      agencies responsible for investment, the programmes used to channel funds, and the
      overall scale of activity found in West London.


2.1   Agencies

      At least 12 different government agencies – working at all territorial levels (local, regional
      and national) – targeted investment into West London for services that help people get
      work, including:

       Jobcentre Plus;
       LSC London West;
       London Development Agency;
       The six local authorities (Brent, Ealing, Hammersmith and Fulham, Harrow, Hillingdon
        and Hounslow);
       London Councils (formerly known as the Association of London Government);
       The Department for Work and Pensions (DWP); and
       the Home Office.


2.2   Programmes

      These agencies led or managed more than 30 different programmes, excluding Further
      Education (FE), work-based learning (WBL), and adult and community learning (ACL)
      funded by LSC London West (See Annex One for detailed information). The main
      programmes of activity found to date included:

      ► 11 area-based programmes, targeting resources at the most deprived areas in the
        boroughs of Brent, Ealing, and Hammersmith and Fulham. These programmes
        accounted for almost £4.5 million in 2006/07, or a tenth of the investment found that
        was specifically geared to help people move towards and into work.
      ► 11 programmes working with a specific group of people who face disadvantage in
        the labour market. Most of these initiatives are led by Jobcentre Plus, and included:
          ■ New Deal programmes working with young people, long-term unemployed adults,
              lone parents, disabled people, older people and partners of people who are
              unemployed;

                                               A6
       ■ Ethnic Minority Outreach and the Fair Cities pilot targeting people from black and
         minority ethnic (BME) groups in Brent4;
       ■ provision for refugees through Refugees into Jobs and the Home Office’s Sunrise
         pilot; and
       ■ Progress2Work which works with people who misuse drugs and/or alcohol.
► More generic programmes, including 5 separate programmes of the European Social
  Fund Objective 3 Co-financing managed by Jobcentre Plus, the London Development
  Agency, London Councils, and the Learning and Skills Council (LSC). While these
  programmes encourage projects to target resources towards deprived areas and people
  who face disadvantage in the labour market, there are no firm requirements at a
  programme level. Instead, these programmes tend to be used in a more flexible way, to
  fill gaps in and to build on existing mainstream provision, and so work across all
  boroughs of West London and with a wide range of individuals.


Funding from Jobcentre Plus, the Learning and Skills Council, the London Development
Agency and the European Social Fund accounted for more than 90% of the £40 million
invested in West London in 2006/07, as illustrated in Figure 2.

Figure 2. 2006/07 funding sources



                                                        Other
                                                        (3%)

                                     LSC (16%)

                                                                                Jobcentre Plus
                                                                            mainstream programmes
                              Fair Cities                                            (35%)
                                (2%)



                            LDA (10%)



                              NRF&NDC
                                (3%)
                                                                         Jobcentre Plus specialist
                                                                             initiatives (1%)

                                                 ESF Objective 3
                                                     (30%)




Source: ECOTEC Research & Consulting Ltd

4
    Note that these programmes are also counted under the area-based programmes.


                                                      A7
The number and value of funds are set to change over the next few years as budgets are
rationalised and agencies seek to make better use of fewer resources. Over a third (36%)
of the key funds identified or almost £14 million are from time-bound programmes that
have either come to an end in 2006 (such as Ethnic Minority Outreach) or are due to end
in the next couple of years, as shown in Figure 3. In addition, annual funding of just over
£2 million from the Neighbourhood Renewal Fund (NRF), New Deal for Communities
(NDC) and the Fair Cities pilot is scheduled to end between 2008 and 2011. At the same
time, all government agencies are under pressure to deliver efficiency savings.

Figure 3. Current timetable of funding programmes
Key funds &                                                             Financial years
Estimated value of annual funding (£))
                                              2006/07      2007/08     2008/09     2009/10     2010/11     2011/12
Ethnic Minority Outreach (£200k)
Action Teams for Jobs (N/k)
LDA STEP Programme (£100k)
Neighbourhood Renewal Fund (£350k)
Fair Cities (£1m)
European Social Fund Obj 3 (£12.5m)                                        (New programme expected for 2007-2013)

LDA Opportunities Fund (£1m)                       (2 programmes: 2006-2009 & 2007-2010)

New Deal for Communities (£700k)
Source: ECOTEC Research & Consulting Ltd, 2006.




Brent and (to a lesser extent) Hammersmith and Fulham are likely to be most affected by
changes in funding as significant programmes come to an end, including: Ethnic Minority
Outreach; Action Teams for Jobs; NRF; Fair Cities; and NDC. The relative impact of
changes to more generic funding programmes – such as the anticipated reduction in
funding for ESF – is likely to be greatest in the west of the sub-region where there are
typically fewer resources focused on helping people move towards or into work – in
Harrow, Hillingdon, and Hounslow. The West London Working City Strategy Pathfinder
provides a real opportunity in the current policy climate to develop a more co-ordinated
and coherent offer across the sub-region to help people who are not in work to move into
employment.




                                              A8
2.3   Providers

      Over 200 organisations from the public, private and third sectors deliver services in West
      London for the main programmes and funding agencies identified5. These organisations
      include:

         Further Education (FE) colleges;
         WBL providers;
         organisations delivering information, advice and guidance (IAG) services;
         local Jobcentres; and
         a wide range of voluntary and community organisations.


      Employers, recruitment agencies, schools and the health sector are also likely to be
      actively involved in shaping and delivering relevant activity in West London. but it was not
      possible to capture this diversity in the time available for the study. Similarly, smaller
      voluntary and community organisations are less likely to access funds from the
      programmes and agencies cited but will provide vital guidance services to West London
      residents. Changes to the design and implementation of existing delivery structures in
      West London will need to take these and other services into account, such as the LDA’s
      Diversity Works for London and the Childcare Affordability Programme, to ensure that
      available resources are used to their best effect.

      It will be difficult for the West London Working City Strategy Pathfinder to work with the
      overall number and diversity of service providers involved in employment-focused activity.
      Many of these providers will be bound by existing contracts or service level agreements
      and will be working towards their organisation’s goals and development priorities. Instead,
      there appears to be scope to improve the coherence and coverage of existing services to
      make the most of existing resources. Figure 4 shows that in 2006/07, at least 30 providers
      with a main site in West London received funding from more than one of the key agencies
      or programmes available. Of these providers, eight received funds from four or more
      programmes. These warrant further attention to ensure that the funds are used for
      complementary activity in the local area and do not duplicate existing provision available
      from other organisations.




      5
        This figure does not include providers delivering mainstream LSC funded activity, unless they are also delivering
      activity funded under one of the labour market programmes identified. In addition, each local service delivery office of
      large organisations recorded was counted individually.


                                                           A9
  Figure 4. The main site of organisations delivering employment-related provision and
  the number of funding sources received.




The next chapter outlines the shape and nature of the service provision found in West
London in more detail.




                                      A10
3.    The Shape of Current Provision in West London
      This chapter looks at the shape and nature of provision offered in West London, focusing
      on:

         the type of services available;
         geographical coverage;
         the client groups targeted; and
         employer engagement.

      All analysis and findings presented in this chapter relate only to provision where project or
      provider level information was collected for the £40 million investment specifically geared
      to employment-focused services. As such, it does not cover:

       mainstream learning and skills provision funded by the Learning and Skills Council
        (LSC);
       mainstream childcare provision;
       schools;
       work in the health-sector; and
       private-funded activity by employers or recruitment agencies.


3.1   The type of provision available in West London

      Information on the type of provision was extracted and coded from summary information
      on each project. The following analysis aims to provide an indication of the main services
      offered and so does not purport to be comprehensive.

      Most provision in West London works to provide individuals with the skills, knowledge and
      confidence required for the world of work – increasing individuals’ employability rather than
      placing people in jobs. Figure 5 shows the number and value of projects that offer a
      particular type of employment-related support. The categories are not mutually exclusive,
      and many projects offered a range of services to individuals. The key findings are:

          ►   Training appears to be the most common type of service offered. Almost three-fifths
              (58%) of all projects found in West London offered some kind of training to people
              who are workless. There was very little readily available information on the specific
              type, focus and level of this training or how it differs from that available elsewhere.

                                                A11
    As a result, it is not possible to show the type of jobs or employers in West London
    for which the training may be relevant. There is also a risk that this training may
    duplicate the significant learning and skills provision funded by the Learning and
    Skills Council (LSC). We recommend that these services are investigated in more
    depth to assess the extent to which the training meets the dual needs of individuals
    and employers in West London.


Figure 5. Type of provision available to West London residents.

                          180

                          160

                          140
    Number of providers




                          120

                          100

                          80

                          60

                          40

                          20

                           0
                                Training       Job          IAG /      Basic Skills   Job brokerage      Work
                                           preparation   counselling                                  Placements


Source: ECOTEC Research & Consulting Ltd, 2006.




►   Over two-fifths (43%) of projects provided information, advice and guidance (IAG)
    support. This activity is additional to the IAG services funded and delivered by 46
    organisations in West London under Next Step. These services, alongside those
    available from debt advice agencies, legal centres and smaller voluntary and
    community organisations who do not receive funds from the key agencies and
    programmes, provide an excellent platform on which West London Working can build
    an integrated access to services in West London. The number of organisations
    involved will require strong links to ensure that services are co-ordinated and readily
    accessible to those who require support, regardless of where they live.


►   Almost 100 projects were recorded as offering some type of support with basic skills.
    At the same time, the LSC allocated almost £20 million to Skills for Life support in

                                                         A12
            2006/07 as part of wider Further Education (FE) provision. There is a wide range
            and type of evidence pointing to the considerable need for such provision in West
            London. It is less clear, however, if and how the ‘ad hoc’ projects identified above
            complement existing provision funded by the LSC.

        ►   Relatively few of the projects found focused on matching or placing people who are
            not in work to available jobs. This suggests that a significant number of projects are
            preparing people for work but do not necessarily provide the appropriate support or
            mechanisms to help these individuals find jobs. Such mechanisms are key if West
            London Working is going to successfully increase the employment rate and reduce
            child poverty and so we feel this should be a priority for the West London Working
            City Strategy Pathfinder. We recommend that West London Working seeks to
            improve the coverage and coherence of job brokerage and matching services so that
            all people who want to work can access jobs.



3.2   The location and coverage of service providers

      Many of the providers based in West London and funded under the main employment-
      related programmes are concentrated in the east of the sub-region, particularly in the
      boroughs of Brent, and Hammersmith and Fulham and, to a lesser extent, along a
      ‘corridor’ of Ealing, as shown in Figure 6. This pattern reflects the targeting of resources to
      the more deprived areas of West London, through programmes such as the
      Neighbourhood Renewal Fund (NRF), New Deal for Communities (NDC), Fair Cities,
      Action Teams for Jobs, and Ethnic Minority Outreach (see section 2.2 for more detail). In
      contrast, organisations are more sparsely distributed in the outer boroughs of West
      London – particularly in Harrow, Hillingdon, Hounslow, and in the North of Ealing.


      Organisations are generally more effective at reaching and working with people who live in
      the areas in which they have a base. People who are not in work and live in the west of
      the sub-region may therefore struggle to access services that help them prepare for and
      find work. The West London Working City Strategy Pathfinder currently plans to target
      people across the sub-region and is in the process of agreeing targets for the number of
      people helped in each borough. These targets need to be assessed against the
      concentration of workless people living in these areas – particularly for the Pathfinders’
      priority target groups - and the location of service providers to ensure that they are
      feasible, realistic and achievable.




                                              A13
Figure 6. The main site of organisations delivering services in West London.




Most projects and providers based in West London are recorded as offering services in
more than one borough of the sub-region, as follows:

      ► almost three-quarters (73%) of current projects offer services in more than one
        borough of West London; and
      ► over a third (39%) of the projects cover all six boroughs of West London.



While relatively few organisations’ main site is located in Harrow, Hillingdon and
Hounslow, for example, around half of all projects found in West London were reported to
offer services to residents of these three boroughs6. The extent to which these
organisations effectively engage and work with residents in the areas in which they do not
have a base is unclear, however. Further information is needed on their recruitment and
engagement methods, and the location of any satellite or outreach sites used to work with
individuals.




6
    52% of projects cover Hounslow; 49% operate in Harrow; and 48% offer services to Hillingdon residents.


                                                     A14
      Unfortunately, few organisations were able to provide ECOTEC with reliable data on the
      number of people from each West London borough helped by their project or programme.
      In some cases, organisations did not record information on the basis of individuals’
      address or borough of residence. In others, their programme was only recently
      implemented and it was too early for data to be available. In a small number of cases,
      organisations recorded the information but were not able to provide the information in the
      time available to the study. Consequently, it is not possible to provide an accurate picture
      of where activity is currently concentrated7.


3.3   The location of different types of services

      In general, provision that was commonly offered in West London was found located across
      the sub-region, including: training; basic skills support; and IAG provision. Services that
      were less common tended to be more concentrated in specific areas, as follows:

          ►   Providers offering work placement opportunities tended to be located in
              Hammersmith and Fulham, as shown in Figure 7.
      Figure 7. The main site of organisations offering work placements.




      7
       Funding directed to each borough could be used as a proxy indicator but this would assume that each organisation
      uses funds with the same efficiency or performance results. This approach would also under/over-estimate the level of
      activity in a borough in which organisations are based / are not based and so this information is omitted from the report.


                                                          A15
  ►   Organisations delivering job preparation services were mainly clustered in
      Hammersmith and Fulham, with some based in Ealing and Brent as illustrated in
      Figure 8.


Figure 8. The main site of organisations offering job preparation services.




For these services, there is a risk that other West London borough’s residents have very
limited access to such support.

In contrast, job brokerage services were relatively well distributed across the sub-region
compared to job preparation and work placement activity, and despite the fewer number of
projects recorded to offer these services than more generic employability support, as
shown in Figure 9. We recommend that West London Working analyses the specific
demands and needs of individuals and employers across the sub-region to fully assess the
adequacy and appropriateness of the current balance and pattern of provision in the area.




                                       A16
      Figure 9. The main site of organisations offering job brokerage services.




3.4   Key target groups

      Information on the type of people or groups targeted by organisations or projects tends to
      be generic, and so most provision is recorded as working with people who are
      ‘unemployed’. At the other end of the spectrum, there is clear evidence of specialist
      support for particular groups, including ex-offenders, refugees, and asylum seekers.
      Analysis of existing information attempted to focus on more specific groups of individuals
      to highlight those who are and are not targeted by services in West London. The main
      findings are:

        ►   Around two-fifths (60%) of the projects found reported that they specifically target
            people from black or minority ethnic (BME) groups. Services targeting BME groups
            were found across the West London sub-region, with concentrations in Brent,
            Hammersmith and Fulham, and Ealing and fewer organisations based in the outlying
            boroughs. This reflects the general pattern of provision in West London discussed in
            sections 2.2 and 3.2, and is depicted in figure 10.



                                             A17
Figure 10. The main site of organisations working with people from BME groups.




  ►   Around one in five projects (20%) offered services targeting lone parents, excluding
      New Deal for Lone Parents. There were no service providers based in Hounslow
      and only two organisations in Hillingdon that specifically targeted lone parents.
      These findings suggest that there are few locally-based services for this target group
      and so the main support available is via New Deal for Lone Parents, led by Jobcentre
      Plus.




                                       A18
      Figure 11. The main site of organisations working with lone parents.




        ►   Little information was available on projects or services working with either women
            returners or families where at least one parent is not in work. These individuals are
            a priority for the West London Working City Strategy Pathfinder and represent a key
            means for reducing child poverty. Further information on the services targeting these
            individuals is needed as it may be an area that requires the direction of resources.


3.5   Employer engagement

      Few organisations were able to provide information on their employer-facing activities and
      so it is not possible to provide a detailed picture here. Nevertheless, current information
      indicates an overwhelming concentration of activities and assistance focused towards the
      individual, rather than on employers. Around one in five projects (20% or 50 projects in
      total) were recorded to work with employers, as shown in figure 12. This supports earlier
      findings that relatively few projects and providers offer services to help people into jobs.




                                             A19
Figure 12. The number of projects working with individuals and employers.

  180

  160

  140

  120

  100

   80

   60

   40

   20

    0
                          Individuals                         Employers



Source: ECOTEC Research & Consulting Ltd




Considerable employer-engagement activity is led by the key funding agencies: Jobcentre
Plus; the London Development Agency (LDA); and the Learning and Skills Council (LSC).
It is unclear if or how this work affects or filters down to organisations working ‘on the
ground’ or the extent to which such activity meets the needs of individuals and employers
in West London. This warrants further attention to ensure that organisations working with
individuals can meet the needs of local employers.




                                           A20
4.    Performance & Monitoring
      Performance management and the monitoring of activity is crucial if the West London City
      Strategy Pathfinder is to fulfil its vision and achieve its objectives. A key element of the
      baseline study was to review the current practices, drivers and mechanisms in place to
      provide an insight into areas for enhancement. This chapter outlines:

       the performance targets relevant to the West London Working City Strategy Pathfinder;
       current monitoring arrangements;
       performance indicators used by government agencies and service providers in West
        London;
       recent performance data; and
       barriers to performance.


4.1   Performance targets

      In order to fully understand performance, it is necessary to understand the key drivers -
      namely the delivery chain from HM Treasury through to local areas. The Treasury sets
      Public Service Agreement (PSA) Targets, which guide government activity. Individual
      government departments either own or share PSA Targets. Figure 13 sets out the key
      PSAs relevant to West London Working and shows the government department(s) with
      overall responsibility for each.

      Figure 13. Spending Review 2004 PSA Targets
      Department for Education and Skills (DfES)


      All young people to reach 19 ready for skilled employment or higher education:

      ► Increase the proportion of 19 year olds who achieve at least Level 2 by 3% between 2004 and
        2006, and a further 2% between 2006 and 2008 and increase the proportion of young people who
        achieve Level 3.
      ► Reduce the proportion of young people not in education, employment or training (NEET) by 2%
        points by 2010.

      Tackle the adult skills gap:

      ► Increase the number of adults with the skills required for employability and progression to higher
        levels of training through:
         Improving the basic skills levels of 2.25 million adults between the launch of Skills for Life in
            2001 and 2010, with a milestone of 1.5 million in 2007; and
         Reducing by at least 40% the number of adults in the workforce who lack NVQ2 or equivalent
            qualifications by 2010. Working towards this, one million adults in to the workforce achieve
            Level 2 between 2003 and 2006.



                                                   A21
Department for Work and Pensions (DWP)


As part of the wider objective of full employment in every region, over the 3 years to spring 2008, and
taking account of the economic cycle:

► Demonstrate progress on increasing the employment rate;
► Increase the employment rates of disadvantaged groups (lone parents, ethnic minorities, people
  aged 50 and over, those with the lowest qualifications and those living in local authority wards with
  the poorest initial labour market position); and
► Significantly reduce the difference between the employment rates of the disadvantaged groups and
                  8
  the overall rate .
PSA 2 (Department for Communities and Local Government, the Department for Trade and
Industry, and HM Treasury) is key to the LDA and complements the above



► Make sustainable improvements in the economic performance of all English regions by 2008, and
  over the long term reduce the persistent gap in growth rates between the regions.



The current target framework for Pathfinder relevant activity links directly to the PSA
framework detailed above. The PSA targets shape the policy and strategy of individual
government departments and their agencies. PSA targets set for DWP, for example, will
affect those of Jobcentre Plus while targets for DfES apply to the Learning and Skills
Council (LSC) and other agencies under the auspices of DfES. Local and sub-regional
agencies (or district offices) adapt the PSA targets to reflect local needs and
circumstances to provide a performance framework that is relevant to their area. This
ensures that priority and focus is given to the areas and target groups most in need. While
target groups at a local level will fit within national priorities, the emphasis may vary
according to local needs. For West London Working, for example, lone parents in Brent
may be more of a priority than older people.

Existing performance frameworks for the three key agencies in West London are as
follows:

Figure 14. Performance frameworks for key agencies in West London
Jobcentre Plus


[Draft Note: To complete.]
 job outcomes (JOT);
 monetary value of fraud and error (in relation to the payment of benefits);
 employer outcomes;
 business delivery (across all aspects of Jobcentre Plus’ end-to-end business process); and
 average actual clearance times (also in the relation to the payment of benefits).


8
    The overall employment rate element is joint with HM Treasury.


                                                     A22
      LSC London West

      Young people
       Target clusters of low participation in learning by young people aged 16-18.
       Increase achievement rates at Levels 1, 2 and 3 for young people, targeting providers with
         curriculum areas showing below average achievement.
       Increase choice by developing high quality entry level, Level 1 and vocational provision by
         extending the network of skills centres.

      Adults
       Increase the number of adults in accredited FE at Level 2 by further reducing other non-accredited
         provision.
       Increase the number of adults participating in, and achieving accredited basic skills provision,
         focusing on those suffering disadvantage and those in employment. Within this, the highest priority
         will be given to ESOL.

      Employers
       Identify and meet employers’ needs through more effective engagement.
       Put the most disadvantaged first, enhance the role of the LSC in economic and social development
        by maximising job opportunities for local people in deprived areas.
      London Development Agency


      [Draft Note: To complete]




4.2   Monitoring systems

      During the review, the information provided in relation to monitoring and performance was
      extremely weak. This does not necessarily lead to an assumption that activity is weak. A
      safer assumption may be that the monitoring and performance aspect of work is less
      integrated than delivery.

      It was clear from the information received that monitoring was directly linked to the
      requirements of the funds that were distributed. These included a mix of monthly,
      quarterly or annual returns, as illustrated by the following examples:

       The LSC’s Pan London European Social Fund Objective 3 programme required monthly
        financial returns.
       LDA monies generally required quarterly financial returns with progress updates.
       Neighbourhood Renewal Funding (NRF) expected annual monitoring returns.
       Jobcentre Plus systems are directly linked to a national framework.


      There was also little information on the systems used to inform or support monitoring, such
      as client management or ICT systems. Some providers used a kind of ‘beneficiary form’ to

                                                   A23
      record individual information. These forms tended to vary in format, and so would be
      difficult to share across programmes or use for referral purposes. Other providers used
      bespoke access-based systems to record monitoring information. Examples of other
      systems used included:

       YETI (generally linked to the LDA); and
       System K.


4.3   Performance Indicators

      Performance indicators are an important measure of local performance and the
      responsiveness of partners in meeting local objectives. They provide managers with
      information to assess progress against local priorities and to help provision to be
      developed to suit local circumstances. There was a concerning lack of awareness around
      performance indicators and their function amongst the organisations contacted for the
      study. Where indicators were used, they tended to reflect the PSA framework and focused
      on outputs such as:

         number of clients / starters / beneficiaries recruited;
         number of completers;
         number of people into jobs / progressed into employment;
         number of people progressed onto Further Education (FE);
         number of people progressed onto Modern Apprenticeships / work placements;
         number of people progressed onto other training;
         number of people achieving qualifications (NVQs/NVQ units);
         number of people achieving qualifications (basic skills / ESOL);
         number of people completing non-accredited training;
         number receiving information, advice and guidance (IAG) support.

      Each government agency collects data for slightly different outputs. A very small number
      of common outputs were found across funding agencies and programmes, including:

       number of starts / clients / beneficiaries recruited; and
       number of people into jobs / progressed into employment.


      These outputs are highly pertinent to the West London Working City Strategy Pathfinder
      but are limited in scope and will not be sufficient to assess performance against the work



                                             A24
      streams planned. Further work will be needed here to refine performance and monitoring
      arrangements to meet the needs of the Pathfinder.


4.4   Performance data

      The study was only able to collect partial data on programmes’ and providers’
      performance. This was for a number of reasons, as follows:

       Some service providers were unable to provide the data in the time available to the
        study due to limited resources. These included organisations delivering projects under
        NRF, NDC, the LDA’s Area Programme, the Fair Cities pilot, and other small
        programmes.
       Information was not available for the London Councils’ European Social Fund (ESF)
        Objective 3 programme or the Home Office’s Sunrise pilot for confidentiality reasons.
       Some programmes only started in 2006 and so no data was available at the time of the
        study. These included: 2006-08 ESF Objective 3 projects co-financed by Jobcentre
        Plus, the LDA, LSC London West, Pan London LSCs and London Council; 2006-08
        Opportunities Fund projects led by the LDA; and other LDA programmes used to co-
        finance ESF Objective 3 projects such as the STEP Programme and Regional Skills
        Partnership.


      In 2005/06, just under 13,000 people are estimated to have been helped by the three key
      agencies involved in employment-focused support (Jobcentre Plus, the LDA, and the
      LSC). Figure 14 provides an overview of where these people were supported. Please
      note, however, that it is not possible to identify individuals who may have been helped by
      more than one agency and so these results may include some double counting.




                                             A25
      Figure 14. Number of West London beneficiaries in 2005/06
      Funds / programmes                                                         Number of starts in 2005/06
      Jobcentre Plus
      Mainstream programmes                                                                                     5,509
      Specialist initiatives                                                                                      Tbc
                                                                       9
      2005-07 ESF Obj 3 projects & Jobcentre Plus match funds                                                     895
      Total for Jobcentre Plus                                                                          6,404 (+Tbc)
      London Development Agency
                                                            10
      2005-07 ESF Obj 3 projects & LDA match funds                                                              1,190
                           11
      Area Programmes                                                                                             N/a
      Total for the LDA                                                                                         1,190
      Learning and Skills Council
                                                 12
      2005-07 LSC London West ESF Obj 3                                                                         4,139
                                          13
      2005-07 Pan London ESF Obj 3                                                                              1,019
      Total for the LSC                                                                                         5,158
      TOTAL NUMBER OF STARTS                                                                          12,752 (+Tbc)
      Source: ECOTEC Research & Consulting Ltd, 2006.


4.5   Barriers to Higher Performance

      Key barriers cited to performance were generally focused on the complexity of clients
      worked with and the intensity of work required with clients who suffer multi-deprivation. In
      terms of the findings of the review, key barriers that the Pathfinder can work to address
      include:

       guidance manual on the various stages of performance management and its importance
        to the Pathfinder;
       West London based performance indicators which complement LAAs and promote
        collaboration;


      9
        Assumes an even number of starts per month over the projects’ duration, and all projects run from April 2005 to July
      2006, the last month for which data is available. [Draft Note: ECOTEC to confirm Jobcentre Plus matched funding
      for ESF does not double count starts from mainstream or specialist provision.]
      10
         Assumes an even number of starts per month over the projects’ duration, and all projects ran from January 2005 to
      June 2006, the last month for which data is available. Number of starts includes ESF-funded and LDA match-funded
      beneficiaries.
      11
         Incomplete data.
      12
         Assumes an even number of starts per month over the projects’ duration, and all projects ran from April 2005 to June
      2006, the last month for which data is available.
      13
         Assumes an even number of starts per month over the projects’ duration, and all projects ran from January 2005 to
      August 2006, the last month for which data is available.


                                                         A26
 review of monitoring information captured and its purpose (i.e. to inform funders,
  strategically guide the organisation etc.);
 management systems used – platforms as well as shared information on audit
  documentation so that information is more transferable; and
 Thematic leads, partners to take lead co-ordinating responsibility for cross-agency
  updates which develop good practice in operation and strategic aspects of support
  (shared employer engagement for example could enhance efficiency and would benefit
  the private sector).




                                    A27
5.      Conclusions
        This chapter summarises the key findings of the mapping exercise and puts forward a
        number of recommendations for the West London Working City Strategy Pathfinder.


5.1     Key findings

5.1.1   Key agencies, funds and programmes
         In 2006/07, approximately £40 million was invested in provision specifically geared to
          help West London residents into work. A further £150 million was directed to learning
          and skills provision by the Learning and Skills Council (LSC) London West.
         Funding from Jobcentre Plus, the LSC, the London Development Agency and Objective
          3 of the European Social Fund (ESF) accounts for more than 90% of the £40 million
          investment.
         Government agencies manage 30 different programmes in West London, including
          area-based initiatives, programmes targeting specific groups of people, and more
          generic funding. These programmes work with over 200 different organisations from
          the public, private and third sectors to deliver employment-focused services in West
          London.
         Over £14 million of funding will come to an end in the next two years, in or around
          March 2008 if not before.


5.1.2   Type of provision
         Most provision in West London seeks to improve individuals’ employability rather than
          place people into jobs.
         Training is the most common type of service offered amongst employment-focused
          projects.
         Almost 100 projects were recorded as offering some type of support with basic skills.


5.1.3   The location and coverage of providers and services
         Many of the providers based in West London are concentrated in the east of the sub-
          region, particularly in the boroughs of Brent, and Hammersmith and Fulham and, to a
          lesser extent, in Ealing.
         Organisations are more sparsely distributed in the outer boroughs – Harrow, Hillingdon,
          Hounslow and the North of Ealing.


                                              A28
         Most service providers offer services in more than one borough of the sub-region, and
          over a third (39%) cover all six boroughs.
         Services commonly found in West London were located in all six boroughs of West
          London.
         Work placement and job preparation services appeared to be concentrated in
          Hammersmith and Fulham and, to a lesser extent, in Brent.


5.1.4   Target groups
         Information on the type of people or groups targeted by services tends to be generic,
          working with people who are ‘unemployed’.
         A high proportion of projects (60%) were recorded as specifically targeting people from
          black or minority ethnic (BME) groups. These services were concentrated in Brent,
          Ealing, and Hammersmith and Fulham.
         There are few locally-based services for lone parents and the main support available is
          via New Deal for Lone Parents, led by Jobcentre Plus.
         Little information was available on projects working with women returners or families
          where at least one parents is not in work.


5.1.5   Employer engagement
         Relatively few services focused on employers’ needs – just one in five projects were
          recorded to work with employers.


5.2     Recommendations

        The following recommendations are for the attention of the West London Working City
        Strategy Pathfinder Consortium:

          ►   Review organisations based in West London that receive funds from four or more
              agencies / programmes to ensure added value and minimise duplication of existing
              services.

          ►   Assess the extent to which training provision in labour market programmes and
              projects in West London meets the dual needs of individuals and employers in West
              London.

          ►   Explore how projects’ basic skills support fits with the LSC’s Skills for Life provision to
              ensure complementarity.

                                                 A29
►   Improve the coverage and coherence of job brokerage and matching services so that
    all people who want to work can access jobs.

►   Assess agreed targets on the number of people from each borough to enter
    employment against the concentration of workless people living in these areas and
    the location of service providers to ensure the targets are realistic and achievable.

►   Investigate the extent to which organisations who offer services across more than
    one borough are able to effectively engage and work with individuals who live in an
    area in which the organisation does not have a base.

►   Analyse the specific demands and needs of individuals and employers across the
    sub-region against the current balance and patterns of provision in the area.

►   Explore the need to direct resources to services targeting women returners and
    families where at least one parent is not in work to ensure the Pathfinder contributes
    to reductions in child poverty.

►   Agree a core set of data to be regularly collected for the Pathfinder at a consistent
    level (project or programme level).

►   Develop performance indicators that complement Local Area Agreements (LAAs)
    and promote collaboration.




                                      A30
Annex One: Key agencies,
programmes & funds available in West
London




        A31
Table A1. Key agencies, programmes & funds available in West London, 2006/07
Lead Agency               Programme / Fund         Amount of                 Period of operation
                                                   funding in
                                                   2006/07 (£)


Local authorities & agencies


LB Brent                  Neighbourhood                 £160,000     2001-2008.
                          Renewal Fund
                          (NRF)
                          New Deal for                  £275,000     2001-2011.
                          Communities (NDC)
                          Single Regeneration                    -   The programme is in its last year of
                          Budget                                     operation


                          Section 106                   £250,000     Ongoing. Amount of funds vary from
                                                                     year to year as it is negotiated on a
                                                                     project-by-project basis.


LB of Ealing              NRF                           £150,000     2001-2008.


LB of Hammersmith and     NRF                            £40,000     2001-2008.
Fulham
                          NDC                           £420,000     2001-2011.


LB Harrow                 No significant programmes / interventions found

LB Hillingdon


LB Hounslow


Hillingdon Primary Care   Various projects              £340,000     Unknown
Trust


Sub-regional & regional agencies or offices


Jobcentre Plus            Mainstream                 £14,640,000     Ongoing.
                          programmes,
                          including:
                           Programme
                               Centres
                           New Deal for
                               Young People
                           New Deal 25+
                           New Deal for
                               Lone Parents



                                             A32
Lead Agency              Programme / Fund         Amount of                Period of operation
                                                  funding in
                                                  2006/07 (£)


                            New Deal for
                             Disabled People
                            New Deal for
                             50+
                            Dew Deal for
                             Partners
                            Other
                             programmes for
                             disabled people
                         European Social             £2,150,000    2001-2006 (projects from the last
                         Fund Objective 3                          tendering round run 2006-2008).
                                                                   New Structural Fund programmes
                                                                   due 2007-2013 but no details are
                                                                   currently available.

                                                                             th
                         Ethnic Minority              £220,000     Ended 30 September 2006.
                         Outreach


                         Progress2Work                £190,000     Contract runs until 2008.


                         Employment Zone             - (National   Contract runs until 2009.
                                                       contract)

                                                                             th
                         Action Teams for            - (National   Ended 30 September 2006.
                         Jobs                          contract)


London Councils          European Social              £390,000     2001-2006 (projects from the last
(formerly known as the   Fund Objective 3                          tendering round run 2006-2008).
Association of London                                              New Structural Fund programmes
Government)                                                        due 2007-2013 but no details are
                                                                   currently available.


                         Co-financing for             £480,000     Unknown
                         ESF Objective 3.


London Development       Priority Area               £2,030,000    Ongoing
Agency                   Programmes


                         European Social             £1,020,000    2001-2006 (projects from the last
                         Fund Objective 3                          tendering round run 2006-2008).
                                                                   New Structural Fund programmes
                                                                   due 2007-2013 but no details are
                                                                   currently available.




                                            A33
Lead Agency                  Programme / Fund            Amount of                  Period of operation
                                                         funding in
                                                         2006/07 (£)


                             Opportunities Fund               £970,000     Current round runs from 2006-2009.
                                                                           A second round will run 2007-2010.


                             Regional Skills                  £410,000     2006-2008 as co-financing for ESF
                             Partnership                                   Objective 3.


                             STEP Programme                   £120,000     2006-2008 as co-financing for ESF
                                                                           Objective 3.

                                     14
                             Other                            £450,000     2005-2007 as co-financing for ESF
                                                                           Objective 3.


LSC London West              Further Education           £138,010,000      Ongoing
                             provision


                             Work-based                     £9,360,000     Ongoing
                             learning


                             Adult & community              £6,690,000     Ongoing
                             learning


                             ESF Objective 3                £4,560,000     2001-2006 (projects from the last
                                                                           tendering round run 2006-2008).
                                                                           New Structural Fund programmes
                                                                           due 2007-2013 but no details are
                                                                           currently available.


                             Next Steps                     £1,000,000     Annual funding. A national IAG
                                                                           review reporting at the beginning of
                                                                           2007 will determine funding beyond
                                                                           07/08.


London LSCs                  Pan London ESF                 £4,400,000     2001-2006 (projects from the last
                             Obj 3                                         tendering round run 2006-2008).
                                                                           New Structural Fund programmes
                                                                           due 2007-2013 but no details are
                             Co-financing for               £5,380,000     currently available.
                             ESF Objective 3.


National agencies




14
  The LDA matched funding to the 2005-2007 tendering round for European Social Fund Objective 3. No specific
programmes were identified as the source of this match.


                                                 A34
Lead Agency               Programme / Fund          Amount of                 Period of operation
                                                    funding in
                                                    2006/07 (£)


Home Office               Sunrise                                 -   Pilot project – duration unknown.


                          Refugees into Jobs            £380,000      Unknown


Department for Work       Fair Cities Pilot            £1,000,000     2005-2008.
and Pensions / National
Employment Panel


Total funding available                             £193,730,000




                                              A35
A36

				
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