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Why should you choose to convert to waterless urinals

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					           Why Should You Choose To Convert To Waterless Urinals?

Waterless urinals have been around for over 15 years and have attracted a lot of bad
press. As with most new Technology, there are always bugs in the systems that are
weaned out over time with new designs. The old style waterless urinals used to work
using a membrane in the trap at the bottom of the urinal. When the membrane got wet,
it would open and then close once it dried. Unfortunately, the memory in the
membrane wasn’t good enough and would fail to close meaning the smells of the
waste pipes would come back through in to the washrooms.

As with all technology, this has improved over time and waterless urinals now work
using a very clever cartridge. Each of the urinals has a cartridge which is locked into
an O ring using a key, forming an air tight barrier between the urinal and the waste
pipe. A liquid seal is poured into the small hole at the top of the cartridge which then
forms an airtight seal between the cartridge and the waste pipe. By locking the
cartridge in and using the liquid seal, a complete barrier is created between the waste
pipes and the washroom. This is actually around 500 times more effective than a
standard P-trap and prevents the smells associated with men’s washrooms.

So how can these urinals not smell if there is no water washing the urine away? Most
of the problem is due to mixing urine with water which creates an aerosol, no water,
no aerosol. Water is also a breeding ground for bacteria and it is the bacteria that
cause the unpleasant smell. This actually makes waterless urinals five times more
hygienic than flush urinals!

The average flush urinal with a flush sensor will waste around 60,000 litres of water
per annum or 60m3. Water rates around the Uk range from 1.87 per m3 to £3.84 per
m3 which is £112 - £230 per year in water charges. Imagine if you had 10 urinals and
replaced them with waterless ones. You could potentially save £1,120 - £2,300 every
year! Taking into account that water rates have just increased and will no doubt
increase again in the future, this is a sound investment and it seems that more and
more people agree.

There are also the environmental benefits; treating 1 m3 of sewage water creates 177g
of Co2 emissions which means that average CO2 emission associated with a standard
flush urinal on a flush sensor creates over 10kgs of CO2 emissions every year!

In 2012 there were 177,000 urinals sold throughout the UK; 20,000 of which were
waterless. There is currently a push to have waterless urinals added to the
Environmental Capitol Allowances (ECA) list which means that they become tax
deductable. If this happens, waterless urinal sales will increase from 20,000 sales in
2012 to 60,000 sales in 2016.

				
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Description: Waterless urinals have been around for over 15 years and have attracted a lot of bad press. As with most new Technology, there are always bugs in the systems that are weaned out over time with new designs.