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Integrating Hands-on Activities into the LessonUnit

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					Integrating Hands-on Activities
      into the Lesson/Unit
                By
           David Agnew
      Arkansas State University
               Objectives
• Define terms associated with Hands-on
  activities
• Describe how you would integrate Hands-
  On Activities into a lesson.
• Identify the parts of a Hands-On Activity
  Plan.
                   Terms
•   Lesson Plan
•   Unit plan
•   Daily Lesson plan
•   Teaching Learning Plan (TLP)
          The Big Picture




Semester is made up of X# of instructional Units
that last from 1 to maybe 10+ days (most 3-5 days)
The Unit of Instruction



Day 1




  4 days ??
  Where to put the Hands-on Activity
  The Normal Day at School
Semester
   Unit
     Daily Plan 50-55 minutes

               Body of the lesson
             Body of the lesson



   Introduction of the lesson       Review and Closure
   Develop Set, Motivation, Linkage
The Big Picture

            Daily plan


             4 day Unit




    Semester -- X # of units
  Where to Put the Hands-on
          Activity?


    Day 1   Day 2   Day 3   Day 4




Early       Middle          Late
                 EARLY
• Less likely to be a good time
• Can be done to introduce a cluster or
  concept.
• Can be done early to generate interest
  almost as a motivational activity/interest
  approach.
• Sometimes there is a problem with
  understanding why if done early.
                  Middle
• Very good time and likely to be successful
• Students have had time to place the activity
  into a context of a cluster or unit title.
• What comes before is important to success
  than what comes after.
                    Late
• Also very good time and likely to be
  successful
• Students have had time to place the activity
  into a context of a cluster or unit title.
• What comes before is important to success
  than what comes after.
• Activity can provide a fun closure to the
  topic or unit.
 Can You Have More Than One
  Hands-on Activity in a Unit?
• Answer is YES
• Problems with more than one?
  – Time
  – Resources
Do you have to have one or more
hands-on activity with each Unit?

• No
• Some teachers use one and apply to two
  different clusters
• This is a teacher decision
 Two Major Types of Hands-On
          Activities
• Cluster
• Non Cluster
  NEW -- 16 Clusters Divisions
• Agriculture & Natural
                          • Health Science
  Resources
                          • Hospitality & Tourism
• Architecture &
  Construction            • Human Services
• Arts, Audio, Video.     • Information Technology
  Technology &            • Law & Public Safety
  Communications          • Manufacturing
• Business &              • Retail wholesale Sales &
  Administration            Service
• Education & Training    • Scientific Research &
• Finance                   Engineering
• Government & Public     • Transportation.
  Administration            Distribution, & Logistics
                Non- Cluster
•   Research
•   Assessments, Personal skills traits,
•   Employability skills
•   Real Game
•   Interviewing
•   Etc.
Unit Plan vs. Daily Plan
Parts of a Lesson Plan
 The Components of a Hands-
       on Activity Plan
 • Two parts
   – Teacher reference--One detailed reference for the
     teacher to use in conducting the activity. To keep on
     file with lesson plan other materials.Students do not
     usually see this
   – Student reference--A worksheet/job sheet or
     assignment sheet for students. To be given out at the
     time of the activity. Not required ! But sometimes
     very helpful. usually shorter than teacher reference.
Note: Sometimes these are one and the same.
Format for Hands-on Activity for
    the teacher’s reference

 –   Objective(s)
 –   Point value
 –   Resources/supplies needed
 –   Procedural notes to teacher
 –   Guidelines and Procedures for students
 –   Evaluation Criteria
   Worksheet/job Sheet or
Assignment Sheet for Students

–   Place for name, date, etc….
–   Objective(s)
–   Point value
–   Resources/supplies needed
–   Guidelines and Procedures for students
–   Evaluation Criteria
          Typical Flow of a
          Hands-on Activity
• After a lesson, with objective(s) introducing
  the topic give an overview of what is going to
  be done.
• Give a demonstration if needed --Walk
  through it step by step.
• Distribute materials.
• Conduct the activity
• Debrief , review what was learned
               Typical Sequence in a
                Hands-on Activities

Beginning                                         Ending
            Duration of Hands-on Activity




Introduction         Distribute
                     Resources    Conduct the   Review
                                  Activity      Debrief
            Demonstration
                                                Closure
Review, Debrief, Closure
• Depends on the activity, but it usually consist of questions such
  as:
   –   What did you think?
   –   What did you like about this activity?
   –   How did it go?
   –   What skills would you need to do this as a career?
   –   Etc…
• Some activities come with their own set of follow-up questions.
• Assess student ability or success at the activity.
• Key Point: Always be positive about the activity. We are all not
  alike.
• Note: We did not say evaluate or test. Why?
The End

				
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posted:1/24/2013
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