Mapping Out China - Berkshire Publishing Group by pengxuebo

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									                                                    Mapping Out
                                                    China: Some
                                                    Numbers and
                                                      Statistics



A             ccording to official data posted on the China’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs
              website, China’s territory measures north to south—from the center of the
              Heilongjiang River north of the town of Mohe (latitude 53°30’ north), to
the Zengmu Reef at the southernmost tip of the Nansha Islands (latitude 4° north)—a
distance of some 5,500 kilometers (about 3,449 miles). From west to east, China extends
from the Pamir Mountains (longitude 73°40’ east) to the confluence of the Heilongjiang
and Wusuli rivers (longitude 135°05’ east), about 5,200 kilometers (about 3,231 miles).
China borders fourteen countries—Mongolia, Russia, India, Myanmar (Burma),
Kazakhstan, North Korea, Vietnam, Nepal, Kyrgyzstan, Pakistan, Bhutan, Laos,
Tajikistan, and Afghanistan. Russia borders fourteen countries as well, although the
length of China’s borders (22,117 kilometers, about 13,743 miles) exceeds Russia’s by
about 2,000 kilometers (or 1,243 miles).
    A topographical map shows that China’s terrain descends, for the most part, in
four steps from west to east: (1) Qīnghǎi-Tibet Plateau is called the “roof of the world,”
with an average elevation of more than 4,000 meters (nearly 2.9 miles) above sea level.
(2) The second step, with elevations between 1,000 and 2,000 meters (about 0.6 and
1.2 miles), includes the Inner Mongolia, Loess, and Yúnnán-Guìzhōu plateaus, and
the Tarim, Junggar, and Sìchuān basins. (3) The third step begins at the perimeters of
the Greater Hinggan (Xīn’gān), Tàiháng, Wūshān, and Xuěfēng mountain ranges and
extends eastward to the coast, with an elevation of about 500 to 1,000 meters (about
0.3 to 0.6 mile). (4) The fourth step comprises the coastal lowlands and the continental
shelf extending into the ocean in the east. The water there is less than 200 meters (656
feet) deep.
    China’s highest point is Mount Everest, at 8,850 meters (about 5.5 miles) above
sea level), while its lowest is Turpan Pendi, at –154 meters (or –505 feet) below sea
level. Turpan Pendi, a depression in the Tarim Basin in northwest China, also holds the

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   2    This Is China : The First 5,000 Years
                                                             这   就    是   中        国




                                                                                                 R

                  Kazakhstan


                                                                      Mongolia
                                                  Urumqi
            Kyrgyzstan

  Tajikistan                          Xinjiang

Afghanistan                                                      Gansu
   Pakistan
                                                                                       Ningxia
                                                                          Xining
                                                             Qinghai                   Lanzhou

                                                                                                  S
                                       Xizang
                                        (Tibet)                               Chengdu
                        N                           Lhasa
                            ep                                             Sichuan
                                                                                                 Ch
                                 al
                                            Bhutan                                               Gu
                                                                                                 G
            India                        Bangladesh                       Kunming
                                                                          Yunnan

                                                           Myanmar
                                                            (Burma)
                                                                                       Vietnam
                                                                              L ao s
                                                                  �ailand
                                               Mapping Out China: Some Numbers and Statistics                      3




                                                                                                              N
     Russia

                                      Hailar
                                                         Hei long jiang
                                                              Harbin


                                                           Changchun
                        Nei Monggol
                       (In n er Mo ngol ia)
                                                              Ji l i n

                                               Liaoning
                                                                 North
         Hohhot     Beijing                                      Korea
                                 Beijing                                                           Japan
                                   Tianjin           Dalian
                       Hebei Tianjin                                     South
ia               Shanxi      Jinan
                                                                         Korea
                          Shandong
                                                 Y ELLOW
        Xi'an        Zhengzhou             Jiangsu SE A
      Shaanxi Henan                            Nanjing
                                   Hefei
                                                          Shanghai
                                   Anhui
                    Hubei
     Chongqing
                 Changsha        Nanchang
                                                 Hangzhou
                                               Zhejiang
                                                                    E A ST
                                                                   C HIN A
                                                                                       CHINA
                              Jiangxi                                SE A
     Guizhou Hunan
                                            Fuzhou
     Guiyang                               Fujian             Taipei

       Guang x i Guangdong                            Taiwan
                            Guangzhou
          Nanning      Macao
                                 Hong Kong
m                                                                         0            300                    600 Miles
                                      SOUTH
                    Haikou                                   0                   300         600 Kilometers
                                      C HIN A
                     Hainan
                                        SE A  Phi l ip p in es
4    This Is China : The First 5,000 Years
                                                                 这   就    是     中    国



record for the hottest temperature (48.9ºC, or 120ºF); Mohe, aptly called China’s “Arctic
Village,” has seen the lowest temperature (–52.3ºC, or –62ºF).
     China’s two longest rivers are the Yangzi (Chang) at 6,300 kilometers (3,915 miles),
with a catchment area of 1.809 million square kilometers (698,459 square miles); and
the Huang (Yellow), at 5,464 kilometers (3,395 miles), with a catchment area of 752,000
square kilometers (290,349 square miles). Looking at the rivers in relationship to each
other on a map, they run loosely parallel from the east to west, the Huang on top, the
Yangzi below, until the Huang bends sharply north and then makes a wide U-turn,
while the Yangzi, at just about the same longitude, dips slightly south to follow,
roughly, a wide V-shaped path.
     Lake Poyang, China’s largest freshwater lake, measures about 3,585 square kilo-
meters (about 1,384 square miles), while the largest inland saltwater body in China,
Qinghai Lake, is about 4,300 square kilometers (about 1,660 square miles). Given
China’s enormous size, both are just small blue dots on the map; to put their size into
perspective, remember that Lake Superior in the United States, the world’s second
largest freshwater lake, measures 82,100 square kilometers (about 31,700 square miles).
     Speaking of maps, the whole of China can be seen through the Google Satellite
Map Viewer (http://52ditu.googlepages.com/english.htm).




             Learn more about China by reading:

             
     This Is China
     The First 5, 0 0 0 Years
                       BERKSHIRE PUBLISHING GROUP
                        Great Barrington, Massachusetts

								
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