EET - CEDE - Pennsylvania State University

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					            The Pennsylvania State University
                                  Berks Campus

            Electrical Engineering Technology Program


                      Self-Study Questionnaire




                       Technology Accreditation Commission
                                           ABET, Inc.
                                 111 Market Place, Suite 1050
                                Baltimore, Maryland 21202-4012
                                      Phone 410-347-7700
                                      FAX 410-625-2238
                                     E-mail: tac@abet.org
                                 Website: http://www.abet.org




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                                                                    Table of Contents
TABLE OF CONTENTS ............................................................................................................................................2

LIST OF FIGURES .....................................................................................................................................................3

LIST OF TABLES .......................................................................................................................................................3
    1. BACKGROUND .......................................................................................................................................................4
    2. GENERAL REQUIREMENTS ....................................................................................................................................4
    3. PREPARATION .......................................................................................................................................................4
    4. SUBMISSION AND DISTRIBUTION ...........................................................................................................................4
    5. CONFIDENTIALITY .................................................................................................................................................4
PART 1 .........................................................................................................................................................................5

SELF-STUDY REPORT .............................................................................................................................................5

A. BACKGROUND INFORMATION .....................................................................................................................5
    1. TITLES ...................................................................................................................................................................5
    2. PROGRAM MODES ..................................................................................................................................................5
    3. ACTIONS TO CORRECT PREVIOUS FINDINGS ..........................................................................................................5
B. ACCREDITATION SUMMARY .........................................................................................................................8
    1. PROGRAM EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES ..................................................................................................................8
       1.a EET Program Objectives ...............................................................................................................................9
    2. PROGRAM OUTCOMES ...........................................................................................................................................9
       2.a EET Program Outcomes ................................................................................................................................9
       2.b EET Program Outcome Relationship with ABET Criterion 2 ...................................................................... 10
       2.c EET Program Outcome Relationship with ABET Criterion 1 ...................................................................... 11
       2.d Process Used to Produce EET Program Outcomes ..................................................................................... 12
       2.e EET Program Supporting Documentation ................................................................................................... 13
    3. ASSESSMENT AND EVALUATION .......................................................................................................................... 13
       3.a EET Program CQI Process .......................................................................................................................... 14
       3.a.1 Penn State University Wide Continuous Improvement Plan for SEDTAPP .............................................. 14
       3.a.2 Penn State Berks Local EET Continuous Improvement Process............................................................... 21
       3.a.2.1 Program Constituencies ......................................................................................................................... 22
       3.a.2.2 Use of Assessment Findings to Strengthen Program.............................................................................. 24
       3.b Continuous Improvement Evidence .............................................................................................................. 24
    4. PROGRAM CHARACTERISTICS .............................................................................................................................. 24
       4.a EET Curriculum and Course Sequencing .................................................................................................... 25
       4.b Program Credit Requirement ....................................................................................................................... 28
       4.c Quality Assurance of Core Courses ............................................................................................................. 28
       4.d Descriptive Details on Content and Portions of the Program ..................................................................... 29
    5. FACULTY ............................................................................................................................................................. 32
       5.a Faculty Qualifications Analysis ................................................................................................................... 32
       5.b Faculty Background and Core Competencies .............................................................................................. 32
       5.c Faculty Support of Program ......................................................................................................................... 33
       5.d Faculty Industrial Experience ...................................................................................................................... 33
       5.e Faculty Development .................................................................................................................................... 33
       5.f Faculty Resources for Program Objective Management .............................................................................. 34


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        5.g Faculty Workload Summary ......................................................................................................................... 34
        5.h Listing of Courses taught by Faculty ........................................................................................................... 35
    6. FACILITIES .......................................................................................................................................................... 47
        6.a EET Program Classrooms, Laboratories, and Infrastructure ..................................................................... 47
        6.b EET Program Classroom Adequacy Assessment ......................................................................................... 47
    7. INSTITUTIONAL AND EXTERNAL SUPPORT ........................................................................................................... 48
        7.a Adequacy of Institutional Support, Resources and Leadership .................................................................... 48
        7.b Support Expenditures for the 2EET Program .............................................................................................. 50
        7.c Penn State Berks Campus Industrial Advisory Committee ........................................................................... 50
    8. PROGRAM CRITERIA ............................................................................................................................................ 51
        8.a Evidence of Program Criteria Satisfaction .................................................................................................. 51


                                                                      List of Figures
Figure 1: EET Program Graduation Statistics since ABET TAC 2000/01 Assessment Cycle .................................... 13
Figure 2: SEDTAPP University-Wide Continuous Improvement Process for Engineering Technology Programs .... 15
Figure 3: Curriculum Committee – Course Chair – Faculty Interactions .................................................................... 19
Figure 4: Berks campus EET Program Continuous Improvement Process ................................................................. 22
Figure 5: Penn State Berks campus MEET Course Survey Data FA04/SP05 ............................................................. 29

                                                                       List of Tables

Table 1: ABET TAC Assessment Team Findings at Berks Campus .............................................................................6
Table 2: Program Objective and Outcome Correlation ............................................................................................... 10
Table 3: EET Program Outcomes and ABET General Criteria Relationship .............................................................. 11
Table 4: Program Outcome/ EET Program Course Mapping ...................................................................................... 12
Table 5: EET Program Assessment Measures, Methods, Participants and Frequency ................................................ 20
Table 6: EET Program Curriculum and Course Sequencing ....................................................................................... 25
Table 7: EET Program General Education Courses..................................................................................................... 27
Table 8: Penn State Berks Actions Stemming from Measures & Evaluation in Engineering Technology Survey ..... 28
Table 9: Faculty Background Versus EET Program Curricular Areas ........................................................................ 32
Table 10: Berks Campus Faculty Professional Development Activities Since Last ABET Visit ................................ 34
Table 11: Berks Campus Faculty Workload Summary ............................................................................................... 34
Table 12: Berks Campus Listing of Courses Taught by Faculty ................................................................................. 35
Table 13: Faculty Analysis .......................................................................................................................................... 36
Table 14: Support Expenditures for the EET Program ................................................................................................ 50
Table 15: Penn State Berks Campus Industrial Advisory Committee ......................................................................... 50




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1. Background
2. General Requirements
3. Preparation
4. Submission and Distribution
5. Confidentiality




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                                                  PART 1
                                           Self-Study Report
                             Electrical Engineering Technology Program

A. Background Information
1. Titles

The Electrical Engineering Technology (2EET) program is a two-year engineering technology program that upon
graduation awards successful graduates with an Associate in Electrical Engineering Technology diploma. The
2EET diploma is the only degree awarded; there are no options.

2. Program Modes

The 2EET program is offered as a day and evening program. The day program commences annually in the Fall
semester session. The evening program cycles every 6 years.

3. Actions to Correct Previous Findings

The last accreditation visit of the Berks Campus 2EET program occurred October 16 thru 17, 2000, and the final
report documenting the findings of the visit was issued August 22, 2001. During this assessment cycle three Berks
Campus engineering technology degree programs we evaluated by the ABET TAC assessment team; the Mechanical
Engineering and Electrical Engineering Technology Associate degree programs along with the newly established
Electro-Mechanical Engineering Technology Baccalaureate degree program. Both Associate degree programs were
re-accredited and the new Baccalaureate degree program for the first time was accredited.
A summary of the ABET TAC assessment team final statements for the 2EET Associate degree program are
outlined in Table 1. Several strengths were noted for both the institution and the program. No deficiencies were
identified. Weaknesses, Concerns, and comments aligned with a few central themes, primary regarding student
recruitment and laboratory equipment.




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                           Table 1: ABET TAC Assessment Team Findings at Berks Campus
ABET TAC Assessment Team Category      Berks Campus 2000/01                    2EET AD
Institutional Strength                 3                                       -
Institutional Deficiency               0                                       -
Institutional Weakness                 0                                       -
Institutional Concern                  1                                       0
Institutional Comment                  0                                       -
Program Strength                       -                                       2
Program Deficiency                     -                                       0
Program Weakness                       -                                       0
Program Concern                        -                                       1
Program Comment                        -                                       0



The ABET TAC assessment team recommended in its 2000/01 Institutional Concern that a recuiting and enrollment
strategy be developed for the associate degree programs to ensure continued program growth and stability. The
Berks campus developed nine actions to address this concern;
 (1) the college produce brochures for each program and distribute them to prospective students each academic
     year.
 (2) the college representatives annually visited high schools in the college service area.
 (3) the college faculty participate in Open House sessions for prospective engineering and engineering technology
     students.
 (4) the college representatives attended College Fairs to discuss engineering technology programs and distribute
     literature.
 (5) the college staff enhanced websites for all engineering technology programs.
 (6) the college engineering technology students and faculty participate in recruitment phonathons.
 (7) the college representatives attend Transfer Fairs at surrounding community colleges.
 (8) the college staff hosted meetings with the Southeast Pennsylvania Tech Prep Consortium.
 (9) the college advertised engineering technology programs in local media.


The ABET TAC assessment team recommended in its 2000/01 2EET Program Concern that the college develop and
implement a recruitment plan specifically focused at increasing enrollment in the program in order to ensure
continuous program growth and stability. The Berks campus developed four actions to address this concern:
 (1) the college met with the Southeastern Tech Prep Consortium of Pennsylvania to develop articulation
     agreements with Career and Technology Centers in Berks and Lancaster counties.
 (2) the college published a new EET program brochure and distributed t to high schools in the college’s service
     area.
 (3) the college met with prospective engineering technology students and parents during college sponsored Open
     Houses.
 (4) the college conduct a panel discussion of industry leaders during National Engineers week.

In addition to the above the Berks campus has completed the following actions since the last assessment cycle:
(1) The Berks Campus hired a full-time engineering lab aide in November 2004 to support the engineering
    technology programs.



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(2) Since the 2000 accreditation visit, the School of Engineering Design, Technology and Professional Programs1
    (SEDTAPP) and the individual campuses offering engineering technology programs have undertaken a
    comprehensive re-design and implementation of continuous quality improvement programs. Many of the
    changes implemented through this process address the timely collection and evaluation of feedback from all
    program constituents, including graduates and employers of graduates. Details of improvements to the quality
    control process for the EET as well as other programs are included in the assessment and evaluation section in
    this report.

The Berks Campus formed its Continuous Quality Improvement Team comprised of five faculty members that are
not currently Program Coordinators. The full-time faculty is reviewing the Standard Course Outlines and providing
feedback to the Course Chairs. The team is working with part-time faculty to incorporate outcomes into course
syllabi. Subteams in electrical and in mechanical disciplines are developing plans to evaluate the assessment data on
ET courses collected in Spring 2004. The subteams will make recommendations to the program coordinators based
on an evaluation comparison of campus outcome ratings to results for all of ETCE. The recommendations will be
acted upon with concurrence from the IAC and other constituents.

The Berks campus addressed areas for improvements identified by ABET during the last accreditation visit. A
recruitment strategy was developed to stabilize the enrollment in the engineering technology programs and to
provide an opportunity for growth. The strategy encompassed producing and distributing advertising brochures to
prospective students; involving faculty and admissions staff at promotional events for parents and students;
developing partnerships with secondary schools, career and technology centers, and community colleges; and
enhancing program information available on our Web sites and during individual freshmen advising sessions. A
laboratory renovation and equipment upgrade was conducted to provide more laboratory experiences for students on
industrial type equipment. Two laboratories were repainted, refurbished, and reequipped. Grants and gifts were
secured to purchase over $100,000 worth of modern equipment for the engineering technology labs. Several
initiatives closed the loop leading to quality improvements in the ET programs at Berks.
The Berks campus conducts an annual meeting each Fall with its Engineering and Engineering Technology
Industrial Advisory Committee. The purpose of the 2000 and 2001 meetings was to meet with the ABET TAC
assessment team during their site visits for the EET and MET programs in 2000 and for the EMET program in 2001.

The 2002 meeting was conducted on 15 October with ten faculty, five staff, and twelve engineers from industry
present. Members from industry were invited to be guest speakers at First Year Seminars for engineers. The EMET
Program reported on graduation and enrollment numbers and the status of articulation agreements with community
colleges. The 2EET Program reported on student enrollment and new automated data acquisition techniques to be
introduced into laboratory classes. The 2MET Program reported on student enrollment and requested feedback on
the computer-aided design software used by local industries. The Baccalaureate Engineering Program reported on
enrollment and the PA Engineering Equipment Grant Program. Continuing Education reported on the Project Lead
The Way Program and certificate courses in technology.

At the meeting the IAC was provided an overview of the Engineering Assessment Plan development and
implementation process by BKLV’s Institutional Research & Assessment Officer. The assessment plans developed
within the Engineering programs at the college determine student learning outcomes, prepare for accreditation
renewal, and enhancing the programs’ accountability to their constituency (prospective students, current students,
alumni, employers, faculty, etc). The development of the assessment plan includes several components:

    (1) Development/refine mission statement
    (2) Confirm education objectives

1
  SEDTAPP is the department of Penn State’s College of Engineering with academic authority over the EET
program. This is a new name for the department. At the time of the 2000 visit, the department was named the
School of Engineering Technology and Commonwealth Engineering (SETCE).


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 (3)   Articulate learning outcomes (includes defining assessment strategies and criteria)
 (4)   Gather data via assessment strategies
 (5)   Analyze and interpret data as feedback
 (6)   Recommend improvements to curriculum and learning objectives

Both associate and baccalaureate degree programs developed preliminary assessment plans with the new ABET
2000 criteria in mind. Appropriate assessment strategies such as employer surveys, alumni surveys, and exit
interviews with graduating students will be coordinated with the Office of Institutional Research to reduce
duplication of effort and maximize efficiency. Other assessment strategies such as review of transcripts and sample
student work will be coordinated in conjunction with the institutional research office and Engineering program
coordinators and assessment teams. A panel of Industrial Advisory Council members will be asked to review the
feedback and make recommendations for curricular improvements.

After the luncheon meeting, breakout sessions were held by each subcommittee to discuss details of assessment
plans for the EMET, EET and MET programs and to review continuing education activities to help meet the
technical training needs of area industries.

The 2003 meeting was held on 28 October. The agenda included status reports from EMET, 2EET, 2MET, ENGR
at LV, ENGR at BK, Career Services, and Continuing Education. The Division Head for Engineering, Business,
and Computing lead a discussion forum on Engineering and Engineering Technology in the Berks and Lehigh
Valley Areas. A Program Coordinator presented material on ABET Preparation for Engineering Technology
Programs. Breakout groups met for EMET, 2EET, and 2MET to discuss the Program Objectives and Program
Outcomes drafted by the SEDTAPP Curricular Committees.

B. Accreditation Summary
To be accredited by the Accreditation Board of Engineering and Technology (ABET), it is now necessary for
engineering technology programs adopt clearly defined and measurable program objectives and outcomes.
Objectives represent those post-graduation accomplishments reasonably expected of program graduates within the
first few years following graduation. Outcomes represent the skills, knowledge and capabilities graduates should
attain at the time of graduation such that they are prepared to achieve the objectives of the program.
The EET program at Penn State is offered at several campuses within the Penn State system including Berks
Campus. However, the program is academically controlled and administered by the School of Engineering Design,
Technology, and Professional Programs (SEDTAPP), which is a department within Penn State’s College of
Engineering. As such, the EET program curriculum, as well as its objectives and outcomes, are common to all
offerings of the program. To ensure proper breadth, relevance, and currency, the EET curriculum, and the expected
objectives and outcomes, were established and maintained, through an ongoing process that involves faculty and
constituent representation from all campuses where the EET program is offered. The details of this process are
described in later sections of this report where continuous quality improvement practices are described; however, it
was through this collective process that the current EET program objectives and outcomes were established. The
current objectives and outcomes are described in the following paragraphs.

1. Program Educational Objectives

The objectives of the Penn State EET program reflect the conviction that future graduates will be faced with ever
increasing technical job challenges driven by the rapidly changing face of the global economy. Modernization,
digitization, and automation across the spectrum of human endeavor mean that almost any technical system today
will include elements from almost all aspects of electrical technology. Analog sensors measure the state of the
surroundings. Signal conditioners manage and digitize that information, and computers or embedded processors use



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the digitized information to determine desired actions and information. Computed results drive both digital and
analog devices to move things, display things, alter things, communicate, or otherwise produce desired effects.
EET graduates in this environment will be obligated to understand, assemble, install, operate, troubleshoot, and
many times help in the design of all aspects of these new technologies and products. To do so, they will need a solid
theoretical foundation across the spectrum of electrical, electronic, digital and computer topics. However, beyond
the theory, they will need to understand and quantify the practical capabilities and limitations of technologies built
on the theory. Otherwise, without this practical foundation, their ability to operate, install, troubleshoot, and
maintain modern systems will be severely limited.
However, theoretical and practical understanding is no longer enough. The ever increasing influence of global
competition and the global economy means that all fields, technical and non-technical, involve more interaction and
cooperation among individuals from varying cultures and backgrounds than ever before. In this environment, strong
interpersonal skills, effective communication, and sound social, environmental, and ethical awareness are essential.
Finally, the rapid pace of technological change in recent years has made it clear that the technical details that
students learn in school today will be obsolete long before their careers end; possibly even before the ink is truly dry
on their diplomas. The only defense against technical obsolescence is a commitment to continual education, either
self-directed or in an organized format. Technical specialists must accept this commitment or they will fail. With
this philosophical framework, the objectives adopted for Penn State’s EET program are discussed in the following
section.
1.a EET Program Objectives
The EET program objectives are – “To produce graduates who, during the first few years of professional practice,
will:
    1.   Demonstrate broad knowledge of electrical/electronics engineering technology practices to support
         design, application, installation, manufacturing, operation, and maintenance as required by their
         employer,
    2.   Apply basic mathematical and scientific principles for technical problem solving in areas which may
         include circuit analysis and analog and digital electronics, microprocessors and electrical machines,
    3.   Utilize computers and software in a technical environment,
    4.   Demonstrate competence in written and oral communication,
    5.   Work effectively as an individual and as a member of a multidisciplinary team,
    6.   Show awareness of social concerns and professional responsibilities in the workplace, and
    7.   Continue their professional training and adapt to changes in the workplace through additional formal
         or informal education.”
2. Program Outcomes

The program objectives outlined in section 1 are the achievements that are expected of EET graduates once they
leave Penn State and embark on their careers. Program outcomes, on the other hand, are those skills and capabilities
that are the foundation on which those achievements can be built.
Program outcomes are the basis on which EET graduates will build a successful career, as reflected in their ability to
achieve the objectives outlined above. Eleven outcomes have been established for the EET program to ensure
graduates are equipped to accomplish the expected objectives.
2.a EET Program Outcomes
Those outcomes require that – “Graduates be able to:
    1.   Apply basic knowledge in electronics, electrical circuit analysis, electrical machines, microprocessors,
         and programmable logic controllers,



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      2.  Conduct experiments, and then analyze and interpret results,
      3.  Apply basic mathematical, scientific, and engineering concepts to technical problem solving,
      4.  Demonstrate a working knowledge of drafting and computer usage, including the use of one or more
          computer software packages for technical problem solving,
      5. Communicate effectively orally, visually, and in writing,
      6. Work effectively in teams,
      7. Understand professional, ethical and social responsibilities,
      8. Have a respect for diversity and a knowledge of contemporary professional, societal and global issues,
      9. Recognize the need for lifelong learning and be prepared to continue their education through formal
          or informal study,
      10. Apply creativity through the use of project-based work to design circuits, systems or processes, and
      11. Have a commitment to quality, timeliness, and continuous improvement.”
If program outcomes are to provide the proper foundation for achieving program objectives, it is essential that there
be a direct correlation between the outcomes and the expected objectives. Table 2 illustrates this correlation in
general terms.

                                       Table 2: Program Objective and Outcome Correlation

                                                                                                                Program Objectives

                      Program Outcomes (i.e., students should:)                                        1    2      3    4    5       6   7
 1         Apply basic knowledge in electronics, electrical circuit analysis, electrical machines,     X    X
           microprocessors, and programmable logic controllers.
 2         Conduct experiments, and then analyze and interpret results.                                X           X
 3         Apply basic mathematical, scientific, and engineering concepts to technical problem         X    X      X
           solving.
 4         Demonstrate a working knowledge of drafting and computer usage, including the use           X    X      X
           of one or more computer software packages for technical problem solving.
 5         Communicate effectively orally, visually, and in writing.                                               X    X
 6         Work effectively in teams.                                                                                        X
 7         Understand professional, ethical and social responsibilities.                                                             X   X
 8         Have a respect for diversity and a knowledge of contemporary professional, societal                               X       X
           and global issues
 9         Recognize the need for lifelong learning and be prepared to continue their education                                          X
           through formal or informal study.
 10        Apply creativity through the use of project-based work to design circuits, systems or       X                     X
           processes.
 11        Have a commitment to quality, timeliness, and continuous improvement.                                   X         X       X


2.b EET Program Outcome Relationship with ABET Criterion 2
In addition to the objectives, which establish expectations for the performance of EET graduates once they enter the
workforce after graduation, TAC of ABET also has expectations regarding the capabilities and skills that all
engineering technology students should possess at the time they graduate. These general expectations are defined in
Criterion 2 of the General Accreditation Criteria and are typically referred to as the “a – k” requirements. In the
most recent Accreditation Criteria, these requirements stipulate that – “graduates [from accredited engineering
technology associate degree programs] have:
      a.     appropriate mastery of the knowledge, techniques, skills and modern tools of their disciplines
      b.     ability to apply current knowledge and adapt to emerging applications of mathematics, science,
             engineering and technology
      c.     ability to conduct, analyze and interpret experiments and apply experimental results to improve
             processes


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     d.   ability to apply creativity in the design of systems, components or processes appropriate to program
          objectives
     e.   ability to function effectively on teams
     f.   ability to identify, analyze and solve technical problems
     g.   ability to communicate effectively
     h.   recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in, lifelong learning
     i.   ability to understand professional, ethical and social responsibilities
     j.   respect for diversity and a knowledge of contemporary professional, societal and global issues
     k.   commitment to quality, timeliness and continuous improvement”
2.c EET Program Outcome Relationship with ABET Criterion 1
In addition to the General Criteria, which apply to all accredited engineering technology programs, there are also
specific performance expectations established by program specific accreditation criteria. The program specific
criteria for Electrical/Electronic(s) Engineering Technology Programs stipulate that – “graduates [from accredited
associate degree programs] must demonstrate knowledge and hands-on competence … in:
     a.   the application of circuit analysis and design, computer programming, associated software, analog
          and digital electronics, and microcomputers to the building, testing, operation, and maintenance of
          electrical/electronic systems, and
     b.   the application of physics or chemistry to electrical/electronic(s) circuits in a rigorous mathematical
          environment at or above the level of algebra and trigonometry.”
Both the general and the program specific criteria were considered during the development of the EET program
outcomes. The correspondence between EET outcomes and the general and program specific criteria are outlined in
Table 3.

                         Table 3: EET Program Outcomes and ABET General Criteria Relationship

                    Program Outcomes                                             ABET General Criteria                   EET
                       (Students should: )                                                                             Program
                                                                                                                       Specific
                                                                                                                       Criteria
                                                                     a   b   c     d   e     f   g    h    i   j   k   a     b
1    Apply basic knowledge in electronics, electrical circuit        X   X                                             X
     analysis, electrical machines, microprocessors, and
     programmable logic controllers.
2    Conduct experiments, and then analyze and interpret results.            X                                         X
3    Apply basic mathematical, scientific, and engineering               X         X         X                         X    X
     concepts to technical problem solving.
4    Demonstrate a working knowledge of drafting and computer        X                                                 X
     usage, including the use of one or more computer software
     packages for technical problem solving.
5    Communicate effectively orally, visually, and in writing.                                   X
6    Work effectively in teams.                                                        X
7    Understand professional, ethical and social responsibilities.                                         X
8    Have a respect for diversity and a knowledge of                                                           X
     contemporary professional, societal and global issues
9    Recognize the need for lifelong learning and be prepared to                                     X
     continue their education through formal or informal study.
10   Apply creativity through the use of project-based work to                     X                                   X
     design circuits, systems or processes.
11   Have a commitment to quality, timeliness, and continuous                                                      X
     improvement.




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2.d Process Used to Produce EET Program Outcomes
In general, EET program outcomes are achieved through work in the various courses that make up the EET
curriculum. To ensure that that happens, it is necessary to recognize the relationship among the expected outcomes
and the courses that are responsible for achieving those outcomes. That relationship, as currently constituted in the
EET curriculum, are illustrated in the following table, which indicates those courses that are primarily responsible
for achieving the individual outcomes. However, it is important to recognize that most, if not all, outcomes are
achieved through the influence of many courses and activities. That is, the relationship between program outcomes
and program courses shown in Table 4 is not an exclusive one; the courses indicated as responsible for achieving an
outcome are just the primary source of that training, but not necessarily the only one. Details of the curriculum and
the courses making up the curriculum are covered in a later section of this report.

                                 Table 4: Program Outcome/ EET Program Course Mapping

          Program Outcomes                                                                                                         Courses
          (Students should: )                                                     EET 109 LAB




                                                                                                                                         EET 118 LAB

                                                                                                                                                       EET 120 LAB

                                                                                                                                                                     EET 205 LAB




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      EET 221 LAB
                                                                                                                                                                                                       EET 213W




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    Gen. Educ.
                                                                                                EGT 101

                                                                                                          EGT 102
                                                                        EET 101




                                                                                                                    EET 114

                                                                                                                              EET 117




                                                                                                                                                                                   EET 210

                                                                                                                                                                                             EET 211



                                                                                                                                                                                                                  EET 216

                                                                                                                                                                                                                            EET 220
                                                      ET 002

                                                               ET 005




1 Apply basic knowledge in electronics, electrical                      X                                           X         X                                                    X         X         X          X         X
  circuit      analysis,    electrical    machines,
  microprocessors, and programmable logic
  controllers.
2 Conduct experiments, and then analyze and                                       X                                                     X              X             X                                                                X
  interpret results.
3 Apply basic mathematical, scientific, and                    X                                                    X                                                              X                   X          X
  engineering concepts to technical problem
  solving.
4 Demonstrate a working knowledge of drafting                  X                                X         X                                                                                  X                              X
  and computer usage, including the use of one or
  more computer software packages for technical
  problem solving.
5 Communicate effectively orally, visually, and in                                                                                                     X             X                                 X                    X
  writing.
6 Work effectively in teams.                                                                                                            X                                                              X                    X         X
7 Understand professional, ethical and social                                                                                                                                                                                                       X
  responsibilities.
8 Have a respect for diversity and a knowledge of                                                                                                                                                                                                   X
  contemporary professional, societal and global
  issues
9 Recognize the need for lifelong learning and be     X                                                                                                                                                                                             X
  prepared to continue their education through
  formal or informal study.
1 Apply creativity through the use of project-based                                                                                                    X             X                       X                              X
0 work to design circuits, systems or processes.
1 Have a commitment to quality, timeliness, and                                                                                                                                                        X                    X
1 continuous improvement.




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2.e EET Program Supporting Documentation

TBD

3. Assessment and Evaluation

Data provided by the Penn State Berks Alumni and Registrar Offices show that at 61% of EET graduates have gone
on to further their education by pursuing a four-year or advanced degree. Figure 1 shows student enrollment has
gradually increased since 2000 with exception to the 2004/05 academic year where the enrollment dropped to five.
This brief drop in enrollment is believed to be caused by the recent closure of Agere Systems, which in the past, was
a major constituent of the program due to the number of their employees enrolled in the program. At the time of this
report the Berks EET program has eight (8) paid accepts with twenty-one (21) students enrolled overall for the Fall
2005 session.


                     Berks 2EET Graduate Trend                                 Distribution of 2EET Graduates

              16
              14
              12                                                                                  1, 3%
   Students




              10
               8                                                          16, 39%                                   15, 38%
               6
               4
               2
               0                                                                                8, 20%
                    2000/01   2001/02   2002/03   2003/04   2004/05
                                    Academic Year

                                    2EET Graduates                       BS EET     BS EMET      Other Degree    Work/Unknown

                   Figure 1: EET Program Graduation Statistics since ABET TAC 2000/01 Assessment Cycle




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3.a EET Program CQI Process

The SEDTAPP is the department for the College of Engineering with the academic authority to carry out the
engineering technology mission as established by the College’s strategic plan. SEDTAPP is also the office that
coordinates the delivery of these programs for the University College, of which the New Kensington campus is one
location. From the perspective of curriculum and programs, that mission for engineering technology is to ‘develop
and deliver an undergraduate curriculum based on active, problem-based and professionally oriented teaching and
learning’2 and to do so in a way that gives Penn State engineering technology programs their ‘own identity and
decision making capability,’ ‘strengthen[s] baccalaureate pathways for viable programs,’ and ‘markets Penn State
engineering technology programs nationwide.’3



3.a.1 Penn State University Wide Continuous Improvement Plan for SEDTAPP

The SEDTAPP strives to achieve this mission via a three-pronged strategy that emphasizes ongoing assessment of
and planning for the future vision of technology; systematic control, monitoring and evolutionary growth of existing
program curricula; and coordinated resource allocation and professional development of faculty. The general
responsibilities for carrying out these three strategies are embedded in three broad-based activities headed,
respectively, by the Engineering Technology Council, the Engineering Technology Advisory Board, and the
administrations of the SEDTAPP and the individual University campuses where technology programs are offered.
Further, ongoing monitoring, assessment, improvement, and strategic growth of all the engineering technology are
inherent features of these activities. The attached diagram, Figure 2, summarizes the organization and interaction
among these activities. Detailed descriptions of the activities and responsibilities of each area follow.




2
    Penn State University College of Engineering Strategic Plan, 2005/6 – 2008/9, page 11
3
    Penn State University College of Engineering Strategic Plan, 2005/6 – 2008/9, page 13


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    Figure 2: SEDTAPP University-Wide Continuous Improvement Process for Engineering Technology
                                            Programs




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THE ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY COUNCIL (ETC)

In addition to the COE’s engineering technology programs delivered by the University College, there are
engineering technology programs offered, and in some cases academically controlled, by four other academic
colleges within the Penn State system (The Capital College, the Altoona College, the Behrend College and the
Berks-Lehigh Valley College). Student movement among these programs is common, and in fact, is encouraged by
the University to optimize the availability of programs to all Pennsylvania residents. As a result, it is essential that
programs at all locations and colleges remain as compatible as possible to avoid creating artificial barriers for
students needing this flexibility of movement. Further, it is essential that all the technology programs at the
University share a coordinated strategy of program and curriculum development to minimize unwanted duplication,
optimize resource usage, avoid internal competition for students, and create an integrated system of opportunities for
future technology students. The ETC is the main vehicle for ensuring the inter-campus coordination necessary to
bring these results about.

The ETC consists of the administrative leaders (department heads, division head, etc.) at each of the six colleges
involved in offering engineering technology programs. The Council typically meets four times a year, and the
meetings typically focus on developing long-term vision and strategy to enhance ET system-wide. These efforts
involve developing a body-of-knowledge for ET, working with state-wide economic development initiatives,
collaborating with state industry consortiums, and benchmarking with other institutions in the country.

The ETC is supported in its role by two other groups, the Engineering Technology Vision Team (ETVT) and a
State-wide Industrial Advisory Council (SIAC). The ETVT was formed in early 2004 to examine the state of
technology programs at Penn State and, based on that examination, to develop a strategic vision of how the
programs should evolve. Subsequently, the ETC decided that such strategic brainstorming was a natural
complement to its duties, particularly if it included the development of practical recommendations for achieving
future visions. Thus, the ETVT was charged with that responsibility as an ongoing support group for the ETC. The
functions of these two ETC support groups are:

         Engineering Technology Vision Team – The ETVT consist of selected senior and junior faculty members,
         key administrators, and active curriculum and course coordinators from all parts of the Penn State ET
         system. It typically meets two to three times each year to assess the state of affairs in technology, the
         progress on development initiatives, and to modify and update future plans for the SEDTAPP technology
         programs. One of its key responsibilities in this role is the identification of funding sources for
         development activities and the preparation of funding and grant proposals to support those activities.

         State-wide Industrial Advisory Council – The state-wide IAC was established in 2005 to bring together
         representatives from key industrial constituents around Pennsylvania primarily to establish a more
         integrated understanding of the needs and expectations of employers of technology graduates and how
         those expectations should be factored into Penn State’s spectrum of technology offerings. The state-wide
         IAC was also created to provide a greater visibility within both the University and the state’s industrial
         community of the importance of technology programs to Penn State. Members of the state-wide IAC are
         generally self-identified, active volunteers from the various local IACs that support the many campus
         technology programs. The council typically meets twice a year with the ETC, and their main role is to
         provide the ETC with input about where industry is headed and how those directions should impact the
         future directions for technology programs at the University.

THE ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY ADVISORY BOARD (ETAB)

Where the ETC, with the support of the ETVT and the SIAC, is charged with charting the long-range future
directions of Penn State technology, the ETAB is charged with facilitating the consistent delivery of SEDTAPP’s
existing technology programs throughout the system, and with managing the orderly evolution of those curricula to



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meet changing demands. It does this by coordinating curriculum development activities, establishing desired
program outcomes, correlating course activities with desired program outcomes, establishing and disseminating
curriculum and course standards, responding to constituents’ suggestions for curriculum improvement, and
managing evolutionary changes in curricula. Like the ETVT, the ETAB consist of selected senior and junior faculty
members, key administrators, and active curriculum and course coordinators from all parts of the Penn State
technology system, and in fact, there is typically significant overlap between the two groups. Meetings of the
groups are also typically coordinated to permit exchange of ideas and information between the two activities. The
ETAB accomplishes its objectives primarily by developing strategic direction for its three main support groups: the
system-wide program coordinators, the program curriculum committees, and the course chairs. The roles of each of
those groups are:

        System-wide Program Coordinators – though there are eight distinct ET programs in the SEDTAPP system
        (EET, MET, BET, TelET, NanoET, AET, BEST, and EMET) , commonalties in their curricula permit them
        to be grouped into three major programmatic areas: Electrical-based ET (EET, TelET, BET, & NanoET),
        Mechanical-based ET (MET, AET, & BEST), and Electro-Mechanical ET (EMET). The SEDTAPP has
        assigned a System-wide Program Coordinator for each of these programmatic areas. A system-wide
        coordinator’s job is to be the liaison among the individual program coordinators at all campuses where their
        respective programs are offered. The liaison function relates primarily to keeping campus program leaders
        abreast of curriculum developments, coordinating development activities that involve those leaders,
        identifying opportunities for resource sharing and/or exchange among programs, and identifying common
        needs and interests, and opportunities for shared effort, among faculty at different locations.

        Program Curriculum Committees – as with the system-wide coordinators, there are three SEDTAPP
        Curriculum Committees, one for EET-related programs, one for MET-related programs, and one for the
        EMET programs. Curriculum committees are responsible for establishing, controlling, monitoring,
        disseminating, and directing the orderly evolution of the SEDTAPP engineering technology program
        curricula. The committees meet twice during the year at the spring and fall SEDTAPP faculty meetings
        and at other times during the year as situations dictate. Committees consist of faculty representatives from
        all of the colleges within Penn State that deliver engineering technology programs. Committee functions,
        membership, and operating rules are governed by Bylaws, which are available at ???? . Each committee
        accomplishes its charge mainly through the following activities:

                Establishing and disseminating the TC2K ‘objectives’ expected of the program, and periodically
                 reviewing and updating those objectives based on assessment information.
                Establishing and disseminating the TC2K ‘outcomes’ expected of the program, and periodically
                 reviewing and updating those outcomes to ensure they support the current program objectives.
                Establishing those courses and activities in the program curriculum that are to be the primary
                 means by which program outcomes are to be achieved.
                Recruiting and managing course chairpersons to develop and maintain standard course outlines for
                 all technical courses in the curriculum.
                Reviewing, approving, and disseminating standard course outlines to faculty.
                Receiving, reviewing, responding to, and acting on faculty recommendations for curriculum
                 change and improvement.
                Managing the curricular change process though the colleges and the University Faculty Senate for
                 official curriculum changes.
                Monitoring program-related assessment information from various assessment systems (employer,
                 graduate, and student exit surveys; advisory body inputs; M.E.E.T. data system; etc.) and taking
                 appropriate curricular action to respond to that information.
                Maintaining records documenting curricular change activities.




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       Course Chairpersons – chairpersons in charge of SEDTAPP’s standard course outlines hold a key place in
       the SEDTAPP curricular quality control structure. As noted above, curriculum committees establish the
       expected ‘objectives’ and ‘outcomes’ for programs, and then identify those courses in the curriculum that
       are the key producers of the expected outcomes. The committees rely on a set of approved, standard course
       outlines to ensure that the defined outcomes are consistently achieved everywhere a program is offered.
       They do this by expecting every faculty member teaching in the SEDTAPP engineering technology
       programs to use the standard outlines as the basis for their own in-course syllabi. Course outlines follow a
       standard format. They also explicitly identify the program outcomes supported by the course, expand those
       program outcomes into specific course outcomes, suggest example activities and practices that can be used
       to achieve those course outcomes, and suggest possible ways to assess and document students’ success in
       achieving each outcome.

       Course chairs are the agents responsible for developing, maintaining, and revising the course outlines.
       Chairs are selected from among the faculty who have significant experience teaching each course. Those
       faculty are responsible to first develop, and then provide annual updates of the outlines to the curriculum
       committees for review and approval. Approved outlines are then distributed to all faculty, generally via the
       various curriculum committee websites. The EET Curriculum Committee website can be found at ????.

       In the process of developing and maintaining outlines, course chairs receive input from several sources. As
       noted above, curriculum committees identify the program outcomes to be supported by courses, and act as
       the review and approval body for changes to outlines. However, the primary inputs leading to
       improvement of outlines come from faculty. Each semester, the SEDTAPP surveys (via the M.E.E.T data
       system) the performance of every technology course at every location with reference to the established
       program ‘outcomes.’ One element of that process offers faculty the opportunity to comment on the
       effectiveness of existing course outlines and course outcomes, and to offer suggestions for improvement.
       Those suggestions and comments are made available directly to the course chairs. When receiving such
       comments, course chairs are expected to evaluate the comments, if necessary, discuss the comments with
       the appropriate faculty, and develop suitable responses. Suitable responses may be anything from a
       discussion and resolution of the comments with the interested faculty to the identification of necessary
       revisions to the outline. Course chairs are responsible for managing and documenting these activities and
       reporting the outcomes to curriculum committees on an annual basis. The flow chart in Figure 3 clarifies
       the nature of these interactions.




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                   Figure 3: Curriculum Committee – Course Chair – Faculty Interactions


ADMINISTRATIVE SUPPORT STRUCTURE FOR ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY

The framework on which all of the above activities hang is the administrative infrastructure of the Penn State
colleges that offer technology programs. The head of the SEDTAPP provides overall coordination of this function,
primarily by interacting with the local campus Directors of Academic Affairs (DAAs) to keep them apprised of
external demands and obligations on the technology programs (mostly related to accreditation), future directions and
opportunities being pursued by SEDTAPP leadership, and funding and grant opportunities that may help support
local programs. The SEDTAPP head also establishes workload guidelines for technology faculty, provides input to
faculty performance evaluations, consults in and provides guidance for faculty hiring, and advocates, with the
campus administration, in faculty promotion and tenure decisions. Finally, the SEDTAPP provides some funds to
the campuses to support professional development activities for faculty.

Campus DAAs are the local counterparts to the SEDTAPP head. They are the academic leaders at the campuses,
and as such, are most directly responsible for faculty supervision and development. They are responsible for
managing work assignments, providing necessary clerical and staff support, assessing and rewarding performance,


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planning for and supporting professional development, ensuring adequate resources and facilities for programs,
hiring faculty, and advocating for faculty in promotion and tenure processes.

A Campus Program Coordinator is the main administrative interface between the DAA and the technology program
and its faculty. The coordinator’s core role typically includes establishing program class schedules, assigning
standing faculty to classes, arranging for adjunct faculty when needed, advising students, and interacting with the
System-wide Program Coordinator (see above). Coordinators also monitor and anticipate equipment and resource
needs of the technology programs and keep campus administration aware of those needs. They also are expected to
take the lead in identifying sources and possible funding to meet those needs. Much of this activity takes place via
interactions with the local industrial advisory committees, which are typically orchestrated by the campus
coordinator. Finally, coordinators are typically leaders in campus recruitment and marketing efforts, and for
identifying and organizing student internships, tours, and recruitment functions.

Finally, the faculty represent the foundation for all the functions discussed above. In the context of ensuring quality
of the technology programs, they have four key roles. First and foremost, they are obligated to teach the various
courses in the program with particular emphasis given to accomplishing the course outcomes stipulated in the
standard course outlines. Second, they are responsible for continually assessing the accomplishments in their
courses against their expected outcomes, mainly by participating in the various assessment activities and surveys
conducted by the SEDTAPP via the ETAB. The are also expected to routinely assess both their courses and the
program with respect to developing trends and changing technology, and to recommend to course chairs and
curriculum committees, course and curriculum adjustments to adapt to these changes. Finally, faculty are expected
to be actively involved with local industrial contacts, via the local advisory committee and elsewhere, to identify
sources of resources, funding, and adjunct faculty candidates, and to create opportunities for tours, internship,
student employment, and faculty development and consultancy.

A number of strategies are employed by the Berks Campus to assure the EET program is fulfilling its stated mission.
These strategies include an evaluation and assessment plan designed to monitor the program and provide feedback
to the Berks Campus EET program continuous improvement committee (CQI) for appropriate action. Assessment is
undertaken using a feedback loop system generally based on two means of feedback. The first of the two loops
reviews the objectives and determines whether the program satisfactorily meets the requirements of the constituents,
while the second reviews the outcomes to determine whether the program is providing the education necessary to
meet the objectives. Evaluation is based on data obtained from assessment measures reflected in Table 5 and are
used to draw assessment conclusions about the EET program vision, mission, and outcomes.

             Table 5: EET Program Assessment Measures, Methods, Participants and Frequency

Measure           Method                      Purpose                Participants            Frequency      Media
1                 Locally Developed           Analyzing student      Instructors             Periodically   Paper
                  Student Course              performance in and                             During Each
                  Examinations and Quizzes    out of the classroom                           Semester
2                 Locally Developed           Analyzing student      Instructors             Periodically   Paper
                  Laboratory Reports          competence in                                  During Each
                                              critical laboratory                            Semester
                                              skills
3                 Locally Developed           Analyzing student      Instructors             Periodically   Paper
                  Student Communication       competence in                                  During Each
                  Skills & Competencies       critical                                       Semester
                                              communication
                                              skills
4                 Graduating Student Exit     Seeks 180 degree       Graduating Students     Each           Online
                  Questionnaires              evaluation of                                  Semester
                                              program
5                 https://engr.psu.edu/MEET   Seeks 360 degree       Students and Faculty    Each           Online
                  Course                      evaluation of                                  Semester



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                 Evaluations              courses
6                Alumni Survey            Seeks alumni         Graduates within 5 years   Annually       Mailing
                                          evaluation of the    of graduation
                                          program and
                                          objectives
7                Employer Survey          Seeks employer       Employers in the Berks     Annually       Mailing
                                          evaluation of        County region and those
                                          program and          who hire graduates
                                          objectives
8                Student Focus Groups &   Seeks student        Entering Freshmen          Periodically   Paper
                 Forums                   feedback on the
                                          reasons they chose
                                          the program



        Measures 1, 2, and 3: Student exams, laboratories, project reports, presentations, and project evaluations, in
        core EET classes are the basis for assessment measures 1, 2, and 3. Samples of this data are provided by all
        EET instructors and are forwarded to the staff assistant for report consolidation and archiving. The report
        is made available by the Program Coordinator at the end of each semester. The Program Coordinator then
        disseminates the results to appropriate constituents.

        Measure 4: Student exit questionnaires are distributed in the fourth semester in conjunction with the
        graduation application process. The results of the exit questionnaire are subsequently forwarded to the staff
        assistant. The results of this survey are made available by the Program Coordinator at the end of the
        semester. The Program Coordinator then disseminates the results to appropriate constituents.

        Measure 5: Web-based course evaluations are administered at the end of each semester by the University
        and subsequently provided to the Staff Assistant. The results of this survey are made available to the
        Program Coordinator at the end of the semester by each faculty member along with a plan of actions to
        address inadequacies. The Program Coordinator then disseminates the results to appropriate constituents.

        Measures 6 and 7: Alumni and Employer surveys are administered by the staff assistant normally in late
        Spring/early Summer. The results of these surveys are made available to the Program Coordinator at the
        end of the semester. The Program Coordinator then disseminates results to appropriate constituents.

        Measure 8: Student focus groups may be held periodically to study the trends of Freshmen students
        entering the college and the reasons for their major selections. The results of this survey are made available
        to the Program Coordinator at the end of the semester. The Program Coordinator then disseminates the
        results to appropriate constituents.

3.a.2 Penn State Berks Local EET Continuous Improvement Process

The EET program is controlled overall by the mission, vision, goals of the college and the program’s continuous
improvement (CQI) committee. The committee’s charter is to continuously improve the program though feedback
taken from the assessment measures, advances in technology, students, industrial, and alumni constituencies. The
Berks EET program CQI committee is composed of fulltime faculty who teach courses in the EET program and is
chaired by the Program Coordinator. The CQI committee meets twice per semester to discuss status of actions
based on data collected from the assessment measures and program constituencies. Figure 4 reflects the means by
which the continuous improvement process in conducted.




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                  Figure 4: Berks campus EET Program Continuous Improvement Process


3.a.2.1 Program Constituencies

It is important that the EET program meets the needs of its constituents and we recognize that the constituents’
needs may change over time. The program must change as the needs change in order to remain valuable to the
constituents. To recognize the need for change, the program must keep contact with the constituents. Any changes
affecting more than one constituent will be reviewed with input from other constituents. Determining the degree to
which the constituents are satisfied is done in the manners listed below. The program strategies to do so are
contained here.




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       Students: The SEDTAP committee developed a web-based assessment tool for use in engineering and
       engineering technology programs. At the end of each semester students are requested to complete a course
       survey that prompts them to rate their ability in accomplishing the course requirements and overall
       outcomes. The instructors of these courses are requested to complete a course survey that prompts them to
       rate the effectiveness of the course in meeting each outcome as well as each individual students ability to
       meet the outcomes. The data is compiled at University Park campus and is available to all engineering
       faculty usually by the next semester.

       Graduates: The ETCE has initialed on a pilot basis a new tool to help assess and potentially improve the
       quality of engineering technology programs. That tool is a comprehensive, web based exit survey given to
       all two-year engineering technology graduates. This survey investigates all aspects of the students’
       experiences in the EET program, ranging from hours spent studying to satisfaction with faculty, advising,
       lab facilities, student classmates, etc. The first pilot survey was conducted during March and April of 200,
       thus results are not available at the time of preparing of this report. However the results are expected to
       provide valuable information for monitoring and possible redirecting the EET program. Results of the pilot
       should be tabulated and available for review by the accreditation review team next visit.

       Alumni: Surveys sent to former graduates of the EET program are utilized to assess the use of their skills
       gained by the program and ascertain whether new materials should be integrated into the curriculum.

       Industrial Advisory Committee: The fourth of the program constituencies is the Industrial Advisory
       committee (IAC). The current members of the Berks campus IAC are listed in Table 15. As with the EET
       Curriculum Committee, the role of the IAC is defined by the bylaws, department level guidelines, and its
       primary function is to “permit representatives from the industry that hire technology graduates to reflect
       upon, evaluate, and emphasis of [EET]…education.” At the Berks Campus, the EET Subcommittee of the
       IAC meets at least once each year. The specific issues addressed at these meeting vary, but primarily they
       focus on curriculum changes being considered by the faculty and the EET Curriculum Committee. IAC
       members are asked to comment on changes being considered. Comments and recommendations from the
       IAC that are generic in nature are channeled back to the EET Curriculum Committee for consideration.
       IAC comments that are pertinent only to Berks Campus are handled locally. Typically, items in the latter
       category relate to such things as technical elective offerings appropriate for Berks-Lehigh Valley, industrial
       support for donations to the program, internship opportunities, graduate opportunities etc.

       EET Curriculum Committee: The EET program (as are all engineering technology programs in the
       SETCE) is supported by an official Curriculum Committee. The charter for this committee can be found in
       attachment E, but fundamentally its purpose is to continually assess the content and organization of the
       EET program curriculum o ensure that it continues to meet objectives specified in the University Programs
       Bulletin. As such, the EET Curriculum Committee is the focal point for continuing quality control,
       assessment, and improvement of the EET program.

       The committee accomplishes its charter through periodic meetings in which academic issues are debated,
       evaluated, and if appropriate, proposed to the full body of EET faculty for approval. If approved by the
       faculty, changes are then forwarded to the College of Engineering Faculty Council for ratification. If
       approved at this level, changes are implemented through the standard curriculum revision process of the
       University Faculty Senate. This multi-level, multi-discipline review process provides assurance that
       curricular changes are deemed appropriate by a wide3 audience before implementation.

       By charter, Curriculum Committee meetings must be held at least once per year. In practice, there have
       been between two and four meetings each year for the last decade. EET faculty are kept apprised of the
       committee’s activities through biannual SETCE faculty meetings. A standard item of those meetings is a
       breakout session for EET faculty in which committee activities are discussed and faculty input for



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        curricular improvement is solicited. In recent years, with the advent of the Internet and e-mail, the
        committee has also begun to relay on broadcast messaging to disseminate special announcements, conduct
        polls, and exchange information with faculty.

        Critical to the quality control function of the Curriculum Committee is the fact that most recommendations
        brought before it come from the EET faculty. This is critical for two reasons. First, the faculty has day-to-
        day involvement with students in the program and facilities available that deliver the program. Secondly,
        many faculty are actively involved in industry and consulting. Thus they have direct experience with
        employer expectations for technology graduates, and they learn, first-hand, of new developments and
        changes in direction in technology industries. Together these facts make faculty one of the better
        assessment and feedback groups for program quality control. The Curriculum Committee review and
        revision process recognizes and takes advantage of this fact.

3.a.2.2 Use of Assessment Findings to Strengthen Program

        Once the above information has been gathered and compiled, the assessment and evaluation committee
        reviews the data and determines if action is necessary. This is done during the regular meetings of the
        committee. These meetings take place at least once per semester.

        Action is necessary when goals were not met, when there is evidence of shortcomings in the program or
        student outcomes, or there are changes in the needs of the constituencies.

        If the committee determines action is necessary, the team must also determine what type of action is
        required. Action can be in the form of changing courses, using different learning exercises, adjusting goals,
        modifying outcomes, or changing objectives. In very rare instances it may be necessary to change the
        mission. The action plan must also include appropriate changes or additions to the assessment tools and
        measures, learning experiences and goals.

        The Faculty, Administration, and IAC must approve any changes to the Mission or Objectives. The
        continuous improvement committee must approve changes to the student outcomes, learning experiences,
        or goals. The faculty assessment team and the university administration must approve course changes.

        Any approved action is enacted as soon as reasonably possible. This is likely the beginning of the next
        semester. The action plan is documented and incorporated into the assessment plan for the program. This
        change is now reviewed on a continuous basis during the regular meeting of the faculty assessment team.


3.b Continuous Improvement Evidence
        TBD

4. Program Characteristics

The characteristics of the EET curriculum are outlined in the following paragraphs. The information is organized
according to the specific topics called out by Criterion 4 of the General Accreditation Criteria.




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4.a EET Curriculum and Course Sequencing
         The EET curriculum and course sequencing are illustrated in Table 6. The year and semester in which
         students typically take courses are indicated in the first column; however, some alteration of this schedule
         may occur in individual cases depending on specific student needs. Sequencing of technical courses is
         dictated by course prerequisites, which are stipulated in the University Bulletin. Footnotes in Table 6
         highlight correlations between various curriculum elements and specific TC2K accreditation criteria.
         Detailed outline/syllabi for the technical core and specialty courses listed in the table are included in
         Appendix ???? . General education courses available to EET program students are illustrated in Table 7.

                             Table 6: EET Program Curriculum and Course Sequencing
 Year and                        Course                                                                    Category (Credit Hours)
 Semester              (Department, Number, Title)




                                                                                                                                                              (Lecture/Lab Credits)
                 (C) – indicates foundation or core course




                                                                                                                  Physical & Natural




                                                                                                                                                              Technical Content
                                                                                                                                          Social Sciences &
                 (S) – indicates technical specialty course
                                                               Communications




                                                                                            Mathematics




                                                                                                                                          Humanities
                                                                                                                  Sciences
                                                Electrical & Electronics Courses1
 Yr 1, Sm 1   EET 101 – Electrical Circuits I (C)                                                                                                                          3/0
 Yr 1, Sm 1   EET 109 – Electrical Circuits I Lab (C)                                                                                                                      0/1
 Yr 1, Sm 2   EET 114 – Electrical Circuits II (C)                                                                                                                         4/0
 Yr 1, Sm 2   EET 117 – Digital Electronics (S)                                                                                                                            3/0
 Yr 1, Sm 2   EET 118 – Electrical Circuits II Lab (C)                                                                                                                     0/1
 Yr 1, Sm 2   EET 120 – Digital Electronics Lab (S)                                                                                                                        0/1
 Yr 2, Sm 1   EET 205 – Semiconductor Lab (S)                                                                                                                              0/1
 Yr 2, Sm 1   EET 210 – Fund. of Semiconductors (S)                                                                                                                        2/0
 Yr 2, Sm 1   EET 211 – Microprocessors (S)                                                                                                                                3/0
 Yr 2, Sm 1   EET 213W – Fund.of Elecrical Machines2 (S)                        (4/1)3                                                                                     4/1
 Yr 2, Sm 2   EET 216 – Linear Electronic Circuits (S)                                                                                                                     3/0
 Yr 2, Sm 2   EET 220 – Programmable Logic Controls (S)                                                                                                                    1/1
 Yr 2, Sm 2   EET 221 – Linear Electronics Lab (S)                                                                                                                         0/1
                                                                                                                                       Total credits =                    23/7
                                                  Supporting Technical Courses1
 Yr 1, Sm 1   EGT 101 – Technical Drawing Fund. (C)                                                                                                                         0/1
 Yr 1, Sm 1   EGT 102 – Intro. to Computer-Aided Drftg                                                                                                                      0/1
              (C)
 Yr 1, Sm 1   ET 002 – ET Orientation (C)                                                                                                                                   0/1
 Yr 1, Sm 2   ET 005 – Engr. Methods in ET (C)                                                                                                                              0/1
                                                                                                                                       Total credits =                      0/4
                                                       Mathematics Courses4
 Yr 1, Sm 1   Math 081 – Tech Math I                                                                       3
 Yr 1, Sm 2   Math 082 – Tech Math II                                                                      3
 Yr 2, Sm 3   Math 083 – Tech Math III                                                                     4
                                                              Total credits =                             10
                                                    Physical Sciences Courses5
 Yr 1, Sm 2   Phys 150 – Tech Physics I                                                                                       3
 Yr 2, Sm 1   Phys 151 – Tech Physics II                                                                                      3
                                                                                         Total credits =                      6
                                                     Communications Courses
 Yr 1, Sm 1   Engl 015 – Rhetoric & Composition2                                  3



2997fb81-4136-48d6-9d5b-77fc7ba49563.doc                                                                       Page 51 of 51
    Yr 2, Sm 2     CAS 100 – Effective Speech2                              3
                                                    Total credits =         6
                                                  Technical Elective Course Selections
(Courses below automatically satisfy technical elective requirements of the program. Other courses may be approved by the ETCE Dept. Head)
 Yr 2, Sm 2     Chem 011 – Intro Chemistry                                                              3
 Yr 2, Sm 2     Chem 012 – Chemical Principles                                                          3
 Yr 2, Sm 2     CET 261 – Fluid Flow                                                                                                3
 Yr 2, Sm 2     CmpSc 101 – Basic Computer Prgmg                                                                                    3
 Yr 2, Sm 2     CmpSc 201 – Computer Prgmg for Engr                                                                                 3
 Yr 2, Sm 2     EET 297 – Independent Studies                                                                                     1–9
 Yr 2, Sm 2     IET 101 – Mfg Matls, Processes & Lab                                                                                3
 Yr 2, Sm 2     IET 105 – Economics of Industry                                                                                     2
 Yr 2, Sm 2     MchT 111 – Statics                                                                                                  3
 Yr 2, Sm 2     Math 140 – Calc w/ Analytic Geom I                                         4
 Yr 2, Sm 2     Math 141 – Calc w/ Analytic Geom II                                        4
 Yr 2, Sm 2     BiSc 003 – Environmental Science                                                        3
                                                                             Total Credits (A minimum of 1 credit is required) =  1–4
                              General Education Courses (one course in each discipline is required) 6
    Yr 1, Sm 1     Social Sciences, Humanities or Arts7                                                                     3
    Yr 2, Sm 2     Social Sciences, Humanities or Arts7                                                                     3
    Yr 2, Sm 2     Social Sciences, Humanities or Arts7                                                                     3
                                                                                                   Total Credits =          9
                  Totals Required for the Degree (by Category) =            63             10              6                9              35
                                               Percent of Total =           93             15              9               14              53
                                                                                          Total Credits Required in the Program =          668


                                                                Table 6 – Notes
1     The breadth and depth of the technical sciences and supporting technical courses are designed to satisfy the Technical Content requirement
      of Criterion 4 of the GENERAL CRITERIA. Details of how individual courses address specific elements of this criterion are covered elsewhere
      in this report.
2     These courses have specific and significant relevance to the Communications requirements specified by Criterion 4 of the GENERAL
      CRITERIA. The college composition and public speaking courses are required by the University of all associate degree graduates. Further,
      the “W” designated course requires extensive and focused development of written and oral communication skills within the specific context
      of the program discipline. The requirement for a discipline-specific “W” course in all degree programs is also a University-wide
      requirement.
3     These totals and percentages do not include the contribution of the “W-designated” technical course to the communications training of
      students. If that contribution is included, the communications credit total would be 11, and the percentage would be 17%
4     The technical math sequence includes topics in college algebra, trigonometry, and concepts of technical calculus, including limits,
      derivatives & differentiation, integration & integration techniques, and basic differential equations. This range of coverage exceeds the
      minimum Mathematics requirements of Criterion 4 of the GENERAL CRITERIA.
5     The two-course physics sequence required by the EET program covers topics in mechanics, heat, wave motion, sound, electricity, light, and
      basics of modern physics. Coverage is from the perspective of the basic sciences, which provides students with a broader theoretical
      foundation for their studies in the technical sciences. Both courses include experimental lab activities. This content and focus is consistent
      with the Physical and Natural Sciences requirement of Criterion 4 of the GENERAL CRITERIA.
6     All associate degree graduates at Penn State University must complete a minimum of nine credits in the study of the Social Sciences,
      Humanities, and Arts. One course in each area is generally required. Additionally, at least one of these courses must be intercultural in
      nature, and a second must be international in focus to satisfy University-wide requirements for breadth and diversity in programs’ societal
      and global perspectives. These requirements are consistent with the Social Sciences and Humanities requirement of Criterion 4 of the
      GENERAL CRITERIA.
7     Examples of Social Sciences, Humanities, and Arts courses typically available at the campus are listed in Table 1A, which follows.
8     Total program credits exceed the minimum of 64 specified by Criterion 4 of the GENERAL CRITERIA.




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                                         Table 7: EET Program General Education Courses
General Education Courses - EET students are required to complete three credits each of Social Sciences, Humanities, and Arts
studies for a total of nine General Education credits. At least one of these courses must be an “International and Intercultural Competency” (GI)
designated course. Typical courses satisfying these requirements are listed below. GI designated course are shown in Italics.

Subject                               Course                    Description
                                                                       Arts
Art                                   Art 20                    Introduction to Drawing
Art History                           ArtH 100                  Introduction to Art
                                      ArtH 111                  Ancient to Medieval Art
                                      ArtH 112                  Renaissance to Modern Art
Integrative Arts                      InArt 1                   The Arts
Music                                 Music 005                 An Introduction to Western Music
                                      Music 007                 Evolution of Jazz
                                      Music 008                 Rudiments of Music
                                      Music 009                 Introduction to World Musics
Theatre Arts                          Thea 100                  The Art of the Theatre
                                      Thea 102                  Fundamentals of Acting

                                                                   Humanities
Comparative Literature                CmLit 10                  The Forms of World Literature
English                               Engl 104                  The Bible as Literature
                                      Engl 139                  Black American Literature
                                      Engl 182                  Literature and Empire
                                      Engl 194                  Women Writers
History                               Hist 1                    The Western Heritage I
                                      Hist 2                    The Western Heritage II
                                      Hist 20                   American Civilization to 1877
                                      Hist 21                   American Civilization since 1877
                                      Hist 175                  The History of Modern East Asia
                                      Hist 191                  Early African History
                                      Hist 192                  Modern African History
Philosophy                            Phil 10                   Critical Thinking
                                      Phil 106                  Introduction to Business Ethics
                                      Phil 221                  Philosophy of Science
                                      Rl St 001                 Introduction to World Religions

                                                         Social & Behavioral Sciences
Anthropology                          Anth 045                 Cultural Anthropology
Economics                             Econ 002                 Introductory Microeconomic Analysis
                                      Econ 004                 Introductory Macroeconomic Analysis
Geography                             Geog 020                 Human Geography: An Introduction
History                               Hist 12                  History of Pennsylvania
                                      Hist 120                 Europe since 1848
International Studies                 IntSt 100                Introduction to International Studies
Political Science                     Pl Sc 001                Intro to American National Government
                                      Pl Sc 003                Introduction to Comparative Politics
                                      Pl Sc 014                International Relations
Psychology                            Psy 002                  Psychology
                                      Psy 213                  Intro to Developmental Psychology
                                      Psy 221                  Introduction to Cognitive Psychology
                                      Psy 243                  Psychology of Personal Well-Being
Sociology                             Soc 001                  Introductory Sociology
Women’s Studies                       WmnSt 001                Introduction to Women’s Studies




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4.b Program Credit Requirement
         The EET program consists of 66 total credits which exceeds the 64 credit minimum stipulated by the ABET
         TAC 2005-2006 Program Criteria.


4.c Quality Assurance of Core Courses
         The quality of core EET course is facilitated by the M.E.E.T online 360 degree evaluation of courses. The
         process for implementing corrective action is discussed in detail in section 3. The data from Fall 2004 and
         Spring 2005 appears in Figure 5 is an average of all EET courses offered. Specific data on individual
         courses are available by query and download via the website at https://www.engr.psu.edu/MEET. Actions
         taken based on Survey results are outlined in Table 8.

    Table 8: Penn State Berks Actions Stemming from Measures & Evaluation in Engineering Technology Survey

Action             Course              Description            Faculty        Response                Solution

1                  EET 220             Motion control not a   Stanton        Lab on motion control   Equipment purchased
                                       part of EET 220                       to be added after       in June 2005. Motion
                                       curriculum.                           equipment is            control lab to be
                                                                             purchased.              integrated into
                                                                                                     curriculum by Spring
                                                                                                     2006.

2                  TBD                 TBD                    TBD            TBD                     TBD




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                        Fall 2004 Berks Campus EET Student/Faculty                                            Spring 2005 Berks Campus EET Student/Faculty
                                     Course Evaluations                                                                    Course Evaluations


             11a                                                                                       11a

             10b                                                                                       10b

             07b                                                                                       07b

             06a                                                                                       06a

             05c                                                                                       05c

             05a                                                                                       05a

             04b                                                                                       04b

             03c                                                                                       03c

             03a                                                                                       03a

                                                                                             Outcome
   Outcome




             02c                                                                                       02c

             02a                                                                                       02a

             01h                                                                                       01h

              01f                                                                                       01f

             01d                                                                                       01d

             01b                                                                                       01b

              *6a                                                                                       *6a

              *4a                                                                                       *4a

              *1b                                                                                       *1b

             *10a                                                                                      *10a

                    0           0.5            1               1.5          2          2.5                    0         0.5           1              1.5        2            2.5
                                                      Rating                                                                                Rating

                            Student Performance            Faculty Perception                                     Student Performance            Faculty Perception
                            Student Self Perception        Student Course Perception                              Student Self Perception        Student Course Perception



                               Figure 5: Penn State Berks campus MEET Course Survey Data FA04/SP05


4.d Descriptive Details on Content and Portions of the Program
                Communications – While communications skills are imparted in a variety of places in the EET curriculum,
                the specific elements that address students’ communications skills directly are English 15 (Rhetoric &
                Composition), Communications Arts and Sciences 100 (Effective Speech) and EET 213W (Fundamentals
                of Electric Machines).” The first two of these courses provide traditional college-level instruction in the art
                of effective writing and effective public speaking respectively. The EET 213W course is the University-
                approved “writing intensive” course in the EET program.

                The University requires all students to complete at least 3 credits of writing-intensive courses within their
                major. Further, "W" courses must include writing assignments that relate clearly to the course objectives
                and serve as effective instruments for learning the subject matter of the course. Typically, assignments are


2997fb81-4136-48d6-9d5b-77fc7ba49563.doc                                                                                Page 51 of 51
       designed to help students investigate the course subject matter, gain experience in interpreting data, shape
       writing and/or speaking for a particular audience, or practice the type of writing and/or speaking associated
       with a given profession or discipline. “W” courses also provide opportunities for students to receive
       written feedback from the instructor and to apply that feedback to future efforts. “W” courses often include
       peer review of student communications, tutorial assistance, instructor conferences, group writing projects,
       use of writing or learning centers, and classroom discussions of writing and/or speaking assignments. From
       a grading perspective, it is typically expected that 25% of the grade in a “W” course will be determined
       from the writing and speaking activities.

       While the English composition, speech communications, and “W” courses provide special emphasis to the
       development of EET students’ communications skills, it is also possible to point out specific examples of
       written, oral and graphical communications exercises within the technical curriculum.

       Technical Writing Exercises – Essentially all lab courses within in the EET curriculum require students
       to prepare formal written reports to document lab exercises. Basic, structured lab reports are required
       in all three of the freshman lab courses (EET 109, 118 & 120); sophomore electronic labs (EET 205 &
       221) elevate the level of this type of formal lab reporting. Finally, the EET 213W course requires
       students to prepare a substantial, library-research-based research paper, and the EET 220 course
       requires students to prepare several project reports, in a journal paper format, documenting PLC-based
       controls projects done in that course. Formal laboratory write-ups for EET 220 PLC system design are
       required several times (3-5) during the semester, and a capstone final project is required at the end of
       the semester and serves as the final exam. The final project culminates the course content by
       integrating into one project. Students are required to submit proposals and formal write-ups of their
       projects. RSLogix 500 development software serves as a CAD type illustration of the project.
       Informal oral demonstrations of their projects are also required.

       Oral Presentation Exercises – The speech communications class is the obvious focus for developing
       students’ oral presentation skills. However, oral presentations are a standard element of the EET
       213W course where students are required to present summaries of their research reports to classmates
       using standard presentation tools. As part of the training in the use of presentation software, students
       are required to combine results from various software tools (word-processing, spreadsheet tables and
       graphs, electronic simulations, etc.) into a professional slide-based presentation. Students in EET 220
       are required to give informal oral demonstrations of their final projects.

       Graphical Presentation Exercises – Graphical presentation of visual and numerical information is a
       critical skill in technology professions. The EET curriculum imparts this skill in several courses.
       Visual presentations using CAD are the specific focus of the EGT 102 course. Students are required to
       demonstrate a full range of skills covering multi-view, sectional and isometric drawings; dimensioning,
       layout, and complex assemblies. As noted above, creation of graphical representations of numerical
       data is required in many labs, and the ET 005 and EET 213W courses give particular emphasis to this
       topic. ET 005 covers the use of various mathematical and simulation software (Excel, Mathcad,
       Matlab, PSpice, etc.), and part of that coverage specifically addresses creation of engineering-quality
       graphs of calculated and measured data. Graphing skills learned in ET 005 are honed in EET 213W
       where a variety of lab exercises require students to collect, analyze, and synthesize laboratory
       measurements into meaningful engineering-quality graphs of machine performance characteristics.

       Library Research & Use of Technical Literature – There are two key instances where EET students are
       required to investigate and use library and technical data resources. In ET 005, students are instructed
       in the content and use of a range of technical data retrieval resources available through the University
       Libraries. They are required to use this knowledge to conduct to retrieve a collection of technical
       resources ranging over a broad range of technical subjects. Also, the research report required in the
       EET 213W course is a formal research report requiring review and proper referencing of information


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       sources, which are generally retrieved both through the library and the Internet. Finally, the EET 120,
       205, 220, and 221 lab courses routinely require students to retrieve equipment and component
       performance specifications from manufacturers’ literature, most often via Internet websites. In EET
       220 students are required to research technical specifications on the internet that can be used with
       either discrete or analog PLC modules.

       Teamwork Skills – Essentially all lab courses in the EET curriculum are team-based exercises
       involving teams of 2 or 3 students conducting lab exercises. In EET 213W, students are required to
       work in teams and conduct research projects during the semester on topics that relate to electrical
       machines. They are also required to give team-based oral presentations on their research projects to
       their peers and other EET instructors. Student peer evaluations and EET faculty evaluations are a
       factor in the grading process. In EET 220 students are required to work in teams of 2 or 3 students to
       design a PLC based solution for a sequential control problem.

       Mathematics – The EET technical math sequence includes topics in college algebra, trigonometry, and
       concepts of technical calculus, including limits, derivatives & differentiation, integration & integration
       techniques, and basic differential equations. This range of coverage exceeds the minimum requirements of
       the ABET criteria for an associate degree program.

       Physical and Natural Sciences – The two-course physics sequence required by the EET program covers
       topics in mechanics, heat, wave motion, sound, electricity, light, and basics of modern physics. Coverage
       is from the perspective of the basic sciences, which provides students with a broader theoretical foundation
       for their studies in the electrical and electronic technical sciences. Both courses include experimental lab
       activities. This content and focus is consistent with the physical and natural sciences requirement of the
       ABET criteria for an associate degree program.

       Social Sciences and Humanities – All associate degree graduates at Penn State must complete a minimum
       of nine credits in the study of the social sciences, humanities, and arts. One course in each area is generally
       required. Additionally, at least one of these courses must be intercultural in nature, and a second must be
       international in focus to satisfy University-wide requirements for breadth and diversity in programs’
       societal and global perspectives. These requirements are consistent with the social sciences and humanities
       requirement of the ABET criteria for an associate degree program.

       Technical Content – The technical content of the EET curriculum consists of the combination of ET-, EGT-
       , and EET- designated courses (see Table 1 above). The combination of these courses represents 35, or
       53%, of the total 66 credits in the program, which is between the minimum of 33% and the maximum of
       67% required by the General Criteria.

       The ET-, EGT- and 100-level EET-designated courses constitute the core or foundation of the program.
       The ET courses provide students with foundation training in computer tools that are essential to success in
       the program. The EGT courses provide a similar purpose with respect to engineering drawing and
       computer-aided drafting skills. The freshman-level EET courses teach students the fundamental concepts,
       theories and analysis techniques for dealing with DC, AC and digital circuits; tools that are essential to
       success in the technical specialty courses of the sophomore year.

       The 200-level EET-designated courses represent the technical specialty courses in the EET program.
       Building on the core courses, these courses teach students fundamentals of the operation and analysis of
       analog electronic devices and circuits, microprocessors and microcontrollers, programmable logic controls,
       and AC and DC electrical machines.

       Laboratory Activities - support essentially all core and specialty topics. All laboratories require students to
       use standard laboratory measurement equipment (analog and digital voltage and current meters, function



2997fb81-4136-48d6-9d5b-77fc7ba49563.doc                                      Page 51 of 51
       generators, frequency counters, power supplies, oscilloscopes, tachometers, power meters, etc.) to excite
       and monitor the performance of electrical and electronic devices and electrical machines. In most cases,
       the data determined through these measurements are analyzed and synthesized into formal laboratory
       reports. Laboratory teams are used with EET 213W to perform experiments on electrical machines and
       transformers.

       Design practices and the use of design tools -in the EET curriculum are concentrated in four topical areas:
       digital electronics, analog electronics, programmable logic controls, and electric machines. Courses in each
       of the areas require students to complete open-ended design analyses, in many cases supported by lab
       demonstrations, to arrive at workable device and circuit designs. These projects include such activities as
       designing PLC controls for sequential processes involving on/off temperature, robotic bins, traffic, and
       carwash controls; investigating the effects of standard modeling parameters on performance characteristics
       of induction motors; designing, building and verifying digital combinational logic circuits and
       counter/timer circuits; designing, building and verifying operation of standard amplifier circuits; etc. In all
       cases, students are expected to use standard design tools such as PSpice, LogicWorks, Excel, Mathcad,
       LabView, etc. as well as standard design methods taught in class to accomplish these design efforts.

       Capstone Experience – ????

5. Faculty

5.a Faculty Qualifications Analysis

       An analysis of the Berks Campus EET Faculty is outlined in
       Table 13. Faculty vitae information immediately follows this section.



5.b Faculty Background and Core Competencies

       Table 9 relates faculty backgrounds and competencies to each of the curricular areas of the EET program
       based on industrial experience, research, and/or fields of study.


Table 9: Faculty Background Versus EET Program Curricular Areas
                 Circuit         Analog         Digital                                              Programmable
                 Analysis        Electronics    Electronics      Microprocessors      Machines       Logic
                                                                                                     Controllers
Buczynski        X               X              X                                     X
Litwhiler        X               X              X
Stanton          X               X              X                                     X              X
Haraschak        X                              X                X
Schanzenbach     X               X              X
Tappert          X               X                               X                    X




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5.c Faculty Support of Program

       The number of EET faculty members is sufficient to accommodate the needs of the program. With roughly
       20 students in the program, the faculty to student ratio provides for a great deal of interaction and personal
       attention. Advising and counseling duties are performed by the full time faculty members with the student
       load equally shared. All of the full time faculty members are active participants in the Industrial Advisor
       Committee which meets regularly with local employers and industry representatives to discuss and affect
       the program emphases and direction.

5.d Faculty Industrial Experience

       As indicated in the matrix of part b and the attached curriculum vitae, each of the faculty members has
       significant industrial experience in their course areas. Faculty members are active members of discipline-
       specific societies which provide journals, periodicals and conference opportunities to help maintain
       technical currency.

5.e Faculty Development

       The EET program is supported by the Engineering, Business, and Computing (EBC) division of Penn State
       Berks. As part of this division, college and university, ample opportunities exist for professional
       development for the EET faculty members. Opportunities range from local workshops to funding for
       international travel to attend conferences. Faculty members prepare an annual report on their activities in
       these areas and are strongly encouraged to participate. Table 10 provides an example of such activities for
       each faculty member.




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            Table 10: Berks Campus Faculty Professional Development Activities Since Last ABET Visit
Faculty Member           Professional Development Activities
Buczynski                Presented a paper at ASEE Mid-Atlantic Conference, April, 2003. Participant at ASEE
                         Mid-Atlantic conferences- 2002 and 2004. Reviewer for ASEE Annual Conference
                         Proceedings, 2004 & 2005. Invited participant- ABET TEI Workshop- June 2002.
                         Participant- ABET TC2K workshop, May, 2004. Participant- ANGEL workshop, Penn
                         State Berks, March 2005. Participant- "Writing in Science and Technology" workshop,
                         Penn State Berks, May 2004. Participant- faculty retreat, "Developing a Student Centered
                         Culture", Penn State Berks, January 2003. Participant- faculty retreat- "Student Learning",
                         Penn State Berks, January, 2002. Participant- "Teaching and Learning Seminar", Penn
                         State Berks, March, 2000.
Litwhiler                TBD
Stanton                  Attended 4 day Rockwell PLC Maintenance and Troubleshooting seminar 8/10/2004 thru
                         8/13/2004. Scheduled and passed PA state FE exam on 10/31/2004. Granted PA state FE
                         certificate 12/21/2004. Attended Pack Expo Conference 2004 with local food processors
                         and higher education institutions 11/9 thru 11/10. Attended conference on Educating,
                         Supporting, and Serving Returning Adult Students 11/19/2004. Attended Penn State
                         Berks faculty retreat 1/5/2005. Participated in Penn State Road Scholars Outreach Tour
                         2005. Attended PLC Training Exposition in Harrisburg, PA on 5/4/2005. Participated in
                         Servo and Loop Control training at Hershey Company 5/24/2005 thru 5/26/2005.
                         Attended FTCAP student advising training on 6/23/2005. Planning to attend Rockwell
                         DeviceNet network design seminar in August 2005. Planning on taking PA state PE exam
                         in October 2005.
Haraschak                TBD
Schanzenbach             Improve teaching ????
Tappert                  TBD

5.f Faculty Resources for Program Objective Management

         Program objectives are developed by the EET curriculum committee at the university level. Any faculty
         member can provide input to the curriculum committee to affect changes to the program objectives. Each
         faculty member has control over his/her own course materials used to convey the required course content.
         Feedback via various evaluation methods is then used by the faculty members to correct and/or improve the
         outcomes.

5.g Faculty Workload Summary

         The Berks Campus faculty workload summary is outlined in Table 11.

                             Table 11: Berks Campus Faculty Workload Summary
                                       Range                                         Average
Credit Hours                           8 - 10                                        9
Contact Hours Per Week                 9 - 12                                        11
Laboratory Size                        7 - 12                                        9
Class Size                             7 - 50                                        15
Advisees                               15 - 17                                       16




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5.h Listing of Courses taught by Faculty

         The Berks Campus faculty workload summary is outlined in Table 12
                         Table 12: Berks Campus Listing of Courses Taught by Faculty
Robert Buczynski                EET 114, EET 213W*

Dale Litwhiler                  EET 101*, EET 205*, EET 210*, EET 216, EET 221

Gregory Stanton                 EET 101*, EET 109*, EET 220

Henry Haraschak                 EET 109*, EET 117, EET 120*, EET 211”

George Schanzenbach             ET 002*, ET 005, EET 109*, EET 118

Eric Tappert                    EET 114, EET 213W* (lab only)

* Indicates Fall 2006 course.




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 Table 13: Faculty Analysis

                                                                                                                                      Level of Activity (high, med, low, none)*
                                                                                       Years of Experience               Professional in:



                                   FT or PT
                                              Degrees Earned                                                             Registration
                                              Degree, Year, &                          Govt./Industry Teaching This      (Indicate    Professional Professional Work in
Name                   Rank                   Institution                              Eng/ET         Eng/ET Institution State)       Development Society            Industry
Robert J. Buczynski    Assoc.     FT          BSEE, 1961, Bucknell U.                                                      PE,
                       Prof.                  MSEE, 1964, Northeastern U.              10            35          24        Pennsylvania

Dale H. Litwhiler      Assist.    FT          BSEE, 1984, Penn State Univ.                                                 PE,
                       Prof.                  MSEE, 1989, Syracuse Univ.               13            9           4         Pennsylvania
                                              PhD EE, 2000, Lehihgh Univ.
Gregory D. Stanton     Lecturer   FT          ASEET, 1990, Penn State Univ.                                                FE,
                                              BSEET, 1992, Penn State Univ.            11            2           2         Pennsylvania
                                              MSEE, 1998, Penn State Univ.
Henry P. Haraschak     Lecturer   PT          BSEE, 1958, Penn State Univ.
                                              MS, Physics, 1964, Franklin & Marshall
                                                                                       26            32          32
                                              College
George Schanzenbach    Lecturer   PT          BSEE, when?, where?                                                          PE,
                                              MSEE, when?, where?                      32            13          13        Pennsylvania
                                              M. Adm., when?, where?
Eric Tappert           Lecturer   PT          BSEE, 1969, U. of PA.                                                        PE, NJ & PA.
                                              MS Telecomm, 1998, U. of Colorado.       27            ?           ?




 2997fb81-4136-48d6-9d5b-77fc7ba49563.doc                                                        Page 36 of 51                                       July 15, 2005
                                      Faculty Curriculum Vitae

1.     Name:                  Robert J. Buczynski

2.     Department:            Engineering, Business and Computing

3.     Appointment Date:      August 1982

4.     Years/Service          23

5.     Rank:                  Associate Professor of Engineering

6.     Degrees:               BSEE, Bucknell University
                              MSEE, Northeastern University
7.     Other Teaching:        Luzerne Community College, Associate Professor and Chairman of Engineering
                              Technology, 1967-78.

8.     Industrial:            Western Electric, Senior Engineer, 1980-82
       (full-time)            Metropolitan Edison, Supervisor, 1979-80
                              Bell Telephone Laboratories, MTS, 1978-79
                              RCA, Applications Engineer, 1965-67

9.     Industrial:            None
       (part-time)

10.    Consulting:            None

11.    Registration:          Professional Engineer, Pennsylvania

12.    Publications:          Buczynski, R. J. “Audio Evaluation of Laboratory Reports”, Proceedings of the
                              ASEE Mid-Atlantic Conference, April, 2003.

                              Buczynski, R. J. “A Model Industrial Advisory Committee for Engineering and
                              Engineering Technology”, Proceedings of the ASEE Mid-Atlantic Conference,
                              November, 1997.

                              Buczynski, R. J., "Computer Software for Engineering Technology," Computers
                              in Education Journal, Oct.-Dec. 1989.

                              Buczynski, R. J. "Computer Software for Engineering Technology: A
                              Compilation," ASEE, Washington, D.C., January 1988.

                              Buczynski, R. J. "A Computer-Assisted Method for Laboratory Reports,"
                              Proceedings of the 95th Annual Conference of the American Society for
                              Engineering Education, ASEE, Washington, D.C., Vol. 1, June 1987.

                              Buczynski, R. J. "Implementation of a Project Team Method in Two-Year
                              Engineering Technology Laboratories," Journal of Engineering Technology,
                              ASEE, Washington, D.C., Vol. 3, Spring 1986.



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13.    Societies:             IEEE - Senior Member. Served as secretary of IEEE Committee on Technology
                              Accreditation Activities, 1990 & 1991.

                              IEEE – TAC of ABET Program Evaluator, 1985-1994

                              ASEE - Member of Engineering Technology Division; Reviewer for Annual
                              Conference Proceedings; Participant at: ASEE Mid-Atlantic Conferences -
                              2002, 2003, 2004; ASEE National Conferences – 1993 -1997.

14.    Honors:                Recipient of ASEE Centennial Certificate, June 1993.

                              Selected as Senior Member of IEEE, September 1989.

                              Recipient of the Penn State Engineering Society Outstanding Teaching Award,
                              May 1988.

15.    Programs:              Participant –ABET TC2K Accreditation Workshop, May, 2004.

                              Invited Participant – ABET TEI Workshop, June, 2002.

                              Participant – IEEE TAC of ABET Accreditation Workshop, June 1993.

16.    Other Duties:          Advisor for Engineering and Engineering Technology students.
       (base salary)
                              EET Program Coordinator- Berks Campus, May 2002- May 2005.

                              EET Program Coordinator for SETCE, January 1993 - September 1994.

                              Co-Chair – Penn State Berks Campus Industrial Advisory Committee, 1990 to
                              2002.

                              Chair – EBC Division Promotion and Tenure Committee, 2004-05

                              Member – Berks College Promotion and Tenure Committee, 2005-06.

                              Member – BKLV College Promotion and Tenure Committee, 1997-99, 2001-03.

                              Member – EBCHD Division Promotion and Tenure Committee, 1999-2000

                              Member – ETCE Promotion and Tenure Committee, 2003-04.

                              Member – SETCE Promotion and Tenure Committee, 1993-94.

                              Member – College of Engineering EET Curriculum Committee, 2000-2003.

                              Chair – BKLV College Engineering Search Committee, 2001-02.

                              Member – BKLV College Engineering Search Committees, 2003-04 and 1997-
                              98.



2997fb81-4136-48d6-9d5b-77fc7ba49563.doc                              Page 38 of 51
                              Chair – BKLV College EE/EET Lab Supervisor Search Committee, 2004.

                              Co-Supervisor – EE/EET Lab Supervisor, 2004 - present.

                              Member – ABET CQI team, 2004 – present.

                              Peer Teaching Reviewer for 2 to 3 Berks campus faculty per year from various
                              disciplines, 1999 – present.


17.    Other Duties           Administrative Evaluator for Division Head – conducted annual
       (extra comp.)          performance evaluations of all engineering faculty at BKLV College, spring
                              2001.


18.    Summer:                Freshman Testing, Counseling and Advising Program – Faculty Advisor,
                              Summers 1999-2005.


19:    Other:                 Judge -Annual Science Fairs at area schools, January 1995 – 2004.




2997fb81-4136-48d6-9d5b-77fc7ba49563.doc                              Page 39 of 51
                                      Faculty Curriculum Vitae


1.     Name:                  Dale H. Litwhiler

2.     Department:            Division of Engineering, Business and Computing, Penn State Berks – Lehigh
                              Valley College.

3.     Date Hired             August 2002

4.     Years/Service          4

5.     Rank:                  Assistance Professor of Engineering

6.     Degrees:               BSEE, Penn State University, 1984
                              MSEE, Syracuse University, 1989
                              Ph. D. EE, Lehigh University, 2000

7.     Other Teaching:        Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA. Teaching assistant 1989 – 1993.

8.     Industrial:            Lockheed Martin, Newtown, PA. Staff Engineer, 1994 – 2002.
       (full-time)            IBM Federal Systems, Owego, NY. Senior Associate Engineer, 1984 – 1989.

9.     Industrial:            IBM Federal Systems, Owego, NY. 1989 – 1994.
       (part-time)

10.    Consulting:            Apogee Labs, North Wales, PA. 2005.

11.    Registration:          Professional Engineer, Pennsylvania

12.    Publications:          Litwhiler, D. H. and Lovell, T.D., “USB Data Acquisition Units Provide New
                              Measurement and Control Options for Engineering Technology Students,”
                              Proceedings of the ASEE Annual Conference, ASEE, Portland, OR, June, 2005.

                              Litwhiler, D. H. and Lovell, T.D., “Acoustic Measurements Using Common
                              Computer Accessories: Do Try This at Home,” Proceedings of the ASEE
                              Annual Conference, ASEE, Portland, OR, June, 2005.

                              Litwhiler, D. H., “A Versatile LabVIEW™ Environment for Communicating
                              with Dallas-Maxim 1-Wire™ Devices,” Computers in Education Journal, Vol.
                              XV, No. 2, April – June, 2005.

                              Litwhiler, D. H., “More Meaningful PSpice Simulations via LabVIEW,”
                              International Journal of Engineering Education, Vol. 21, No. 1, 2005, pp. 3 - 10.

                              Litwhiler, D. H., “Listening to PSpice Simulations with LabVIEW,”
                              International Journal of Engineering Education, Vol. 21, No. 1, 2005, pp. 19 –
                              25.

                              Litwhiler, D. H., “A Simple Software and Hardware System Solution for


2997fb81-4136-48d6-9d5b-77fc7ba49563.doc                               Page 40 of 51
                              Process Measurement and Control in Engineering Technology Student Design
                              Projects,” Proceedings of the ASEE Annual Conference, ASEE, Salt Lake City,
                              UT, June, 2004.

13.    Societies:             ASEE - Member of Engineering Technology and Instrumentation Divisions.
                              Reviewer for the 2004 Annual Conference Proceedings; Reviewer for the 2005
                              Annual Conference Proceedings; Moderator for the 2005 Annual Conference.

14.    Honors:                one

15.    Programs:              Participant – ABET TC2K workshop, Greensburg, PA, October, 2003.


16.    Other Duties:          Advisor for 12 Engineering Technology students.
       (base salary)
                              Member – Penn State Berks Campus Industrial Advisory Committee

                              Member – BKLV College Engineering Search Committee, 2004.

                              Member – BKLV College EET Lab Supervisor Search Committee, 2004.

                              Supervisor – EET Student Laboratory Assistant, 2003 – 2005.

                              Co-Supervisor – EET Lab Supervisor, 2004 - Present.

                              Member – ABET CQI team, 2004 – Present.

                              Member – University EET Curriculum Committee, 2002-2005.


18.    Other Duties           Freshman Testing, Counseling and Advising Program – Faculty Advisor, July,
                              2004.
        (extra comp.)


19:    Other:                 TBD.




2997fb81-4136-48d6-9d5b-77fc7ba49563.doc                             Page 41 of 51
                                       Faculty Curriculum Vitae


1.     Name:                   Gregory D. Stanton

2.     Department:             Division of Engineering, Business and Computing, Penn State Berks – Lehigh
                               Valley College.

3.     Date Hired              July 1, 2004

4.     Years/Service           2

5.     Rank:                   Lecturer of Engineering

6.     Degrees:                ENG EET, Penn State University, Abington College, 1990
                               BS EET, Penn State University, Capital College, 1992
                               M ENG EE, Penn State University, Captital College, 1998

7.     Other Teaching: None.

8.     Industrial:             Engineering Director, Bulova Technologies, LLC; Lancaster, PA, 2003 – 2004.
       (full-time)             Process Engineer, Manager of Electronics Manufacturing and Producibility,
                               Smiths Aerospace Electronic Systems; Germantown, MD, 2001 – 2003
                               Test Cell Manager, Production Manager, Sr. Product Manager, Hughes Network
                               Systems, Inc.; Germantown, MD, 1997 – 2001
                               Reliability Engineer, Quality Engineer, Quality Manager, Product Quality
                               Manager, Yuasa-Exide, Inc.; Reading, PA, 1993 – 1997
                               Engineering/Math Tutor, Penn State University, Harrisburg, PA, 1992 -1993
                               Lab Assistant, Penn State University, Abington, PA, 1988-1990
                               Electronics Technician, Gauss Systems and Controls, Inc., Ivyland, PA, 1987-
                               1988

9.     Industrial:             None.
       (part-time)

10.    Consulting:             None.

11.    Registration:           Professional Engineer, Pennsylvania, 2005 (EST)
                               Fundamentals Engineering, Pennsylvania, 2004
                               Certified Process Engineer, Maryland, SMTA, 2002
                               Certified Systems Engineer, Maryland, SMTA, 2001

12.    Publications:           Stanton, G. D., Idowu P. B. “A Fuzzy Genetic Modeling of the Multiple-
                               Constrained Economic Dispatch Problem,” Proceedings from the Large
                               Engineering Systems Conference on Power Engineering, Halifax, Nova Scotia,
                               Canada, June 1999.

13.    Societies:              Member of IEEE, 1998
                               Member of ISA, 2005
                               Member of SMTA, 2001


2997fb81-4136-48d6-9d5b-77fc7ba49563.doc                              Page 42 of 51
14.    Honors:         None.


15.    Other Duties:           Program Coordinator, Electrical Engineering Technology Program
       (base salary)           Advisor for Electrical Engineering Technology students.
                               Member – Penn State Berks Campus Industrial Advisory Committee
                               Member – ABET CQI team, 2004 – Present.




2997fb81-4136-48d6-9d5b-77fc7ba49563.doc                            Page 43 of 51
                                         Faculty Curriculum Vitae


1. Name:                      Henry P. Haraschak

2. Department:                Division of Engineering, Business and Computing, Penn State Berks – Lehigh
                              Valley College.

3. Date Hired:                August 1974

4. Years/Service:             25+ years part-time

5. Rank:                      Lecturer

6. Degrees:                   BSEE, The Pennsylvania State University, 1958
                              MS, Physics, Franklin & Marshall College, 1964

7. Other Teaching:            Reading Area Community College
                              Continuing Education – Penn State Berks Campus
                              Technician Review Course – Keystone Technical Associates

8. Industrial:                AT&T Technologies - 26 years Senior Design Engineer,
   (full-time)                1959 - 1985


9. Industrial:
   (part-time)


10. Registration:

11. Consulting:

12. Publications:

13. Societies:                Sigma Pi Sigma -Physics Honor Society

14. Honors:


15. Other Duties:
  (base salary)

16. Other Duties:
  (extra comp.)

17. Summer:

18: Other:



2997fb81-4136-48d6-9d5b-77fc7ba49563.doc                              Page 44 of 51
                                      Faculty Curriculum Vitae

1. Name:                      George Schanzenbach

2. Department:                Division of Engineering, Business and Computing, Penn State Berks – Lehigh
                              Valley College.

3. Date Hired:                August 1993

4. Years/Service:             13

5. Rank:                      Lecturer, part-time

6. Degrees:                   B.S.E.E., M.S.E.E., MAdm

7. Other Teaching:            Substitute teacher local area public schools (Kutztown, Conrad Weiser,
                              Reading, Antietam, Wyomissing)

8. Industrial:                32 years engineering experience as System Engineer/Project Engineer applied to
                              data
  (full-time)                 processing systems, photovoltaic solar electric systems, wind turbine electric
                              systems, turbomachinery instrumentation and control, and spacecraft attitude
                              control.
9. Industrial:
   (part-time)

10. Registration:             Professional Engineer, Commonwealth of PA, PE-012659

11. Consulting:

12. Publications:             "Reduction of Electrical Runout to Improve the Accuracy of Eddy Current
                              Probe Sensing of Turbomachinery Vibration," ASME 72-LUB-R, 1972.
                              "The Installation and Application of Sensors for Turbomachinery Monitoring,"
                              Third Turbomachinery Symposium Texas A&M University, 1974.
                              "Economic Emergence of Solar Electric Systems," Penn State University, 1981.

13. Societies:                Member - IEEE

14. Honors:

15. Other Duties:
  (base salary)

16. Other Duties:
  (extra comp.)

17. Summer:

18: Other:                    Patents: "Adjustable Probe Holder," #3898562
                              "Trip Device for a Rotating Machine," #4064764


2997fb81-4136-48d6-9d5b-77fc7ba49563.doc                              Page 45 of 51
                                         Faculty Curriculum Vitae


1. Name:                      Eric Tappert

2. Department:                Division of Engineering, Business and Computing, Penn State Berks – Lehigh
                              Valley College.

3. Date Hired:                August 2002

4. Years/Service:             3

5. Rank:                      Lecturer

6. Degrees:                   BSEE, University of Pennylvania, 1969
                              MS Telecomm, University of Colorado, 1998

7. Other Teaching:            Northampton County Area Community College
                                     Associate Professor Electronics Technology, 1981 – 1984.

8. Industrial:                Agere Systems, Member Technical Staff, 1996 – 2001.
   (full-time)                AT&T Bell Labs, Member Technical Staff, 1995 – 1996.
                              AT&T Microelectronics, Member Technical Staff, 1993 – 1994.
                              PEComm, Chief Engineer, 1991 – 1993.
                              All-Control Systems, Project Manager, 1990 – 1991.
                              AT&T Microelectronics, Technical Support Mgr., 1984 – 1989.
                              Western Electric, Senior Engineer, 1969 – 1981.

9. Industrial:
   (part-time)


10. Registration:             Licensed Professional Engineer, New Jersey and Pennsylvania.

11. Consulting:

12. Publications:

13. Societies:                IEEE, ACM, NSPE, PSPE

14. Honors:                   Eta Kappa Nu


15. Other Duties:
  (base salary)

16. Other Duties:
  (extra comp.)

17. Summer:


2997fb81-4136-48d6-9d5b-77fc7ba49563.doc                             Page 46 of 51
6. Facilities

6.a EET Program Classrooms, Laboratories, and Infrastructure

The Electrical Engineering Technology lab area is comprised of four rooms: an electronics lab, a programmable
logic controller lab, a stockroom and an electrical lab. This area is managed by a full time staff laboratory
supervisor.

6.b EET Program Classroom Adequacy Assessment

The electronics lab covers about 600 square feet and is composed of six student workstations each with dual power
supply, function generator, digital multimeter, timer/counter and oscilloscope. A Dell Dimension computer is
located at each station that is connected to the network and contains software programs such as PSpice version 8, B-
Square Logic, MATLAB 5 and LabVIEW 7.1. There is a separate workstation that is used to program PLDs and
this computer has CUPL and the EMUP program installed on it. Three storage cabinets are located in this
laboratory. The room is equipped with an overhead projector and screen and a TV and VCR.

The programmable logic controller lab is composed of a 12 seat classroom area and a formal laboratory area
covering about 900 square feet. Both areas are supported with whiteboard space, an electronic smart-board, a data
projector, an overhead projector and screen, and general storage cabinets. The formal lab area contains six teaching
stations and each is equipped with two 120VDC supplies and 120V 1, 120V 3, and 208V 3 supplies. The PLC
equipment includes six SLC-500 stations, two PLC-5 stations and an instructor station. Also, nine Dell Optiplex
Gxa computers are located here running Windows NT with Office 97, Netscape Communicator, MATLAB 5,
LabVIEW 7.1, PSpice Eval 8, RSView 32, RS Logix 5, RS Logix 500, RS Linx, and Panel Builder software.

The stockroom separates the electrical and PLC laboratories. The room is comprised of a general area,
approximately 500 square feet, and two smaller areas (a repair room and a power room), each of about 77 square
feet in size. Components, instruments, and a collection of reference materials are stored here. This area also houses
the office of the laboratory supervisor. Switches and breakers to control all voltages to the power panels for each
teaching station are located in the power room.

The electrical lab covers an area of about 900 square feet. It includes a 25-seat classroom area, supported by
chalkboard space, a technology podium (Dell computer with internet and LAN access, CD/DVD/VCR players),
projection system, retractable screen, and an overhead projector. The principle lab area is equipped with seven
teaching stations with each one having 120VDC, 120V 1, 120V 3 and 208 3 supplies. The room is equipped
with DC motors and generators, AC motors and generators and five mobile DC/AC motor control stations. Also,
four networked Dell Dimension computers are located here running Windows XP with Office XP, Netscape
Communicator, MATLAB 5, LabVIEW 7.1, and PSpice Eval 8. A networked laser jet printer is also located in this
room. There are three storage cabinets in the rear of the room.

Additional computer equipment is centrally located in rooms L140 – L146 of the Luerssen building and it is
connected to mainframe computers at University Park with related interactive terminals and backup equipment.
Also there are microcomputers and twenty handheld iPAQ pocket PC devices available for implementation into
classroom work and for student use. Since the previous ABET visit, the following additional laboratory equipment
has been added:

        12 Tektronix Model 1002 Digital Storage Oscilloscopes with communications adapter.
        12 LabJack USB portable data acquisition units.


2997fb81-4136-48d6-9d5b-77fc7ba49563.doc                                      Page 47 of 51
        8 B-K Precision Adjustable Power Supplies
        Manufacturer and model? Spectrum Analyzer
        Allen Bradley SLC 500 motion control equipment and software

The facilities described above are used by the Engineering Technology department; however the labs are shared by
all the electrically-based ET programs and the baccalaureate EMET program At present, the facilities are adequate
to accommodate all enrollment demands without scheduling conflicts among the programs. Enrollment trends
indicate that this situation should not change in the near future.
Historically, money to replace laboratory equipment has come from several sources, including grant proposals,
tuition surcharges, targeted fund drives, matching funds from the College of Engineering (COE), Berks Campus
equipment funds, and campus general funds. Generally, major renovations and equipment upgrades are handled
through grant activities, while smaller purchases and expendable resources are covered from general funds and
surcharge accounts.
In recent years, funding for equipment purchases and repairs in most of the labs has become more available because
of tuition surcharges imposed on the baccalaureate EMET students who also use these labs. Those funds are
earmarked exclusively for lab maintenance and equipment purchases for those labs supporting the EMET program,
which includes the EET program since the same labs are used by both. Those funds are totally under the control of
the campus’ EMET program coordinator. Some additional funds for equipment purchases and repairs are provided
by an EET annual budget
Equipment repair and maintenance are handled in two ways. Minor repairs and maintenance are done by the
technical support staff on campus. Major repairs are contracted out either to the equipment repair center at the
University Park campus or to equipment vendors. Funds for these repairs come from the same sources indicated
above.
Computer Facilities
Computer equipment available in the EET labs is described in the previous section. However, in addition to lab-
based computing equipment, students in the EET program have access to computers in the campus Computer
Center. The Computer Center consists of five computer labs?? and an AutoCAD classroom. The rooms are
equipped as follows: {Dale – please add descriptions of the computer labs in Luerssen and the .}
        The five Computer Labs contain...
        The AutoCAD lab contains


A variety of applications software is available on the Computer Lab stations, and in many cases, to all computers
connected to the campus network.. A sampling of available analytical software relevant to the EET program would
include, among others, PSpice, MultiSim, Mathcad, Matlab, and Labview.
The Computer Center also maintains a collection of reference materials for all software. Materials are available to
students for use in the Center, but they may not be checked out. Help services are provided via reference desk,
which is manned by both administrative staff and work-study students.(BK EET faculty, is this true?)

7. Institutional and External Support

7.a Adequacy of Institutional Support, Resources and Leadership

An annual EET budget for equipment purchases and repairs is provided by the head of the Engineering, Business,
and Computing Division of the Berks Campus. The Director of University Relations is the person who is the


2997fb81-4136-48d6-9d5b-77fc7ba49563.doc                                      Page 48 of 51
campus representative to patrons and benefactors who may wish to donate money or equipment to the Electrical
Engineering Technology Associate Degree program. Funding for upgrading of computers and software used in the
2EET program can be obtained through annual EET budget request, state annual grant funding, or other special
funding options. When a piece of equipment becomes non-operational a decision is made to repair, scrap or replace.
If the equipment is repairable, it is repaired in-house or sent out for repair if the depth of the repair exceeds in-house
expertise. If a piece of equipment is non-operational and is no longer needed in the program, then it is sent to
salvage. Operation and use of equipment is under the direction of the instructor of the particular course(s) the
equipment is used and the full-time lab supervisor.

The Berks campus provides financial aid services, advising, tutoring, and career placement services. A divisional
administrative assistant is available to support the engineering technology faculty, however, most of the engineering
technology faculty prepare their own exams, reports, etc.

Faculty positions are publically advertised. A search committee is delegated with the responsibility of screening all
candidates for the advertised position. Instructors are required to hold a minimum of a Master’s degree, more
recently however, a PhD is desired. Instructors are hired having varying degrees of industrial experience. Tenure
faculty positions require a PhD degree. All faculty hold some professional affiliation. Faculty within the university
are appropriate monies annually for the purposes of remaining current in their field of expertise and also for
professional development.

The Berks campus has an open enrollment policy. Students are funneled through the FTCAP process which
includes placement testing in English, Mathematics, and Chemistry. If the results of the test scores are below
required levels students are placed in remedial courses to bring them up to the level expected for entry into the
program. Students do not receive credit towards there degree for taking these courses however the courses do
contribute towards there cumulative GPA.

An advisor is assigned to each student in the 2EET program. Near the conclusion of each semester students are
advised of the courses that they should schedule the next semester. Should the student require individual advising
anytime the semester then the student is encouraged to arrange for an appointment with their advisor.

The Berks campus has a Career Services Office which aims to develop independence, self-esteem, empowerment,
and resourcefulness in Penn State Berks students. The office functions as a tam working with the overall university
and local community. Services are available to both recent graduates and alumni. Goals of the career services
office include:

 (1) Develop of campus employment oppprtunities
 (2) Provide listings of part-time, temporary, or summer employment via College Central Network
     (http://www.bk.psu.edu/academics/career_services/cc.html)
 (3) Facilitate student entry into community and employment market in their area of study.
 (4) Develops internship positions related to a student’s program of study
 (5) Provide support for cover letter and resume writing and access to the Career Technology Center




2997fb81-4136-48d6-9d5b-77fc7ba49563.doc                                         Page 49 of 51
7.b Support Expenditures for the 2EET Program


                                  Table 14: Support Expenditures for the EET Program

Expenditure                                                                                                Budgeted for the
Category                     Two years ago          Last Year                    Current Year              Year of the Visit
Operations,
                             TBD                    TBD                          TBD                       TBD
excluding staff 1
Travel 2                     TBD                    TBD                          TBD                       TBD
Equipment: 3
  (a) Institutional
                             TBD                    TBD                          TBD                       TBD
Funds
  (b) Grants and
                             TBD                    TBD                          TBD                       TBD
Gifts 4
Temporary (non-
teaching)                    TBD                    TBD                          TBD                       TBD
Assistance

7.c Penn State Berks Campus Industrial Advisory Committee

                            Table 15: Penn State Berks Campus Industrial Advisory Committee
Name                                       Title                                          Organization
Mr. Richard P. Aulenbach                   President and CEO                              RPA Associates, Inc.
Mr. Scott Benner                           Plant Manager                                  Hofmann Industries, Inc.
Mr. John Eagelman*                         Supervisor – Electrical & Software Engrg.      Magnatech International, L.P.
Dr. Terry D. Hand, P.E.                    Manager of Civil Engineering                   Spotts, Stevens and McCoy, Inc.
Mr. Frank Kaczmarczyk                      Consultant
Mr. Charles Kopicz                         Chief Advocate for Positive Change             Performance Advocates
Ms. Kim Loudis*                            Vice President                                 Barbey Electronics
Mr. Neil F. McCormick                      Engineering Leader, Control Systems            Arrow International
Mr. William B. Meister, AIA                                                               Meister Architects
Mr. Michael A. Melnick, P.E.*              Principal Electrical Engineer                  Air Products and Chemicals, Inc.
Mr. Donald C. Miller                       Manager-Industry Issues                        GPU Energy
Mr. Kenneth A. Orr *                       Engineer                                       World Electronics
Mr. Josh Perlman                           Project Engineer                               Reading Body Works
Ms. Jennie Rodriguez                       Manager, Employment and Diversity              Carpenter Technology Corporation
Mr. Brian Roth                             Project Engineer                               Arrow International
Mr. Keith Sanford                          Executive Vice President                       Neapco, Inc.
Mr. Michael R. Schmehl                     Plant Administrative Manager                   Reliant Energy
Dr. Jerry F. Shoup*                        Associate Director, School of Science,         Penn State Harrisburg
                                           Engineering and Technology
Mr. Leonard Stump                          Staff Specialist                               Carpenter Technology Corp.
Mr. Ronald J. Tomasello                    Director, Global Engineering                   Dana Corporation
Mr. Norman A. Ulrich, Jr.                  Executive Vice-President of Operations         Can Corporation of America
Mr. Hani Wahba*                            Electrical Engineer                            Nexans
Ms. Bernette D. Wrobel*                    President                                      Pagoda Electrical & Mechanical, Inc.
*Denotes EET Program Subcommittee members



2997fb81-4136-48d6-9d5b-77fc7ba49563.doc                                               Page 50 of 51
8. Program Criteria

8.a Evidence of Program Criteria Satisfaction

There are four main vehicles used by faculty to demonstrate the 2EET program criteria,
outcomes, and objectives are being satisfied. More detail on the process and frequency is
covered in section 3. The following evidence will be provided to ABET TAC assessement eam
during their visitation:

 (1)   MEET Surveys
 (2)   Exit Surveys
 (3)   Graded Course Exams and Quizzes lined to Outcomes
 (4)   Graded Laboratories and other Assignments linked to Outcomes




2997fb81-4136-48d6-9d5b-77fc7ba49563.doc                      Page 51 of 51

				
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