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									                               模拟测试六
                        SECTION 1 LISTENING TEST
                         Part A: Spot Dictation
    Directions: In this part of the test, you will hear a passage and
read the same passage with blanks in it. Fill in each of the blanks
with the word or words you have heard on the tape. Write your answer
in the corresponding space in your ANSWER BOOKLET. Remember you will
hear the passage ONLY ONCE.
    In the ruins of the Palm Beach Hotel you get a powerful sense
that an era is drawing to a close that Israel's attempt to settle its
people on the Gaza Strip is in its last days. (1) the fine sand in
front of the beach hotel. But since the Palestinians launched their
uprising against Israel the intifada— (2) , Gaza has become a
violent, dangerous place. People don't come on holiday anymore. The
Palm Beach resort complex was abandoned (3) The reception area and
the dining room have been stripped of their fixtures and fittings.
The wind off the sea blows in across floors (4) . A similar fate
awaits everything that Israel has built here—if (5) in August, as
planned. Some young settlers have been squatting in the hotel as it's
decayed around them. For Elazaar Elchiam, life is good. He lives for
nothing in (6) The Mediterranean waves are just meters away, and
Elazaar has a passion for surfing. (7) in one of the nearby
settlements— where red-roofed bungalows surrounded by lawns bake in
the summer sun. Elazaar dreads the thought that this may well be his
(8) The settlers say Israel is making a mistake. That it's handing
victory to the Palestinian militants who have been attacking Gush
Katif for years. (9) the possibility that the settler's homes will be
treated as the spoils of victory by groups (10) To prevent that, it's
possible that the army will demolish everything in the days before
the Israelis leave. Debbie Rosen, a mother (11) in Gush Katif, said
she hates the thought of her home being destroyed. But at the same
time she couldn't bear the idea of what she called " (12) " taking
over the house as they celebrate Israel's retreat. Since the Israeli
army captured Gaza (13) —in the Six Day War—it's been occupied
territory. When it moved civilian settlers into the Strip it was
breaching the Geneva Conventions— (14) . This means nothing to
settlers like Debbie Rosen. She said she never thought of her home as
being (15) . For her, Gaza is part of the land that God promised the
Jews. The occupation may mean nothing to the settlers of Gush Katif—
but it means everything (16) , in the Palestinian town of Khan Younis.
For decades, for Palestinian families, the occupation (17) and limits
and humiliations in many areas of life—and it's hated. Along the
western side of Khan Younis Israeli troops man watchtowers that are
part of (18) And the area has seen many clashes between the army and
Palestinian militants. They frequently (19) on the settler
communities that they see as being so symbolic of the Israeli
presence. The beach used to be an escape from the heat and (20) of
Khan Younis. But to keep the militants out of the settlement zone,
the army has blocked the Palestinian road to the sea. Khan Younis has
lost its beach.
                     Part B: Listening Comprehension
    Directions: In this part of the test there will be some short
talks and conversations. After each one, you will be asked some
questions. The talks, conversations and questions will be spoken ONLY
ONCE. Now listen carefully and choose the right answer to each
question you have heard and write the letter of the answer you have
chosen in the corresponding space in your ANSWER BOOKLET.
    Questions 1 to 5 are based on the following conversation.
    1. (A) She felt bored. (B) She felt lonely.
    (C) She cherished them. (D) The subject was easy.
    2. (A) Doing surveys at workplace. (B) Analyzing survey results.
    (C) Designing questionnaires. (D) Taking a psychology course.
    3. (A) The nature of work. (B) Office decoration.
    (C) Office location. (D) Work procedures.
    4. (A) She felt unhappy inside the company. (B) She felt work
there too demanding.
    (C) She was denied promotion in the company. (D) She longed for
new opportunities.
    5. (A) She was willing and ready. (B) She sounded mildly eager.
    (C) She was a bit surprised. (D) She sounded very reluctant.
    Questions 6 to 10 are based on the following news.
    6. (A) Algeria and Libya. (B) Saudi Arabia.
    (C) Venezuela and Algeria. (D) Venezuela.
    7. (A) To go on providing humanitarian aid. (B) To increase the
food supply.
    (C) To revise the oil-for-food programme. (D) To lift the embargo
on his country.
    8. (A) To cut down on the US military presence in Europe.
    (B) To increase the European Union's military influence.
    (C) To make combined efforts to sustain its economic growth.
    (D) To take concrete actions to stop arms race.
    9. (A) Sex discrimination in the US troops is far less obvious
than in other fields of American life.
    (B) Race relations have considerably improved in the US military.
    (C) There are more black or Hispanic officers in the armed
services than before.
    (D) Many minority military personnel complained about negative
race relations.
    10. (A) 4.4%. (B) 11.2%. (C) 14.4%. (D) 44%.
    Questions 11 to 15 are based on the following interview.
    11. (A) English language proficiency. (B) Different cultural
practices.
    (C) Different negotiation tasks. (D) The international
Americanized style.
    12. (A) Supportive. (B) Negative. (C) Ambiguous. (D) Cautious.
    13. (A) Americans prepare more points before negotiations.
    (B) Americans are more straightforward during negotiations.
    (C) Brazilians prefer more eye contact during negotiations.
    (D) Brazilians seek more background information.
    14. (A) The British. (B) Germans. (C) Americans. (D) Not
mentioned.
    15. (A) Reserved. (B) Prejudiced. (C) Polite. (D) Prudent.
    Questions 16 to 20 are based on the following talk.
    16. (A) By the lack of a generally balanced diet. (B) Through the
exhaust fumes of cars.
    (C) By eating seafood contaminated by lead. (D) By lead water
pipes.
    17. (A) The toys cost a large sum of foreign currency.
    (B) The paint on the toys was found to contain lead which caused
great damage to a baby or young child.
    (C) The blazing color of the toys was not suitable for a baby or
young child.
    (D) The toys made the young children distracted from their
studies.
    18. (A) Get angry more easily and even more violent.
    (B) Be inactive and lack energy.
    (C) Have difficulty focusing on anything for long in spite of the
relatively high IQ.
    (D) Tend to daydream much more than other children.
    19. (A) About'30 years ago. (B) In 1977.
    (C) In the 1990s. (D) Only in the past three years.
    20. (A) Don't use any product containing lead.
    (B) Move out of the urban areas to the countryside.
    (C) Eat less fish, crabs, prawns and vegetables.
    (D) Get sufficient calcium from a generally balanced diet.
                          SECTION 2 READING TEST
    Directions: In this section you will read several passages. Each
one is followed by several questions about it. You are to choose ONE
best answer, (A), (B), (C) or (D), to each question. Answer all the
questions following each passage on the basis of what is stated or
implied in that passage and write the letter of the answer you have
chosen in the corresponding space in your ANSWER BOOKLET.
    Questions 1~5
    Richard, King of England from 1189 to 1199, with all his
characteristic virtues and faults cast in a heroic mould, is one of
the most fascinating medieval figures. He has been described as the
creature and embodiment of the age of chivalry, In those days the
lion was much admired in heraldry, and more than one king sought to
link himself with its repute. When Richard's contemporaries called
him "Coeur de Lion"(The Lion Heart), they paid a lasting compliment
to the king of beasts. Little did the English people owe him for his
services, and heavily did they pay for his adventures. He was in
England only twice for a few short months in his ten years' reign;
yet his memory has always English hearts, and seems to present
throughout the centuries the pattern of the fighting man. In all
deeds of prowess as well as in large schemes of war Richard shone. He
was tall and delicately shaped strong in nerve and sinew, and most
dexterous in arms. He rejoiced in personal combat, and regarded his
opponents without malice as necessary agents in his fame. He loved
war, not so much for the sake of glory or political ends, but as
other men love science or poetry, for the excitement of the struggle
and the glow of victory. By this his whole temperament was toned, and
united with the highest qualities of the military commander. Love of
war called forth all the powers of his mind and body.
    Although a man of blood and violence, Richard was too impetuous
to be either treacherous on habitually cruel. He was as ready to
forgive as he was hasty to offend; he was open-handed and munificent
to profusion; in war circumspect in design and skilful in execution;
in political a child, lacking in subtlety and experience. His
political alliances were formed upon his likes and dislikes; his
political schemes had neither unity nor clearness of purpose. The
advantages gained for him by military geoids were flung away through
diplomatic ineptitude. When, on the journey to the East, Messina in
Sicily was won by his arms he was easily persuaded to share with his
polished, faithless ally, Philip Augustus, fruits of a victory which
more wisely used might have foiled the French King's artful schemes.
The rich and tenable acquisition of Cyprus was cast away even more
easily than it was won. His life was one magnificent parade, which,
when ended, left only an empty plain.
    In 1199, when the difficulties of raising revenue for the endless
war were at their height, good news was brought to King Richard. It
was said there had been dug up near the castle of Chaluz, on the
lands of one of his French vassals, a treasure of wonderful quality;
a group of golden images of an emperor, his wife, sons and daughters,
seated round a table, also of gold, had been unearthed. The King
claimed this treasure as lord paramount. The lord of Chaluz resisted
the demand, and the King laid siege to his small, weak castle. On the
third day, as he rode daringly, near the wall. Confident in his hard-
tried luck, a bolt from a crossbow struck him in the left shoulder by
the neck. The wound, already deep, was aggravated by the necessary
cutting out of the arrow-head. Gangrene set in, and Coeur de Lion
knew that he must pay a soldier' s debt. He prepared for death with
fortitude and calm, and in accordance with the principles he had
followed. He arranged his affairs; he divided his personal belongings
among his friends or bequeathed them to charity. He declared John to
be his heir, and made all present swear fealty to him. He ordered the
archer who had shot the fatal bolt, and who was now a prisoner, to be
brought before him. He pardoned him, and made him a gift of money.
For seven years he had not confessed for fear of being compelled to
be reconciled to Philip, but now he received the offices of the
Church with sincere and exemplary piety, and died in the forty-second
year of his age on April 6, 1199, worthy, by the consent of all men,
to sit with King Arthur and Roland and other heroes of martial
romance at some Eternal round Table, which we trust the Creator of
the Universe in his comprehension will not have forgotten to provide.
    The archer was flayed alive.
    1. "Little did the English people owe him for his service"
(para.1) means that the English people ______.
    (A) paid few taxes to him (B) gave him little respect
    (C) received little protection from him (D) had no real cause to
feel grateful to him
    2. To say that his wife was a "magnificent parade" (para.2)
implies that it was to some extent ______.
    (A) spent chiefly at war (B) impressive and admirable
    (C) lived too pompously (D) an empty show
    3. Richard's behavior as death approached showed ______.
    (A) bravery and self-control (B) wisdom and correctness
    (C) devotion and romance (D) chivalry and charity
    4. The point of the last short paragraph is that Richard was
______.
    (A) cheated by his own successors
    (B) determined to take revenge on his enemies
    (C) more generous to his enemies than his successors
    (D) unable to influence the behavior of his successors
    5. Which of the following phrase best describes Richard as seen
by the author?
    (A) An aggressive king, too fond of war. (B) A brave king with
minor faults.
    (C) A competent but cunning soldier. (D) A kind with great
political skills.
    Questions 6~10
    There has been much hullabaloo about corporate accounting scams
in America, yet perhaps the biggest accounting oversight of all time
remains hidden in governments' own national figures. GDP per head is
the most commonly used measure of a country's success, yet it is
badly flawed as a guide to a nation's economic well-being. A new
study in the OECD's 2006 "Going for Growth" report considers some
alternatives.
    Economists spend much time discussing how to boost GDP growth.
The OECD itself drew attention this week to the widening gap between
American' s and Europe's GDP per head. Yet a nation's well-being
depends on many factors ignored by GDP, such as leisure time, income
inequality and the quality of the environment. GDP was developed
primarily as a planning tool to guide the huge production effort of
the Second World War. It was never intended to be the definite
yardstick of economic welfare. Would another indicator change the
ranking of countries or their relative performance over time?
    GDP is not even the best gauge of the monetary aspects of living
standards. It measures the value of goods and services produced by
the residents of a country. But some of the income of earned in
Britain, say, is paid to non-residents, while residents receive
income from abroad. Adding net income from abroad to GDP gives us
gross national income (GNI, also known as gross national product),
which is more relevant for the prosperity of a nation.
    Most countries' rank by GNI pre head is similar to that by GDP.
One exception is Ireland: its GDP per head is one of the highest in
the OECD, but because of large net outflows of investment income, its
GNI per head is merely around the OECD average. Its average GNI
growth rate over the past decade has also been about one percentage
point less than on a GDP basis.
    Another flaw is that GDP makes no allowance for the depreciation
of the capital stock. Subtracting this from GNI leaves net national
income (NNI), which is probably the best national account measure of
welfare. Awkwardly, the numbers are harder to come by, making it
difficult to compare across countries and over time.
    But even NNI is an imperfect measure of people's welfare: it
excludes the value of such important things as leisure, inequality
and the environment. GDP should ideally be reduced to take account of
pollution and the using-up of non-renewable resources, but no
standard accounts that can do this are yet available.
    On the other hand, the OECD has made a brave attempt to adjust
GDP for the distribution of income. To most observers, a country
where a few families enjoy huge wealth but most live in abject
poverty would have a lower level of well-being than one with the same
GDP but less poverty. A dollar of income is, in effect, worth more in
the hands of the poor, though just how much more depends on attitudes
towards inequality, the gap between American and most other rich
countries, which have a more equal distribution of income, should be
greatly reduced. By this measure, adjusted income per head is higher
in France than in America.
    Inequality has also risen in recent years in most countries.
Assuming again a strong aversion to equality, average adjusted income
per head grew by only 0.6% a year in OECD countries between 1985 and
2002, against 1.4% for GDP per head. But such estimates are sensitive
to big value judgments. If, instead, people care little about
inequality, then the adjustment will be much smaller.
    Longer holidays and shorter working hours increasing an
individual's well-being, yet conventional national accounts
completely overlook such benefits. America is one of the world's
richest countries, yet its workers toil longer hours than those
elsewhere. As a result, adjusting GDP for leisure also narrows the
gap between America and Europe.
    So far, neither the adjustment for inequality nor that for
leisure alone overturns America's economic superiority. However, if
both adjustments were made, then on certain assumptions, the gap
between United States and several European countries could vanish.
    This does not mean that Europe can afford to abandon economic
reforms. Leisure time is valuable, but it will not pay for future
pensions. Nevertheless, the OECD is to be congratulated for being the
first mainstream organization to challenge the conventional GDP
numbers. Its task now is to encourage governments to start producing
more relevant statistics.
    6. Which of the following is TRUE about the author's attitude
towards the current GDP evaluation system adopted by the American
government?
    (A) It is the origin of the majority of corporate accounting
scams in America.
    (B) It is manipulated by the government to mislead the public
regarding the country's economic performances.
    (C) It is the most commonly used measure of a country's success
in economic terms.
    (D) Its adoption as a guide to a nation's economic well-being is
not well-grounded.
    7. According to the passage, which of the following is NOT true
about NNI?
    (A) It is the result of subtracting the depreciation of capital
stock from GNI.
    (B) It can be easily adopted to compare across countries and over
time.
    (C) It is not a perfect measure of people's welfare.
    (D) Compared with GDP and GNI, it is a more reasonable national-
account measure of welfare.
    8. According to the passage, why is the inequality-adjusted
income per head in France higher than that in America?
    (A) Because the GDP per capita in France is substantially higher
than in America.
    (B) Because France witnessed a sharp increase of inequality in
income distribution.
    (C) Because income distribution is more polarized in America than
in France.
    (D) Because the two countries adopted different methods of
national-account measurement.
    9. According to the passage, regarding an individual's well-being,
which of the following facts will NOT narrow the GDP gap between
America and Europe?
    (A) Environmental deterioration in Europe is more serious than in
America.
    (B) American workers work longer hours than their counterparts in
Europe.
    (C) Inequality in income distribution is more serious in America
than in France.
    (D) European workers can enjoy longer holidays than those in
America.
    10. What is the general attitude of the OECD towards GDP?
    (A) GDP is not a reasonable indicator of well-being.
    (B) GDP is the best available indicator on a timely basis, so
there is no need for any reform.
    (C) When other factors are included, GDP is not very reliable.
    (D) GDP needs to be complemented by other measures for better
economic performance evaluation.
    Questions 11~15
    For one brief moment in April, Larry Ellison came within a few
dollars of being the richest man in the world. The computer tycoon
was holding a global conference call on a Wednesday morning, when the
value of his company surged.
    It was the moment he almost overtook Bill Gates, founder of
Microsoft, as the wealthiest on the planet. For a few seconds, as
share of traders marked Microsoft down and Oracle up, Ellison came
within US $ 200,000 of Gates. The self-proclaimed "bad boy" of
Silicon Valley found himself worth more than US $ 52 billion, up from
a mere US $10 billion this time last year. Then Microsoft's share
price, which had plunged in recent weeks, recovered and the moment
passed.
    Once, Ellison, founder of the software company Oracle, would have
danced around his desk cursing like a pirate at failing to bring down
Gates, a rival he had constantly made fun of in public. But Silicon
Valley insiders said he remained calm, and muttered: "One day, one
day very, very soon." He knew his moment was close.
    Unlike Gates, he is not big on charity, preferring to spend his
money his way. He has his own private air force, a military-style
crew based at San Jose airport near Redwood City, to help him fly his
Gulfstream V jet (with two marbled bathrooms), a Marchetti fighter
plane imported from Italy, and a handful of other aircraft, including
a trainer for his son. He also plans to import a Russian Mig-29
fighter (capable of 1,500 mph). Why does he want one? So that, he
joked, he can blast Gates' home near Seattle. Cars are cheap and
cheerful by comparison. He has a relatively modest Porsche Boxster,
two specially altered Mercedes and a US $ 900,000 silver McLaren.
    In San Francisco he owns a magnificent house in Pacific Heights,
one of Western America's most expensive stretches of real estate. The
house is a technical marvel. When he inserts his key, the opaque
glass door turns transparent, revealing a Japanese garden in the
middle of the house. For reasons he knows best, Ellison is obsessed
with Japanese culture. Though he says he once briefly dated the
actress Sharon Stone, Ellison is better known for the number than the
fame of his wives. It is said he introduced himself with: "Can I buy
you a car?" In one year he gave at least four US $ 50,000 cars to
young ladies.
    While Gates comes from a strong family, Ellison still does not
know who his father was. He was born to an unmarried mother and
adopted by his Russian uncle and aunt. A brilliant but unpredictable
self-promoter, he dropped out of college, drove to California in a
battered Thunderbird car and ended up working with computer
technicians at a bank. "He always had a champagne lifestyle on beer
money," his first wife said.
    He set up Oracle in 1977 as a super-salesman with 3 programmers,
creating software for businesses. It almost collapsed when it
promised more than it could deliver, but since then its fortunes have
soared. Now it employs 43,000 people and has designed data-processing
systems used by Britain's M15 spy service as well as big western
companies. Oracle's software is more Internet- friendly than Gates'
Windows, one factor behind the company's recent share price rise.
    Since his company got big, Ellison has promised shareholders that
he will spend more time in the office. But can he escape being the
thrill-seeker he is at heart? As summer approaches, he may find it
hard to resist the lure of his yachts, Sakura, one of the longest in
the world, and Sayonara (Japanese for "see you later"), which he
races furiously. It is dangerous sport, even for guests. Media tycoon
Rupert Murdoch once nearly lost a finger when he grabbed a rope
during a race onboard the Sayonara. Ellison joked at least he could
"still wrote checks".
    Regardless of distractions, Ellison will not give up in his
battle against Gates. He hates to lose. Ellison declares that any
such dominance by one man, like Microsoft in computer industry, is
unhealthy. He has obviously forgotten his own plan for a global
empire, which he wanted to call the Universal Titanic Octopus
Corporation.
    11. In the stock market, ______.
    (A) Ellison is as rich as Bill Gates
    (B) Ellison has US $ 200,000 less than Bill Gates
    (C) Ellison is richer than Bill Gates
    (D) Oracle has more money than Microsoft
    12. Unlike Bill Gates, Ellison ______.
    (A) comes from a strong family (B) has a poor father
    (C) does not spend much on charity (D) was born in California
    13. Which of the following is NOT Ellison's belongs?
    (A) A Gulfstream V jet. (B) A Marchetti fighter.
    (C) A Poesche Boxster. (D) A Russian Mig-29 fighter.
    14. Which of the following is TRUE?
    (A) Ellison has had many wives.
    (B) Ellison's wives are famous.
    (C) Ellison is more famous for many wives than for money.
    (D) Ellison is more famous for many wives than for their
popularity.
    15. Oracle's advantage is that ______.
    (A) its share price is pretty high
    (B) it has more employees than Microsoft
    (C) it's the biggest western company.
    (D) its software is more Internet-friendly than Gates' Window
    Questions 16~20
    Brian Harper knows from personal experience how curious people
are about priests and nuns. He began training to be a priest 20 years
ago, straight from school, and although he left after two years he
has never quite escaped the legacy. Whenever he tells people about
that period in his life they fire him with questions about what
prompted him to consider that route in the first place.
    There are the usual questions about coping with celibacy and the
restrictions that this puts on personal relationships. But there is
real curiosity, too, about why an "otherwise normal" person would
take on such a life.
    "There is a genuine interest in the whole area of spirituality
and the spiritual life," Harper says, "The contrast has never been
greater than it is now between the religious and secular paths. "
Many young people head for a life in the church, he says, after
attending Catholic schools where the emphasis is placed on religious
observance, ritual and the importance of obedience and personal
humility. But in today's world it is becoming increasingly difficult
for such young people to ignore what is happening in the secular
world behind the church. Many priests and nuns have left the safety
of the ordered religious life in the past couple of decades. But they
have not done so without a struggle. Harper can identify with the
experience of those who leave.
    "It is so much easier to join up than it is to quit," he says,
"It's like in personal relationships, they're easy enough to get into,
but extricating yourself from one that's not working or that you're
not happy with can be very difficult indeed. "
    Steven Mc Callanan, a parish priest, is frank about his life in
church. He sums it up: "If you are prepared to see life in all its
color then go ahead, take orders. But don't think it will be easy. I
face problems every day. "
    Harper believes the religious life attracts a true cross-section
of people, from the extrovert to the shy and retiring, although many
are drawn by the church's emphasis on ritual and performance. If one
were to generalize, though, most priests have the kind of artistic
temperaments that would "I know some brilliant men and women in the
church, then I know some tried and disillusioned ones and some who
are struggling with their own kind of personal demons," says Harper.
He says it is a shame that the Catholic community has traditionally
put priests on a pedestal, "up there with God", whereas in fact they
are just like everyone else: flawed and vulnerable, make them good
actors or performance poets-and social drinkers.
    "Being a priest just happens to be a career, admittedly a
specialized one and one that demands a certain range of qualities.
But priests are just as frail and weak as the rest of us."
    Harper has made a television programme about priests, monks and
nuns in the Catholic Church. The message he gave to those who took
part in his documentary was: "We are not trying to trip you up or
make you appear strange or foolish. We are just trying to answer what
we think are some generally asked questions about your attitudes,
your dilemmas, and the kinds of lives you lead. "It makes fascinating
viewing.
    16. People are always curious about ______.
    (A) why a person would like to be priest (B) who would like to be
priests
    (C) what is inside a church (D) what education priests may get
    17. Brian Harper wants to be a priest for the reason that ______.
    (A) there are so few young men who prefer to emphasize religious
observance, ritual and the importance of obedience and personal
humility
    (B) his parents thought that it was the legacy for him to take
the religious path
    (C) he has a sincere interest in the whole area of spirituality
and the spiritual life
    (D) he has been considered an abnormal person who takes on such a
life
    18. According to Brian Harper, to quit being a priest ______.
    (A) is like in personal relationship (B) is not allowed
    (C) is impossible (D) is really difficult
    19. Brian Harper says that priests ______.
    (A) are not vulnerable (B) are just normal people
    (C) do not have dilemmas (D) are usually kind
    20. Harper has made a television program to ______.
    (A) raise questions about the Catholic Church
    (B) trip the audience up
    (C) make the Catholic Church appear interesting
    (D) answer the usual questions about priests and nuns
                        SECTION 3 TRANSLATION TEST
     Directions: Translate the following passage into Chinese and
write your version in the corresponding space in your ANSWER BOOKLET.
    There is no better school than adversity. Every defeat, every
heartbreak, every loss, contains its own seed, its own lesson on how
to improve my performance next time. Never again will I contribute to
my downfall by refusing to face the truth and learn from my past
mistakes. Because I know: gems cannot shine without polish, and I can
not perfect myself without hardship.
    Now I know that there are no times in life when opportunity, the
chance to be and do, gathers so richly about my soul when it has to
suffer cruel adversity. Then everything depends on whether I raise my
head or lower it in seeking help. Whenever I am struck down, in the
future, by any terrible defeat, I will inquire of myself, after the
first pain has passed how I can turn that adversity into good. What a
great opportunity that moment may present to take the bitter root I
am holding and transform it into fragrant garden of flowers.
    Always will I seek the seed of triumph in every adversity.
                         SECTION 4 LISTENING TEST
                   Part A: Note-taking and Gap-filling
    Directions: In this part of the test you will hear a short tally.
You will hear the talk ONLY ONCE. While listening to the talk, you
may take notes on the important points so that you can have enough
information to complete a gap-filling task on a separate ANSWER
BOOKLET. You will not get your ANSWER BOOKLET until after you have
listened to the talk.
    No (1) way exists to explain how to form a good idea. You think
about a problem until you are tired, forget it, maybe sleep on it,
and then (2) ! When you're not thinking about it, suddenly the answer
arrives as a gift from the gods.
    Of course, all ideas don't occur like that but so many do,
particularly the most important ones. They burst into the mind,
glowing with the heat of (3) . How they do it is a (4) , but they
must come from somewhere. Let's assume they come from the " (5) ".
This is reasonable, for psychologists use this term to describe (6)
processes, which are unknown to the (7) Creative thought depends on
what was unknown becoming known.
    All of us have (8) this sudden arrival of new idea, but it is
easiest to examine it in the great creative (9) . One can draw
examples from genius in any field. All truly creative activities
depend in some degree on these (10) from the unconscious, and the
more highly (11) the person, the shaper and more (12) the signals
become.
    In the example of Richard Wagner (13) the opening to "Rhinegold",
the conscious mind at the moment of creation knew something of the
actual processes by which the (14) was found.
    As a (15) , Henri Poincare's finding of the Fuchsian functions
make us see the conscious mind (16) the new combinations being formed
in the unconscious, while the Wagner story shows the sudden (17) of a
new concept into consciousness.
    Wagner's and Poincare's experiences are (18) of countless others
in every field of culture. The unconscious is certainly the source of
(19) activity. But in creative thought the unconscious is responsible
for the production of new organized forms from relatively (20)
elements.
                    Part B: Listening and Translation
    I. Sentence Translation
    Directions: In this part of the test, you will hear 5 English
sentences. You will hear the sentences ONLY ONCE. After you have
heard each sentence, translate it into Chinese and write your version
in the corresponding space in your ANSWER BOOKLET.
   (1) ______
   (2) ______
   (3) ______
   (4) ______
   (5) ______
   II. Passage Translation
   Directions: In this part of the test, you will hear 2 English
passages. You will hear the passages ONLY ONCE. After you have heard
each passage, translate it into Chinese and write your version in the
corresponding space in your ANSWER BOOKLET. You may take notes while
you are listening.
   (1) ______
   (2) ______
                          SECTION 5 READING TEST
    Directions: Read the following passages and then answer IN
COMPLETE SENTENCES the questions which follow each passage. Use only
information from the passage you have just read and write your answer
in the corresponding space in your ANSWER BOOKLET.
    Questions 1~3
    From sacred cow to white elephant is a short jump. Wind power,
once seen as the eco-friendly cure-all for Britain's energy problems,
is attracting unprecedented criticism. The latest campaign, which
unites veteran Greens and the opposition Tories, opposes a proposed
installation of 27 wind turbines next to Romney Marsh in Kent, a
noted bird sanctuary and beauty spot. Hundreds more are planned
elsewhere—many in beautiful bits of the countryside where some of
Britain's richest people happen to live. A bunch of media-savvy local
organizations is now lobbying hard to stop them.
    The government remains unmoved. It calls wind power "the most
proven green source of electricity generation" and cites Denmark as a
role model. Renewables (mostly wind) account for 20% of electrical
generation capacity there. Renewable energy is needed both to cut CO2
emissions, promised under the Kyoto treaty, and to reach the
government's own target of generating 10% of British electricity from
renewable sources by 2010. The cost of this to the taxpayer is likely
to be £1 billion a year by 2020.
    But as well as Tories, toffs and country-lovers, many others
think that wind power is seriously flawed. The first big problem is
that it is too expensive. Although the British Wind Energy
Association puts the cost of electricity from onshore wind farms at
2.5p per kilowatt-hour, only slightly more costly than other power
sources, the Royal Academy of Engineering claims that on a more
realistic view of construction costs it is much dearer(more
expensive): 3.7p when generated onshore and 5.5p offshore.
    The government has tried to bridge this gap with tradable
certificates. The wind-gatherers gain one of these for each megawatt-
hour they generate. Power distribution companies then buy them as an
alternative to paying the fines levied for failing to buy a set
proportion (currently 4.9%) of renewable energy annually. But a
recent House of Lords report noted a big snag: the nearer the
industry gets to meeting the governments targets, the less the value
of the certificates once the target is passed, their worth falls
abruptly to zero.
    So the certificates, which will cost consumers a cool £500m this
year and will be even more expensive next year, cap the supply of
renewable energy instead of encouraging it. In effect, firms will buy
only the minimum amount of renewable energy necessary to comply with
the law.
    Then there are the engineering problems. Too light a breeze means
no power too strong a gale and the turbines shut down to prevent
damage. Even the wind-lovers expect that the farms will manage only
30% of their full capacity on average. Worse, that output can
fluctuate rapidly—by up to 20% of the total national wind capacity
in the space of a single hour, according to Hugh Sharman, an energy
consultant, who has studied Denmark's wind industry. Furthermore, in
a typical year like 2002, he says, there were 54 days when the air
was so still that virtually no wind power was generated at all.
    But whereas Denmark can import power from Norway and Germany to
keep the lights on during calm periods, Britain's power grid is not
set up for imports. So conventional coal-, oil- or gas-fired power
stations would have to be kept running, ready to take up the load.
That sharply raises the real cost of wind energy and means extra CO2
emissions.
    Ministers may be right when they argue that wind power is the
only renewable energy source that has even a theoretical chance of
meeting the government' s targets. Given the costs and technical
uncertainties, perhaps it would be better to abandon those targets
altogether.
    1. Explain the statement "from sacred cow to white elephant is a
short jump". (para.1)
    2. Introduce briefly the controversy around the wind power
project in Britain.
    3. What is British government's "tradable certificate"?
    Questions 4~6
    They weren't exactly Hollywood's idea of a power couple: Disney
CEO Robert Iger, once derided as a "suit", and studio chief Richard
Cook, who got his start as a monorail operator at Disneyland. But
last week Iger and Cook dropped a bomb bigger than any of the
explosions you'll see in Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest.
Just weeks after the record-smashing release of the sequel—soon to
be the highest-grossing film in Disney history—Cook fired studio
president Nina Jacobson and announced Disney was slashing 20 percent
of its studio staff and cutting the number of films it makes each
year by a third.
    As usual, Hollywood thought it was all about them. "People are
concerned that if Disney is cutting back on live-action movies, then
what are other companies going to do," says Jim Wiatt, chief
executive of the William Morris Agency. The unflappable Iger's
response: "We're focused on our own issues and strategies. If it has
an effect on the industry, so be it. But it really is about us. "
    Not bad for two guys who were considered perpetual bridesmaids.
Iger and Cook both spent years toiling in the shadow of larger-than-
life CEO Michael Eisner, who ran Disney like his personal kingdom.
When Eisner's reign came to a Shakespearean end after a shareholder
revolt led by Walt Disney's nephew, Iger found himself having to
audition for his boss's job. Cook, who came up through the marketing
ranks, had to endure similar Tinseltown tongue-clucking from those
who assumed the affable bear of a guy who didn't have teeth.
    No one's saying Iger and Cook aren't "sexy" anymore. In short
order, Iger made up with shareholders and Pixar honcho Steve Jobs,
who'd had an epic battle with Eisner, even persuading Jobs to sell
the animation company to Disney. Cook, meanwhile, had been turning
theme-park rides into movies and getting Disney back to its family
roots. "Dick and Bob go by their own beat," says Oren Aviv, who was
promoted to president of production last week. "They're not
interested in fanfare or press or what other people think." (Mostly
not interested: Iger did tell Newsweek once, "I hate being called a
suit.")
    What people think now is that Disney is setting the pace for the
industry. The film business has been on shaky ground: U.S. box office
is flat, DVD sales have stalled and the cost of making movies is
soaring. Family films seem like the only sure bets these days, and
Disney is in a prime position to meet the demand. "Disney is the only
real brand name in the movie business around the world," says Cook.
In fact, Iger is taking the name "Disney World" quite literally. He
spoke to Newsweek Friday after flying home from a five-day trip to
Asia, where he attended the stage premiere of The Lion King in
Shanghai. His immediate goal is to build the Disney brand in China
and India. Iger has also aggressively embraced technological advances,
podcasting and webcasting episodes of Lost and Desperate Housewives,
hits on Disney's ABC network. "I don't see technology as a threat,"
he says. "Technology allows us to be in step with the consumer. "
    All of which sounds pretty good to Wall Street. Last week's cuts
will save the company between $ 90 million and $100 million a year,
according to Cook, and while that wasn't enough to boost its stock
price, it sure doesn't hurt investor relations. "Iger has stated his
goals and stuck to [them]; investors like that predictability," says
analyst Jason Helfstein of CIBC World Markets. "He's widely regarded
in a positive light." Ironic, since he wasn't supposed to have the
job in the first place.
    4. What was the "bomb" that Iger and Cook dropped in Disney
Company?
    5. Why does the author say that "the film business has been on
shaky ground"? (para.5)
    6. What do people believe now that Disney is setting the pace for
the industry? (para.5)
    Questions 7~10
    U.S. consumer prices climbed faster than expected in May, further
fanning investor fears over inflation. Stock markets around the world
have cracked sharply lower the past few weeks, with the Dow Jones
Industrial Average losing all the ground it had gained so far this
year. Japan's stock market is down 11% on the year; gold has had its
biggest slide in a decade and a half; and many emerging markets are
wobbling. After Wednesday's Consumer Price Index report from the
Labor Department, which showed a 0.4 percent increase in prices for
May (core inflation, which excludes food and energy, rose 0.3
percent), the stock market made a comeback. But with future interest
rate hikes now starting to be priced into the market, investor fears
that central bankers around the world will go overboard and continue
to drive rates higher is set to further spook markets. This is no
trading correction that investors have to absorb. The real risk of a
jarring bear market has emerged.
    But while the trauma that inflation created for investors in the
1970s is still close to the surface, the sudden frenzy is misplaced.
Powerful forces in the world economy continue to keep prices largely
in check.
    Over the past decade, inflation has been a minor threat compared
with brutal deflationary shocks. They started with the collapse of
the Mexican peso in the mid-1990s. In 1997, much of eastern Asia's
flourishing economy was leveled. Next were Russia, Turkey and
Argentina; Brazil teetered on the brink. By early 2001, Silicon
Valley, the pride of the U. S. economy, was crashing, while entire
sectors of the so-called New Economy disintegrated.
    The tech wreck may be over, but it has left a legacy of low
prices. Tech companies had to dump on the market everything from
fiberoptic networks to computer chips, as desperate investors
struggled to raise cash. That slashed telecommunication costs at the
very moment that emerging markets were producing a skilled and hungry
generation of information workers. Result? The offshore outsourcing
revolution and downward pressure on global production costs that
keeps inflation under control. Equally powerful are the ultra-low-
cost emerging-market manufacturing bases, led by China. With more
than 1 billion people set to enter the urban labor markets of China,
India, Brazil and Indonesia in the next 20 years, all those pressures
on prices will only intensify.
    More immediate forces are also at work to keep prices from
surging. Despite some wishful thinking, growth in Europe is slowing,
not accelerating. A large part of U. S. growth has been driven by
booming real estate prices. But in the past two years, the Fed has
increased rates 16 times, so real estate-driven consumption is
yesterday's news. Tomorrow's story will be the sharp fall in U. S.
growth as consumers face higher mortgage costs. That dynamic could
become particularly nasty, given the record level of U. S. household
debt, government deficit and unequaled current-account shortfall.
    Investors are often caught fiat-footed when markets slide. In
2001~2002, deflation was the fear of the day, but few investors at
the time saw the opportunity in commodities, which were going for a
fraction of today's prices. Today investors are obsessed with
inflation, while government and top-tier corporate bonds are shunned.
    That should be telling us something. What is it? In the past few
years, the central banks of Japan, the U.S. and Europe have cut
interest rates so aggressively that the real cost of borrowing fell
to, effectively, below zero. That spurred extraordinary amounts of
debt financing by governments and corporations. But now, as the
global credit cycle tightens, some of the marginal investments will
quickly become unsustainable. If central bankers keep raising
interest rates, deeper cracks would open in the world economy.
    What is really troubling markets is not inflation. It is the fear
that central banks may have tightened too much, and will tighten
further. If that happens, the recent market shock would be merely the
precursor to a still more dramatic quake.
    7. What is the situation of the world financial markets recently?
    8. What does the author mean by "the tech wreck may be over, but
it has legacy of low price"? (para.4)
    9. What is the relationship between real estate market and
economic growth in U. S. in the past and in the near future?
    10. What are the "powerful forces" that can keep inflation
"largely in check"?
                        SECTION 6 TRANSLATION TEST
    Directions: Translate the following passage into English and
write your version in the corresponding space in your ANSWER BOOKLET.
  这次到台湾访问交流,虽然行程匆匆,但是,看了不少地方,访了旧友,
交了新知,大家走到一起,谈论的一个重要话题就是中华民族在 21 世纪的强
盛。虽然祖国大陆、台湾的青年生活在不同的社会环境中,有着各自不同的生
活经历,但大家的内心都深深铭刻着中华文化优秀传统的印记,都拥有着振兴
中华民族的共同理想。在世纪之交的伟大时代,我们的祖国正在走向繁荣富
强,海峡两岸人民也将加强交流,共同推进祖国统一大业的早日完成。世纪之
交的宝贵机遇和巨大挑战将青年推到了历史前台。跨世纪青年一代应该用什么
样的姿态迎接充满希望的新世纪,这是我们必须回答的问题。
    日月潭水波不兴,仿佛与我一同在思索……
                                 参考答案
                               听力部分(1)
    Part A: Spot Dictation
    In the ruins of the Palm Beach Hotel you get a powerful sense
that an era is drawing to a close that Israel's attempt to settle its
people on the Gaza Strip is in its last days. The waves still crash
on the fine sand in front of the beach hotel. But since the
Palestinians launched their uprising against Israel—the intifada—
nearly five years ago, Gaza has become a violent, dangerous place.
People don't come on holiday anymore. The Palm Beach resort complex
was abandoned by its staff and management. The reception area and the
dining room have been stripped of their fixtures and fittings. The
wind off the sea blows in across floors strewn with broken glass. A
similar fate awaits everything that Israel has built here—if it
withdraws from Gaza in August, as planned. Some young settlers have
been squatting in the hotel as it's decayed around them. For Elazaar
Elchiam, life is good. He lives for nothing in one of the resort's
beachfront apartments. The Mediterranean waves are just meters away,
and Elazaar has a passion for surfing.   He grew up in one of the
nearby settlements—where red-roofed bungalows surrounded by lawns
bake in the summer sun. Elazaar dreads the thought that this may well
be his last summer on Gaza's beach. The settlers say Israel is making
a mistake. That it's handing victory to the Palestinian militants who
have been attacking Gush Katif for years. Israel has a horror of the
Possibility that the settler's homes will be treated as the spoils of
victory by groups like the Hamas organization. To prevent that, it's
possible that the army will demolish everything in the days before
Israelis leave. Debbie Rosen, a mother who's raised six children in
Gush Katif, said she hates the thought of her home being destroyed.
But at the same time she couldn't bear the idea of what she called "
terrorist who killed her friends" taking over the house as they
celebrate Israel's retreat. Since the Israeli army captured Gaza
nearly forty years ago—in the Six Day War—it's been occupied
territory. When it moved civilian settlers into the Strip it was
breaching the Geneva Conventions—the international rules of war.
This means nothing to settlers like Debbie Rosen. She said she never
thought of her home as being in occupied territory. For her, Gaza is
part of the land that God promised the Jews. The occupation means
nothing to the settlers of Gush Katif—but it means everything just a
short distance away, in the Palestinian town of Khan Younis. For
decades, for Palestinian families, the occupation has restrictions on
movements and limits and humiliations in many areas of life—and it's
hatred. Along the western side of Khan Younis Israeli troops man
watchtowers that are part of the defenses for the settlements. And
the area has seen many clashes between the army and Palestinian
militants. They frequently launch rocket and other attacks on the
settler communities that they see as being so symbolic of the Israeli
presence. The beach used to be an escape from the heat and squalor of
the alleyways of Khan Younis. But to keep the militants out of the
settlement zone, the army has blocked the Palestinian road to the sea.
Khan Younis has lost its beach.
    Part B: Listening Comprehension
    Questions 1 to 5 are based on the following conversation.
    M: Well, I see from your resume, Ms. Green, that you studied at
University of California. How did you find it there?
    W: I had a great time. The teaching there was good, and I made a
lot of friends. The psychology department was a great place.
    M: How come you chose psychology?
    W: Well, at first I didn't have any clear idea of what I want to
do after university. I guess I have just always been interested in
people, and the way they act. I want to know why people think and act
the way they do. It's a fascinating area.
    M: And what was the course like?
    W: Good, the teachers were all really nice, and they had the
special approach to teaching. You know, they didn't just give us
lectures and tell us to read books like they might do in some more
traditional places, the whole course was based on a problem-solving
approach. You know, they'd describe particular situations to us, and
we'd discuss what might happen, and after that, we'd do some reading
and see if it confirmed our own ideas. That's what I like best, the
really practical orientation of the course. I learned very well with
that style, so for me it was just great.
    M: I see from your resume that you graduated about four years ago
and after that, let me see...
    W: I got a job with the department of employment; it was only a
temporary thing for about five months. I was a researcher in the
department. We designed survey, went out to the factories, and asked
all the questions to the workers and the management, then went back
to the office, analyzed all the data and produced a report. It was
quite interesting, and I guess the psychology course at college
helped me a lot.
    M: And after that, you worked for three years in an advertising
agency. That must have been a bit of change from the department of
employment, wasn't it?
    W: Well, not really. I suppose the office furnishings were a bit
more sophisticated but the work was quite similar. I was basically
still doing the same thing, designing questionnaires, going out,
asking questions and writing reports. The only difference was that
this time I wasn't asking people about their work. I was asking them
what kind of shampoo that their advertising campaigns, I enjoyed my
work a lot.
    M: So why did you decide to leave?
    W: Three years is a long time to be asking people that sort of
questions about shampoo and drinks. No, seriously, after two years, I
was in charge of the research department of the agency, and I had one
assistant researcher, I guess after two years of doing that, I
suppose I felt, you know, I can do this well and now I want to do
something else that's a little different, and there was nowhere for
me to go inside the company. It just wasn't challenging for me
anymore, and because I needed challenge, I decided to move on. When I
heard about the position of senior researcher here, I thought, that's
exactly what I want, the chance to combine my management skills and
my research interests, working in a much larger department with more
varied work.
    M: And you felt that the job description in our advertisement
will offer you the kind of challenge you are looking for?
    W: Exactly. Yes, as I said, management in a large organization
and research combined, also, to be honest with you, I heard about the
job before it was advertised, a friend of mine who works here, Mark
Aston, told me a few weeks ago that you were looking for someone to
take over the job. He described the position to me in quite a bit of
detail, and I thought, well, that's exactly what I am looking for. So
really, I'd written my letter of application before the job was even
advertised.
    M: I should tell you that with the present cutbacks, we've only
got one full-time administrative assistant in the section. How would
you feel about doing your own word processing, photo copying, that
sort of things?
    W: Oh, I am used to that. I've done all my own word processing
for ages. It's the only way to write really, isn't it? I can type
well, about sixty words a minute. I took the secretarial course after
I left school so I learned typing in a short time, then a few years
later I bought a PC, and I learned how to do word processing too.
    M: Well, that's good. Now, in the position you've applied for,
and you'd have five assistant researchers reporting to you. That's
considerably more responsibility than you have had before, and as you
said you like a challenge. I was wondering, what you see yourself
doing in, say, five or ten years down the track?
    W: Oh, that's a difficult question. Let me try to answer your
question this way. I am particularly interested in experimental
design and also in teaching. I know that you have lecturers here who
do just that sort of thing, some practical work and some
undergraduate and postgraduate teaching. So that's what I am really
aiming for, to be a lecturer here as well.
    M: Well, that's certainly a career path we'd encourage you to
follow, but of course it might be necessary to upgrade your present
qualifications first. I see from your resume that you've been
enrolled in a MA in experimental psychology, could you tell me a bit
about the courses you're planning to take?
    Q1. Which of the following statements is TRUE about Ms. Green's
university days?
    Q2. Which of the following is NOT part of her job with the
Department of Employment?
    Q3. According to Ms. Green, what is the main difference between
the department of employment and the advertising agency?
    Q4. Why did Ms. Green want to leave the advertising agency?
    Q5. How did Ms. Green react to a heavier workload in the new job?
    1-5. CDDDA
    Questions 6 to 10 are based on the following news.
    VIENNA
    The Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries holds an
emergency meeting in Vienna Sunday to discuss an increase in the
production of crude oil. Delegates from the 11 member nations of OPEC
gather for the second time in a month at their Vienna headquarters.
The cartel is expected to increase its official output quota, some
officials speculate, by one million, or 1.5 million barrels per day,
to make up the shortfall caused by a six-week strike in Venezuela, a
major supplier to the United States. Saudi Arabia wants a bigger
increase, but Algeria and Libya are pressing for a million barrel per
day increase, which would represent about a four percent rise over
the current output of 23 million barrels per day.
    UNITED NATIONS
    Iraq asked the United Nations to continue providing humanitarian
aid despite cutting off exports of crude oil under the UN's oil-for-
food programme, UN officials said.
    The Iraqi ambassador to the UN, Saeed Hasan, met on Tuesday with
programme director Benon Sevan and Iraq "wanted the UN to continue
normal operations," UN spokesman Fred Eekhard told reporters.
    The spokesman for the programme, John Mills, said "humanitarian
supplies will continue to arrive and be distributed in Iraq." On
Monday, the UN said that Iraq had stopped pumping oil through the
960-kilometre pipeline to Turkish port of Ceyhan.
    LONDON
    For the first time in its 42-year history, the European Union (EU)
staged a joint meeting of foreign affairs and defence ministers to
debate how the union can acquire a security dimension consistent with
its economic strength.
    During that meeting, Britain and France proposed that Europe, by
either 2002 or 2003, should possess the capacity to deploy a rapid
reaction force of some 50,000 troops in a peacekeeping operation in
or around the EU.
    The proposal received a strong response, which is indicative that
the EU is making concrete efforts to bolster its military clout in
Europe.
    WASHINGTON
    A high percentage of blacks, Hispanics and other minorities in
the US military complained in a survey of more than 40,000 US troops,
and one in five blacks responding also said they felt race relations
played a negative part in their prospects for promotion or assignment.
But the survey, taken in 1997, indicated that military personnel felt
Pentagon efforts to promote good race relations and equal opportunity
were succeeding and that discrimination in uniform was far less
pronounced than in other areas of American life.
    TOKYO
    Japan's trade surplus plunged 14.4 percent in October from its
level a year ago, the government said yesterday.
    Government officials blamed the strong yen for severely damaging
exports.
    The trade surplus dropped to US $11.2 billion, the Finance
Ministry reported, making October the seventh month in a row for a
drop in the trade surplus. "Japan's exports have been pressed by the
sharp appreciation of the yen against the US dollar, which mainly
contributed to the surplus fall," said Naoko Ogata, an analyst at the
Sakura Research Institute. "With the yen rising to current levels,
exporters are finding it difficult to make a profit. "
    Q 6. Which country is pressing for an increase of a million
barrels per day?
    Q 7. What did the Iraqi ambassador ask the United Nations to do?
    Q 8. What was proposed at the joint meeting staged by the
European Union?
    Q 9. What was disclosed in a survey released by the US Defence
Department on Tuesday?
    Q10. As compared with the same period last year, how much did
Japan's trade surplus drop?
    6-10. AABDC
    Questions 11 to 15 are based on the following interview.
    M: I'm talking to Janet Holmes who has spent many years
negotiating for several welt-known national and multi-national
companies. Hello, Janet.
    W: Hello.
    M: Now Janet. You've experienced and observed the negotiation
strategies used by people from different countries and speakers of
different languages. So before we comment on the differences, could I
ask you to comment first of all on what such encounters have in
common?
    W: OK, well, I'm just going to focus on the situations where
people are speaking English in international business situations.
    M: I see. Now, not every one speaks English to the same degree of
proficiency. So, maybe that affects situations.
    M: Yes, perhaps. But that is not always so significant. Well,
because, I mean, negotiations between business partners from
different countries normally mean we have negotiations between
individuals who belong to distinct cultural traditions.
    M: Oh, I see.
    W: Well, every individual has a different way of performing
various tasks in everyday life.
    M: Yes, but isn't it the case that in the business negotiation,
they must come together and work together to a certain extent. I mean,
doesn't that level up the style of, the style of differences or
somewhat?
    W: Oh, I am not so sure. I mean there are people in the so-called
Western world who say that in the course of the past 30 or 40 years,
there were a lot of things that had changed a great deal globally,
and that as a consequence, national differences had diminished. We
have got fewer, giving way to some sort of international Americanized
style.
    M: Yeah, I’ve heard that. Now some people say this Americanized
style has acted as a model for local patterns.
    W: Maybe it has, maybe it hasn't. Because on the one hand, there
does appear to be a fairly unified even uniform style of doing
business with certain basic principles and preferences, you know,
like "time is money", that sort of thing. But at the same time, it is
very important to remember the way all retain aspects of national
characteristics. But it is actual behavior that we will talk about
here. We shouldn't be too quick to generalize that to national
characteristic and stylistic type. It doesn't help much.
    M: Yeah. You mentioned Americanized style. What is particular
about American style of business bargaining or negotiating?
    W: Well. I've noticed that, for example, when Americans negotiate
with people from Brazil, the American negotiators make their points
in a direct, sophistical way.
    M: I see.
    W: While Brazilian make their points in a more indirect way.
    M: How?
    W: Let me give you an example. Brazilian importers look at people
they're talking to straight in the eyes a lot. They spend time on
what some people thinks to be background information. They seem to be
more indirect.
    M: Then, what about the American negotiators?
    W: American style of negotiating, on the other hand, is far more
like that of point-making; first point, second point, third point,
and so on. Now of course, this isn't the only way in which one can
negotiate and absolutely no reason why this should be considered as
the best way to negotiate.
    M: Right. Americans seem to have different styles, say, even from
the British, don't they?
    W: Exactly, which just show how careful you must be about
generalizing. I mean, asking you explain how the American negotiators
are seen as informal, and sometimes much too open. For British eyes,
Americans are too direct even blunt.
    M: Is that so?
    W: Yeah, at the same time, the British too. German negotiators
can appear direct and uncompromising in the negotiations, and yet if
you experience Germans and Americans negotiating together, it is
often the Americans who are being too blunt for the German
negotiators.
    M: Fascinating! So people from different European countries use
different styles, don't they?
    W: That's right.
    M: OK. So what about the Japanese then? I mean, is their style
different from the Americans and Europeans?
    W: Oh, well, yes, of course. Many Europeans nod the extreme
politeness of their Japanese counterparts, the way they avoid giving
the slightest defense, you know. They're also very reserved to people
they don't know well. At the first meetings American colleagues have
difficulties in finding the right approach sometimes. But then when
you meet the Japanese negotiators again, this initial impression
tends to disappear. But it is perhaps true to say that your average
Japanese business person does choose his or more really her words
very carefully.
    M: So can we say that whatever nationalities you are dealing with,
you need to remember that different nationalities negotiate in
different ways?
    W: Well, it's perhaps more helpful to bear in mind that different
people behave in negotiation in different ways. And you shouldn't
assume that everyone will behave in the same way that you do.
    M: Right. It is definitely a very useful tip {or our businessmen
who often negotiate with their overseas partners. OK, Janet, thank
you very much for talking with us.
    W: Pleasure.
    Q11. According to Janet, what is the factor that would most
affect negotiation?
    Q12. What is Janet's attitude towards the Americanized style as a
model for business negotiation?
    Q13. Which of the following can NOT be seen as a difference
between Brazilian and American negotiators?
    Q14. Which group of people seems to be the most straightforward?
    Q15. Which of the following is NOT characteristic of Japanese
negotiators?
    11-15. BDACB
    Questions 16 to 20 are based on the following talk.
    In urban areas, cars produce thousands of tonnes of lead in their
exhaust fumes. In some large cities, the amount of lead in the air
and soil is more than a thousand times than the natural level.
    For instance, in Singapore lead can affect the children in many
ways. The most obvious way is through the exhaust fumes of cars. This
means that people who live near busy roads, and especially those on
the lower floors, are most at risk. It is quite likely that the whole
central part of Singapore is polluted by lead from this source.
Another source is lead water pipes. Because it flows through the
pipes, the water dissolves lead and carries it to household taps. In
industrial waste lead is also present. After flowing into the sea,
the lead is absorbed by fish, crabs and prawns which are eaten by
human beings.
    Vegetables grown not far from a busy urban area may be polluted
by lead in the air. Even dust in the home contains harmful amounts of
lead which get into bowls, on plates and on cooking utensils. Many
kinds of paint contain lead, too. At various times in the past, toys
were banned by some countries because the paint on them has been
found to contain lead. When a baby or young child sucks the paint, he
may even find the taste not unpleasant, but he has no idea of the
damage which lead does to the brain and body.
    Thus urban children and adults are surrounded by lead. It comes
from cars and other sources. It is in the air, in the dust, in the
water, and probably in some of the vegetables, meat and fish we eat.
The human body needs calcium to develol5 bones and nerves in the body.
According to some scientists, lead imitates the action of calcium in
the body. Thus the body is cheated and treats lead as a calcium
substitute though it is a deadly poison.
    Slow poisoning by lead affects the brain too. It makes the victim
inactive. He becomes irritable and may even become violent. Lead
attacks the bones of young people and upsets their nervous systems.
Victims are far more likely to daydream than other children. And they
have great difficulty concentrating on anything for very long.
Research in America has shown that lead poisoning lowers a person's
IQ. So they are among the poorer performers at school and may have
trouble getting and holding a job. One expert said that she had
taught children in the centre of a city, in the suburbs and in the
countryside. She found that rural children had a better attitude to
their studies and were easier to teach and control.
    Only about three decades ago, doctors began to discover just how
dangerous lead can be. If children get plenty of calcium in their
diet, such as from milk, suitable fruit and vegetables, the risk is
less. In many countries, governments are now urged to ban the use of
petrol containing lead, and to limit the use of lead in any area
where a substitute can be found. In the USA, there were 2,700 cases
of severe lead poisoning in 1970, but this fell to 300 in 1977 when
more areas used lead-free petrol.
    Q16: In Singapore children can be affected by lead in many ways,
which of the following is NOT mentioned in the talk?
    Q17: Why didn't some countries allow toys in the past?
    Q18: Which of the following is NOT the symptom when the brain is
affected by lead?
    Q19: When did people discover the great dangers of lead,
according to this talk?
    Q20: How can we prevent the lead pollution?
    16-20. ABCAA
                               听力部分(2)
    Part A: Note-taking and Gap-filling
    No satisfactory way exists to explain how to form a good idea.
You think about a problem until you are tired, forget it, maybe sleep
on it, and then flash! When you're not thinking about it, suddenly
the answer arrives as a gift from the gods.
    Of course, all ideas don't occur like that but so many do,
particularly the most important ones. They burst into the mind,
glowing with the heat of creation. How they do it is a mystery, but
they must come from somewhere. Let's assume they come from the
"unconscious". This is reasonable, for psychologists use this term to
describe mental processes, which are unknown to the individual.
Creative thought depends on what was unknown becoming known.
    All of us have experienced this sudden arrival of new idea, but
it is easiest to examine it in the great creative personalities, many
of whom experienced it in an intensified form and have written it
down in their life stories and letters. One can draw examples from
genius in any field, from religion, philosophy, and literature to art
and music, even in mathematics, science and technical invention,
although these are often thought to depend only on logic and
experiment. All truly creative activities depend in some degree on
these signals from the unconscious, and the more highly insightful
the person, the sharper and more dramatic the signals become.
    Take the example of Richard Wagner composing the opening to
"Rhinegold". Wagner had been occupied with the idea of the "Ring" for
several years, and for many months had been struggling to begin
composing. On September 4, 1853, he reached Spezia sick, went to a
hotel, could not sleep for noise without and fever within, took a
long walk the next day, and in the afternoon flung himself on a couch
intending to sleep. Then at last the miracle happened for which his
unconscious mind had been seeking for so long. Falling into a
sleeplike condition, he suddenly felt as though he was sinking in a
mighty flood of water, and the rush and roar soon took musical shape
within his brain. He recognizes that the orchestral opening to the
"Rhinegold', which he must have carried about within him yet had
never been able to put into form, had at last taken its shape within
him. In this example, the conscious mind at the moment of creation
knew something of the actual processes by which the solution was
found.
    As a contrast, we may consider a famous story: the discovery by
Henri Poincare, the great French mathematician, of a new mathematical
method called the Fuchsian functions. Here we see the conscious mind,
in a person of highest ability, actually watching the unconscious at
work. For weeks, he sat at his table everyday and spent an hour or
two trying a great number of combinations but he arrived at no result.
One night he drank some black coffee, contrary to his usual habit,
and was unable to sleep. Many idea kept surging in his head; he could
almost feel them pushing against one another, until two of them
combined to form a stable combination. When morning came, he had
established the existence of one class of Fuchsian functions. He had
only to prove the results, which took only a few hours. Here we see
the conscious mind observing the new combinations being formed in the
unconscious, while the Wagner story shows the sudden explosion of a
new concept into consciousness.
    Wagner's and Poincare's experiences are representative of
countless others in every field of culture. The unconscious is
certainly the source of instinctive activity. But in creative thought
the unconscious is responsible for the production of new organized
forms from relatively disorganized elements.
    1. satisfactory 2. flash 3. creation 4. mystery
    5. unconscious 6. mental 7. individual 8. experienced
    9. personalities 10. signals 11. insightful 12. dramatic
    13. composing 14. solution 15. contrast 16. observing
    17. explosion 18. representative 19. instinctive 20. disorganized
    Part B: Listening and Translation
    I. Sentence Translation
    1. Ranked the 17th largest in the world, the company is a leading
supporter of the development of health care in this Asian country,
but the recent scandal seriously tarnished the image of the company
and caused a sharp decrease of sales volume.
    这家公司在医疗保健业务方面在亚洲国家是首屈一指的,其规模在世界位
居第 17 位。然而最近的丑闻严重破坏了公司的形象,也造成了销售额的大幅下
降。
    2. With the rapid development of modern technology, intelligence
crime, namely the criminal activities in high-tech aspects, has seen
a great increase in the last two decades. Compared with the figure in
1998, the cases of computer crimes reported to the police in 2003
increased by 83%.
    随着现代科技的高速发展,智能犯罪,或者说是高科技领域的犯罪行为,
在过去 20 年中有了迅猛增长。与 1998 年的数字相比,2003 年向警察局报案的
计算机案件增长了 83%.
    3. The traditional means of media, such as TV, radio, newspaper,
magazine, and so on, are still very popular at different layers of
our society, but inevitably, they are facing the impact and pressure
from new forms of media. Those new-technology-based methods of
communications are fundamentally transforming our life.
    传统的媒体形式,如电视、收音机、报纸、杂志等,在社会的不同阶层仍
然十分流行。但它们不可避免的受到了新媒体形式的影响和压力,这些以新技
术为基础的通信方式正在根本性的改变我们的生活。
    4. What kind of vacation do you enjoy most? Maybe you are
thinking about spas, camping, a romantic night on the beach, or you
prefer those extreme sports like bungee jumping. Whatever forms of
vacation you choose, they serve the purpose of recreation and
relaxation.
    你最喜欢的度假方式是什么?也许你想到的是矿泉疗养,野营,海滩边一个
浪漫的晚上,或者 你喜欢类似蹦极的极限运动。不管你选择怎样的度假方式,
它们的目的都是为了休闲和放松。
    5. In April of 2005, our president paid a visit to the three
Southeast Asian countries, Brunei, Indonesia and the Philippines and
attended the commemoration events of the 50th anniversary of Bandung
Conference. He said this visit has won fruitful achievements and
reached the goal of strengthening friendship, advancing cooperation,
enhancing solidarity and making common progress.
    2005 年 4 月,国家主席访问了三个东南亚国家——文莱、印度尼西亚和菲
律宾,并参加了万隆会议 50 周年的纪念活动。他说此次访问很有成果,达到了
增进友谊、促进合作、加强团结、共同发展的目的。
    II. Passage Translation
    1. Like no other plague before, the AIDS epidemic threatens to
wipe out an entire generation and leave another without parents. We
must not let culture, racial, or social barriers distract us from the
job that must be done. Nor can we let political inefficiency stop us
from our task. This is an undeclared war that everyone must sign up
for in order for us to win. We simply cannot let people continue to
die because we don't feel comfortable talking about AIDS.
    [参考译文] 和以前其他传染病不同,艾滋病这一传染性疾病有可能夺去一
代人的生命,从而使另一代人失去双亲。因此我们决不能让文化、种族和社会
的障碍阻止我们专心从事我们必须做的工作。我们也不能因为政府工作效率低
而放弃我们的工作。这是一场不宣而战的战争,我们每个人都必须参加,只有
这样我们才能取得胜利。我们决不能因为谈论艾滋病会使我们感到难受,而听
任人们继续被艾滋病夺去生命。
    2. Television encourages passive enjoyment. We become content
with second-hand experiences. It is so easy to sit in our armchairs
watching others working. Little by little, television cuts us off
from the real world. We get so lazy, we choose to spend a fine day in
semi-darkness, glued to our sets, rather than go out into the world
itself, television may be a splendid medium of communication, but it
prevents us from communicating with each other.
    [参考译文] 电视助长了消极的享受。我们变得满足于间接的经验。躺在扶
手椅中旁观他人干活再舒心不过了。逐渐地,电视将我们跟真实的世界割裂开
来。我们变得极为懒惰。在一个阳光灿烂的日子,我们宁愿待在昏暗的屋子
内,眼睛死盯着电视不放,而不愿走出去投身真实的大自然之中。电视或许是
一种极好的媒介,但它阻止了人们的相互交流。
                                 阅读部分
    I. 单选
    1-5. DDDDB 6-10. DBCAD 11-15. BCDAD 16-20. ACDBD
    II. 回答问题
    1. The idea of wind power, not long ago, was regarded as an eco-
friendly and cure-all solution to Britain's energy problems. But now,
it is attracting unprecedented criticism. The proposal of installing
27 wind turbines was widely and strongly opposed.
    2. British government cites Denmark as a role model and is
determined to launch wind power project. It believes that renewable
energy (most wind) is needed both to cut CO2 emissions and to reach
the government's own target of generating 10% of British electricity
from renewable sources by 2010.
    3. Since the cost of wind power electricity is comparatively high,
British government introduced "tradable certificate" to bridge the
gap. The wind power installations gain one certificate for each
megawatt-hour they generate. Power distribution companies can buy the
certificates as an alternative to paying the fines they would be
levied for failing to buy a set proportion of renewable energy
annually.
    4. The "bomb" that Iger and Cook dropped in Disney Company was
actually their decision to fire studio president Nina Jacobson and
their announcement to slash 20% of its studio staff and cut the
number of films it makes each year by a third.
    5. The author believes that the film business has been on shaky
ground, because U. S. box office is flat, DVD sales have stalled and
the cost of making movies is soaring.
    6. In the time of difficulty for film business, family films seem
like the only sure opportunities, and Disney is in a prime position
to meet the demand. Iger's immediate goal is to build the Disney
brand in China and India. He also aggressively embraced technological
advances, podcasting and webcasting episodes of Disney's popular TV
hits.
    7. Over the past weeks, stock markets around the world are a
little bit depressed. Dow Jones Industrial Average has lost all the
gains it earned so far. Japan's stock market is down 11% on the year.
The price of gold has dropped in the largest scale in 15 years. Many
emerging markets are not stable.
    8. In early 2001, Silicon Valley, the U. S. center of high
technology, suffered a great depression. Now the depression is over,
but its fallouts continue to drive prices down. Tech companies have
to dump on the markets high-tech equipments at very low prices, as
investors want to get cash.
    9. In the past, a large part of U. S. growth has been driven by
booming real estate prices. But in the past two years, interest rates
have been raised 16 times. Since customers now face higher mortgage
costs, the U.S. economic growth is expected to fall sharply.
    10. U.S. consumer prices climbed faster than expected in May, but
powerful forces in the world economy can keep inflation largely in
check. The prices of high tech equipment will continue to fall,
because tech companies are dumping products on the market, and
outsourcing revolution exerts downward pressure on global production
costs.
                                 翻译部分
    I. 英译汉
    逆境是一所最好的学校。每一次失败,每一次打击,每一次损失,都孕育
着成功的萌芽,都教会我在下一次有更出色的表现。我再也不会逃避现实,也
不会拒绝从以往的错误中获取经验,我不再因此而促成自己的失败。因为我知
道,宝玉不经磨砺就不能发光,没有磨难,我也不能完善自我。
    现在我知道,灵魂备受煎熬的时刻,也正是生命中最多选择与机会的时
刻。任何事情的成败取决于我在寻求帮助时是抬起头还是低下头。无论何时,
当我被可怕的失败击倒,在最初的阵痛过去之后,我都要想方设法将苦难变成
好事。伟大的机遇就在这一刻闪现——这苦涩的根必将迎来满园芬芳!
    我将一直在困境中寻找成功的希望。
    II. 汉译英
    The current visit to Taiwan for exchange, brief and cursory as it
is, has enabled us to see many places, to visit old friends while
making new acquaintances. Whenever people gather together, an
important topic of discussion has been how the Chinese nation can
become prosperous and powerful in the 21st century. Although the
young people on the Mainland and in Taiwan live in different social
contexts, with their individually different experiences of life, in
the innermost recesses of their hearts are wrought an indelible mark
by the fine traditions of the Chinese culture. They all cherish the
same ideal to rejuvenate the Chinese nation. In this great epoch at
the turn of the century, our motherland is developing toward greater
prosperity and powerfulness. People across the Taiwan Straits are
bound to strengthen their exchanges and will mutually promote the
earliest possible achievement of the great cause of reunification of
the motherland. The precious opportunities and the tremendous
challenges at the turn of the century have pushed the young people to
the foreground of the historical arena. At this transitional phase
between the two millennia, in what way the young generation should
embrace the forthcoming new century replete with .hopes is a question
to which we have to seek an answer.
    In the Riyuetan Lake, the waves across the lake surface have by
now all vanished. Enveloped in utter tranquility, the Lake has joined
me in deep thoughts ...

								
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