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					                   KLAMATH FALLS AIRTANKER BASE OPERATIONS PLAN
                                       2012




           KLAMATH FALLS AIRTANKER BASE

                            OPERATIONS PLAN

                                          2012

Prepared by




Airtanker Base Manager                      Date



Reviewed By:




Unit Aviation officer                       Date

                                                                       Deleted:            Page Break
                                                                       ¶
                                    TABLE OF CONTENTS                  Intentionally Blank¶
                                                                                     Page Break
                                                            Page No.
                                                                       Formatted: Normal
CHAPTER I - INTRODUCTION

A. Objectives                                                6
B. Mission                                                   6
C. Authority and Policy                                      6
D. Revisions and Approvals                                   6
E. General Information                                       6
    1. WO / RO Organization                                  6
    2. Airtanker Base Locations                              7
    3. Unit Aviation Organization                            7
    4. Air Tactical Organization                             7
    5. Local Airfield Management                             7
F. Local Information and Directories                         7
    1. Directory and Emergency Contacts                      7
    2. Site Map
    3. Fuels and Fire Behavior Common to Area                7-8



                                                0
                    KLAMATH FALLS AIRTANKER BASE OPERATIONS PLAN
                                        2012

   4. Prominent Landmarks in Area                             8
   5. Pilot and Visitor Orientation                           8

Chapter I Appendices
Appendix 1-1 Directory and Emergency contacts                 10-12
Appendix 1-2 Site Map                                         14

CHAPTER II – PERSONNEL, ORGANIZATION AND TRAINIING

A. Agency Responsibilities                                    16
B. Air Tanker Base Personnel                                  16
  1. Organization Chart                                       16
  2. Organization Expansion                                   16
  3. Duties and Responsibilities                              16
  4. Other Fixed-Wing Operations                              16
C. Training                                                   17
  1. General                                                  17
  2. Local Training                                           17
        a) General Operations                                 17
        b) Emergency Procedures                               17
        c) Hazard Communication                               17
        d) Hearing Conservation / Protection                  17
        e) Security                                           17
        f) Fire Extinguishers                                 17
        g) First Aid                                          17
        h) Briefings                                          17
        i) Aviation Transport of Hazardous Materials          17
        j) Forklift                                           18
  3. Position Training                                        18
        a) Retardant Crewmembers                              18
        b) Retardant Mixmaster                                18
        c) Parking Tenders                                    18
        d) Ramp Managers                                      18
        e) Aircraft timekeepers                               18
        f) Fixed Wing Base Managers                           18
  4. Training Accomplishment                                  18
        a) Base Workshops                                     18
        b) On The Job Training                                18
  5. Training Documentation                                   18
  6. Evaluation                                               19
  7. Responsibility                                           19

Chapter II Appendices
Appendix 2-1 Call When Needed Staffing List                   20
Appendix 2-2 Training Courses Outlines                        21
Appendix 2-3 Operations Orientation Training                  22

CHAPTER III – ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES

A. General Administrative Procedures                          23
  1. Airtanker / Retardant Program                            23
  2. Airtanker Contract                                       23
  3. Retardant Contract                                       23
B. Airtanker / Retardant Program                              23
  1. Tactical Fixed-Wing Information Sheet                    23
  2. Individual Aircraft Flight Log                           23


                                                 1
                     KLAMATH FALLS AIRTANKER BASE OPERATIONS PLAN
                                         2012

  3. Aviation Business System                                        23
  4. Fire Business Management / Incident Activity and Cost Summary   23
  5. Landing Fee Contract                                            24
  6. Retardant Rate Adjustment for ODF                               24
  7. Retardant Obligations to ODF                                    24
C. National Airtanker Contract                                       24
  1. Pre-work Meetings                                               24
  2. Safety Briefings                                                25
  3. Airtanker Payment Procedures                                    25
        a) Flight Use Reports (FS-6500-122)                          25
        b) Contract Payment Summary                                  25
        c) Airtanker Contract Daily Diaries                          25
D. Retardant Contract                                                25
  1. Responsibility                                                  25
  2. Contract Administration                                         25
        a) Daily Retardant Use and Inventory                         26
        b) Retardant / Contract Obligations                          26
        c) Contract Payments                                         26
  3. Quality Assurance                                               26
        a) Sampling                                                  26
        b) Sample Routing                                            26
        c) Sample Labels                                             26
        d) Documentation                                             26
        e) Sample Reports                                            26

Chapter III Appendices
Appendix 3-1 Daily Administrative Checklist                          27-29
Appendix 3-2 Routing Instructions                                    30
Appendix 3-3 Forms                                                   31-39

CHAPTER IV - BASE FACILITIES

A. Airport and Local Facilities                                      40
   1. Airport Security                                               40
   2. Airport Safety                                                 40
   3. Locally                                                        40
   4. Access Map                                                     40
B. Base Facilities                                                   40
   1. Airtanker Base Information Sheet                               40
C. Aircrew Facilities                                                40
   1. Standby Facilities                                             40
   2. Rest Facilities                                                40
   3. Transportation and Refreshment                                 40
D. Aircraft Facilities                                               40
   1. Chocks                                                         41
   2. Tie Downs                                                      41
   3. Night Lighting                                                 41
   4. Towing                                                         41
   5. Cleaning                                                       41
E. Transportation                                                    41
F. Communications                                                    41
G. Reference Library                                                 41
H. Parts and Equipment Storage                                       41
I. Equipment and Tools                                               41
   1. Forklift                                                       41
   2. Air Compressor                                                 41


                                                2
                     KLAMATH FALLS AIRTANKER BASE OPERATIONS PLAN
                                         2012

   3. Generator                                                41
   4. Tools                                                    41
   5. Lawn Equipment                                           42
J. Electrical System                                           42
K. Retardant Facilities                                        42
   1. Water Supply                                             42
   2. Water Storage                                            42
   3. Retardant Storage                                        42
   4. Retardant Mixing                                         42
   5. Metering                                                 42
   6. Loading                                                  42
   7. Recirculation                                            42
   8. Wash-down                                                42
   9. Airtanker Offload                                        42
 10. Offload Storage                                           42
L. Base Safety Facilities                                      42
   1. First Aid                                                42
   2. Eyewash and Shower                                       43
   3. Fire Extinguishers                                       43
   4. Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)                      43
M. Facility Inspections                                        43
   1. Self Inspections                                         43
   2. Regional Inspections                                     43
   3. Oregon OSHA                                              43
N. Inspection Documentation                                    43

Chapter IV Appendices
Appendix 4-1 Storm Water, Waste Water and Spill Plan           44-48
Appendix 4-2 Valve Diagram                                     49-50
Appendix 4-3 Irrigation System                                 51
Appendix 4-4 Radio Check-out List                              52

CHAPTER V – OPERATIONS

A. Regulations                                                 53
B. Procedures                                                  53
C. Airtanker Operations                                        53
  1. Landing Loaded                                            53
  2. Aborting Loads                                            53
        a) Local Abort Site (Jettison Area)                    53
  3. Retardant Dropping in Sensitive Areas                     53
  4. Mission Currency                                          53
  5. Lead planes and Aerial Supervision                        53
  6. Flight and Duty Limitations                               54
  7. Pilot Standby / Availability                              54
  8. Off Duty Scheduling and Means of Contact                  54
  9. Dispatch Reaction Times                                   54
 10. Dispatch limitations / Start Up and Cut off               54
 11. Maintenance Scheduling                                    54
D. Dispatch Operations                                         54
  1. Local Dispatch Organization                               54
  2. Zones of Influence                                        54
  3. Flight Planning                                           54
  4. Dispatch Request                                          54
  5. Pre-flight Briefing                                       55
  6. Temporary Flight Restrictions                             55


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                    KLAMATH FALLS AIRTANKER BASE OPERATIONS PLAN
                                        2012

  7. Airspace Coordination                                              55
  8. Flight Hazard / TFR Map                                            55
  9. Timekeeping                                                        55
 10. Dispatch Rotation                                                  55
 11. Flight Following                                                   55
 12. Communications Plan                                                55
E. Ramp Operations                                                      56
  1. Parking Plan                                                       56
        a) Overflow Parking                                             56
        b) Day Off Parking                                              56
        c) Light Aircraft Parking                                       56
        d) Helicopter Parking                                           56
        e) Large Transport Parking                                      56
        f) Vehicles                                                     56
  2. Pre-Arrival Planning                                               56
  3. Positioning                                                        57
  4. Safe Engine Operation                                              57
  5. Departing Aircraft                                                 57
  6. Fueling                                                            57
        a) Local Vendor                                                 57
        b) Procedures                                                   57
        c) Equipment Inspections                                        57
F. Retardant Operations                                                 57
  1. Water Supply                                                       57
  2. Water Storage                                                      58
  3. Fire Retardant in Use                                              58
  4. Retardant Storage                                                  58
  5. Retardant Receiving                                                58
  6. Retardant Mixing                                                   58
        a) Quality Assurance                                            58
  7. Airtanker Loading                                                  58
        a) Mixmaster                                                    59
        b) Airtanker Loader                                             59
        c) Hot-loading                                                  59
        d) Pressure Relief                                              60
        e) Cavitations                                                  60
        f) Closed Loading Valve                                         60
        g) Back-Up Pump                                                 60
        h) Maintenance Responsibility                                   60
  8. Retardant Offloading                                               60
  9. Wash-down and Spill Procedures                                     60
        a) Environmental Considerations                                 60
        b) Waste Management System                                      61
        c) Retardant Spills                                             61

Chapter V Appendices
Appendix 5-1 Communication Plan                                         62-65   Deleted: 4
Appendix 5-2 Single Engine Airtanker Operations                         66-70   Deleted: 74-76
Appendix 5-3 Grumman S2T Airtanker Operations                           71-73
Appendix 5-4 BAe-146 AIRTANKER OPERATIONS                               74-76   Deleted: 5
Appendix 5-5 Airline Transport Aircraft Operations                      77-79   Deleted: 77-78
Appendix 5-6 Helicopter Operations                                      80-81   Deleted: 6
Appendix 5-7Modular Airborne Fire Fighting Systems (MAFFS) Operations   82
Appendix 5-8 Retardant Jettison Area                                    83      Deleted: 79
                                                                                Deleted: 7
CHAPTER VI – SAFETY AND SECURITY                                                Deleted: 80



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                     KLAMATH FALLS AIRTANKER BASE OPERATIONS PLAN
                                         2012


A. Base Safety Evaluations and Reviews                                   84        Deleted: 81
   1. Annual Reviews                                                     84        Deleted: 81
   2. Regional Reviews                                                   84
   3. Oregon OSHA                                                        84        Deleted: 81
B. Review Documentation                                                  84        Deleted: 81
C. Ramp Safety                                                           84        Deleted: 81
D. Personal Protective Equipment                                         84
E. Airspace and Aerial Hazards                                           84        Deleted: 81
   1. Aerial Hazard Map                                                  84        Deleted: 81
   2. Airport Hazards                                                    84        Deleted: 81
   3. Turbulence, Wind and Time of Day Restrictions on Flight Activity   84
                                                                                   Deleted: 81
   4. Temporary Flight Restrictions (TFR)                                84
F. Landing With Full or Partial Load                                     85        Deleted: 81
   1. Local Procedures                                                   85        Deleted: 81
   2. Runway and Ramp Wheel-Loading Capability                           85
                                                                                   Deleted: 81
G. Emergency Response Equipment                                          85
   1. Fire Extinguishers                                                 85        Deleted: 82
   2. First Aid Kits                                                     85        Deleted: 82
   3. Eyewash                                                            85
                                                                                   Deleted: 82
H. Emergency Response                                                    85
I. Crash, Search and Rescue (Mishap Plan)                                85        Deleted: 82
J. Hazard, Incident and Accident Reporting                               85        Deleted: 82
   1. Local Procedures                                                   85
                                                                                   Deleted: 82
   2. Routing                                                            86
K. Security                                                              86        Deleted: 82
                                                                                   Deleted: 82
Chapter VI Appendices
                                                                                   Deleted: 82
Appendix 6-1 Ramp Safety Plan                                            87-97
Appendix 6-2 Safety Briefing Guide                                       98-101    Deleted: 82
Appendix 6-3 Emergency Response Plan                                     102-105   Deleted: 82
Appendix 6-4 Hazard Communication Plan                                   106-108
                                                                                   Deleted: 83
Appendix 6-5 Job Hazard Analysis                                         109-116
Appendix 6-6 Airbase Security Plan                                       117-122   Deleted: 83
Appendix 6-7 Bomb Threat Procedures and Checklist                        123-124   Deleted: 84-93
Appendix 6-8 Fremont / Winema Emergency Spill Plan                       125-143
                                                                                   Deleted: 95-98
                                                                                   Deleted: 99-102
                                                                                   Deleted: 103-105
                                                                                   Deleted: 106-113
                                                                                   Deleted: 114-119
                                                                                   Deleted: 120-121
                                                                                   Deleted: 122-141




                                                    5
                      KLAMATH FALLS AIRTANKER BASE OPERATIONS PLAN
                                          2012

CHAPTER I – INTRODUCTION

The Klamath Falls Airtanker Base Operations Plan is supplemental to the National Interagency Airtanker
Base Operations Guide NFES# 2271, http://www.fs.fed.us/fire/aviation/av_library/iabog/iabog.pdf

This plan provides local operational procedures specific to the Klamath Falls Airtanker Base. This
document will not duplicate previously published information except in cases needing clarification. When
quoted, the information will be in italics. Every attempt has been made to provide accurate references.

A. Objectives
The objectives of this supplement are to:

    •   Define the mission and objectives of the Klamath Falls Airtanker Base,

    •   Define and standardize operating procedures at the Klamath Falls Airtanker Base,

    •   Through standardization, facilitate the activation of trained personnel during periods of high fire
        activity,

    •   Provide a common approach in the Government's relationship with airtanker contractor and
        airtanker base personnel,

    •   Provide checklists, orientation outlines, and special instructions for both contractor employees
        (pilots, mechanics) and government workers at the airtanker base.

B. Mission
The mission of the Klamath Falls Airtanker Base is to provide a safe, effective and efficient environment
for the coordination and support of aerial firefighting resources engaged in the protection of the public and
natural resources from wildfire.

C. Authority and Policy
The Klamath Falls Airtanker Base operates under the authority of Forest Service Fire and Aviation
Management through the policies of the Forest Service Manual Directive System, the Fire and Aviation
Management Manual 5700, http://fsweb.wo.fs.fed.us/directives/fsm/5700/ and the Flight Operations
Handbook FSH 5709.16, http://fsweb.wo.fs.fed.us/directives/fsh/5709.16/.

Operational procedures are based on the guidance of the Interagency Airtanker Base Operations Guide
NFES #2271, http://www.fs.fed.us/fire/aviation/av_library/iabog/iabog.pdf a publication of the Interagency
Airtanker Base Operations Committee, a subcommittee of the National Interagency Aviation Committee.

D. Revisions / Approvals
This guide is revised annually by the Airtanker Base Manager prior to the beginning of fire season. It is
then reviewed and approved annually by the Unit Aviation Officer.

E. General Information

        1. Washington Office / Regional Office Organization
        Washington Office Fire and Aviation Management oversee the Forest Service airtanker program
        through the Pacific Northwest Region Fire and Aviation Director. The Regional Aviation Officer,
        Regional Airtanker Program Manager and the Regional Airtanker Base Specialist address
        specific regional airtanker base issues.




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                     KLAMATH FALLS AIRTANKER BASE OPERATIONS PLAN
                                         2012

        2. Airtanker Base Locations
        The Pacific Northwest Region has six heavy airtanker bases. The bases, host forest, telephone
        numbers and managers are as follows:

          Medford ATB           Rogue River-Siskiyou     541-779-0397    Lonnie Allison
          Klamath Falls ATB     Fremont-Winema NF        541-883-6853    Don Cavin
          Redmond ATB           Deschutes NF             541-504-7220    Eric Graff
          LaGrande ATB          Wallowa-Whitman NF       541-962-8665    Russ Hurst
          Moses Lake ATB        Okanogan-Wenatchee       509-762-6184    Rob Meade
          Troutdale ATB         Mt. Hood NF              503-666-3828    Vacant

        3. Unit Aviation Organization
        The Fremont / Winema (FWF) Fire Management Staff through the Unit Aviation Officer and the
        Airtanker Base Manager oversee the Klamath Falls Airtanker Base.

        4. Air Tactical Organization
        The Klamath Falls Airtanker Base has no large airtankers assigned on site. Lead planes are
        located in Redmond Oregon and Redding California, both approximately 30-40 minutes from local
        incidents. An Air Attack platform with ATGS is located at Klamath Falls. Depending on the
        severity of fire season an Air Attack platform is temporarily based at Lakeview Or.

        5. Local Airfield Management
        The Klamath Falls International Airport is operated by the city of Klamath Falls. A portion of the
        airport is occupied by the 173rd Fighter Group, Oregon Air National Guard and is managed by the
        State Military Department and the Department of Air Force. Contact information is located on
        page10.

F. Local Information and Directories
       A base directory including emergency contacts, a site map, local hotels and services and area
       fuels and fire behavior information is located in the personnel orientation guide appendix 1-1.




                                                    7
KLAMATH FALLS AIRTANKER BASE OPERATIONS PLAN
                    2012


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                      8
                      KLAMATH FALLS AIRTANKER BASE OPERATIONS PLAN
                                          2012

                                                  APPENDIX 1-1

                                             AIRBASE DIRECTORY

                                   EMERGENCIES DIAL 9-911
                                    Airport Security 541-885-6663

                                             EMERGENCY CONTACTS:

Title                        Name                   Phone                  Cell                 Home
Base Manager                 Don Cavin              541-883-6853           541-891-1170         541-664-1434
Asst. Base Manager           Autumn Clark           541-883-6854           541-891-9409
Unit Aviation Officer        Dave Machado           541-947-6187           541-219-0106
Dispatch Center Manager      Tammy Wodarczak        541-883-6850
State Dispatch               Randy Baley            541-883-5693           541-891-7861
    Coordinator
Zone FMO                     John Giller            541-947-6212-
Unit Fire Staff              Mike Haddock           541-883-6863           541-394-8123
FS Law Enforcement-West      Joan Rizkallah         541-883-6793           541-891-7875
FS Law Enforcement-East      Mark Suba              541-947-6222           541-891-3850
Airport Security                                    541-885-6663
Airport Operations           Bill Hancock           541-883-5372           541-891-2620
Airport Fire                                        541-885-6382
R-6 Aviation Facilities      Eric Shilling          541-504-7253           541-280-7351         FAX 541-504-7258
    Security Manager


                                             AIRTANKER BASE PHONES

                     Line 1              Line 2           Fax                   VHF Frequency
                     541-883-6853        541-883-6854     541-273-1457          123.975

                                  AIRTANKER BASE AGENCY PERSONNEL

       Title                              Name                  Phone           Cell            Home
       Base Manager                       Don Cavin             541-883-6853    541-891-1170    541-664-1434
       Asst. Base Manager                 Autumn Clark          541-883-6854    541-891-9409
       Airbase Technician                 Michael Gaither       541-883-6853    530-356-1553
       Air Tactical Group Supervisor      Jim Hansen            541-883-6857    541-420-3476
         & Asst. Unit Aviation Officer


                          AIRTANKER BASE RETARDANT CONTRACT PERSONNEL


                 Title                   Name               Phone              Cell            Home
                 Foreman                 Jimmy Johnson                         541-892-7652
                 Asst. Foreman           William Pizano                        541-331-4114
                 Warehouse Office                           541-850-9017




                                                            9
                      KLAMATH FALLS AIRTANKER BASE OPERATIONS PLAN
                                          2012




                                KLAMATH FALLS INTERAGENCY DISPATCH

                             Line 1          Fax                Primary Frequency
                             541-883-6850    541-883-6830       169.925 tone 103.5



                         KLAMATH FALLS INTERAGENCY DISPATCH PERSONNEL

          Title                      Name                  Phone             Cell           Home
          Dispatch Center Manager    Tammy Wodarczak       541-883-6850
          State Coordinator          Randy Baley           541-883-5693      541-891-7861
          FS Lead Dispatcher         Vaccent               541-883-6851      541-891-6517   541-891-0541   Deleted: Darren Yazzie
          FS Dispatcher              Vaccent               541-883-6852
          State Dispatcher           Jake Barnett          541-883-5694                                    Deleted: Donna Bordelon




                               KLAMATH FALLS AIRPORT ADMINISTRATION

Title                 Name            Office Phone    Cell             Fax              Home
Airport Manager       John Longley    541-883-5372
Operations Manager    Bill Hancock    541-883-5372    541-891-2620     541-883-5376     541-885-9637
Operations            Richard Voss                    541-891-3867
                      Ron Lynch                       541-891-0567
Administration        Linda Tepper    541-883-5372



                                     KLAMATH FALLS AIRPORT TOWER

Title      Name                        Phone           Tower Frequency         Ground Control   ATIS
Tower                                  541-882-4641    133.975                 121.90           126.5
ATC        Dave Cunningham             541-331-8813
Manager



                              KLAMATH FALLS AIRPORT FIRE DEPARTMENT

                                     Fire Department Phone      541-885-6382



                                          AIRPORT FUEL SERVICES

                                        Ocean Air            541-882-4681
                                        Darren Trausch       541-891-6130

                                        AIRCRAFT REPAIR SERVICES

                                        Ken Gooch            541-882-5856




                                                      10
     KLAMATH FALLS AIRTANKER BASE OPERATIONS PLAN
                         2012



                       KINGSLEY AIR NATIONAL GUARD

                        Command Post       541-885-6886
                        Exchange (BX)      541-885-6371


                         RETARDANT CONTRACTOR

       ICL Performance Products LP
       Ontario, CA.                     909-983-0772
       Phos-Chek                        1-800-682-3626    909-984-4770

                         AIRTANKER CONTRACTORS

 Vendor                Phone                    Fax             Cell
 Neptune Aviation      406-542-0606             406-721-1309    801-710-4257
  Suzie Kendall        406-721-8886 ext. 12     406-542-3222
  Mark Timmons         406-542-0606 ext. 110

 Aero Union Chico      530-230-1900             530-230-1537
 Mike Grimm            530-230-1663             530-230-1643

 Minden Aviation       775-267-1167

 TBM Butler Aircraft   541-548-8166


                       PNW REGION AIRTANKER BASES

Base            ATBM             AATBM           Base Phone      Base Fax
John Day        Vacant                           541-575-3384    541-575-3382
La Grande       Russ Hurst       Craig Droke     541-962-8665    541-962-8640
Medford         Lonnie Allison   Vacant          541-779-0397    541-779-3098
   ODF          Harry Kelley                     541-621-4118    541-779-3098
Moses Lake      Rob Meade        Sherry Buss     509-762-6184    509-762-6186
Redmond         Eric Graff       Cynthia Lusk    541-504-7220    541-504-7223
   ODF          Pat Ryan                         541-504-7220    541-504-7223
Troutdale       Bruce Haynes     Vacant          503-666-3828    503-666-3829
Pendleton       Doug Simler                      541-969-7994    541-9628673
Klamath Falls   Don Cavin        Autumn Clark    541-883-6853    541-2731457




                                      11
KLAMATH FALLS AIRTANKER BASE OPERATIONS PLAN
                    2012


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                      12
KLAMATH FALLS AIRTANKER BASE OPERATIONS PLAN
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               APPENDIX 1-2.

     KLAMATH FALLS AIRTANKER BASE
                SITE MAP




                     13
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        14
        CHAPTER II – PERSONNEL, ORGANIZATION, TRAINING AND RESPONSIBILITIES                                           Deleted: ORGANIZATION ,


A. Agency Responsibilities
The USDA Forest Service, the Fremont/Winema National Forest (FWF) and the Westside Fire Staff Officer
supervise the Klamath Falls Airtanker Base (KFATB). The Airtanker Base Manager supervises an assistant
manager and one temporary Airbase Technician.

B. Airtanker Base Personnel
The KFATB has an agency Manager and an Assistant Manager and employs one temporary Airbase Technician
providing seven day a week coverage during the fire season. A vendor/contractor operating under a full service
retardant contract provides personnel for retardant mixing and loading. When fire activity dictates, “Call When
Needed, (CWN), staff is ordered. A list of CWN personnel, their qualifications and contact numbers is located in
appendix 2-1.

   1. Organization Chart
   See the Organization Chart, page 4 of the Interagency Airtanker Base Operations Guide for positions typical at
  the airtanker base during fire activity. One person may fill more than one position if necessary.
         .
   2. Organization Expansion
  As the complexity of the airtanker operation expands, additional positions may be required. The following are
  general guidelines to assist the base manager in planning for expanding operations.

        a. 1 Airtanker in Rotation
            • 1 ATBM / Timekeeper / Radio Operator
            • 1 RAMP / Parking Tender
            • 1 Airtanker Loader (Vendor Provided)
            • 1 Mixmaster (Vendor Provided)

        b. 2-3 Airtankers in Rotation
            • 1 ATBM
            • 1 RAMP
            • 1 Parking Tender
            • 2 Airtanker Loaders (Vendor Provided)
            • 1 Mixmaster (Vendor Provided)
            • 1 Timekeeper / Radio operator

        c. 4 Airtankers in Rotation
            • 1 ATBM
            • 1 RAMP
            • 1-2 Parking Tenders
            • 2 –3 Airtanker Loaders (Vendor Provided)
            • 1 Mixmaster (Vendor Provided)
            • 1 Aircraft Timekeeper / Radio Operator
            • 1 Driver / Runner

   3. Duties and Responsibilities.
  In general the duties and responsibilities of personnel at the Klamath Falls ATB, are as described in Chapter II,
  B.,pg. 5, Airtanker Base Personnel: Duties and Responsibilities, Interagency Airtanker Base Operations Guide
  NFES #2271

   4. Other Fixed Wing Operations
  At any time, additional fixed wing operations such as crew, overhead and equipment transport can complement         Deleted: compliment
  the airtanker operation. Photo aircraft, smokejumper, and recon aircraft may be active at the base as well.
  Depending on the complexity of the situation, an additional Fixed Wing Base or Ramp Manager will be
  requested to oversee the additional activities.




                                                        15
C. Training
The Klamath Falls Airtanker Base utilizes trained and qualified personnel for key positions. The following training
may be mandatory or recommended depending on the position performed:

  1. General
  It is the responsibility of the home unit supervision of each agency employee to ensure that all employees
  have attended training sessions required by the agencies health and safety programs and personnel
  regulations. This required training may include but is not limited to; Hazardous Materials Background (Right to
  Know), Defensive Driving, Blood borne Pathogens, Civil Rights, First Aid, and Computer Security.

  2. Local Training (All Personnel)
  All base personnel receive training in the following as required. Training is scheduled as needed to
  accomodate CWN staff.

        a. General Operations
        Familiarization with general base operations and an overview of the base operations plan.

        b. Emergency Procedures
        Base personnel are briefed on emergency procedures. All personnel will become familiar with the KFIFC
        emergency response plan including locations of first aid kits, fire extinguishers, evacuation routes,
        emergency contacts and bomb threat protocol.

        c. Hazard Communication Plan
        All base personnel will become familiar with the Hazard Communication Plan. This training includes
        instruction in the presence of hazardous materials in the workplace, the availability of Material Safety
        Data Sheets, the Confined Space Plan, and the Job Hazard Analysis, which covers all positions. See
        the KFATB Hazard Communication Plan on103.

        d. Hearing Conservation / Protection
        The Fremont / Winema National Forest Safety and Health Coordinator include ramp personnel in the
        forest Hearing Conservation Program. Ramp personnel will always use proper hearing protection while
        working on the ramp. Training is provided in the proper use of hearing protection devices. Approved
        hearing protection devices are supplied by the ATB. See the Job Hazard Analysis, 106.                         Deleted: ,106


        e. Security
        All personnel will receive a briefing on the KFATB security procedures. See the KFATB Security Plan,
        page 114.

        f. Fire Extinguisher Use
        All base personnel have annual recurrent basic training in the use of the fire extinguishers provided at
        KFATB.

        g. First Aid
        Base personnel are encouraged to maintain annual currency in basic first aid and CPR. At least one
        employee at the base should be current in basic CPR.

        h. Briefings
        Safety briefings will be conducted with base personnel and aircrews when significant issues arise or
        there is a change in operations procedures or new information occurs. The procedures for briefings are
        outlined in the Safety and Security portion of this plan, page96. The base manager or assistant will
        address issues of concern at the briefings.

        f. Aviation Transport of Hazardous Materials
        Only those personnel who have had current instruction in Aviation Transport of Hazardous Materials will
        be involved in the loading or unloading of hazardous materials. Ideally, base personnel do not handle
        hazardous materials. The retardant product is not a hazardous material.



                                                        16
     g. Forklift
     Only trained, certified and authorized personnel shall operate the forklift. Forklift training may be
     provided as the need is identified.

3. Position Training

     a. Retardant Crewmembers (RTCM) Airtanker Loading and Hot Loading
     A contractor provides retardant crewmembers. Retardant Crewmembers will receive training in loading
     all types of airtankers. Retardant crewmembers involved in hot loading airtankers must have specific
     training in local airtanker hot loading procedures. The training must be documented in the employee files
     located at KFATB.

     b. Retardant Mixmaster (MXMS) Retardant Mixing and Quality Control
     Retardant Mixmaster’s are provided by the contractor. Retardant Mixmaster’s will be trained in              Deleted: Mixmasters
     procedures for mixing and maintaining quality control of the retardant product. Retardant Mixmaster’s       Deleted: Mixmasters
     involved in hot loading airtankers must have specific training in local airtanker hot loading procedures.
     The training must be documented in the employee files located in the warehouse office.                      Deleted: Mixmasters


     c. Parking Tenders (FWPT) Aircraft Parking and Support
     Agency and non-agency personnel in the position of Parking Tender will meet the training and
     qualifications standards in FSH 5109.17. Trainees will receive the mandatory IAT, computer-based
     training in addition to base specific instruction. Training documentation will be filed in the operations
     area.

     d. Ramp Managers (RAMP) Ramp Supervision
     Agency and non-agency personnel in the position of Ramp Manager will meet the training and
     qualifications standards in FSH 5109.17. Trainees will receive the mandatory IAT, computer-based
     training in addition to base specific instruction. Training documentation will be filed in the operations
     area.

     e. Aircraft Timekeepers (ATIM)
     Agency and non-agency personnel in the position of Aircraft Timekeeper will meet the training and
     qualifications standards in FSH 5109.17. Trainees will receive the mandatory IAT, computer-based
     training in addition to base specific instruction. Training documentation will be filed in the operations
     area.

     f. Fixed Wing Base Manager (FWBM)
     Agency and non-agency personnel in the position of Fixed Wing Base Manager will meet the training and
     qualifications standards in FSH 5109.17. Trainees, agency and non-agency will receive the mandatory
     training, including computer-based training, in addition to base specific instruction.

4. Training Opportunities

     a. Base Workshops
     Much of the local training occurs at KFATB workshops for Call-When-Needed and contractor employees.
     Workshops are conducted annually. An outline of the local orientation presented at KFATB is in
     appendix 2-2, page 22.

     b. On-the-Job Training (OJT)
     Most local training is conducted on-the-job. Trainees get one-on-one instruction when they arrive at the
     base prior to conducting operations on their own. Trained personnel monitor trainees throughout the
     operation.

5. Training Documentation
      Training documentation for all agency and non-agency personnel is maintained on file at KFATB.
      Additional documentation may be available from the individual’s Wildland Firefighting Qualifications and
      Individual Development Training databases at their home unit.



                                                      17
     Training documentation for all retardant contract crewmembers will be on file in the retardant contract
     supervisor’s office in the warehouse.

6. Evaluation
     Base personnel, whether qualified or trainees, will receive evaluations of their position performance.
     These evaluations will be included in their personnel file at the base and will be forwarded to the Unit
     Training Officer for inclusion in the employee’s incident qualifications files.

7. Responsibility
     The base manager will be responsible for seeing that all trainees receive required training and that
     adequate on-the-job training (OJT) is conducted before the individual is released to perform duties
     without direct supervision.




                                                      18
                               APPENDIX 2-1

                         Call When Needed Staffing
                     Contact Numbers and Qualifications
                              Updated 05/2011

        Name                          Contact Numbers          Quals         Remarks
Vicki Baker          Work       541-947-6190                 SEAT ATIM
                     Cell       541-219-1497                 RAMP
Lakeview BLM         Home       541-353-2552                 FWPT
SEAT Manager         E-mail     vbaker@or.blm.gov
Dennis Childers      Work       541-783-4001                 FWPT
                     Cell       541-891-0486
Chiloquin District   Home       541-884-0001
                     E-mail     dchilders@fs.fed.us
Richard Ford         Work       541-883-6887                 FWPT
                     Cell       541-891-1158
Winema NF Office     Home       541-882-2696
                     E-mail     Richard_Ford@fs.fed.us
Karl Greulich        Work       541-883-6757                 ATIM (T)
                     Cell       541-892-3633
Winema NF Office     Home       541-884-2662
                     E-mail     kgreulich@fs.fed.us
Don Hoffheins        Work       541-885-4105                 RTCM-THSP
                     Cell       541-892-8207/8208            RAMP
Klamath Falls BLM    Home       541-850-8721                 FWPT
                     E-mail     Don_Hoffheins@or.blm.gov     ATIM (T)
Chris Jones          Work                                    Driver
                     Cell                                    FWPT (T)
Casual Hire          Home       541-884-8461
                     E-mail     linkvillenewfs@charter.net
Glenda Jones         Work                                    ATIM (T)
                     Cell       541-891-4216
Casual Hire          Home       541-884-8461
                     E-mail     linkvillenewfs@charter.net
Nancy Kersh          Work       541-885-3501                 ATIM        After 1630 and
                     Cell                                                weekends only.
Klamath District     Home       541-273-2921
                     E-mail     nkersh@fs.fed.us
Brian McCarty        Work       541-885-4151/ 541-883-6919   MXMS
                     Cell       541-891-7687                 RTCM-THSP
Klamath Falls BLM    Home       541-884-4976                 FWPT
                     E-mail     Brian_McCarty@or.blm.gov     RAMP
Rob McEnroe          Work       541-885-4116                 RTCM-THSP
                     Cell       541-591-1715                 FWPT
Klamath Falls BLM    Home       541-883-2402
                     E-mail     Rob_McEnroe@or.blm.gov
Leonard Smith        Work                                    FWPT
                     Cell       541-591-1855                 RAMP (T)
Casual Hire          Home       541-884-5727
                     E-mail     wapitistalker@q.com
Gary Sprague         Work                                                Comes from Silver
                     Cell       541-480-8187                             Lake.
Casual Hire          Home
                     E-mail     Smokey68@coinet.com




                                    19
                                               APPENDIX 2-2

                                       TRAINING COURSE OUTLINES

Course: General Operations, Safety and Security Training


1. Orientations and Operations Plan Review
    • Organization                                       2. Retardant
    • Positions and Duties                                  • Contract and Purchasing
    • Facilities                                            • Quality Assurance
    • Safety Equipment                                      • Use and reporting
    • Dispatch Procedures                                3. Airtanker Contract
    • General Procedures                                    • FS 6500-122’s/Aviation Business System
2. Safety Training                                               (ABS)
    • Briefings                                             • Cumulative Summaries
    • Emergency Procedures                                  • Daily Diaries
    • Hazard Communication                                  • Reporting
    • Job Hazard Analysis
3. Security Training
    • Airbase Security

Course: Retardant Crewmember (RTCM)

1.   General Airtanker Loading Procedures
2.   Grumman S2 Procedures and Hot loading
3.   SEAT Procedures and Hot loading
4.   MAFFS Operations

Course: Retardant Mixmaster (MXMS)

1.   Chemicals
2.   Mixing
3.   Quality Control
4.   Metering
5.   Wash down
6.   Truck Offload
7.   Spill Containment and Clean up

Course: Ramp Management (RAMP)

1.   Management and Planning
2.   Communications
3.   Fueling
4.   Light and Tactical Aircraft
5.   Helicopters
6.   Fixed Wing Base and Transport Aircraft Operations

Course: Aircraft Timekeeper (ATIM)

1. Aircraft Timekeeping
   • Aircraft Logs
   • Cost Reporting
   • Landing Fees




                                                     20
                                           Appendix 2-3

                             OPERATIONS ORIENTATION TRAINING

       Initial next to each subject as it is reviewed

      ORGANIZATION AND                     Ramp Operations        Incident Reporting
      TRAINING
         Positions and Duties              Ramp Management         Safety Briefings
         Training Requirements             Fueling                    Fuel Spills
         Training Documentation            Retardant Chemicals         Hazard
                                                                   Communication
      ADMINISTRATION                     Mixing                    Confined Space
         General Procedures              Quality Control         Job Hazard Analysis
         Safety Briefings                Metering                   Base Security
      FACILITIES                         Loading
         Aircrew                         Wash-down
         Aircraft                        Delivery Trucks
         Equipment and Tools             Ramp Safety
         Retardant                       Single Engine
                                         Airtankers
         Base Safety Facilities          S2’s
         First Aid                       Transports
         Fire Extinguishers              MAFFS
         Eyewash and Shower              Helicopters              Eye Protection
         PPE, Radios, Batteries       SAFETY AND SECURITY        Hearing Protection
         Spill Management                Airspace
      OPERATIONS                         Emergency
                                         Procedures
             Airtanker Operations        Medical
             Dispatch Procedures         Fire
             Timekeeping                 Evacuation
             Communications              Mishap Plan

Student
Print Name                          Signature                    Date

Instructor
Print Name                          Signature                    Date




                                                 21
                                CHAPTER III - ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES

A. General Administrative Procedures
The administrative procedures, forms and reports used at the Klamath Falls Airtanker Base are based on those
described in the Interagency Airtanker Base Operations Guide, page 85. Administrative procedures tend to fall in
to one of three categories:

    1. Airtanker / Retardant Program
       Procedures in this category apply generally to the fixed wing airtanker / retardant base and shared
       resource program. They include planning, funding, procurements, landing fee and other local
       agreements, incident cost reporting, retardant use reporting and other documentation.

    2. Airtanker Contract.
       Airtankers on federal and state contracts operate from the KFATB. Information and documentation
       related to these airtankers should to be forwarded to the Contracting Officers Representative (COR)
       assigned to that airtanker contract item daily if the airtanker is working out of KFATB. Currently the base
       manager is the COR on one national airtanker contract item.

    3. Retardant Contract
       This category contains the administrative procedures related to the retardant contract. They include the
       value analysis process if applicable, administration of the retardant contract, quality assurance and the
       maintenance and reporting of retardant costs.

B. Airtanker / Retardant Program

    1. Tactical Fixed Wing Information Sheet
       This form is designed to provide information on contract aircraft to airbase personnel. It should be filled
       out by the COR of each aircraft. When the aircraft arrives at the ATB, the pilot will give a copy to base
       personnel. As an alternative, the COR can fax this form ahead, to the base the aircraft is traveling to.
       See page 89 of the Interagency Airtanker Base Operations Guide.

    2. Individual Aircraft Flight Log
       The Individual Airtanker Flight Log is used to keep track of all daily airtanker and tactical support aircraft
       operations. The information on this form is critical, as it is the source form for all other administrative
       forms.

        The log form is prepared daily for each airtanker or tactical aircraft operating from the base. Complete all
        information by hand for each flight including fire information and billing, flight times, costs, and retardant.
        At Klamath Falls, the log information for each aircraft is entered into a File Maker Pro software database,       Deleted: Falls
        which uses the Crystal Reports program to generate the final log sheet.                                           Deleted: database which

        Flight information for airtankers and Call When Needed aircraft is phoned or faxed daily to the
        appropriate COR. The log sheets are maintained throughout the season in a notebook in the operations
        area. This information is also used to put together an incident cost summary.

    3. Aviation Business System (ABS)
       The Aviation Business System program is the required method of recording Forest Service aircraft
       contract payments. A hardcopy of the log sheet must be maintained in real time to prevent the loss of
       information in the event of a computer failure.

Fire Business Management /Incident Activity and Cost Summary
       The daily report corresponds to the daily use and cost summary listed in the Interagency Airtanker Base
       Operations Guide, page 100. The form provides a daily accounting of all incident costs, cumulative
       activity for airtankers, retardant use and other aircraft activity at the base.

        The information needed to complete this summary comes from the Aircraft Logs. The File Maker Pro
        software creates the report using the log database and Crystal Reports software.



                                                         22
       This report should be faxed daily to the Air Operations Branch of each incident or to the controlling
       dispatch center aviation desk for each incident.
    4. Landing Fees
       Airtankers operating from Klamath Falls that are over 12500 lbs gross weight are subject to a landing
       fee. The Landing Fee Agreement is with the Klamath Falls International Airport. The report is generated
       on the File Maker Pro program. Aircraft weights are listed in the bottom right corner of the report.

        The Base Manager is responsible for keeping the landing fee form up to date. Landings are recorded on
        the log sheet by number per incident per Airtanker. A cumulative summary of charges to each fire code
        is completed near the bottom of the form.

        A landing fee costs are compiled every two weeks. An original cost form is submitted to the airport office
        for signature and a copy is left with the airport management. The airport management will produce a
        billing invoice that will be mailed to the airtanker base. The invoice can then be paid using a
        government-purchasing card.

    5. Retardant Season Average Rate Adjustment for Oregon Department of Forestry
       At Klamath Falls, a contractor under the National Full Service Retardant Contract provides retardant
       mixing and delivery services. The retardant contractor is paid by the gallon for retardant delivered. The
       rate per gallon changes under a tiered rate structure. The first 100,000 gallons is more expensive than
       the second or third 100,000 gallons.

        Fires generally begin to occur in the lower elevation lands protected by the Oregon Department of
        Forestry (ODF) before they begin to occur on other agency lands. Retardant charges to ODF tend to be
        higher when they have fires occurring early in the season. To help alleviate the cost burden, the PNW
        region has chosen to charge the State a flat rate that represents an average price per gallon delivered
        from the various bases over the course of the season.

        The form “Retardant Season Average Rate Adjustment” is used to determine a season average rate and
        show a cost comparison for retardant delivered to all agencies. The form is filled out at the end of the
        ODF Airtanker Contract period and forwarded to the Incident Business Management staff on the unit and
        in the regional office.

    6. Retardant Charges Obligated to the Oregon Department of Forestry
       In addition to reporting the season average use rate, this form lists the incidents and retardant charges
       that were made to ODF fires during the course of the season. This information is provided to the unit
       and Regional Incident Business managers so that adjustments can be made. *Note: With the
       exception of retardant delivered by SEAT’s, all retardant charges to the State of Oregon
       Department of Forestry are charged to the same fire code which is provided by the Regional
       Office at the beginning of the fire season.

C. National Airtanker Contract
The USDA-Forest Service Contracting Office located at the National Interagency Fire Center in Boise, ID., issues
the National Airtanker Contract. Federally contracted airtankers operate under this contract.

Currently, the KFATB manager is the COR on one national contract item.

The COR is the person who generally interacts daily with the contractor representative, typically the pilot or co-
pilot. The COR, with help from the contractor representative, gather the information and documentation to
support the payments for services provided by the contractor. See Chapter III, C. Contract Administration,
Interagency Airtanker Base Operations Guide, page 26.

    1. Pre-work Meetings
       Contract pre-work meetings are conducted prior to the start of the airtanker contract. Meetings include
       the Contractors Representative, the Contracting Officer (CO), the Contracting Officers Representative
       (COR) and Project Inspectors (PI). Pre-work meeting notes and subjects are documented and filed in
       the contract file binder located in the operations area. Meetings can be in person or conference call.



                                                         23
        Information for the complete (pre-work conference) pilot briefing is found in the airtanker contract binder
        located in the operations area.

    2. Safety Briefings
       Safety briefing information is posted daily in the conference room. Formal briefings are conducted when
       circumstances warrant them. The specific format for the presentation and documentation of briefings is
       found in appendix 6-1, page 96.

    3. Airtanker Payment Procedures
       The proper completion of flight payment documents is critical to the correct and timely payment of
       contractors. Aircraft status and flight information must be passed back to the COR in a timely manner, to
       insure proper credit for service rendered by the contractor. This can be done in two ways:

        •   The contractors designated representative, usually the pilot and/or co-pilot, or the contract COR can
            call the operations base and request the information by phone or

        •   The management of the operations base can send by facsimile (FAX), the information to the aircrafts
            COR, on the form (Individual Airtanker Flight Record) or a similar form.

        From this information the COR can complete the following forms:

            a) Flight Use Reports (FS 6500-122)
               Flight Use Reports are completed daily, or as practical in the Aviation Business System (ABS)
               program. Flight times and other charges are verified with the contractors’ representative.
               Mission/project information is verified with the hosting unit.

            b) Contract Payments
               Payment summaries are generated through the reporting feature of ABS when needed.
               Payment packages are printed and filed in the airtanker contract file located in the operations
               area.

            c) Airtanker Contract Diaries
               An Aircraft Contract Daily Diary is completed daily for the airtanker documenting the previous
               day’s activities. Copies of these diaries are routed every two weeks to the Contracting Officer
               and Administrative COR.


D. Retardant Contract.
    Fire retardant mixing and loading operations are conducted by a contractor under the National Full Service
    Rretardant Contract. The Contractor/Vendor is responsible for maintaining an adequate supply of fire
    retardant chemicals on site, keeping the chemicals ready for use, demand-mix the retardant into the aircraft,
    maintain quality control, and maintain records of retardant delivered.

    Administration procedures for the full service contract fall under the direction of the National Long Term Fire
    Retardant Contract. A copy is located in the operations area.

    1. Responsibility
       The Airtanker Base Manager and Assistant are the designated Project Inspectors on the National Long
       Term Fire Retardant Contract. The retardant crew supervisor is generally also the contractor
       representative as well as the retardant crew lead.

    2. Contract Administration

            a) Daily Retardant Use and Inventory
               Each retardant and water delivery mission is documented on the Retardant Use Record. This
               record is kept at the Mixmaster station and includes the pounds and gallons of retardant flown off
               and to which incident. Retardant sampling information is also included. The document is
               located in the Interagency Airtanker Base Operations Guide, page 98. The log is a source
               document for completing retardant use and incident billing documents as well as other program
                                                        24
                record keeping and reporting.

Retardant / Contract Obligations
               Retardant use and contract charges are documented on the Retardant / Contract Obligation
               Form. See exhibit 3-5, page 36. This form is prepared from the aircraft flight logs and retardant
               use logs. The Retardant / Contract Obligation Form are submitted bi-weekly to the Albuquerque       Deleted: is
               Incident Finance Center for billing the benefiting agency. A copy is maintained in the retardant
               contract file located in the operations area.

            b) Contract Payments
               Contract payments are made in accordance with the National Long Term Retardant Contract
               payment process. Retardant use is recorded on a Retardant Use/Payment Summary and
               submitted bi weekly to the Albuquerque Incident Finance Center for payment. A copy of the
               Retardant Use/Payment Summary is maintained in the retardant contract file located in the
               operations area.

    3. Quality Assurance
       FSH 5162.2 and the National Retardant Contract require participation in the Lot Acceptance and Quality
       Assurance Program. The Contractor/Vendor and the Airtanker Base Manager have the responsibility to
       ensure the quality of the product flown from the base. The procedures for the program are listed in the
       Lot Acceptance, Quality Assurance and Field Quality Control for Fire Retardant Chemicals Guide NFES
       1245, page 6.

            a) Sampling
               Tank samples are drawn at the beginning of the operating season, after adequate re-circulation
               and at the end of the operating season. There are sampling valves on the front and back of
               each tank. Aircraft samples are drawn from the sample valve on the discharge side of the
               loading pump.

            b) Sample Routing
               Samples are sealed, labeled, packaged and sent to the Missoula Technology and Development
               Center. The Lot Acceptance, Quality Assurance and Field Quality Control for Fire Retardant
               Chemicals Guide NFES 1245 outlines proper labeling on page 8, the ship to address on page 43
               and data collection forms on page 44.

            c) Sample Labels
               Sample information labels can be printed or pre-printed, adhesive labels are available from the
               Missoula Wildfire Chemicals Lab. Contact Shirley Zylstra at (406) 329-4859 or
               szylstra@fs.fed.us for pre-printed adhesive labels. See exhibit 3-7.

            d) Documentation
               Aircraft retardant sample results are documented in the Mixmaster’s Retardant Use Record and
               the use records are filed in the retardant contract file located in the operations area.

            e) Sample Reports
               Retardant Sample Result Reports generated by the Missoula Technology and Development
               Center outlining the results of retardant sample tests are sent to the respective use bases.
               These results can be found in the retardant file located in the operations area.




                                                       25
                                                Appendix 3-1

                                DAILY ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES

DAILY STATUS AND BRIEFING

         Status Board
         Update the airtanker status board located in the hallway next to the HVAC room, include
             o Airtanker rotation,
             o Current sunset time,
             o Total retardant use to date.

         Organization Chart
         Update the organization chart including CWN and contractor personnel who have been verified as
         available.

         Safety Briefing Preparation
         Gather the necessary information to conduct a safety briefing. Including but not limited to.              Deleted: :
            o Situation Reports
            o Weather
            o Local Temporary Flight Restrictions
            o Notices to Airmen
            o Incident Action Plans
            o Safety Topic
            o Pull Recent Safecoms
            o National Threat Advisory Level
            o AFF information on morning airtanker locations

         Safety Briefing
         During periods of activity, conduct a formal safety briefing and complete the documentation on the
         Airbase Safety Briefing form located in the conference room.

DAILY RETARDANT CONTRACT ADMINISTRATION

         Retardant Use Form (Mixmaster’s Log)                                                                      Deleted: Mixmasters
         Obtain a copy of the retardant use form from the Mixmaster,                                               Deleted: mixmaster
            o Double check the figures listed,
            o Look for discrepancies in the LAQA figures,
            o Add fire names and budget codes as necessary,
            o Update the totals for retardant use by agency for the day and cumulative for the season,
            o Obtain information on standby hours from the retardant crew,
            o File in the retardant contract file located in the operations area.

         Retardant and Contract Obligations
         Using the day’s retardant use form and contractor daily report to:                                        Deleted: days
             o Update the summary with retardant use and retardant crew extended hours, water loads etc,
                 broken out by budget code,
             o Consolidate dollar totals for each budget code,
             o Update the use by agency portion on the summary.

         Retardant Contract Daily Diary
         Prepare a daily dairy for the previous days activities involving the retardant contract.

         Retardant Contract Payment Summary
         The Retardant Contract Payment Summary is prepared every two weeks by the retardant contractor
         representative. See payment preparation and routing below.
         Retardant Samples
         Ensure that any retardant samples from the previous day are sealed, labeled and mailed to the
         Wildfire Chemical Lab. File sample result information that is received in the retardant file located in

                                                      26
        the operations area.
                    Send Retardant Sample To:
                    Wildland Fire Chemical Systems
                    MTDC
                    5785 Hwy. 10 W
                    Missoula, Montana 59808
                    Attn: Lot Acceptance

DAILY AIRTANKER CONTRACT ADMINISTRATION

        Fire name Database Update
        For each fire dispatch, update the Filemaker Pro “firename.db” database with the incident
        information.

        Airtanker / Aircraft Flight Record
        Complete an airtanker / aircraft flight record for each airtanker and tactical aircraft operating from the
        base daily. Enter the information to the Filemaker Pro “tanker.db” file. Create flight leg tickets for
        airtankers on federal contracts in ABS as time allows. Entering these records as the missions occur
        will save time later when producing reports.

        Airtanker Contract FS 6500-122’s
        Refer to the airtanker logs received from the previous day. Complete the FS 122’s invoices in the
        ABS system for the airtanker that is administered by the Klamath Falls airtanker base.

        Airtanker Payment Summaries
        Payment summaries are not created until the invoices are packaged, bi-weekly, at that time the
        packaged payments should be printed and filed in the airtanker contract binder located in the
        operations area.

        Airtanker Contract Diaries
        Refer to the airtanker logs received the previous day. Complete an aircraft contract daily diary for
        the assigned airtanker contract item for the previous day’s activities. File in the aircraft contract file
        located in the operations area.

DAILY LANDING FEE CONTRACT ADMINISTRATION

        Landing Fee Record
        Update the Landing Fee Record Summary. Submit to the airport operations office biweekly.

        Landing Fee Billing
        The Landing Fee Billing Invoice will be generated by the airport operations office biweekly. Pay the
        invoice in a timely manner with a government purchase card.

PERSONNEL ADMINISRATION

        Employee Timesheets
        Ensure agency employee and casual hire timesheets are accurate, complete and filed in the
        employee files.

        Employee Evaluations
        When appropriate, document employee performance with an evaluation. File in the employee file
        and send a copy to the training officer, Carmen Thomas at the Klamath–Lake BLM office, using an
        agency routing envelope.




                                                      27
END OF DAY

        Retardant Use Form (Mixmaster’s Record)                                                                        Deleted: Mixmasters
        Copy the Retardant Use Record from the Mixmaster station. Ensure the Mixmaster log matches the                 Deleted: mixmaster
        amounts indicated on the Airtanker Flight Records. File in the retardant contract file for tomorrow’s
        paperwork. Attach Micro-Motion receipts to the appropriate aircraft log by tail number.                        Deleted: mixmaster


        Airtanker / Aircraft Flight Record
        After ensuring that an airtanker / aircraft flight record for each airtanker and tactical aircraft operating
        from the base has been completed, enter the information into the ABS system and fax or email the
        daily records to the assigned COR. Provide a copy to the manager of each SEAT. Obtain the flight
        information and status of the aircraft administered by the Klamath Falls base. File the records in the
        flight record file located in the operations area.

        Daily Incident Cost Report
        Use the Filemaker Pro program to complete an incident cost summary for each incident supported by
        the KFATB. After completion fax or email a copy to Incident Air Operations or the hosting dispatch
        center. If directed, fax aircraft information to the Albuquerque Service Center.

        Safecoms
        Complete any Safecoms if necessary for events of the day. Discuss the incident(s) with the parties
        involved; document the discussions in the Safecom and on the Aircraft Daily Diary.




                                                      28
                                          Appendix 3-2

                                    ROUTING INSTRUCTIONS


Send Retardant Contract Payment Package Originals to:

       USDA Forest Service
       Albuquerque Service Center
       Incident Business Branch
       101 B. Sun Ave. N.E.
       Albuquerque, NM 87109              866-372-7249


Send Airtanker Payment Bundles and Diary Copies to:

       NIFC Contracting
       Attn Elna Black
       USDA Forest Service
       3833 S. Development Ave.
       Boise, ID 83705          208-387-5632




Pre-printed labels available in the operations area.




                                                29
                        Appendix 3-3

                           FORMS


Exhibit 1: Aircraft / Airtanker Daily Operations Log

Exhibit 2: Airbase Daily Incident Cost Summary

Exhibit 3: Airbase Landing Fee Record

Exhibit 4: Retardant Daily Use Record

Exhibit 5: Retardant Inventory/Use Worksheet

Exhibit 6: Cumulative Retardant Use/Payment Summary

Exhibit 7; Retardant Sample Label

Exhibit 8; ODF Retardant Averaging Worksheet




                             30
Exhibit 1




   31
Exhibit 2




   32
Exhibit 3




   33
Exhibit 4




   34
Exhibit 5




   35
Exhibit 6




   36
                                                 Exhibit 7

                                         LAQA Sample

                      Base Information
                      Airtanker Base:
                      ATB Manager:
                      ATB Fax:
                      ATB E-mail:
                      Base Sample Identification:
                      Name and phone of person taking sample:


                                      Delivery Information
                      Retardant Name:
                        Wet Concentrate      Dry Concentrate        Mixed
                      Delivery Date:                       Delivery Time:
                      Shipper Number:
                      Weight of Delivery:                  (pounds or
                      bags)
                      Transferred to ATB tank number:

                                     Sample Information
                        Delivery        Begin season       End season
                      Number of gallons mixed:
                      Refractometer Reading:
                      Viscosity:
                         Marsh funnel time:          Temperature:

                      Comments:   (P code, storage tank number, problem, etc.)




Send to:
Wildland Fire Chemicals Systems
MTDC
5775 Hwy 10 W.
Missoula Montana 59808
406-329-4859

Via ground, shipping labels available in the operations area.




                                                     37
Exhibit 8




   38
                                            CHAPTER IV – FACILITIES                                                    Formatted: Font: Bold

A. Airport and Local Facilities.
The Klamath Falls International Airport and the community of Klamath Falls provide excellent services needed to
support a large airtanker base. The main runway, (14/32), is 10,301 ft. An additional runway, (7/25) is available
at 5,260 ft. Commercial airline services are available as well as taxis, shuttles, and rental cars. A restaurant is
located at the terminal. A fixed base operator provides aircraft services including fuel and light maintenance.
There is also an A & P on the facility, see page 11.

  1. Airport Security
       The Airport Security program is very comprehensive requiring security training and programmable key
       access for base personnel.

  2. Airport Safety
       A fully equipped Aircraft Rescue and Fire Fighting department is located on the Airport to respond to
       fires, spills, and medical emergencies. Phone numbers and contacts are located in the base directory on
       page 10 and in the Airtanker Base Emergency Response Plan, page 121.

  3. Locally
       Within three miles of the Airport are several hotels, numerous restaurants, service stations, laundry, and
       major shopping. More information is in the Pilot/Visitor Guide (pending).

  4. Access Map
       A map showing the local area and access to the base is located in chapter one, page 14.

B. Base Facilities General
The Klamath Falls Airtanker Base provides complete facilities for extended airtanker operations support. These
include accommodations for all current types of fixed wing airtankers, large transport aircraft, and light aircraft,   Deleted: light
light and heavy helicopters. Retardant operations facilities include storage, mixing, loading, quality control, and
waste management. The base also has a variety of equipment for light maintenance.

  1. Airtanker Base Information Sheet
       The Airtanker Base Information Sheet outlines some of the facilities at the Klamath Falls Airtanker Base
       and is updated annually for the Interagency Airtanker Base Directory. The directory lists information for
       all bases nationally. Directory is located in the operations area.

C. Aircrew Facilities

  1. Standby Facilities
       Standby facilities for aircrews are available at the base. They include an aircrew lounge complete with
       telephone, television and a kitchen area with stove, microwave, refrigerator, sink, coffeemaker, icemaker
       and cooking utensils.

  2. Rest Facilities
       In addition, there are complete restroom facilities with showers and lockers; a laundry facility is available
       as well. Quiet Rooms are available with single beds for undisturbed rest.

  3. Transportation and Refreshment
       For meals and refreshments, the base follows the contract requirements found in the National Airtanker
       Contract section G.1.10 (3). The Base Manager is authorized, during times of high activity to provide
       meals, ice and drink refreshments at the government’s expense in order to sustain those operational
       periods.

        Bottled water is available in the refrigerators in the pilot lounge and on the west wall of the warehouse
        building. A water fountain is located in the KFATB operations building.

D. Aircraft Facilities
KFATB maintains complete facilities for airtanker operations accommodating dispatch, communications,
timekeeping, briefings, and parking.

                                                         39
  1. Chocks
       Chocks are available for most aircraft types. They are located next to each parking site.

  2. Tie downs
       Tie down locations are installed at each light aircraft parking area. Tie down ropes are kept in the
       laundry room locker.

  3. Night Lighting
       Several high intensity lights routinely light the ramp areas at night. The ramp lights are on a timer
       located in the HVAC room and can be manually turned for all night security. Routinelly the ramp lights
       come on at dusk and shut off at 2200. Portable lighting is available upon request and is located in the
       warehouse. Additional lights may be obtained by calling the Air National Guard and requesting the use
       of their power plants with lights. Contact information is on page 12.

  4. Towing
       An aircraft tug for heavy aircraft is available. Consult with the base manager for information on its use.
       A light aircraft tow bar is available in the warehouse.

  5. Cleaning
        A limited number of aircraft cleaning supplies are available in the warehouse. There is water and
        electricity available in all 4-pit areas.

E. Transportation
A Forest Service vehicle is available for transportation and deliveries. Drivers must be agency approved.

F. Communications
Telephones are located in the operations building. Computer access for agency personnel is available in the
operations office. Communications between the operations and the ramp is by radio. The base has a VHF base
set and VHF handheld radios with headsets for use on the ramp. The base frequency is 123.975, for ramp,
timekeeping, and aircraft communications while on the ramp. The ramp also has an outside public address
system.

G. Reference Library
The reference library at KFATB is as listed in Chapter IV, IV.7. Reference Library, Interagency Airtanker Base
Operations Guide, in addition to the latest update of the previously referenced guide. An electronic version of all
reference materials is also available via the computers in the operations area. Check the “favorites” menu for
titles and links.

H. Parts and Equipment Storage
KFATB has a warehouse for the storage of parts and equipment. The personnel assigned to KFATB are
responsible for the majority of the maintenance. In the event, the maintenance requirement is beyond the
capability of the base crew, a specialist will be located and their services contracted for the job.

I. Equipment and Tools
Located in the warehouse are tools and equipment for facility maintenance.

  1. Forklift
       A 3000 lb. capacity forklift is available for moving and handling loads. Refer to the Training and Safety
       portions of this guide for information regarding its use on page 41.

  2. Air Compressor
       An electric air compressor is located in the warehouse.

  3. Generator
       A Homelite gas powered 120v generator is located in the warehouse.

  4. Tools
       Several tools are located in the warehouse.


                                                        40
  5. Lawn Equipment
       A lawnmower, weed eater, rakes, shovels, wheelbarrow, and other types of lawn tools are available in
       the warehouse.

J. Electrical System.
The electrical service on the ramp is a 400 amp system. This service provides electricity to the pumps (2), the
live reels, the GFCI's located on the ramp (4) and to the pump remotes (4). In the event of an electrical failure, a
gas-powered pump is available to load aircraft and a generator is available to provide power. Operations may be
considerably slower.

K. Retardant Facilities

  1. Water Supply
      The primary water source for retardants is city water supplied and monitored by a mechanical float
      controlled valve at the top of the water tank.

  2. Water Storage
      Water is stored in a 20,000-gallon steel tank located behind the retardant tanks.

  3. Retardant Storage
       Retardant is stored in four 10,000 gallon steel tanks. Liquid concentrate, delivered in tanker trucks, is
       offloaded using a 4" Gorman Rupp positive displacement pump driven by a Wisconsin VH4D air-cooled
       gasoline engine.

  4. Retardant Mixing
       Liquid concentrates are mixed with water as they flow through a “blender” on the way to the aircraft.

  5. Metering
      The retardant mixture is metered by one of two 4" Micro Motion F300 mass flow meters. The meters use
      an RFT 3700 remote flow transmitter to send flow rate and density information to a monitoring/rate
      totalizer readout. Load information is transmitted to one of two printers in the operations office.

  6. Loading
       A six inch loading line supplies each of the three loading pits. Remote switches operate the loading
       pumps. Retardant is supplied to the aircraft by either of two 40 hp electrical pumps. The back-up pump
       is a 4” Gorman-Rupp with a Wisconsin VH4-D gasoline motor.

  7. Recirculation
       The gasoline powered retardant offload pump is also used to re-circulate the retardant in the tanks to
       prevent separation of the product.

  8. Wash down
      A two-inch water line supplies the wash down system to the pits. Each hose reel on the ramp has 100
      feet of 1" hose.

  9. Airtanker Offload
       An additional 4” Gorman-Rupp pump with a Wisconsin VH4D gasoline engine is kept on hand for
       airtanker offloading. A Homelite 385 positive displacement pump is also kept as a backup for truck and          Deleted: back up
       airtanker offloading

  10. Offload Storage
       Airtanker off load storage consists of a 5000 gallon metal tank located behind the main retardant storage
       tanks.

L. Base Safety Facilities

  1. First Aid
        Fully stocked first aid kits are located in the operations building between the restrooms and in the
        warehouse office. For serious injuries, the airport Fire / Rescue is available to respond. Blood borne

                                                        41
        pathogen protection is available in the on-site kits. A portable defibrillator is located in the dispatch
        building.

  2. Eyewash and Shower
       Eyewash and shower stations are located at the northwest and southeast corners of the retardant plant
       area. Showers are also located in the operations building restrooms.

  3. Fire Extinguishers
        Fire Extinguishers are located at each loading pit, at each aircraft parking area, in the warehouse,
        operations building, retardant plant and pilot lounge.

  4. Personal Protective Equipment
       Eye and hearing protection, sunscreen, coveralls, and gloves are available for all employees. Safety
       items are located in the laundry room locker or in the warehouse safety cabinet.

M. Facility Inspections
Several types of Inspections are conducted annually.

  1. Self Inspections are conducted locally by the Base Manager to determine the bases’ readiness for the
  upcoming season as well as to determine equipment and maintenance needs. The Forest Safety
  Coordinator also conducts annual reviews in conjunction with Forest Engineering to assure compliance with
  OSHA, FS Health and Safety codes and Forest Service facilities standards.                                         Deleted: OSHA ,

  2. Regional Representatives conduct biennial inspections of the base coordinated usually with the beginning
  of the operational season to assure compliance with national standardization.

  3. Oregon OSHA on occasion conducts inspections to determine the bases’ needs to comply with OSHA
  standards. The Base manager reviews the results of these inspections and develops a plan for addressing
  noted discrepancies and initiates actions to meet compliance.

N. Inspection Documentation
The results of all base inspections are kept on file in the Base Managers office. In the same file are the
documented action plans and progress files associated with ongoing projects resulting from the inspections.




                                                          42
                                                  APPENDIX 4-1

        STORM WATER, WASTE WATER AND SPILL MANAGEMENT PLAN
A. FACILITY DESCRIPTION

Facility:       Klamath Falls Airtanker Base
                USDA Forest Service - Fremont / Winema National Forest

Address:        6300 Summers Lane
                Klamath Falls, Oregon 97603

The Klamath Falls Airtanker Base provides fire retardant reloading and other logistical support to wildfire fighting
aircraft. The base is located on the northeast quadrant of the Klamath Falls International Airport in Klamath Falls
Oregon.


                               KLAMATH FALLS AIRTANKER BASE SITE MAP
                                             Exhibit 4-1




Fire retardant aircraft are parked on one of four concrete parking pads that are one hundred feet square and set
fifty feet apart. The pads have drains at each corner that direct all storm water, waste water and spills toward a
water management system.

Aircraft are loaded with fire retardant on these pads as well as fueled, serviced and washed.




                                                        43
Fire retardant is stored in four 10,000-gallon tanks located on a concrete containment pad east of the parking
pads. Mixed retardant is pumped through metal pipes located in concrete containment channels that run to each
parking pad. Drainage for the containment pad and channels directs all spills and runoff to the water and spill
management system.

Fire retardant is delivered to the site in tanker trailers containing up to 5200 gallons. The trucks park directly
behind the retardant storage tanks. There is no containment where the trucks park. The retardant is transferred
from the trailers to the main storage tanks through a pipe and valve system within the containment area.

Water is stored in one 20,000-gallon tank behind the retardant tanks. There is no containment for the water tank.

Vehicles and equipment are washed within the concrete containment pad next to the storage tanks.

The water and spill management system is a series of valves located underground in the drain system. The
valves allow runoff to be contained at the spill point, directed to a containment/capture tank, directed to the storm
drain or to a sand oil separator.

The facility is primarily used for retardant operations during fire season, generally between May and November.
During the operation season, all waters run through the sand/oil separator before entering the local sewer
system. During non-operations months, waters run directly to the local sewer system. See pages 49-50 for
appropriate valve positioning.




                                                         44
                               KLAMATH FALLS AIRTANKER BASE
                    RETARDANT PLANT AND UNDERGROUND MANAGEMENT SYSTEM




B. WATER AND SPILL MANAGEMENT

The drainage system at KFATB is designed to direct all rain or storm water, waste water and spills of all liquids to
appropriate points of disposal.

In general, storm water generated by rain or snow is directed to the storm drains. See drain site map, page 47.

Waste water generated by typical operations such as washing small quantities of fire retardants off the ramp or
aircraft or by using detergents to clean aircraft of dirt, grease and oil is directed through a sand-oil separator
before entering the sewer system.

Significant spills of retardants, fuels, oil and/or other materials are contained and then reused or professionally
disposed of.




                                                         45
1. Storm Water

The storm water drains indicated as (C) on the site map take water from rain or snow directly into the
storm drain system. These drains are unaffected and normally uncontaminated by operations.

Storm water entering the containment drains from the loading pads (A), storage tank pad (B), and pipe
channels (D) go to the water and spill management system.

From approximately November 1 to April 31 or when operations are not anticipated, all runoff from these
drains is allowed to flow directly to the storm drain system.

From approximately May 1 to October 31 or during periods of operations, the runoff from these drains is
directed through a sand-oil separator system prior to entering the sewer system.

2. Operations Waste Water

From approximately November 1 to April 31 or when no operations are expected, all runoff from the
operational area drains (A), (B) and (D) is allowed to flow through the water management system directly
to the storm drains.

From approximately May 1 through October 31 or during periods of activity all runoff from the operational
area drains (A), (B) and (D) is directed through a sand-oil separator system prior to entering the sewer
system.


3. Spill Containment

During normal operations small spills of fire retardant, fuel, oil and detergents may occur. When these
spills occur within the normal operations areas they are washed down with water into the water
management system, which directs them through the sand-oil separator prior to their entry into the sewer
system.
                                               46
        Large unexpected spills of these materials enter the water and spill management system and are
        captured in a recovery tank for future disposal.

        Large retardant spills occurring in the retardant storage area are captured and held within the storage
        tank containment area and are recovered.

C. WATER AND SPILL MANAGEMENT SYSTEM OPERATION

All water, fire retardant, wash down water or fluids that enter the drains in the operations areas at (B), (C), or (D)
enter the water and spill management system.

After entering the system, the fluids encounter a number of valves. Referencing the diagram on page 49, valve A
when closed prevents fluids from entering the spill recovery tank. When valve A is open, fluids are allowed to           Deleted: open
enter the tank.

Valve B in the closed position prevents fluids from entering the sand-oil separator tank. When valve B is, open          Deleted: is
fluids will enter the sand/oil separator.

Valve C in the closed position prevents fluids from directly entering the storm drain system. When valve C is
open, it allows fluids to travel directly into the storm water system without treatment.

Valve D when closed prevents spills in the retardant tank pad from leaving the containment area. When valve D
is open, it allows fluids from the retardant tank pad area to enter the water management system.




                                                          47
                                                  Exhibit 4-2
                                 Water and Spill Management System Diagram




1. Valve Positions for Each Event

Refer to diagram

Off-season, end of day and during significant rain event:

    •   Valve A Closed
    •   Valve B Closed
    •   Valve C Open
    •   Valve D Open

Wash down of small spills of retardant or non-hazardous fluids in the retardant tank area or wash down of
vehicles in the retardant tank area:

    • Valve A Closed
    • Valve B Open
    • Valve C Closed
    • Valve D Open
Wash down of small spills of retardant or fluid in the aircraft parking pads or wash down of aircraft on the aircraft
parking pads:


                                                         48
    •   Valve A Closed
    •   Valve B Open
    •   Valve C Closed
    •   Valve D Open

Containment of a large retardant spill in the retardant tank area:

    •   Valve A Closed
    •   Valve B Closed
    •   Valve C Closed
    •   Valve D Closed

Containment of a large retardant spill on an aircraft parking pad:

    •   Valve A Open
    •   Valve B Closed
    •   Valve C Closed
    •   Valve D Closed

Containment of a large fuel spill on the aircraft parking pad:

    •   Valve A Open
    •   Valve B Closed
    •   Valve C Closed
    •   Valve D Closed




                                                         49
                                             APPENDIX 4-3
                                  IRRIGATION SYSTEM OPERATION

                                                  (DRAFT)




The irrigation system is controlled electronically. The control system is located in the HVAC/Computer room.
Contact base management regarding the programming or maintenance of this system.




                                                      50
                                      APPENDIX 4-3

                            RADIO CHECK OUT LIST


                                                                 CHECKED OUT BY
RADIO               HEADSET TYPE                     USER        / DATE

  # 4862 IC-A3         Flight Line               Contract Crew

  # 4596 IC-A3         Flight Line               Contract Crew

  # 6680 IC-A3         Flight Line               Contract Crew

  # 9218 IC-A3         Flight Line               Contract Crew

  # 4545 IC-A3         Flight Line               Contract Crew




  # 6033 IC-A3         Flight Line                   RAMP

  # 4598 IC-A3         Flight Line                   RAMP


  # 6609 IC-A3         Flight Line                   CAVIN

  # 4544 IC-A3          Flight Line                  CLARK
  # 4598 IC-A3   Flight Line                         Gaither




                                          51
                                         Chapter V - OPERATIONS                                                       Formatted: Font: Bold
                                                                                                                      Formatted: Font: Bold
Operations at the Klamath Falls Airtanker Base rely on good communications, daily briefings, on-the-job training,
and a demonstrated concern for safety. These key factors help in the safety and efficiency of the overall base
operation.

A. Regulations
Operations on the Klamath Falls base are conducted in accordance with Forest Service Directives. Additional
regulation by the City of Klamath Falls and the FAA govern some operations on the base. The city oversees
local maintenance operations. The FAA and the airport regulate flight operations and security, since the airport
has a commercial air carrier, and an active Air National Guard F-15 unit.

B. Procedures
Procedures at KFATB are conducted in compliance with applicable policies found in Forest Service Handbooks
and Manuals, the Interagency Airtanker Base Operations Guide, the Contract Administration Manual, the Health
and Safety Code, the National Airtanker Contact, the Retardant Lot Acceptance and Quality Assurance Guide,
the Air Tanker Base Planning Guide, Aviation Fuel Quality Program, Area Mobilization Plans, pre-dispatch
planning, the Incident/Accident Action Plan, the Interagency Airspace Coordination Guide, and others. Hard-
copies and electronic versions are available in the operations area.

C. Airtanker Operations
Airtanker operations fall under the direction of the Forest Service 5700 manual, specifically FSH 5709.11, Flight
Operations Handbook. Refer to chapter 40 for direction regarding performance, take off criteria, retardant
dropping, and congested area operations and crew proficiency/mission currency.                                        Deleted: congested

        1. Landing Loaded
        Generally, loaded landings are not conducted however, at the discretion of the pilot and within the
        limitations of each type of airtanker; landing loaded may be an acceptable procedure. Refer to the
        National Airtanker Contract, B.5.B.5, and page 4.                                                             Deleted: page

        2. Aborting Loads
        In the event of an emergency, the retardant load will be jettisoned at the pilot’s discretion. When it is     Deleted: emergency
        necessary to abort all or part of a retardant load to enhance the performance characteristics of the
        aircraft when no emergency exists, a specific abort site has been established.

                a. Local Abort Site (Jettison Area)
                The local jettison area is located northeast of the KFATB near Calimus Butte lookout within the
                boundaries of the old Lone Pine fire on the Fremont / Winema National Forest. Specific
                information about the site is located in appendix 5-7, page 80.

        3. Retardant Dropping in Sensitive Areas or near Waterways
        Sensitive areas, within the Klamath Falls base initial attack zone that might be affected, are Klamath Fish   Deleted: are:
        Hatchery, local watersheds, local streams, structures, lakes, and noise-sensitive areas (Eagle Nesting).

        The 300 foot buffer zone guideline applies to dropping retardant near waterways. Refer to interagency
        policy regarding dropping retardants near water sources located in Interagency Standards for Fire and
        Fire Aviation Operations Guide chapter 17 -11 and Forest Service policy located in FSH 5709.16,35.23.

        4. Mission Currency / Practice Drops
        Mission currency flights are conducted as required by Forest Service policy. Water drops are generally
        conducted on the Lone Pine fire abort site. Reference FSH 5709.16, 15.2.


        5. Lead planes and Aerial Supervision
        When available, a lead plane shall accompany the airtanker. As an option, an Air Tactical Group
        Supervisor or Aerial Supervision Module may be ordered to meet mission supervision requirements.
        Reference Forest Service Manual 5716.32, page 39.

        6. Flight and Duty Limitations
                                                         52
       Flight and duty limitations will be adhered to according to the National Airtanker Contract requirements
       and/or as directed in Forest Service policy. Reference FSH 5709.16, 11.27.

       7. Pilot Standby/Availability Hours
       Normal standby for the aircraft assigned to the Klamath Falls Airtanker Base will be 0900-1800 hours
       daily. Hours will be adjusted, to start earlier or later, depending on fire danger, activity and the airtanker
       crews flight and duty limitations. Reference National Airtanker Contract, section C.16.A, B, Flight and
       Duty Limitations, page 15.

       8. Contact Requirements for Off-Duty and Authorized Breaks
       The contractor will notify the KFATB personnel of local address and telephone number. Reference
       National Airtanker Contract, page 22.

       9. Dispatch Reaction Time Requirements
       Will be in accordance with the National Airtanker Contract, F 3, B.2a, page 22.

       10. Dispatch Limitations, Start Up and Cut Off
       “Normally, airtankers shall be dispatched to arrive over a fire not earlier than 30 minutes after official
       sunrise and not later than 30 minutes before official sunset.”

       “Airtankers may be dispatched to arrive over a fire as early as 30 minutes prior to official sunrise and as
       late as 30 minutes after official sunset provided:

               1. “A qualified Air Tactical Group Supervisor or Airtanker Coordinator (lead plane) is on the
               scene; and”

               2. “Has determined that visibility and other safety factors are suitable for dropping retardant; and”

               3. “Notifies the appropriate dispatcher of this determination.”

           Refer to the National Airtanker Contract section C.8, H (4), page 9, and FSH 5709.16, 35.32

       11. Maintenance Scheduling
       Maintenance will be scheduled and accomplished according to the provisions in the National Airtanker
       Contract section C, C.5, page 7, Aircraft Maintenance and section F 3, B.3, page 22, Authorized Breaks.

D. Dispatch Operations
General dispatch procedures are as discussed in Chapter IV-C, Dispatch Procedures, and page 49 of the                   Deleted: page
Interagency Airtanker Base Operations Guide. Additional information is available in the Klamath Falls
Interagency Fire Center Aviation Standard Operating Procedures Guide. Information specific to KFIFC:

       1. Local Dispatch Organization
       The local dispatch office is an Interagency effort involving the USDA-Forest Service (Winema NF) and
       Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF). Through cooperative agreements, the dispatch center provides
       dispatch support for: BLM (Klamath Resource Area), NPS (Crater Lake National Park), and the USF&WS
       (Klamath Wildlife Area).

       2. Zones of Influence
       The initial attack area for the Klamath Falls ATB encompasses approximately 4 million acres on 7                 Deleted: on:
       national forests in Regions 5 and 6, BLM, US Fish & Wildlife Service, Crater Lake National Park, Lava
       Beds National Monument, Oregon Department of Forestry, and California Department of Forestry.

       3. Flight Planning
       Flight planning, arrangements for transport aircraft etc; is conducted by dispatch.

       4. Dispatch Request
       Dispatch operations are located in the building northeast of the airtanker base. Procedures may differ
       slightly from remotely located facilities. Aircraft orders are received by the Klamath Falls Interagency


                                                         53
Dispatch Center directly from the ordering unit through a neighboring forest agreement or from the
Northwest Interagency Coordination Center.

KFIFC dispatch will alert the airtanker base by public address of the incoming airtanker order. KFATB
personnel will alert the aircrews and retardant crews who, with confirmation from base management and
a nod from the pilot, may begin loading the aircraft.

Information from the Aircraft Resource Order is transferred to the Tactical Fixed-Wing form. The form
(ATB-3) is filled out in accordance with information found in Chapter III, C.5., and Exhibit B 4 of the
Interagency Airtanker Base Operations Guide. Information contained within the boxes with the heavy
black borders must be furnished. The information should be placed on the form prior to the aircraft
departure. The Airtanker Base Manager will obtain the order from dispatch.

Diversions or changes in the dispatch request will normally be relayed to the airtanker by radio on the
base frequency 123.975 or by dispatch. Depending on cockpit activity, the information may be relayed to
the ATGS or leadplane.

5. Pre Flight Briefing
The aircrews will obtain a copy of the mission request from KFATB personnel and they will have an
opportunity to receive a briefing on the incident information and consult maps for location and hazards.
Special concerns or considerations of the mission will be discussed at this time.

6. Temporary Flight Restrictions
Local temporary flight restricted areas are established by KFIFC Dispatch through the Northwest
Coordination Center. The policies regarding the establishment of TFR’s are located in the National
Interagency and Northwest Mobilization Guides in chapter 20–24.11. Additional information regarding
temporary flight restrictions is available in the Interagency Airspace Coordination Guide at
www.fs.fed.us/r6/fire/aviation/airspace.

7. Airspace Coordination
KFIFC Dispatch will deconflict military training routes and activity when necessary. Local military training
routes are depicted on the Flight Hazard / TFR maps located in the conference room. Refer to the KFIFC
Standard Operating Guide for Aviation Dispatching.

8. Flight Hazard / TFR Map
Flight hazards and local TFR maps are posted in the KFATB conference room. This information should
be discussed during mission briefings. Additional information regarding flight hazards is provided in
Chapter VI Safety and Security, E, page 81.

9. Timekeeping
A timekeeping clock is located in the operations area. Pilots will announce their rolling times as minutes
after the hour on 123.975. A timekeeper will verify the rolling time and record it on the Aircraft/Airtanker
Daily Operations Log. Pilots will verify flight times at the end of the day with the flight logs. It is
preferable to have the times confirmed with the timekeeper in case discussion is necessary over
discrepancies. Refer to the National Airtanker Contract section C.16.B (1) page 15.

10. Dispatch Rotation
Dispatch rotation at KFATB follows Forest Service policy referenced in FSH 5709.16, 35.31, page 23 and
the Interagency Airtanker Base Operations Guide chapter 4, section C, 6, page 51.

11. Flight Following
Local flight following is established through KFIFC and is conducted on National Flight Following or a
locally assigned frequency. KFIFC also uses automated flight following system. The sending unit has
the responsibility to forward the flight information on the airtanker to the receiving unit. The flight crew is
responsible for check-in upon arrival at their destination.


12. Communications Plan
See appendix 5-1 for the Klamath Falls Airtanker Base Communication Plan, page 62.

                                                  54
E. Ramp Operations
Safety is the foremost consideration in conducting operations on the aircraft ramp. Maintaining positive
communications is the key to smooth, efficient and safe operations.

The Airtanker Base Manager is responsible for aircraft activity on the ramp. A Ramp Manager will be assigned to
maintain coordination of the operation. Parking tenders will be assigned to assist the ramp manager. One
person may be assigned multiple roles.

        1. Parking Plan
        KFATB will adhere to the parking procedures outlined in the Interagency Airtanker Base Operations
        Guide, Chapter IV B (4) Parking, page 46 and the Klamath Falls Airtanker Base Ramp Safety Plan,
        page 84.

        The airtanker base ramp has adequate parking for three type one airtankers, one at each loading pit. An
        additional day off or maintence pad is available. It may be necessary to push back the aircraft into this
        pad. There is parking for 3 light aircraft with tie-downs for 2 or light aircraft may park in any unoccupied
        loading pit.

                a. Overflow Parking
                During times of high fire activity and when numerous aircraft are assigned to KFATB, (more than
                4) additional parking will be arranged for through the FBO, Ocean Air, the Oregon Air National
                Guard, the Klamath Falls Airport Manager, or the FAA Tower. Day-off and maintenance parking
                is usually on the General Aviation ramp controlled by Ocean Air (East-side/Back-row). Contact
                the FBO for approval.

                b. Day Off Parking
                During periods of low activity or low fire danger airtankers may remain in the pit on days off.
                During periods of activity or high fire danger airtankers will be parked in the maintenance and
                day off parking pad or across the field on the Ocean Air ramp.

                c. Light Aircraft Parking
                A light aircraft parking area is located west of the dispatch office along the fence line. There are
                three spaces with tie-downs for 2.

                d. Helicopter Parking
                Helicopters can be parked at KFATB. Unoccupied pits can be available for short-term parking.
                The day-off/maintenance pad is acceptable for heavy helicopter parking. There is plenty of room
                for associated support equipment in the grass area surrounding the pad. Fixed wing activity will
                take priority
                e. Large Transport Parking
                Transport aircraft operations for mobilizing or demobilizing crews may be conducted at KFATB in
                pit #3 if it does not conflict with other activity. Transport aircraft can be accommodated at
                Klamath Airport overflow ramp, north of the FedEx hanger. A Fixed Wing Base Manager will be
                assigned to coordinate activities if KFATB is active.

                f. Vehicles
                Only Official Use vehicles will be permitted access to the ramp and will only be allowed to
                maneuver around parked aircraft if observed by a ground guide. The Ramp Manager will
                maintain control and supervision of all vehicles on the ramp.

        2. Pre-arrival planning
        Planning and communication prior to airtanker arrival is the best way to ensure smooth operations. The
        ramp manager should attempt contact with the arriving airtanker on 123.975 prior to aircraft entering the
        ramp area. Determine immediate mission needs i.e. fuel, load and return, stand-by. Double check with
        dispatch in case mission request has changed. Apprise all ground crew members of what is to be
        expected.

        Try to determine where the airtanker will park before it is committed to the ramp. Recruit additional help
        such as wing walkers or parking tenders prior to the airtankers arrival. Make sure they understand their

                                                        55
roles. Keep equipment and personnel away from the parking area to be used.

3. Positioning
Always try to maintain radio contact with the pilot. Make sure the pilot understands what you would like
them to do. Maintain visual contact with the pilot as the aircraft approaches. Use hand signals to
supplement your radio communications. Plan for as few turns in the intended path as possible. Pilots
are guided to parking by placing their nose wheels on the solid yellow line in each pit. Deviations to this
procedure could mean a collision for large sircraft. Smaller airtankers may line-up half way between the
yellow line and pad edge.

Keep in mind access and egress of fuel trucks and other service equipment to the airtankers/aircraft.
Consider the C-130’s need to unload the stresses on their main gear and allow room to taxi forward 10
feet in a straight line.

Observe wing tip and tail swing clearances. This is especially true with P3’s. If the airtanker is a turbine
be sure to park it facing into the wind, check with the pilot on their preferences. Consider prop wash
hazards. If the airtanker is to be hot-loaded consider the direction of exhaust. Wheel chocks are
available at the flight crews request. Be observant of the efects helicopter rotor-wash and airtanker
engine exhaust may have on near-by aircraft and /or equipment.

4. Safe Engine Operation
The pilots will be allowed, at their option, with coordination with ramp management, to start the engines,
run them up, and insure they are operating safely and efficiently.

5. Departing Aircraft
All airtankers leaving the ramp area will be released and cleared by ramp personnel. Check with
dispatch that no changes to the airtankers mission are pending.

Conduct a visual check of the aircraft prior to and during engine start up. Look for open doors, fuel leaks,
gear pins, and tools or equipment that may be left on or around the aircraft. Check that the chocks are
removed. Ensure that no persons are in the area before giving clearance to start engines.



6. Fueling
Fueling will be in accordance with the Interagency Airtanker Base Operations Guide and NFPA 407
publication Aircraft Fuel Servicing. Fueling and retardant loading will not occur simultaneously. No
Exceptions. Keep in mind that fueling may sometimes need to take place at the FBO prior to positioning
at the ATB.


        a. Local Fixed Base Operator
        The local Fixed Base Operator (FBO) is Ocean Air. They are the sole source for aviation fuel at
        the Klamath Falls Airport. Ocean Air provides 100LL and oil for reciprocating engines, as well as
        Jet-A. They have no large aircraft or avionics maintenance capabilities.

        b. Procedures
        Fuel can be obtained in two ways: the flight crew may call directly to Ocean Air on Unicom,
        122.95, or call the ATB on 123.975, who will relay the request to Ocean Air. At times when
        activity is light at the ATB, aircraft may be fueled in the loading pit. When activity is heavy,
        aircraft may need to taxi directly to the FBO for fuel before repositioning to the ATB to be loaded
        with retardant.

        c. Equipment Inspection
        Base personnel should observe fuel trucks and fueling equipment. If there is a concern, the
        base personnel will contact the Region 6 Technical Services Program Manager to discuss
        concerns and/or resolve issues.



                                                56
F. Retardant Operations
Retardant operations are governed by the standard operating requirements and procedures found in the Lot
Acceptance, Quality Assurance and Field Quality Control for Fire Retardant Chemicals publication NFES#1245,
Interagency Retardant Base Planning Guide-Fixed and Rotor Wing, NFES#1259 this supplement, and
manufacturers product data.

       1. Water Supply
       The water source for the retardant operation is a city water source. A four inch main line provides water
       to the water tank.

       2. Water Storage
       The water storage tank is the large tank east of the retardant plant. It has storage capacity of 20,000
       gallons. The water tank is filled via an underground line, which runs through the backflow preventer and
       pressure regulation valves to the tank. A mechanical float switch at the top of the tank controls the fill
       level. A six inch manifold on the front of the tank provides water to the blending system. A sight gauge
       on the front of the tank provides a visual reference of the water level.

       3. Fire Retardant in Use
       The retardant product used at KFATB is Phos-Chek LC95A. See the Lot Acceptance, Quality Assurance
       and Field Quality Control for Fire Retardant Chemicals publication, page 15 for product information.
       Material Safety Data Sheets for the product are located in the operationsa area and in the warehouse
       office.

       4. Retardant Storage
       Four 10,000 gallon steel tanks provide storage for liquid retardants. The tanks have valves at the front
       and joined by a four-inch manifold. The manifold provides retardant to the blenders. The tanks also
       have valves at the rear and are joined there by a manifold, which serves as the recirculation system.        Deleted: manifold which
       Access covers are located at the top front of the tanks and a catwalk is provided for inspection and
       monitoring of the retardant inventory.

       5. Retardant Receiving
       Truckloads of liquid retardant concentrate are received at the drive through gate. Always open the gate
       all the way and then deactivate the gate before allowing the truck to pull through. The circuit
       panel is located in the warehouse. The trucks pull through the access road depending on the location
       of their offload valves. The trucks are offloaded utilizing the 4” Gorman-Rupp pump and Wisconson
       gasoline engine. Use a bucket to catch residual when removing the off-load hose. Wash down any
       spills. Copies of manifests and waybills go the the ATBM.

        6. Retardant Mixing
       Liquid concentrate retardants are on-demand blended as they are pumped onto the aircraft. When the
       loading pump is started, retardant concentrate travels through the suction manifold travels through a
       check valve and into a proportioning blender. At the same time water from the travels through the
       suction manifold through a check valve to the proportioning blender. The retardant and water are
       blended as they combine in the blender and travel through the loading pump. From there the mixed
       retardant travels through a pressure manifold, through the metering device and on to the aircraft.

       The Mixmaster selects the retardant tank to draw from. Valves on the selected tank and the water tank
       must be open. The Mixmaster should check to see that all valves are in the correct positions to facilitate
       loading with the pump desired prior to aircraft activity. Follow the retardant and water lines through the
       system to ensure all valves are in the proper positions,check that the meter display has been cleared,
       give the aircraft loader the all clear to start the pump, conduct quality assurance tests, document load
       information and push the “print” button.

               a. Quality Assurance
               At KFATB, the procedures for testing and sampling retardant will be as described in the Lot
               Acceptance, Quality Assurance and Field Quality Control for Fire Retardant Chemicals,
               Determining Fire Retardant Salt Content with a Hand-held Refractometer, page 34. Samples are
               drawn during aircraft loading from the discharge side of the pump


                                                       57
7. Airtanker Loading

a. Mixmaster

Airtankers are loaded using a mass-flow metering device. Loading operations are conducted in
compliance with FSH 5709.16, 35.24, page 24, and the Interagency Airtanker Base Operations
Guide, chapter 4, B, 6, page 46.

The Mixmaster’s station is located in front of the retardant tanks. The metal box houses the         Deleted: Mixmasters
readouts for the Micro Motion mass flow meters and densitometer. The lid of the box folds down
into a desktop. The Mixmaster’s control switch for the main loading pump hangs on a reel by the      Deleted: Mixmasters
electric panel and unwinds to the station. On either side of the Mixmaster are the water and
retardant blenders. On the discharge side of the main pumps are the sample valves for the
Mixmaster to use to take refractometer readings on each load of retardant.

On receipt of an airtanker order, the Mixmaster does a quick visual check of all valve positions
and ensures that they are set properly. The Mixmaster ensures that the meter readout display
has been cleared and prepares the retardant log sheet. Once assured that the mixing plant is
ready, the Mixmaster signals the airtanker loader either by hand signal or by radio that loading
may begin.

As the airtanker is, being loaded the Mixmaster checks the mix by taking refractometer readings      Deleted: is
and by monitoring the density readout on the meter display. Adjustments to the mix ratio are
made at the blender. Retardant tanks shall be capable of being filled….at a minimum fill rate of
400 gpm to a maximum fill rate of 500 gpm. National Airtanker Contract, Sec. J, Exhibit 1, M (1),
page 35.

If the level of retardant product in the selected tank falls too low, the mix may become too lean.
At this point, another retardant tank should be selected. If another tank is
not available the water may be restricted by adjusting the valve on the blender.

All refractometer readings and densitometer readings will be recorded immediately according to
airtanker tail number. Accuracy and legibility are important.

b. Airtanker Loader
The Loading Crew, Ramp Manager, and Parking Tender(s) are the only personnel permitted on
the ramp during aircraft operations.

The loading and ramp personnel will wear personal protective equipment as indicated in the Job
Hazard Analysis for their position.

The aircraft loaders will coordinate with the Ramp manager, Mixmaster and pilot prior to loading.
The Ramp manager will indicate to the loader, which aircraft is next to load.

The Loader will not connect the loading hose to the aircraft until that specific airtanker is
to be loaded. No Exceptions.

The Loader will verify with the aircraft crew that the airtanker is ready to load. The Loader will
await the signal from the Mixmaster to load the airtanker.

Depending on the type of aircraft, the loader will terminate loading operations when the retardant
reaches the appropriate loading hole, when the appropriate load light activates, or when an
aircrew member signals to stop. The Mixmaster will terminate loading operations if the contract
load, as indicated by the metering device, is reached first.

The loader will disconnect the loading hose, replace any caps, plugs, or vent covers and move
away from the aircraft to the rear taking the loading hose away as well.



                                        58
            Once the aircraft has left the ramp and only if the ramp manager indicates that it safe to proceed,
            the loader will wash down any spills on the pad.

          c. Hot-loading
            Hot-loading will be conducted in accordance with the Klamath Falls Airtanker Base Hot-loading
            Plan. Hot-loading will only be conducted by trained personnel. Reference FSH 5709.16, 35.25,
            page 22.

           d. Pressure Relief
           There is currently no pressure relief system within the retardant loading system. It is imperative
           that the electric pumps are not turned on before loading valves are open and shut off before
           loading valves are closed.

           e. Cavitation
           Forgetting to open a valve either to the water system or the retardant system will result in pump
           cavitation. This will be obvious as the pump will make an odd growling noise. The meter display
           will show a very restricted flow rate. Stop the pump immediately and recheck the valves.




           f. Closed Loading Valve
           If the loader forgets to open the loading valve the pump will have an obvious difference in pitch
           and most obviously the meter will show no flow rate. Stop the operation and open the loading
           valve. Without a pressure relief system, this may be difficult due to back pressure on the valve.
           Broken hoses or valves may occur.

           g. Back Up Pump
           In the event of power outage or main pump failure, the back up pump may be used. The back up
           pump is a 4” Gorman-Rupp with a Wisconsin gasoline engine, and must be manually operated at
           the pump. Close the valves leading to the electric pumps and open those leading to the backup
           pump. The electric pump(s), if damaged may be removed for replacment or repair at this point.
           Coordination must be maintained between the Mixmaster and loader while manually operating the
           back up pump.

           h. Maintenance Responsibility
           Retardant contract personnel have the responsibility of maintaining the pumps and ensuring they
           are used for the right application. In the event of a major component failure, the pump is taken to
           a local pump shop for repair. In the event of an electrical problem, a local vendor is contacted for
           the service.

8. Retardant Offloading:
   The KFATB has the ability to off-load retardant from airtankers. Off-loading is best accomplished in pit
   #1 however aircraft can be off-loaded in all pits.

    Off-loading is accomplished by taking the off-load pump out to the aircraft with a short suction hose. At
    pit #1 the loading hose is detached at the “header valve” and placed on the off load valve. Retardant is
    then pulled from the plane and sent the off-load tank. At pits #2 and #3 retardant can be sent back
    though the main loading lines to the off-load tank where the main manifold connects with the off-load line
    near the back up pump. Keep in mind, retardant still in the loading system will also be pumped into the
    off-load holding tank.

    The amount of time that an airtanker sits loaded is a negotiated between the pilot and the ATBM.
    Generally an airtanker will be off-loaded prior to a day off or at any time that a pilot request it be off-
    loaded.

9. Wash down and Spill Procedures
   KFATB has a wash down system that parallels the retardant loading lines. The system is pressured by
   the city water system. Each loading pad has two (2) drains. All wash down material flows down the

                                                      59
drains and makes its way into the sand-oil separator. To capture spills, close all valves immediately and
open only those valves that are needed to proceed with the capture.

        a. Environmental Considerations
        Since the Forest Service is the primary operator of the KFATB, the employees are responsible
        for ensuring compliance with local, state, and federal regulations pertaining to hazardous
        material spillage containment and disposal.

        b. Waste Treatment System
        Wash down water, small amounts of retardant, oil, and fuel and rain water make their way from            Deleted: fuel
        the ramp to containment drains. From there it flows into an underground system and to the
        sand/oil separator during the operational season.

        Washed down liquids can be directed one of three ways: large spills can be directed into a
        holding tank for future disposal, runoff from the ramp can be directed through a sand/oil
        separator into the local sewer system or the runoff flows directly into the storm drains.

        c. Retardant Spills
        Small retardant spills are routinely washed down into the ramp runoff waste treatment system.
        For large retardant spills, including aircraft and holding tank failures, immediately close all valves
        and open only those to the storage tank. See valve diagram on page 49.




                                                 60
                                                APPENDIX 5-1

                                          COMMUNICATION PLAN

1. Local Communications

      a. Dispatch
      Incoming aircraft should initially contact KFIFC Dispatch. The call sign is “Klamath Falls Dispatch”.
      The National Flight Following frequency of 168.650 with a tone of 110.9 should be used for initial contact.
      The Air Guard frequency of 168.625 will be used for inflight mission correction, information, and
      emergencies only.

      b. Flight Following
      Flight following is conducted with KFIFC Dispatch utilizing the National Flight Following frequency or a
      locally assigned frequency coupled with Automated Flight Following (AFF) when applicable and
      available. The use of AFF will be discussed prior to the mission assignment.
      KFIFC frequencies:
      Primary - Rx 167.1750, Tx 167.1750 Tone 131.8
      Secondary – assigned as necessary.

      c. Airtanker Base                                                                                              Deleted: c. Airtanker
      Prior to entering the ramp area, aircraft should contact “Klamath Falls Airtanker Base” on the ramp
      frequency 123.975. Pilots are encouraged to communicate their intentions such as, “load and return” or
      the need for fuel prior to landing to ensure a timely response.

      Aircrews are encouraged to monitor the ramp frequency for parking instructions prior to entering the
      ramp. Communications between operations and the ramp is by radio. The base frequency of 123.975 is
      used for ramp operations, timekeeping, and aircraft communications.

      The base has a public address system.

      d. Airport                                                                                                     Deleted: d. Airport
      The Klamath Falls International Airport is tower controlled. Contact “Klamath Falls” or “Kingsley
      Tower” on 133.975. Hours of operation are 0700-2200 hours daily. The ATIS frequency is 126.5. The
      assigned Flight Service Station is “McMinnville Radio” on 122.6. Seattle Center is 127.6. The Klamath
      Falls VOR is located on the field. Unicom for Ocean Air fuel and services is 122.95.

      e. Sterile Cockpit
      Airtanker operations will observe sterile cockpit procedures when arriving and departing the airport.
      Unless the flight crew initiates the communications, base personnel will not attempt to contact the crew
      while on the take-off roll or during the approach or within 5 miles of the airport. Reference FSH 5709.16,
      36.63, page 30.

      f. Tactical                                                                                                    Deleted: f. Tactical
      The local air tactics frequencies are Air to Air 132.4500 AM (primary), Air to Ground 167.6250N (no
      tone) and 151.3100W TX, TN 156.7. See the Aviation Frequency Zone Map for Region Six in Exhibit E,
      page 64-65. By agreement, aviation communications in the wilderness areas on the border of zones 2
      and 4 will use the tactical frequencies of zone 4.

      When Lead planes are assigned to an incident, the pilot will contact the requesting unit dispatch center
      upon arrival at the airport and incident and upon departing the airport and incident. If an Air Tactical
      Group Supervisor (ATGS) is stationed over the fire, communications from the dispatch center will be
      directed to that person, who will in turn relay the information to the Lead plane pilot. If there is no ATGS
      over the incident the Lead plane pilot will be the direct air tactical link with dispatch

      e. Large Fire Communications
      If KFATB is the main base utilized on an extended attack incident, an Incident Action Plan (IAP) will be
      required daily for the morning briefings of all tactical aircraft flight crews. Updated communications

                                                       61
       information and frequencies will be posted on the ICS 205 form, Incident Radio Communications Plan
       that is located within the IAP.

       h. Area Frequency Guides
       Area dispatch and tactical frequencies are published in the Pacific Northwest Region Frequency Guide.
       Additional frequencies for Northern California are published in the California Northern Region Radio Call
       Plan. These publications are available in the operations area.

          Application                            Frequency     Tone Guard      Remarks
          KIFC Dispatch / Flight Following       167.1750
          KIFC Dispatch / Local Flight           170.525 Rx    131.8
          Following (Swan Repeater)              171.550 Tx
          Air Guard                              168.625                       Restricted Use
          Airtanker Base                         123.975
          Klamath Falls Tower                    133.975
          ATIS                                   126.50
          FSS                                    122.60
          Seattle Center                         127.60
          Unicom                                 122.95
          FS Air Tactical FM Air to Ground       169.1500
          FS Air Tactical AM Air to Air          132.450
          ODF Primary                            151.205       131.80
          ODF Air to Ground                      151.3100


                           2011 Oregon Air-to-Air and Air-to-Ground Frequencies

         OR-01          OR-02            OR-03          OR-04            OR-05          OR-06           OR-07
A/A1    132.1250       124.0750        132.3750        132.4500         132.4750       133.2250        125.0750
A/A2    132.8750       132.3250        133.3250        133.1250         133.5250       134.1750        125.6750
A/A3    133.3750       133.4250        133.8250        133.6750         134.6250       134.8750        133.6250
A/G    G-168.2875     A-168.3125      B-167.3000      H-167.4750       D-167.3750     C-167-6250      F-167.5500
A/G    M-170.0000     J-169.3625      I-166.6750      L-151.3100       M-170.0000     O-169.1500      J-169.3625
                                                      Tone 156.7
A/G                                                   P-169.2875


                       2011 Washington Air-to-Air and Air-to-Ground Frequencies

                                   WA-01                  WA-02                  WA-03
                    A/A1          132.1250               132.4250               132.5500
                    A/A2          133.1750               132.9750               133.0750
                    A/A3          134.6250               133.5500               135.5250
                    A/G          H-167.4750             A-168.3125             E-167.4500
                    A/G          N-169.2000             O-169.1500             K-167.0750
                    A/G




                                                      62
             COMMUNICATION PLAN

Exhibit E: PACIFIC NORTHWEST AVIATON FREQUENCIES




                      63
64
                                                  APPENDIX 5-2

                                 SINGLE ENGINE AIRTANKER OPERATIONS

A. Introduction
SEAT operations from large airtanker bases are permitted if the base has an approved Single Engine Airtanker
Operations Plan in place. SEAT operations from the KFATB are generally temporary in nature. Large airtanker
bases reload SEAT’s primarily when the SEAT vendor is in the process of relocating the portable base unit or
when the airtanker base is in close proximity to a fire where support is relatively brief. SEAT operations in
conjunction with large airtanker operations should be kept to a minimum.

The following provides guidelines to the safe operation of approved SEAT’s from KFATB.

B. Authority
Policy applicable to SEAT operations can be found in the Forest Service Manual, Bureau of Land Management
Departmental Manual, Fire Operations Handbook and Interagency Airtanker Base Operations Guide. The
primary direction for SEAT operations is found in the Interagency Single Engine Airtanker Operations Guide.
Local unit direction is located in the South Central Oregon Fire Management Partnership Single Engine Airtanker
Operation Plan. All publications available in the operations area.

The Klamath Falls SEAT Operations Plan is supplemental to the above direction and provides specific direction
for the KFATB, local information and procedures.

C. Approvals
The SEAT operations portion of the KFATB operations plan must be approved by the Unit Aviation Officer prior to
SEAT operations taking place.

D. Risk Assessment
Consult the Job Hazard Analysis located in this plan in appendix 6-4, page 103, for airtanker operations,
airtanker hot loading and for hazards associated with SEAT operations.

E. Base Personnel Qualifications

Personnel considered qualified in SEAT operations at the base will have had:

    1. Prior training in local SEAT operations conducted by personnel holding current SEAT loading
       qualifications.

    2. Will be qualified to hot load. Base personnel must have specific training in hot loading procedures.

    3. Participated in a review of SEAT operations on the aircrafts initial arrival at KFATB.

    4. Practical experience loading a SEAT under the supervision of a person qualified in SEAT loading
       operations at KFATB.

All classroom and on-the-job training will be documented for each employee in the personnel training files located
in the warehouse office.

F. Coordination
Prior to operating from the KFATB, a qualified SEAT manager should coordinate with the ATBM to annually
review and revise this plan. (Ref. ISOG Chapter 2, a, b)

The SEAT manager (SEMG) of the operating airtanker will be in constant contact with the base manager to
provide verification that SEAT policies and contract provisions are adhered to. While the SEMG’s responsibilities
are not delegated to the ATBM, the airtanker base with coordination and concurrence of the SEMG, may provide
many of the logistics needs of the SEAT prior to the SEMG’s arrival.

These needs may include and are not limited to:
   • Conducting briefings
                                                        65
    •   Regulating aircraft movement
    •   Providing base communications
    •   Monitoring loading
    •   Ensuring retardant quality control
    •   Monitoring fueling
    •   Aircraft Timekeeping
    •   Providing retardant and water
    •   Providing rest and shaded areas
    •   Providing ground transportation, food and lodging

Base personnel will provide the SEMG with contact frequencies and procedures for the SEAT and support
vehicle to follow when they initially arrive at KFATB.

G. Required Personnel
Personnel required to load SEAT’s at Klamath Falls are:

        1. Loading (Hot or Cold) in the Pits

                a. Pilot
                The pilot must monitor loading and load level.

                b. Agency Parking Tender
                The agency parking tender must monitor the entire operation area.

                c. Loader
                The loader must operate the hose, valves and monitor load level.

                d. Pump Operator*
                The pump operator must remain at pump station. *(Note: If the pump throttle kick down
                solenoid is tested and working properly the pump operator may be the Mixmaster).

                e. Mixmaster
                The Mixmaster is necessary to monitor quality control and metering.

H. Dispatch
Dispatch procedures for single engine airtankers are as outlined in chapter 5 of this plan, page 66.

I. Communications
Communication procedures are outlined in chapter 5 of this base operations plan for all airtankers,
page 62.

J. Receiving Aircraft and Briefing

        1. Upon arrival
        The pilot should make initial contact with KFATB approximately 10 minutes out on VHF 123.975 to report
        mission and describe intentions and needs.

       Prior to taxiing in to the ramp area, the pilot will contact the ramp manager or parking tender on 123.975
       to be directed to the appropriate loading pit or parking area.
    3. Initial Arrival Each Operational Period

                a. Base Crew Briefing
                Upon the SEAT’s initial arrival at KFATB, the pilot will shut down and conduct a one-on-one
                briefing with the base personnel who will be involved in SEAT operations.
                b. Vendor Briefing
                If not conducted prior to the beginning of the fire season, the SEAT contractor personnel (pilot
                and loader) will receive a briefing from airtanker base personnel on subjects including but not
                limited to:

                                                        66
                     1. Ramp parking and traffic flow,
                     2. Retardant and fuel loading procedures

                     3. Communications and dispatch procedures

                     4. Base safety, emergency and crash-rescue procedures.

K. Ramp Operations

        1. Operation from Primary Loading Pits
        Operating SEAT’s in the loading pits is acceptable. Adequate separation is maintained due to the side-
        by-side parking arrangement. It is preferable to hot load SEAT’s in pit #1 in order to ensure positive
        visual contact with all personnel.

        2. Operation from Pit #4
        Pit #4 is primarily a maintenance and day off pad for large airtankers. Pit #4 may be used as a location
        to reload SEAT’s directly or when the SEAT contractor has provided a portable mixing unit. The unit may
        be serviced with mixed or concentrate retardant.

        Pit #4 has a water supply, a power supply and full wash down containment. This location provides
        complete separation of type I and type 4 airtanker operations. Locating the portable mixing plant at the
        back corner of the concrete pad provides ample room for SEAT operations.

L. Loading
SEAT’s are loaded using the gasoline back-up pump. Increasing or decreasing the throttle can regulate the
output of the pump. The pump engine is equipped with a flow switch operated throttle kick down feature. The
loader should be able to close the loading valve against the flow and the pump will automatically go to idle.

If the flow switch is not operating correctly, a pump operator will remain at the pump and remain in positive          Deleted: correctly
communication with the loader and the Mixmaster. If the desired load is reached prior to indication by the mass
flow meter, the pilot will signal to the loader to shut down loading. The loader will signal to the pump operator to
idle down the pump and then the loader will shut the valve at the aircraft.

M. Metering and Quality Control
The Mixmaster will monitor quality control of the retardant during loading. At least one refractometer reading will
be taken for each load. The sampling valve location is on the discharge side of the pump. The Mixmaster will
monitor the weight of the load and signal to the loader to shut down the loading operation when the appropriate
load is reached if the loader has not already done so.

As required in the ISOG, the Mixmaster must provide copies of the loading documentation to the SEMG.



N. Hot loading
Single Engine Airtankers will only be hot loaded if all of the following criteria are met:
    1. The base SEAT Hot Loading Plan is current and signed by the Unit Aviation Officer.

    2. The pilot must be present and in the cockpit to monitor loading.

    3. A ramp manager or parking tender must be present to monitor the operations. A Mixmaster must be
       present to monitor the retardant quality control and metering.

    4. The loader, pump operator (when required), Mixmaster, and parking tender must have had previous
       base-specific training in SEAT hot loading operations.

    5. The loader, pump operator, Mixmaster, parking tender and pilot must have conducted the initial briefing
       as outlined above.

                                                         67
6. All personnel involved in hot loading must maintain positive radio and or hand signal communication.
   1. Receiving the aircraft for hot loading

            a. After being directed to the appropriate loading pit the pilot will place the propeller in ground
            idle “flat pitch”.

            b. The ramp manager / parking tender remains in front of and to the side of the aircraft being
            loaded and in full view of the pilot and loader.

            c. The ramp manager / parking tender will insure that the area is safe.

            d. The ramp manager will signal by radio and/or hand to the loader to approach the aircraft.

            e. If un-necessary or unexpected personnel or equipment is observed approaching the aircraft
            the ramp manager / parking tender will signal the pilot to shut down the engine.

    2. Loading

            a. All personnel involved in the hot loading process will remain in positive radio communication
            throughout the operation.

            b. Loaders will approach the aircraft from the rear of the wing.

            c. Loaders will start loading operations when the pilot indicates that all is ready.

            d. The pilot and loader will monitor the tank loading visually while the Mixmaster monitors the
            metering and quality control of the load. The pilot or loader will signal for shutdown when load
            capacity has been reached.

    3. Communication Loss

            a. If radio communications are lost by any person involved in the hot loading operation that
            person will secure eye contact with the ramp manager / parking tender and tap their headset
            followed by a thumbs down signal. The ramp manager or person with an operating radio will
            inform the others of the individual’s radio loss.
            b. Hand signals may be used to continue and finish loading provided that the pilots’ radio is still
            functional.
            c. If a situation occurs requiring engine shutdown the Ramp Manager / Parking Tender will notify
            the pilot by radio or by hand signal.

    4. Releasing the Aircraft

            a. The loader will disconnect the loading hose and move away to a safety area.

            b. The parking tender / ramp manager will signal the pilot by radio and/or hand signal when the
            loader is clear and the aircraft is free to exit the pit.




                                                     68
O. Vendor Operations

        1. Separate Location for Support Equipment
        Pit #4 can be designated as the SEAT operations area. The SEAT vendor may locate the SEAT support
        equipment at the east edge of pit #4. In this situation, agency personnel can supply mixed retardant
        directly to the vendors support unit following the same quality control and metering procedures applicable
        to loading the SEAT in the pits. The vendors’ personnel may then operate their own equipment to load
        the SEAT. The airport management does not allow contractors to fuel themselves. The local FBO
        should be contacted.

        In this scenario, the agency ramp manager will retain full control of the ramp and pit areas.                Deleted: scenario

        2. Loading Concentrate for the Vendor
        Retardant concentrate may be loaded directly into SEAT support equipment by using the recirculation
        pump and a loading hose off the end of the recirculation manifold.

P. Fueling
Fueling may occur in any pit or in pit #4 if it is available. Loading and fueling will not be done
simultaneously. No Exceptions.

        1. Hot Refueling
        Hot refueling or fueling with the engine running is approved only when operating from pit #4 and only if
        the aircraft and support unit are properly equipped. Keep in mind, the airport management does not
        allow fueling unless provided by the local FBO.

Q. Required PPE
Consult the base Job hazard Analysis for personal protective equipment required for SEAT operations, page 106.

R. Emergency Procedures
Follow the emergency procedures outlined in the Klamath Falls Airtanker Base Emergency Response Plan,
page 99.

S. Security
Security procedures are as outlined in the Klamath Falls Airtanker Base Security Plan, page 114.




                                                        69
                                                  APPENDIX 5-3

                                  GRUMMAN S2T AIRTANKER OPERATIONS

I. Introduction
Grumman S2T “Trackers” are twin-engine aircraft currently in use as airtankers by Canada and the United States
by CAL FIRE.

The S2T is the S2A modified with two turbo-prop engines and carries 1200 gallons of fire retardant.

With the S2T, it is often an advantage to leave the turbine engines running while loading to prevent frequent
starting and hot starting of the engines.

The loading of an airtanker with retardant or water while one or more engines remain running is referred to as
“hot loading”.

        A. Reference
        Refer to the Interagency Airtanker Base Operations Guide NFES# 2271 for direction regarding S2T
        operations. Additional guidance is available in the Cal Fire 8300 aviation manual. The KFATB plan
        supplements this direction with specific local information and procedures.

        B. Personnel
        Hot-loading the S2T requires the Pilot, a Ramp Manager or Parking Tender who maintains control of the
        operation, a Retardant Loader, and a Retardant Mixmaster. All positions will maintain contact by radio
        communication, eye contact and hand signals.

        C. Training
        All personnel involved in airtanker hot loading receive training in procedures specific to the aircraft and
        base operations. Documentation of the hot-loading training received by all base personnel will be
        maintained at the airtanker base in the base personnel training files.

        D. Job Hazard Analysis
        The base JHA addresses hazards of S2T operations. Page 110.

II. General Procedures                                                                                                Deleted: . General

        A. Receiving the Aircraft
        The pilot will establish contact with the Ramp Manager by radio prior to entry in to the ramp area.

        The Ramp Manager, through radio communication and hand signals directs the aircraft to the
        appropriate loading pad.

        (Note: On the aircraft’s and/ or pilots first landing at KFATB of the operational season, the
        airtanker will be shut down and the pilot will conduct a briefing with base personnel on loading
        procedures. Regardless of crew experience, this will be done every year.

        Upon reaching the loading pad, the aircraft will be positioned so the engines are away from the loading
        area. Pilots will reduce the engine rpm to idle or to flat pitch and set the parking brake.

        When the pilot has the aircraft secured he/she will inform the Ramp Manager by radio and hand signal,
        (thumps up), that all is clear and loading may begin.

        After visually checking the area the Ramp Manager will signal the loader to commence loading. The
        Ramp Manager will maintain a position allowing visual contact with the aircraft engines, the pilot, loader
        and Mixmaster.
        B. Loading
        The pilot will remain in radio contact with the Ramp Manager. When the Ramp Manager signals the OK
        to the loader, the loader will approach the airtanker from the rear.


                                                         70
        Loaders will start the loading operation. In no case will the Loader move forward of the rear fill port
        of the airtanker.

        1. Loading the Turboprop S-2T Tanker
        The normal load for the S2T is 1200 gallons or 10,800 pounds. However, the pilot will always inform the                  Deleted: However
        loading crew of the load desired.

                 a. The Loader removes the cap from the aircraft loading port, sets the cap on the ground and
                 connects the loading hose.

                 b. Establish radio contact with the pilot. The pilot will tell you the amount of retardant they want.

                 c. Do not start loading until the flapper valve open indicator light is illuminated. If the light
                 is not on, let the pilot know.

                 d. Open the loading hose valve, fully open. With the Mixmaster’s concurrence, start the pump.                   Deleted: Mixmasters

                 e. Watch the tank indicator lights on the side of the tail. The lights illuminate from the bottom to
                 the top. There will be 10 green lights followed by one yellow light and one red light. Each light
                 indicates 100 gallons.

                 f. If at any time the flapper open light is no longer illuminated stop loading immediately. If
                 the valve is closed the retardant will not fill the front of the tank and the aircraft will fall on its tail.

                 g. A warning horn sounds at 1000 gallons. When the warning horn sounds, reduce the flow rate
                 of the retardant. If reducing the flow rate is not possible shut down the pump at this point and
                 allow the retardant to continue to flow into the tank. If the proper weight is reached on the mass
                 flow meter prior to the warning horn or red light, the Mixmaster will stop the pump and notify the
                 loader that loading is done.

                 h. When the red light comes on, or the Mixmaster informs the loader that the loading is complete,
                 stop the pump and shut the loading valve smoothly.

                 i. The Loader will disconnect the loading hose and replace the loading port cap.


                 j. Return the loading hose to the original position and move to the safety area.
                 Give the Parking Tender the “All Clear” signal.

        Note: The Tanker will “settle” as you load the retardant. Do not stand with your shoulder under the tail.
        Be aware of the possibility of the pilot moving the rudder.

        Note: Aircraft mechanics may want to approach the aircraft during hot loading procedures. This will be
        allowed with concurrence and monitoring by the Ramp Manager.

C. Releasing the Aircraft
Loaders will disconnect the loading hose, replace the loading port cap and move back to a safe area. The Ramp
Manager will notify the pilot by radio and hand signal, thumps up, when the loaders are clear and the aircraft is
free to exit the loading pit.
D. Communication Loss
In the event of a loss of radio communication the Ramp Manager will secure eye contact with the pilot and tap
both earphones on his/her headset and signal with a thumbs down informing the pilot of the loss of radio
communication. If the aircraft radio is still operational the loading procedure may continue using hand signals
alone to communicate. If the aircraft radio is not functional the operation must be discontinued and the radio
repaired.

E. Emergency Shutdown
If at any time a situation arises, requiring the shutdown of engines the parking tender will notify the pilot by radio
and by hand signal by using the universal sign of drawing an index finger across the throat.

                                                             71
F. Emergency Procedures
Follow the emergency procedures for ramp operations outlined in this plan, page 84.

G. Safety
Refer to the job hazard analysis, hot-loading airtankers, for hazard considerations, protective gear and
procedures, page 110.

III. Klamath Falls Airtanker Base Specific Procedures                                                                Deleted: . Klamath

The Pilot should contact the Klamath Falls airtanker base on the ramp frequency 123.975 prior to entry into the
ramp area.

The Ramp manager will direct the airtanker to one of the loading pads and have the aircraft pull forward far
enough for the loader to approach safely from the rear. It should not be necessary for the aircraft to be “kicked”
sideways. Most pilots will do this anyway.

Loading the S2T will be done with the primary loading pumps. The Mixmaster must carefully monitor the
pounds of retardant delivered to the airtanker. The Mixmaster should shut down the pump 200 pounds short
of the desired weight. The delay between pump shut down and the loading valve being completely closed
should finish off the load.




                                                        72
                                                 APPENDIX 5-4                                                        Deleted: 3

                                     BAe-146 AIRTANKER OPERATIONS

I. Introduction
The Klamath falls Airtanker Base is authorized to support the BAe-146 pure jet airtanker. The following              Deleted: Klamth
procedures are based on the direction referenced in I/A below.                                                       Deleted: refrenced

The S2T is the S2A modified with two turbo-prop engines and carries 1200 gallons of fire retardant.

With the S2T, it is often an advantage to leave the turbine engines running while loading to prevent frequent
starting and hot starting of the engines.

The loading of an airtanker with retardant or water while one or more engines remain running is referred to as
“hot loading”.

        A. Reference
        The following procedures are based on the USFS BAE-146 Operating Plan published September 2011
        and the Neptune Aviation training PowerPoint BAe-146 Airtanker Base Operations “What you need to
        know” published in September of 2011.

        B. Personnel
        At present, the BAe-146 is not authorized to hot-load. Personnel requirements are a Mixmaster, a
        Retardant Crewmember, a parking tender.

        C. Training
        All personnel involved BAe-146 operations will receive training in procedures specific to the aircraft and
        to local base operations. Documentation of the training received by all base personnel will be maintained
        at the airtanker base in the base personnel training files.

        D. Job Hazard Analysis
        The base JHA addresses hazards of BAe-146 operations refer to page.

II. General Procedures                                                                                               Deleted: . General

        A. Receiving the Aircraft
        The pilot will establish contact with the Ramp Manager by radio prior to entry in to the ramp area.

        The Ramp Manager, through radio communication and hand signals directs the aircraft to the
        appropriate loading pad.

        (Note: On the aircraft’s and/ or pilots first landing at KFATB of the operational season, the
        airtanker will be shut down and the pilot will conduct a briefing with base personnel on loading
        procedures. Regardless of crew experience, this will be done every year.

        Upon reaching the loading pad, the aircraft will be positioned so the engines are away from the loading
        area. Pilots will reduce the engine rpm to idle or to flat pitch and set the parking brake.

        When the pilot has the aircraft secured he/she will inform the Ramp Manager by radio and hand signal,
        (thumps up), that all is clear and loading may begin.

        After visually checking the area the Ramp Manager will signal the loader to commence loading. The
        Ramp Manager will maintain a position allowing visual contact with the aircraft engines, the pilot, loader
        and Mixmaster.
        B. Loading
        The pilot will remain in radio contact with the Ramp Manager. When the Ramp Manager signals the OK
        to the loader, the loader will approach the airtanker from the rear.

                                                        73
        Loaders will start the loading operation. In no case will the Loader move forward of the rear fill port
        of the airtanker.

        1. Loading the Turboprop S-2T Tanker
        The normal load for the S2T is 1200 gallons or 10,800 pounds. However the pilot will always inform the
        loading crew of the load desired.

                a. The Loader removes the cap from the aircraft loading port, sets the cap on the ground and
                connects the loading hose.

                b. Establish radio contact with the pilot. The pilot will tell you the amount of retardant they want.

                c. Do not start loading until the flapper valve open indicator light is illuminated. If the light
                is not on, let the pilot know.

                d. Open the loading hose valve, fully open. With the Mixmaster’s concurrence, start the pump.                   Deleted: Mixmasters

                e. Watch the tank indicator lights on the side of the tail. The lights illuminate from the bottom to
                the top. There will be 10 green lights followed by one yellow light and one red light. Each light
                indicates 100 gallons.

                f. If at any time the flapper open light is no longer illuminated stop loading immediately. If
                the valve is closed the retardant will not fill the front of the tank and the aircraft will fall on its tail.

                g. A warning horn sounds at 1000 gallons. When the warning horn sounds, reduce the flow rate
                of the retardant. If reducing the flow rate is not possible shut down the pump at this point and
                allow the retardant to continue to flow into the tank. If the proper weight is reached on the mass
                flow meter prior to the warning horn or red light, the Mixmaster will stop the pump and notify the
                loader that loading is done.

                h. When the red light comes on, or the Mixmaster informs the loader that the loading is complete,
                stop the pump and shut the loading valve smoothly.

                i. The Loader will disconnect the loading hose and replace the loading port cap.


                j. Return the loading hose to the original position and move to the safety area.
                Give the Parking Tender the “All Clear” signal.

        Note: The Tanker will “settle” as you load the retardant. Do not stand with your shoulder under the tail.
        Be aware of the possibility of the pilot moving the rudder.

        Note: Aircraft mechanics may want to approach the aircraft during hot loading procedures. This will be
        allowed with concurrence and monitoring by the Ramp Manager.

C. Releasing the Aircraft
Loaders will disconnect the loading hose, replace the loading port cap and move back to a safe area. The Ramp
Manager will notify the pilot by radio and hand signal, thumps up, when the loaders are clear and the aircraft is
free to exit the loading pit.
D. Communication Loss
In the event of a loss of radio communication the Ramp Manager will secure eye contact with the pilot and tap
both earphones on his/her headset and signal with a thumbs down informing the pilot of the loss of radio
communication. If the aircraft radio is still operational the loading procedure may continue using hand signals
alone to communicate. If the aircraft radio is not functional the operation must be discontinued and the radio
repaired.




                                                            74
E. Emergency Shutdown
If at any time a situation arises, requiring the shutdown of engines the parking tender will notify the pilot by radio
and by hand signal by using the universal sign of drawing an index finger across the throat.
F. Emergency Procedures
Follow the emergency procedures for ramp operations outlined in this plan, page 84.

G. Safety
Refer to the job hazard analysis, hot-loading airtankers, for hazard considerations, protective gear and
procedures, page 110.

III. Klamath Falls Airtanker Base Specific Procedures                                                                    Deleted: . Klamath

The Pilot should contact the Klamath Falls airtanker base on the ramp frequency 123.975 prior to entry into the
ramp area.

The Ramp manager will direct the airtanker to one of the loading pads and have the aircraft pull forward far
enough for the loader to approach safely from the rear. It should not be necessary for the aircraft to be “kicked”
sideways. Most pilots will do this anyway.

Loading the S2T will be done with the primary loading pumps. The Mixmaster must carefully monitor the
pounds of retardant delivered to the airtanker. The Mixmaster should shut down the pump 200 pounds short
of the desired weight. The delay between pump shut down and the loading valve being completely closed
should finish off the load.




                                                          75
                                                  APPENDIX 5-5                                                        Deleted: 4

                               AIRLINE TRANSPORT AIRCRAFT OPERATIONS

Occasionally, KFATB assists in the mobilization of crews, overhead and equipment. Crews are often transported
on contracted or chartered large commercial airliners. KFATB can accommodate the mobilization of crews either
at the base itself or at the fixed base operation (FBO) ramp located north of the FedEx hanger. Arrangements
will be made with the airport management to use the over-flow ramp if necessary.

When crews are staged and mobilized through the Klamath Falls Interagency Fire Center (KFIFC), dispatch will
receive the initial flight request form the Northwest Coordination Center, dispatch will contact the Airtanker Base
Manager with a copy of the request and a decision will be made whether the operation will be conducted at
KFATB or at the overflow ramp.


A. Crew Transport Operations at the Airtanker Base
Much of the time, crew transport operations can be accomplished at the airtanker base. The pad at loading pit #
3 is the preferred parking location for large transport aircraft.

        1. Preparations

                a. Staffing
                The Airtanker Base Manager will do one of the following: coordinate operations, designate a
                Fixed Wing Base Manager or request/order a Fixed Wing Base Manager depending on local
                activity. Local assistance should be requested for manifesting of crews. Contact dispatch for the
                issuance of resource orders and “O” numbers for CWN staff.

                b. Equipment and Supplies
                Scales are located in the warehouse for weighing personnel and equipment. Rolls of tape are
                located in the warehouse for securing loose cargo. Clipboards and office supplies are available
                in the operations area.

        2. Receiving Crews

                a. Vehicle parking
                Parking for buses and/or crew vehicles is in the grass area north of and across the road from the
                KFIFC parking lot. Additional crew vehicle parking is available along the outside of the north
                fence line.

                Keys for the crew and overhead vehicles may be temporarily secured, by arrangement with
                either dispatch or the airtanker base.

                b. Manifesting
                Crew manifests will be obtained through dispatch. If the crew manifests already contain
                individual weights for persons, gear and cargo it may not be necessary to re-weigh the crew.
                Crew arriving without manifests complete with weights, must be completed.

                It is preferable to manifest, weigh and stage crews and gear in the parking lot outside of the
                KFATB operations area. However if activity is not expected and the light aircraft parking area is
                clear, crew gear may be staged in the light aircraft parking area. *Keep in mind however that
                crews must wait outside the fence and access to their gear will be limited after it is staged
                in the operations/light aircraft parking area.


                c. Weighing
                Determine the crewmember weight and the gear weight separately and list them on the manifest.
                If the crewmembers gear exceeds the allowed maximum of 45 pounds for soft pack plus 20
                pounds for web gear, some contents may need to be removed. Some gear may exceed the limit


                                                        76
                by a few pounds and some gear will be under weight by a few pounds. The total allowable
                weight for the crew is 5100 pounds. Coordinate with the Crew boss if there are any questions.

                d. Chainsaws and Tools
                Only Type 1 crews should be allowed to carry chainsaws or tools aboard the aircraft. The
                decision to accept chainsaws or tools aboard the aircraft is always at the discretion of the pilot in
                command. It is likely that non-NIFC contract jets will not allow saws and possibly not tools. Non-
                NIFC contract jets usually will not have a loadmaster aboard.

                If chainsaws are accepted, the operators may be required to purge them. If tools are accepted
                they must be prepared in a manner that covers sharp edges and bundled in a manner to prevent
                them from becoming loose in the cargo area.

                e. Hazardous Materials
                Generally hazardous materials are not allowed on the transport aircraft. This includes but is not
                limited to ignition devices, fuel, wet cell batteries, explosives, compressed gas, flammable liquids
                and ammunition. The transport of hazardous chemicals aboard the NIFC contract jet will
                be solely at the discretion and under the supervision of the loadmaster and/or pilot in
                command. KFIFC personnel will not make this decision.

When the NIFC contracted 737 arrives from Boise it may have a Loadmaster. The Loadmaster will need
manifests for each crew, overhead team and load of equipment.

If there is an expected wait time for the aircraft, gear may be secured in the light aircraft parking area. Due to
airport security, crews and overhead teams must remain outside the fence until the aircraft arrives.

Do not share the security gate code with the crews or overhead teams. Post someone at the gate to monitor
personnel coming and going. Prop building doors open if necessary. There are wedges available at all doors.
Provide trashcans.

    B. Crew Transport Operations at the FBO ramp

        1. Preparations
        Contact the Airport Operations Manager, Bill Hancock at 541-891-2620 or the Assistant Operations
        Manager, Richard Voss at 541-891-3867 for the status of the overflow ramp and to request use of the
        ramp. Mr. Hancock or Mr. Voss may have special instructions regarding ramp activities for the day.
        They will also make notifications to the other ramp users regarding our operation and impact.

                a. Staffing
                The Airtanker Base Manager will do one of the following: coordinate operations, designate a
                Fixed Wing Base Manager or request/order a Fixed Wing Base Manager depending on local
                activity. Local assistance should be requested for manifesting of crews. Contact dispatch for the
                issuance of resource orders and “O” numbers for CWN staff.

               b. Equipment and Supplies
               Scales are located in the warehouse for weighing personnel and equipment. Rolls of tape are
               located in the warehouse for securing loose cargo. Clipboards and office supplies are available
               in the operations area.
        2. Receiving Crews

                a. Vehicle parking
                Access to the FBO ramp area is off Rand Way. Parking is very limited at the FBO and it is not
                recommended that vehicles remain over night. Once personnel and equipment are dropped off
                at the gate, the drivers should shuttle the vehicles to the KFIFC parking areas. Parking for buses
                or crew vehicles is in the grass area north of and across the road from the KFIFC parking lot.
                Additional crew vehicle parking is available along the outside of the north fence line.

                Keys for the crew and overhead vehicles may be temporarily secured, by arrangement with
                either dispatch or the airtanker base.
                                                         77
                 b. Manifesting
                 Crew manifests are obtained through dispatch. If the crew manifests already contain individual
                 weights for persons, gear and cargo it may not be necessary to re-weigh the crew. Crew
                 manifests without weights must be completed.

                 It is preferable to manifest, weigh and stage crews and gear in the parking lot outside of the FBO
                 ramp area. *Keep in mind however that crews must wait outside the fence and access to
                 their gear will be limited after it is staged in the operations area.

If there is an expected wait time for the aircraft, gear may be secured in the FBO ramp area. Due to airport
security, crews and overhead teams must remain outside the fence until the aircraft arrives.

For the safety of agency personnel and due to commercial, military and private activity in the ramp areas,
personnel are not be permitted to wander inside the gated area. Airbase staff will monitor the gate.

When the aircraft is available for loading, personnel should follow the directions of the loadmaster or designated
individual.

If KFATB is a stop along a longer flight, offer to collect the trash from the aircraft staff.




                                                            78
                                                   APPENDIX 5-6                                                       Deleted: 5

                                           HELICOPTER OPERATIONS

Occasionally, KFATB is asked to accommodate helicopter operations. These operations tend to be short term
events such as dropping off or picking up passengers, fueling, briefing or short term staging and overnight
parking for security. Long-term helicopter operations are also accommodated.

All helicopter operations will conform to the Interagency Helicopter Operations Guide (IHOG). A copy of the
guide is located in the operations area.

Dispatch will contact the Airtanker Base Manager regarding the in-coming helicopter so arrangements can be
made to accommodate the aircraft, equipment and personnel appropriately.

Per the Klamath Falls Airport Helicopter Operations Agreement, established for heavy helicopter operations
involving external loads:

      1. Heavy helicopters will not fly over congested areas.
      2. Heavy helicopters will not fly over or near military aircraft.
      3. The Pilot will contact the Kingsley Tower on victor 118.2 to declare the route they will use for arrival
            and/or departure.
      4. Use the West Route if arriving or departing to the NW, W and SW. See attached map.
      5. Use the East Route if arriving or departing to the NE, E and SE. See attached map.




The preferred parking area for helicopter operations is pit #4, south of the retardant plant. This area is close to
the drive-thru gate and the surrounding area can accommodate support equipment. There is water and
electricity at the pit if needed.

KFATB staff can assist in coordination of personnel, equipment, briefings and assignments until the Helicopter
Manager arrives.



                                                          79
All support equipment operators and personnel will abide by airport security regulations and stop both inside and
outside the drive-thru gate to allow it to close completely before proceeding. The southern edge of pit #4 is the
boundary of the KFATB operating area. Personnel are not to go beyond pit #4, the southern ramp area or the
western ramp area.

Fueling in pit #4 is permitted.




                                                       80
                                               APPENDIX 5-7                                                  Deleted: 6


                              MODULAR AIRBORNE FIRE FIGHTING SYSTEMS
                                        MAFFS OPERATIONS

                                                   (DRAFT)


At this time, all Modular Airborne Fire Fighting Systems (MAFFS) operations will be in accordance with the
MAFFS Operating Plan. A copy of the plan is located in the operations area.




                                                       81
                                        APPENDIX 5-8                                                   Deleted: 7

                                RETARDANT JETTISON AREA

A. The local jettison area is located northeast of the Klamath Falls base near Calimus Butte lookout
   within the boundaries of the old Lone Pine fire area on the Fremont / Winema National Forest.
                                                                                                       Formatted: Centered




                                              82
                                    CHAPTER VI – SAFETY AND SECURITY                                                  Formatted: Font: Bold, Underline
                                                                                                                      Formatted: Font: Bold, Underline
SAFETY

A. Base Safety Evaluations and Reviews
KFATB facility inspections are addressed in the Safety and Security chapter of this plan, page 81. In addition to
facility inspections, reviews of the KFATB Safety Operations Plan are conducted annually.

        1. Annual reviews and revisions of the KFATB Operations Plans are conducted locally by the Airtanker
        Base Manager to determine the bases’ readiness for the upcoming season. The Regional Airtanker
        Base Specialist, The Regional Airtanker Base Coordinator and the Forest Safety and Health Coordinator
        conduct bi-annual base reviews. The Forest Safety and Health Coordinator also conducts occasional
        reviews of the bases safety plans for consistency with local unit policies.

        2. The Regional Aviation Safety Manager in conjunction with the Unit Aviation Officer conduct reviews of
        the base operations plan.

        3. Oregon OSHA, on occasion, conducts inspections to determine the bases’ needs to comply with
        OSHA standards. The ATBM reviews the results of the inspection, develops a plan for addressing
        discrepancies noted and initiates actions to meet compliance.

B. Review Documentation
Results of all KFATB reviews are located in the ATBM office. In the same file are the documented action plans
and progress files associated with ongoing projects resulting from the reviews.

C. Ramp Safety
The KFATB Ramp Safety Plan is located in Appendix 6-1, page 84.

D. Personal Protective Equipment
Refer to the KFATB Job Hazard Analysis for information regarding required and recommended PPE, Appendix 6-
2, and page 106.                                                                                                      Deleted: page

E. Airspace and Aerial Hazards

        1. Aerial Hazard Map
        Aerial Hazard Maps are provided by the Regional Aviation Management. The ATBM and the Unit
        Aviation Officer have the responsibility to acquire and review the map annually, reviewing changes and
        new aerial hazards. The map is posted in the conference room.

        2. Airport Hazards
        The ATBM assembles local hazard information for dissemination to flight crews. This information is
        obtained primarily from the online Notifications toAirmen (NOTAMs)website and the Airport Operations
        Director. As hazards change or are eliminated, the ATBM will brief all flight crews accordingly.

        3. Turbulence, Wind and Time of Day Limitations on Flight Activity
        Information on turbulence may be obtained from pilot reports of such activity such as going to, over, or
        returning from a fire. Information is relayed to other flight crews. Additional information may be obtained
        from the control tower and the National Weather Service.

        Flight restrictions related to high wind events will be obtained from the flight crews and relayed to
        dispatch.

        Time of day flight activity limitations will be obtained from either the ATGS or the Leadplane Pilot.

        4. Temporary Flight Restrictions
        Temporary Flight Restrictions (TFR’s) are ordered through dispatch. Local TFR’s, within the Initial Attack
        area of the base are posted in the conference room. This information should be noted on the Flight
        Resource Order and briefed to flight crews.

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F. Landing With Full or Partial Load.
Landing operations involving full or partial loads shall be in accordance with the National Airtanker Contract,
Section C, C.7.2. (3)I, Takeoff and Landing

        1. Local Procedures Federally contracted airtankers do not land loaded. State contracted airtankers           Deleted: Procedures Federally
        will comply with their contract requirements. Exceptions for emergency procedures are solely at the
        discretion of the Pilot in Command.

        2. Runway and Ramp Wheel-Loading Capability Wheel loading capacities at the Klamath Falls                     Deleted: Capability Wheel
        Airport are: 110,000 pounds for single wheel, 145,000 pounds for dual wheel, and 230,000 pounds for
        dual-tandem wheels.

G. Emergency Response Equipment
Safety equipment available at the base includes the following:

        1. Fire Extinguishers
        Fire extinguishers on the base are inspected on a yearly schedule. The base has 3-50 pound BC
        extinguishers, one at each loading pit. The base also has a minimum of 6-20 pound (ABC) extinguishers
        located strategically throughout the ramp, buildings, and warehouse.

        2. First Aid Kits
        First aid kits are located in the operation building main hallway by the drinking fountain and in the
        warehouse office. The kits are maintained by a vendor and include blood borne pathogen protective
        components.

        The first aid kits are inspected annually and missing or outdated supplies replaced. The inspection is
        documented on the inspection log and initialed by the person conducting the inspection.

        3. Eye-Wash
        Eye-wash and shower stations are located at the front northwest corner and back southeast corner of the
        retardant plant.

H. Emergency Response
In the event of an emergency, base personnel are expected to initiate the appropriate emergency response
following the KFATB Emergency Response Plan locate in appendix 6-3, page 99.

I. Crash, Search and Rescue (Mishap Response Plan)
In the event of an off-site or on-airport mishap or with the occurrence of an overdue aircraft, the South Central
Oregon Crash, Search, and Rescue Plan will be initiated by dispatch. Copies of the plan are located in the
operations area.

Dispatch, with the assistance of the KFATB will follow the plans procedures for making appropriate contacts.

For a mishap occurring on the base it is the responsibility of base personnel to initiate the appropriate emergency
response and then to notify the dispatch who will continue to follow up the response and initiate the mishap plan.
Reference FSM 5723.2.

J. Hazard, Incident, and Accident Reporting
Hazard, Incident, and Accident Reporting shall be in accordance with the Interagency Airtanker Base Operations
Guide, page 62. Complete and submit a Safecom.

        1. Local Procedures It is the responsibility of any individual who observes or who is involved in an          Deleted: Procedures It
        aviation incident or accident to report the occurrence as soon as possible to their supervisor or the Unit
        Aviation Officer. The retardant crew will notify the ATBM. Circumstances of the Hazard, Incident, or
        Maintenance Deficiency should be discussed with the pilot, if possible. The agency with operational
        control of the aircraft, at the time of the incident, has the responsibility to report the incident on the
        SAFECOM system.



                                                         84
        2. Routing After submission of the completed Safecom, contact the appropriate management staff so
           they will know it is in the system for review. Print a hardcopy for the KFATB records.

SECURITY
Reference appendix 6-5 for the airbase security plan.




                                                        85
                                                  APPENDIX 6-1

                                              RAMP SAFETY PLAN

A. Introduction

Safety is the first priority of all Forest Service operations and a by-product of all procedures. The Forest
Service holds in high regard the safety, welfare, and health of its employees. It is the policy of the Forest Service
that every employee is entitled to work under the safest possible conditions. In recognition of this, every
reasonable effort will be made in the interest of accident prevention, fire protection, and health preservation. An
awareness and recognition of safety must be an integral part of everything we do. In this way, each of us will
contribute to make our work place more safe, effective, and efficient.

It is the responsibility of every Forest Service employee to ensure that they are performing their duties in
accordance with Health and Safety Code (HSC) guidelines, FSM, FSH, and other guidelines.

Employees who are directly involved in the movement and loading of airtankers are acutely aware of time and
may develop a tendency toward undue haste while loading the aircraft and marshalling it in and out of the loading
pits.

Rapid, efficient work can be done in a safe manner, provided each member of the team does his/her job and
uses the proper procedures and equipment. Short cuts are never to be used when safety may be compromised.
A pre-planned method of working on at KFATB will prevent confusion, mishandling, and unnecessary rushing, all
of which could lead to accidents and injuries.

B. Responsibilities

The ultimate responsibility for safety rests with the Chief of the Forest Service. Policies have been established
and priorities set. Safety programs have been developed and management is charged to follow the procedures.

All managers and supervisors directly in charge of the activity of others are responsible for the safety and welfare
of all personnel under their direct supervision, and are responsible for reporting hazards, accidents, and incidents
in a timely manner to protect the rights of the employees and the Forest Service.

  Supervisors should:

  1. Enforce all safety regulations,

  2. Ensure all employees are properly trained in all required operational and safety related procedures,

  3. Provide all required safety instructions to employees prior to the commencement of duties,

  4. Review the operation and take prompt action to eliminate unsafe work practices,

  5. Inspect the workplace to ensure hazardous conditions are promptly recognized and eliminated,

  6. Ensure all equipment operational checks are completed, and equipment maintenance is performed
     regularly,

  7. Ensure equipment is operated in the prescribed manner and only by trained, qualified, and licensed
     operators,

  8. Enforce the highest standards of general housekeeping and cleanliness to minimize risks to health and
     safety,
  9. Take appropriate measures to reduce the risks of fire and ensure emergency procedures and evacuation
     plans are developed,

  10. Promote an awareness of the need for safety among all employees,

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  11. Ensure the initial reporting of all accidents/incidents is completed in a timely and appropriate manner.

  Employees shall:

  1. Follow all safe working practices,

  2. Use tools that are in good repair,

  3. Wear clothing and footwear suitable for the job,

  4. Use all safeguards and safety devices furnished for your protection and ensure that these are adequate,

  5. Wear approved protective devices when required, including but not limited to; eye protection whenever
     there is the hazard of foreign bodies entering the eye, approved hearing protection when exposed to
     hazardous levels of noise, wear protective clothing when exposed to chemicals or other injurious
     exposures,

  6. Refrain from wearing any loose, dangling neckwear, bracelets, rings, or the like around mechanical
     equipment,

  7. Confine hair whenever working around hazardous equipment,

  8. Ensure proper housekeeping procedures are maintained to prevent tripping, falling, or slipping accidents,

  9. Refrain from any activity that could endanger the safety of any worker. These include horseplay, scuffling,
     unnecessary running or jumping, practical jokes and speeding in vehicles,

  10. Ensure all elevated stands, ladders or scaffolds are secure and safe prior to using,

  11. Operate only that equipment or machinery, in which they have had adequate instruction including                Deleted: machinery
     knowledge of all operating details,

  12. Ensure that a clear field of vision is maintained and there is adequate space to maneuver whenever
     operating any equipment, to include the use of a ground guide when necessary,

  13. Obey all traffic signs, signals, and regulations at all times and places when operating equipment or driving
     vehicles,

  14. Shut off all vehicle engines when vehicle is parked and unattended,

  15. At no time, under any circumstances, use self contained battery powered electronic devices (e.g. cassette
     and CD players) in any area of the aircraft or ground equipment movement.

C. Ramp Safety Procedures

Ramp areas require constant vigilance to maintain a safe working environment. There are several basic rules
that provide the foundation of safety on the ramp area:

GENERAL

  (1) All employees assigned to work on or around ramp areas must be trained in safety procedures regarding
      the operation of the ramp area. New and inexperienced employees must be provided with proper training
      and supervision.

  (2) Smoking is not permitted on the ramp at any time. Smoking is not allowed in the building and only in
      designated areas. All employees should be vigilant for anyone smoking or preparing to smoke in NON
      SMOKING areas, particularly near aircraft.

  (3) Use only approved flashlights near fueling as ordinary flashlights could ignite fumes.

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  (4) Employees working on ramp areas must wear approved hearing and eye protection and keep clear of
      running engines.

  (5) It must be remembered that ramp operations, while often not involving direct contact with the public, are
       usually visible to the public. Accordingly, employees should operate with the understanding that their
       actions are being viewed by people and that their actions often form the opinion the public may have
       about the U.S. Government, the U.S. Forest Service, and its employees.

  (6) Security is the responsibility of every employee. Personnel assigned to ramp areas must be vigilant to any
      potential security problem on the ramp.

PERSONNEL SAFETY

All employees are to be aware of and practice safety techniques that apply to their particular job assignment.
Attire must be appropriate with the job and consistent with the ramp safety plan.

  (1) The wearing of jewelry such as rings and ID bracelets should be curtailed during operations on the ramp.
      Such articles of apparel are prone to catch on hooks, nails, buckles, locks, or straps, and can severely
      damage fingers and hands, even to sever them completely.

  (2) Footwear must be appropriate for the job. Employees whose job function includes the loading of aircraft
      and the subsequent spill of retardant should wear shoes that provide non-skid protection.

  (3) Employees working on ramp areas in close proximity to the operation of aircraft engines must wear
      approved hearing and eye protection devices.

  (4) If jet engines arrive on the ramp, during passenger transport operations, all personnel must be aware of
       special safety considerations. Employees must stay clear of intakes when jet engines are running. When
       engines are running, employees must stay a safe distance away from the jet blast.

  (5) Smoking is never permitted, at any time, on the ramp, nor in any areas designated as non-smoking.
      Smoking is allowed in approved designated smoking areas.

  (6) In the event of any injury, however small, the employee must seek first aid. All injuries should be reported
       to the supervisor immediately.

  (7) Ramp personnel must no wear shoes/heels with metal plates since a spark may result if the metal is
      scuffed on the ramp. There is also a danger of slipping and falling.

PREVENTING RAMP HAZARDS

All employees must be vigilant during ramp operations in order to keep it hazard-free. Several functional
positions in aviation operations are potentially hazardous to personnel working around aircraft, and the aircraft
itself presents many. General hazards that are present around all aircraft types include:

  (1) Running engines and turning props,

  (2) Noise from engines that are running, especially turbines, and noise from other aircraft i.e., military
      operations,

  (3) Blowing debris from props and jet blasts,

  (4) Protruding control surfaces, antennas, pitot tubes, static wicks, open access hatches and other
      projections,

  (5) Exhaust from Auxiliary Power Units (APU) have high temperatures and velocity. Inlets have sufficient
      suction to draw in loose objects,

  (6) Spilled fluids: retardant, oil, fuel, hydraulic fluid, methanol, etc,

                                                            88
  (7) Tripping over auxiliary power cables, bonding wires, fuel hoses, safety wire, water lines, retardant lines,
      wash-down hoses, other ramp obstacles, etc,

  (8) Flap droop and other devices often extend several feet below the main surface of the wing. The areas of
      these devices should be avoided,

  (9) Stack fires or fires from brakes,

  (10) Injuries from placing and removing wheel chocks,

  (11) Maintenance being done on aircraft engines and personnel working on ramp. Contractors need to notify
       the ATBM when starting engines for maintenance purposes, especially with employees doing
       maintenance work on ramp,

  (12) Monitor taxi speed of aircraft. Slow down if necessary,

  (13) Fixed hazards in the vicinity of loading pits, watch wing tip clearance,

  (14) Fuel leaking from aircraft or fuel truck.

PROPELLER HAZARDS

Strict discipline is absolutely required of employees working around propeller driven aircraft. All employees must
be vigilant to avoid danger during the arrival, start-up and departure phases of ground operations. Employees
should adopt work procedures that include the following:

  (1) NEVER walk through or into the propeller (arc) danger area even when the propellers are stopped. The
      procedure should be to walk around the wing tip, every time.

  (2) Never attempt to stop or move a propeller by hand. A hot engine may rotate even with the ignition
      systems off.

  (3) Have a Marshaller in a position in front of the aircraft during arrival and departure, when the engines are to
      be started or until they come to a full stop.

TURBINE AND JET ENGINE HAZARDS

Particular attention should be given to lose articles in shirt pockets or loose items lying on the ramp. Items such    Deleted: loose
as hats, gloves, paper, rags and tools should be secured in such a manner so that they cannot be drawn into the
propeller or engine intake. Never approach an engine intake unless the engine is shut down.

  (1) Air velocities, at engine intakes, are sufficient to draw-in loose articles.

  (2) Loose items ingested into turbine/jet exhausts will cause damage to the engine. Such ingestion could also
      result in catastrophic engine failure that could cause injury to persons on the ground and in the aircraft.

  (3) Turbine-powered aircraft exhausts are hazardous because of their high velocity, excessive temperatures,
      and toxic fumes.

  (4) The noise emitted by a turbine engine can be such as to represent a potential source of permanent
      hearing impairment. Accordingly, employees working near turbine/jet engines must wear approved
      hearing protection.

AIRCRAFT SAFETY PROCEDURES

  (1) Aircraft will not be taxied on to or off of the ramp unless properly trained personnel are in place to direct
      the aircraft.



                                                          89
  (2) Engines will not be started unless a Marshaller is in place to signal the Pilot in Command that it is clear to
      do so.
  (3) At all times, personnel and loose equipment must be kept well clear of engine-intakes and prop arc areas.

  (4) Servicing vehicles must be chocked when parked near aircraft as well as having the parking brakes set.

  (5) Personnel assigned to signal aircraft on to or off of the ramp are responsible to assure the area is clear
      and safe for the movement of the aircraft.

  (6) Ground equipment should be positioned at least five feet from the aircraft.

  (7) When positioning equipment near aircraft, such as fuel trucks, forklifts, cranes, and any vehicle where
      visibility for the driver is limited, a ground guide will be used.

  (8) Any incident of damage to an aircraft, however minor, by ground equipment or personnel, must be
      reported immediately to: a) the Pilot-in-Command (PIC), b) Contracting Officers Representative, c) Forest        Deleted: Command(
      Aviation Officer, d) Regional Aircraft Maintenance Inspector, and e) Regional Aviation Safety Officer.

       In the event of aircraft damage, the PIC will have the primary responsibility to determine, in concert with
       the Regional Aviation Maintenance Inspector, the extent of the damage and the effect that damage will
       have on aircraft operation.

  (9) Retardant and oil spills must be cleaned up immediately to prevent aircraft tires from entering the spill and
      the possibility of the aircraft sliding on the slick surface and causing damage to the aircraft or injury to
      personnel on the ramp.

  (10) Never back a vehicle in the direction of an aircraft. Always park service vehicles so they do not have to
      back toward the aircraft when the job is completed.


RAMP EQUIPMENT SAFETY GUIDELINES/OPERATIONS

The safe operation of ground equipment is essential to the safety of the airtanker operation. Under no
circumstances is any type of equipment to be operated when there is doubt regarding its safe operational
condition, the working conditions, or the mission to be accomplished.

  (1) Equipment and vehicles must be operated in a safe manner and used for official business.

  (2) When operating equipment, employees are to be aware of other employees, equipment, and aircraft in the
      vicinity.

  (3) Employees and contractors are to operate only equipment with which they are familiar.

  (4) Ground equipment is to be parked in its proper place, with brakes engaged, when not in use.

  (5) Ground equipment is to be chocked, and brakes set whenever in use near aircraft.

  (6) Ramp equipment traffic is to be operated only where it is clear and safe.

  (7) People working on the ramp have the right-of-way over ground equipment on the ramp.

  (8) Fueling of motorized equipment is to be accomplished only from authorized sources and only when the
      engine is shut off.

  (9) Ground equipment is to be operated only when it is in good repair.

  (10) Horseplay of any kind is not permitted when operating equipment or working on the ramp.



                                                        90
  (11) Where vision is restricted and in critical areas, operators should move only on signals from trained,
       qualified ground guides.

  (12) No vehicle or equipment may proceed onto taxiways or runways without express permission from Ground
      Control/Tower. Radio-equipped vehicles must escort vehicles without radios.

  (13) Maximum speed while operating vehicles on the ramp will be 10MPH. When approaching aircraft, speed
      must be considerably reduced.

  (14) Never back any equipment or vehicles in the direction of aircraft.

FOREIGN OBJECT DAMAGE (FOD) PREVENTION

Small items of debris naturally collect on an airport ramp. Such items as nuts, bolts, safety wire, leaves,
tumbleweeds, and other debris is deposited daily on the surface of the ramp as a natural result of operations and
weather. It is important to remember that such items represent a safety hazard to both aircraft and persons using
the ramp. It is the responsibility of all employees who work on the ramp to be constantly aware of any foreign
objects on the ramp that may cause damage to aircraft engines and props. It is a basic requirement that the
ramp be kept tidy at all times. In addition, the following precautions must be followed:

  (1) Avoid carrying loose objects on ramp vehicles and servicing equipment. If any object falls off a vehicle
      and is over-looked, it becomes a potential hazard.

  (2) Do not operate ramp equipment on other than paved areas, if it can be avoided. If it is necessary to
      operate a unit in an unpaved area, check tires for stones, etc, this may be carried back onto the ramp         Deleted: which may be carried back
      area.                                                                                                          onto the ramp area.


  (3) Prior to airtanker operations, personnel should look over ramp quickly to ascertain the presence of any
      foreign objects that may be a hazard.

   (4) Garbage from aircraft and vehicles should be placed in the garbage cans or dumpster located on the
       ramp.

  (5) In addition to the normal departure checks and before the aircraft engines are started, visually check the
       areas around the landing gears and engines to make sure they are clear.

  (6) Pick up any debris immediately to prevent damage to aircraft engines, props, and possibly injury to
      personnel from flying debris.

  (7) Receptacles, preferably brightly-painted large cans should be prominently located on the ramp area.

ELECTRICAL STORM HAZARD

When an electrical storm is near the airport, precautions must be taken to reduce hazards should lightning strike.
The size, intensity, speed, and direction of the electrical storm should be noted. Sound travels about 1/5th of a
mile per second. An approximation of the number of miles to the storm can be made by counting the seconds
between the flash of lightning and the sound of the thunder and dividing this number by 5.

  (1) If the storm passes within a 3-5 mile radius of the airport, fueling operations will be discontinued and
       equipment moved away from the aircraft.

  (2) A visual alert must be maintained.

  (3) When the storm has passed outside of the 3-5 mile radius of the airport, fueling of the aircraft can resume.

4. Ramp Procedures

  A. MARSHALLING


                                                        91
A major factor to ensuring the safe and efficient movement of aircraft on the ramp is the well-coordinated
interface between the flight crew and the ground crew. This coordination is only possible if the aircrew and
ground crew understand what the other expects. This is complicated by the fact that the flight crew must deal
with ground crews at different tanker bases. Therefore, it is vital that all communication be standardized. We
have done this with standard fixed-wing hand and arm signals. Some bases also have radio communications
and whether the communication between the flight crew and the ground crew consists of visual signals or verbal
dialogue, it is essential that each party is precise and clear when a request is made or direction is given. Plain
text should be used on the radio.

  (1) A Marshaller is essentially the eyes and ears of the flight crew while the aircraft is taxiing in to or out of a
      loading pit. The Captain relies on the Marshaller to guide him/her past hazards and on or off of the ramp
      in a safe, smooth, efficient manner.
  (2) All Marshallers must know and use the approved visual signals when moving aircraft.

  (3) When marshalling, visiting/transient airtankers, remember they may not understand your local procedures,
      so you may have to explain it to the flight crew while they are taxiing or after they shut down in the pits.

  (4) Approved hearing and eye protection must be worn by ground personnel when near aircraft with engines
      or APU running or in areas with high noise level.

  (5) Ramp personnel must be aware of the dangers/hazard areas around engines that are running with props
      turning.

MARSHALLING SIGNALS

  (1) The approved Hand and Arm Signals are as described in the Interagency Airtanker Base Operations
      Guide, NFES #2271, page 77, which explains how to execute the proper movements.

  B. RAMP SAFETY OPERATING REQUIREMENTS

  (1) Ground support equipment must not approach the aircraft until the aircraft's engines have been shut down.

  (2) The aircraft Marshaller must remain on the ramp until the aircraft departs and is clear of the ramp area.

  (3) The ATBM must be sure that all personnel working on the ramp are properly trained and familiar with the
      equipment and procedures on the ramp.

  (4) The ATBM must insure that activities are conducted at all times with safety in mind.

  C. PRE-ARRIVAL CHECKS

 Aircraft arrivals and departures require a certain amount of pre-planning. Before the airtankers arrive, certain
 steps must be taken to ensure safe and efficient handling:

  (1) The ramp crew should know their assignments. Each must know what will be expected of them during the
      operation. Who will be assigned: Marshaller, Mixmaster, Deck Coordinator/Ramp, Loader, etc.

  (2) The Marshaller must, prior to the arrival of the aircraft, determine on which ramp the aircraft is to be
      parked.

  (3) The coordination of airtankers and personnel transport aircraft must be done to ensure separation as well
      as safe/efficient movement.

  (4) The area over which the aircraft will taxi must be checked to make sure it is clear of personnel and
       equipment.
  (5) If the ramp is congested, an additional person must be assigned the mission as Ground Guide/Wing
       Walker, to aid in the safe movement of aircraft.



                                                          92
  (6) If equipment is used near the aircraft after it shuts down, keep the equipment clear until the aircraft is
       secured. Do not move fuel trucks into position until the flight crew signals it is o.k. to do so.

D. POSITIONING THE AIRCRAFT

  (1) As the aircraft arrives, the Marshaller must be in a position to remain in eye contact with the flight crew.
  (2) The Marshaller must be so clothed or designated so that the flight crew has no doubt as to who is directing
      their movement. The Marshaller must raise hands and arms or contact the aircraft by radio to indicate to
      flight crew the direction to move aircraft for subsequent parking.

  (3) Although it is seldom of consequence with airtankers, wind direction and velocity must be considered in
      handling aircraft, especially with the increased utilization of turbine engine aircraft. If the wind speed is 17
      mph or greater, the Marshaller should try to park the aircraft into the wind. The Marshaller must contact
      the flight crew and ask their wishes.

  (4) Marshallers must remember that it takes less power for an aircraft to taxi straight ahead than to make a
      turn. Planning should include marshalling paths that involve as few turns as possible.

  (5) When parking the aircraft, the Marshaller must take into consideration positions designated for adjacent
      parking/parked aircraft.

  (6) When parking the aircraft, the Marshaller must take into consideration the space/access needed for
      service/fueling trucks.

  (7) Principal hazards to be guarded against in movement of aircraft on ramps include collision and prop wash.
      When taxiing, close watch of wing tip, tail, and nose positions must be maintained to warn against
      impending collision with other aircraft, fixed hazards, or service equipment.

  (8) Prop-wash hazards are to be guarded against when taxiing as well as collision hazards. Prop wash can
      slam doors shut, cause unsecured equipment to roll or blow over, knock people down, cause turbo-prop
      propellers to rotate, and to blow large quantities of dirt or other debris about the ramp. All of this can
      result in injured people and damaged aircraft and equipment.

(9)    After the aircraft has come to a complete stop and the engines have been shut down, if the flight crew so
       designates, the wheel chocks should be placed in front of and behind at least one main gear. During
       short aircraft turn-rounds, wheel chocks may be placed fore and aft of the nose wheel.                            Deleted: arounds

      (a) Chocking is a procedure used to prevent movement and subsequent damage to aircraft when on the
        ground. To be effective, chocking procedures should be agreed upon and standard. The ground crew
        and the flight crew should discuss the procedures and define how chocking should be done. In most
        instances, the flight crew will place the chocks, but in some instances, the flight crew may request
        placement of chocks by the ground crew.

      (b) The right sized chock block should be used. There are several sets of chack blocks in the warehouse.           Deleted: stes

      (c) Variables that may dictate the need for chocks might be:1) gusty or high winds, 2) sloping ramps, 3)
          shifting CG during loading, 4) or the type of aircraft.

      (d) Before brakes are released during ramp operations, chocks should be placed in front of and behind
          each main gear.

      (e) If the aircraft is in one position overnight, the chocks at the main wheels should be lashed together.

  E. LOADING

  (1) It is important that only qualified employees with a mature attitude work on the ramp with the airtanker
       operation.



                                                         93
(2) A preplanned method of working on each specific aircraft will prevent confusion, mishandling, and possible
    overloading of the aircraft. KFATB has a printed list of all contract aircraft and their contract loads, that
    loaders can refer to prior to loading a specific aircraft.

(3) The loading crew and Marshaller are the only personnel permitted on the ramp during aircraft loading
    operations. Contractor personnel will be allowed on ramp for inspection, maintenance, or talking to flight
    crew.

(4) Aircraft fueling crews will be permitted on the ramp only prior to or after loading operations. Loading and
    fueling will not be done simultaneously. No exceptions.

(5) Retardant loaders will wear eye and hearing protection and high visibility vests or coveralls. Shoes with
    non-skid type soles must be worn on the ramp. Running/tennis type shoes are approved.

(6) Under normal conditions, loading of airtankers with engines running will not be permitted. The exception
    to this rule will be if the airtanker is a C-130, P-3 or S-2. The procedure calls for an engine, on the
    opposite side of the aircraft from the loading port, to remain running. In order to execute this procedure,
    the loading crew must be trained. If not, the procedure will be for the flight crew to shut the aircraft down
    before the loading commences. During this procedure, either the Ramp Manager or a flight crew member
    must be out in front of the aircraft as a safety person to observe the running engine and any possible
    intruders into the hazard area.

(7) Once the loading is complete, the Loader will remove the hose, secure the loading port if required, replace
    the overflow plug, and move the loading hose clear of the aircraft.

F. DEPARTURE PROCEDURES

(1) When the Loader is clear of the aircraft, the Marshaller can signal the flight crew that the starting
    procedures can commence.

(2) A visual check should be completed by the Marshaller prior to the flight crew starting procedure. A visual
    check of the exterior of the aircraft should be made by the Marshaller to ensure the aircraft is ready for
    departure. The following items should be checked: a) fuel spillage/dripping, b) fuel caps and panels, c)
    ramp area/prop blast area, d) personnel and equipment, e) service panels/doors, f) loose
    equipment/attachments, or anything that might appear wrong or put-of-place with the aircraft. It is safer
    to ask than to ignore.

(3) Are the chock blocks removed?

(4) During engine starting at the ramp, alertness is required to ensure the safety of employees and equipment.

(5) The start sequence must be observed by a qualified person at all times. It is the duty of this person to
    ensure all personnel are clear of danger areas and that all equipment is removed from the vicinity of the
    aircraft. The Marshaller must maintain close surveillance of the aircraft and vicinity to ensure that no one
    enters the danger areas after the start sequence has commenced.

(6) The Marshaller must also observe the arrival of other aircraft and the deplaning of that flight crew. Prop
    blast could be a hazard to the deplaning crew.

(7) Personnel charged with the responsibility of engine starting must have full knowledge of the procedures
    and have communications with the flight crew.

(8) As protection against fire, extinguishing equipment must be present during the aircraft start. The type of
    extinguisher must be appropriate with the type of fire anticipated. Managers must ensure that the
    extinguishers are maintained and in good working order, and that all personnel are familiar with their
    operation and use. Ramp crews should talk with flight crews about fires and fire extinguishers, when to
    use them and when not to.



                                                       94
  (9) Once the aircraft engines are started and the Marshaller is given the heads up that the flight crew is ready
      to pull out of the pit, the Marshaller will signal the pilot to pull out, making sure that the airtanker is clear of
      all obstacles.

  (10) All personnel working on the ramp have the responsibility of doing visual safety checks on the aircraft as
      well as on the ramp operations and to either notify the Deck Coordinator or the flight crew of any safety
      items observed.
  (11) All ramp personnel , while on the ramp are working in the active taxiways. It is very important to
      remember to look to the sides and backward for other moving aircraft prior to giving another aircraft the
      thumbs-up to leave the loading pit. Light aircraft are easy to miss as they enter and exit the light aircraft
      parking area.

5. FUELING PRECAUTIONS

This portion on fueling is added for information so that ramp personnel know why we require what we do when
fueling aircraft and what things to look for during fueling operations.

  (A) STATIC ELECTRICITY

The discharge of static sparks is a constant threat to safe fueling. This is why proper bonding and grounding is
essential. When two dissimilar materials make physical contact and are then separated, a charge of static
electricity is nearly always produced. Static electricity is generated when pumping any fuel through the system.
The amount generated increases with the rate of flow, and a high rate of flow is necessary for the transfer of fuel
in a relatively short period of time.

Static electricity can be generated by pumping fuel through a service hose, by allowing fuel to fall freely through
the air from a filler spout into a tank, or by draining fuel from a tank or line into a container. A charge may
accumulate on an aircraft during flight or while on the ground.

Rain, snow, ice crystals, or dust blowing across the aircraft can create a heavy charge of static electricity. A
passing cloud may also create a charge. The servicing vehicle, like any rubber-tired vehicle, may also become
charged. Static can be collected from an electrically charged atmosphere.

Static flows, like water, to a point of lower potential. If the individual metallic structures of an aircraft are bonded,
or connected via a bonding wire, the electrical flow will continue until the aircraft and fuel truck equal. Static
electricity flows along the easiest path, just as lightning follows the highly conductive copper lightning rod and
cable into the ground. If no easy path is available, a charge builds up. When this charge becomes great enough,
an electric spark is created. Often, this spark is capable of igniting flammable vapors.

  (B) SMOKING

      Any persons engaged in fueling operations or working around the aircraft should not carry matches,
      cigarette lighters, and other smoking materials. The "NO SMOKING" rule is rigidly enforced. Fuel vapors
      may settle on the ground and travel long distances, thereby creating a hazard away from the fuel source.

  (C) SPARKS

      Electrical circuits may arc when connections are made or during faulty operation. The following precautions
      are recommended to prevent electric sparks:

      Aircraft Ground Power Units should be located as far away from fueling points as is practical, and neither
      connected nor disconnected during fueling.

      Aircraft electric switches, which are not necessary to the fueling operation, should not be operated during
      fueling, except in an emergency.

      Aircraft radios should be turned off.

  (D) RAMP VEHICLES

                                                           95
   Vehicles that are not properly maintained present a fire hazard during fueling operations. Such things as          Deleted: Vehicles which are not
   fuel leaks, electrical system shorts, arcs across terminals, sparks from the exhaust, or backfires can ignite      properly
   flammable vapors, and must be corrected when first noticed. Vehicles with any of these conditions must
   be removed from the ramp until the problem is corrected.

   No vehicles other than those performing aircraft servicing should be allowed within 50 feet of the aircraft
   during fueling.

(E) BONDING
   Aircraft must always be bonded. The bonding wire must be attached to the aircraft bonding point prior to
   fueling and not removed until the fueling vehicle has completed fueling operations.

   The FBO/fuel contractor is responsible for bonding the aircraft during fueling, Forest Service/ ramp
   personnel must ensure that it is being done.

   Bonding the fueling truck to the aircraft ensures that both the aircraft and the fueling vehicle are at the same
   electrical potential.

(F) CAUTION: DO NOT ATTACH ALLIGATOR TYPE CLIPS TO THE AIRCRAFT STRUCTURE, SKIN,
    DOORS, ETC., AS THIS WILL DAMAGE THESE AREAS.

(G) FUELING

   Smoking will not be permitted while fueling is in progress.

   If a maintenance person is working on or inside the aircraft, exit doors should remain open.

   Ladders or stairways should be in place or open.

   At least one member of the flight crew shall be at the aircraft during the fueling.

  If unexpected vapors are detected, stop the fueling and determine the source. Fueling can be resumed
  only after the hazardous condition has been corrected.
  Should any condition constituting a possible hazard occur during the fueling procedure, fueling should be
  stopped and resumed only after the hazard/condition has been corrected.

  Normally fueling will be done during an actual fire operation or immediately after the termination of the
  mission. If the fueling is to be delayed, the flight crew should notify the ATBM.




                                                       96
                                                  APPENDIX 6-2

                                              SAFETY BRIEFINGS

A. Daily Aviation Safety Briefing

Aviation safety briefings are conducted daily with aircrews and base personnel. At a minimum, when no activity
is anticipated and when no changes or specific concerns are raised, these briefings will be an exchange of
information that will consist of the following information:

    1. Current National Situation Reports
       http://www.nifc.gov/nicc/index.htm

    2. Local Weather
       http://www.wrh.noaa.gov/mfr/fire/index.php

    3. Local Temporary Flight Restrictions
       http://airspace.nifc.gov/mapping/nifc/index.cfm

    4. Local Notices to Airmen
       https://www.notams.jcs.mil/

    5. Incident Action Plans Applicable

    6. Pertinent Safecoms and Concerns
       https://www.safecom.gov/

This information remains posted on the conference room bulletin board and is then filed in the safety binders also
located in the conference room.

B. Formal Aviation Safety Briefings

When local fire danger or activity is present, when the base is active in support of incidents, or at any time a
change in procedures or any safety concern is raised, a more formal briefing will be conducted and documented.

These briefings will consist of the information above as well as the specific topics, events or concerns applicable
to the day.

             a) Documentation
                Briefings are documented and filed in the briefing binder located in the conference room. This
                binder is available for all to view at their leisure.

                Briefing issues should be documented in the remarks area of the airtanker log or the ABS FS
                122 and routed with flight information to the assigned COR of aircraft operating out of KFATB at
                that time.

             b) Presentation.
                A briefing board is located in the conference room. On a day-to-day basis regardless of fire
                activity the ATBM will ensure that national, regional and local situation reports, incident action
                plans, Safecoms, alerts, temporary flight restrictions, weather forecasts and any other pertinent
                information is posted.




                                                        97
           The aviation safety briefing format located below will be followed.
           the information will inlude the fire organization, operations, radio frequencies, contacts, shift
           plans and procedures.

                               AVIATION SAFETY BRIEFING FORMAT

Date:

Base Personnel Assignments
Base Manager         A/C Timekeeper                    Ramp Manager              Mix Master

Special Instructions




Local Communications
                Base                        Ramp                 Airport Unicom       Local Dispatch
Frequencies

Local Procedures
Parking / Fueling / Loading



Dispatch Procedures / Rotation / Flight Following



Crew Comfort Facilities



Logistics Support



Aircraft Performance



Safety / Emergencies / PPE



Security



                                               Page 1 of 3




                                                    98
                       AVIATION SAFETY BRIEFING FORMAT (continued)

Date:

Incident Information
Incident Action Plan Review


Incident           1                   2                  3            4
Location
Bearing
Notes



Frequencies        A/A                 A/A                A/A          A/A
                   A/G                 A/G                A/G          A/G
Flight Follow


Weather:



Airspace / Hazards / Sensitive Areas



Aircraft Performance / Allowable Takeoff Charts / Weight and Balance



Other Aircraft Assignments



Previous Days Concerns / Discussion Topics



Safety Topic




                                           Page 2 of 3




                                               99
             AVIATION SAFETY BRIEFING FORMAT (continued)

Date:

Attendance
Name                               Title

1.

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

                             Page 3 of 3




                                100
                                                  APPENDIX 6-3

                                        EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLAN


The Klamath Falls Airtanker Base is a part of the Fremont / Winema National Forests Supervisors Office and as
such falls within the direction of the Forests Safety and Health Program.

The following Emergency Response Plan is intended to supplement the unit plan with specific information and
procedures relative to the Klamath Falls Interagency Fire Center.

A. Fire Emergencies

       1. Facilities Fire
       If an employee, discovering a fire is properly trained and capable and determines that there is a
       reasonable expectation of success without endangering themselves, they should attempt immediate
       action to prevent the spread of the fire.

       Fire extinguishers are located prominently in every building. Do not attempt to extinguish a fire if
       untrained in the use of fire extinguishers or if any doubt exists about the ability to successfully extinguish
       the fire without placing yourself at risk. Personal safety and the safety of others is the first priority.

       Evacuate the building following the procedures for Building Evacuation. Help to ensure that all
       employees have exited the building by the nearest exit and have assembled in the appropriate assembly
       area. Do not re-enter the building.

       Call 911 or instruct another employee to call 911 from the nearest phone away from the risk area.
       If calling from the KFATB operations area, dial 9-9-1-1.

       Go to the assembly area. Do not leave except to provide direction for arriving emergency vehicles and
       then return as soon as possible. Notify others of your plans.

       2. Aircraft, Vehicle or Fuel Spill Fire
       The only situations warranting employee involvement in aircraft or vehicle firefighting is when a
       reasonable expectation exists that the fire can be extinguished successfully, within the capabilities of the
       extinguishing equipment available, the employee’s knowledge of its use and if the employee is not at             Deleted: employees
       risk.                                                                                                            Deleted: it’s

       Employees should use fire-extinguishing equipment to assist in the emergency egress of aircraft
       crewmembers, but only in situations where an immediate threat to life is perceived and then only if the
       employee is not at risk.

       Fire extinguishers are located at each loading pit and at each aircraft parking area. They exist to be
       used by employees solely under the circumstances outlined above. Under no circumstances should an
       employee, untrained in the basic use of fire extinguishers attempt to extinguish a fire.

       All personnel and crewmembers at potential risk or in the area of a fire should be alerted in the most
       expeditious manner. This can be by radio announcement to aircraft crewmembers, ramp personnel and
       dispatch. This can also be verbal or by hand signals.

       If you have a radio, notify dispatch to Call 911 and initiate an emergency response. If unable to contact
       dispatch instruct another employee to relay to dispatch or call 911 themselves.

       If necessary and appropriate, attempt to extinguish the fire using the nearest appropriate extinguisher.
       Whether attempts to extinguish the fire are successful or not, if emergency response has not been
       initiated, do so immediately. Move away to a safe distance from the vehicle or aircraft and direct arriving
       emergency vehicles to the site.


                                                        101
B. Medical Emergencies

         1. Minor injuries or illness that do not require emergency medical response, may be handled on site
         on a case-by-case basis. Adequately stocked first aid kits are available on site for minor injuries.
         Personnel experiencing minor illness or fatigue may need to be relieved for the day.

    2.      For all Medical Emergencies, call 911 immediately. The Airport Fire and Rescue service will
         undoubtedly be the first to arrive. They have the ability to respond within three minutes.

         Seek out medically trained personnel if necessary. A Blood borne pathogen kit is located with each first
         aid kit if needed.

C. Building Evacuation

         Buildings located at KFIFC are equipped with fire alarm-bell systems however they alert only local
         personnel. None of the buildings have an automatic sprinkler system. Evacuation notification should be
         made verbally.

         On a day-to-day basis, KFATB has a relatively small staff so it becomes the responsibility of the first
         employee who becomes aware of a fire, to both attempt, if appropriate, action to prevent the fire from
         spreading and/or initiate notification and evacuation of all employees through the following:

         a.) Instruct all persons to evacuate the affected building through the nearest exit as posted in the
             building evacuation diagrams. Proceed to the assembly point on the light aircraft ramp area.
             Physically challenged employees should be able to access any exit at KFATB, provide assistance
             as necessary.

         Using the office exits, persons should assemble on the light aircraft ramp. Exit the warehouse to the
         ramp area as well.

         Call or instruct another employee if available, to call 911 from the nearest phone outside the affected
         building and initiate an emergency fire response.

         Make a check of each room if possible to ensure that all persons have evacuated the building. (Don’t
         forget to check the radio and utility rooms.) Close all doors behind you as you leave.

         Join the other employees at the assembly point on the light aircraft ramp. Do a head count for all
         employees. Do not re-enter any buildings.

         Remain in the assembly area. Emergency response vehicles from the airport may be the first to arrive;
         they most likely will arrive from the ramp side of the facility. If emergency vehicles arrive from the street
         side it may be necessary to send someone to open the gate and direct them to the incident. Return to
         the building only after the Fire Marshal or firefighter in charge gives clearance.

         An evacuation plan diagram is posted in the hallways of both office buildings.

D. Aircraft Crash, Search and Rescue

In the event of an off-site or on-airport mishap or with the occurrence of an overdue aircraft the South Central
Oregon Crash, Search, and Rescue Plan will be will be initiated by dispatch.

Dispatch, with the assistance of the KFATB will follow the plans procedures for making appropriate contacts for
the type of mishap.

For a mishap occurring on the base it is the responsibility of base personnel to initiate the appropriate emergency
response and then to notify dispatch who will continue to follow up the response and initiate the mishap plan.




                                                         102
E. Fuel Spills

For fuel spills, follow the direction of the Interagency Air Tanker Base Operations Guide, page 68, located in the
operations area.

In addition, where small spills are to be washed down, be sure that the sand-oil separator system is activated.
Where a Fire Watch may be needed, 20 lb dry chemical and CO2 fire extinguishers are available on the ramp.

In general, small spills may be washed down to the sand-oil separator system. Large spills require contacting the
airport fire department and arranging valves for the capture of spill. If the situation is not an emergency see the
direct phone number listed in the plan, page 10. For emergencies dial 9-9-1-1.

F. Other Hazardous Spills

Consult the Fremont / Winema National Forest Hazardous Spill Plan for instructions on dealing with hazardous
spills. The plan is on file in the Base Managers office.

G. Bomb Threat

If you receive a bomb threat signal a coworker to call 911 from another telephone and advise them of a bomb
threat being received and on which telephone line the threat is being received. Do not use the radio or a cell
phone to call 911 as either one might activate a bomb. Have a coworker begin to evacuate the facilities using
the evacuation procedures.

    1. Keep the caller on the line as long as possible.

    2. Ask the caller all the questions listed below and record the precise answers. It is most important to get
       the location and type of bomb and the time of detonation if possible.

    3. Inform the caller that the building is occupied and the detonation of a bomb would likely result in the
       death or serious injury to many innocent people.

    4. Pay attention to peculiar background noises such as motors running, background music and any other
       noises that may provide clues as to the location of the caller.

    5. Listen closely to the voice (male or female). Voice quality (calm or excited), accents and speech
       impediments.

    6. When the caller hangs up, keep the phone off the hook.

    7. Call airport operations immediately by dialing 883-5372 and notify them of the threat.
       The airport Fire Department is available 24 hours a day by calling 911.

    8. If you are not blown up by now, complete the entire Bomb Threat checklist located by the telephone and
       give a copy to the responding officers for inclusion in their police report.

At this point the person receiving the call should join the rest of the employees at the assembly area in the main
parking lot or on the ramp

Return to the building only after responding emergency service personnel have deemed it is safe to do so.

H. Suspicious Package

If you find a package, which you suspect could be an explosive device:

    1. Notify all persons near the area of the package and warn them to evacuate to a safe distance. Evacuate
       the building using the fire evacuation procedures.

    2. DO NOT TOUCH OR MOVE THE PACKAGE

                                                       103
   3. Call 911 using an available telephone. Do not use a radio or cell phone to call 911 as either one could
      detonate a bomb. Notify dispatch of the suspicious package.

Signs to look for in “identifying suspicious” packages or letters.

   •   Strange odor,
   •   Protruding wires,
   •   Oil stains on wrapping,
   •   Rigid, lopsided, bulky, or unusually heavy,
   •   Restrictive Markings,
   •   Mailed from a foreign country,
   •   Excessive postage or no postage (hand delivered),
   •   No return address or unusual return address,
   •   Package or letter left in unusual location,
   •   Badly typed or handwritten address label,
   •   Misspelled words,
   •   Addressed to a title only,
   •   Wrong title with name.




                                                     104
                                                 APPENDIX 6-4

                                      HAZARD COMMUNICATION PLAN

A. Introduction
The Klamath Falls Airtanker Base complies with the direction outlined in the Fremont / Winema National Forest
Hazard Communication / Waste Minimization Plan. The plan is located in the operations area and is available in
hard copy to all base employees. The KFATB Operations Guide is intended to supplement the Forest plan with
specific information related to the KFATB.

B. Hazardous Materials Identification
The ATBM will ensure compliance with Hazardous Material Identification Standards outlined in the Forest
Hazardous Materials Plan. Hazardous materials will be properly labeled. Hazardous materials on the KFATB
will be kept to a minimum. All flammable hazardous materials will be kept in an appropriate fireproof locker
located in the warehouse.

        1. MSDS
        Material Safety Data Sheets for all hazardous materials on the base are kept on file in the Right to Know
        information station located in the warehouse office.

        2. Hazardous Materials Inventory
        A complete inventory of hazardous materials present on the KFATB is located in the front of the MSDS
        book located in the Right to Know station in the warehouse office. This inventory is reported to the
        Fremont Winema National Forest Safety Coordinator for consolidation with the Forest inventory per the
        Forest Hazard Communication / Waste Minimization Plan.

C. Hazard Analysis
As required by FSH 6709.11, a Job Hazard Analysis (JHA) covering all positions and projects on the air tanker
base has been established as Appendix 6-5, page 103 of this plan. The ATBM will ensure that all employees
have received and reviewed the JHA prior to beginning work on any project.

D. Employee Information and Training
The ATBM will ensure that all employees involved in air tanker operations will receive training on the presence of
hazardous materials specific to their work area, the location of and availability of Material Safety Data Sheets.
The JHA will be discussed with all KFATB employees and will include mitigating procedures on how to reduce
exposure through good work practices. All employees will review the KFATB Emergency Response Plan, which             Deleted: Plan which
will provide safety procedures to follow if exposed to chemicals. An outline of employee training requirements is
located in the KFATB Operations Guide under Personnel Training, page 22.

C. Contractors
The ATBM will ensure that all contract personnel are informed of the presence of hazardous materials in their
work area, precautions to lessen the possibility of exposure and the location of the MSDS in the Right to Know
station located in the warehouse office.

D. Safety Meetings
Safety briefings with employees and contractors are conducted daily during periods of activity and periodically as
changes to the project occur or new information or procedures arise. These briefings are documented in the
safety briefing binder located in the conference room and in the contractor’s daily diary.

HEARING CONSERVATION

A. Introduction
The Klamath Falls Air tanker Base participates in the Fremont / Winema National Forests Hearing Conservation
Plan. The Assistant Manager is identified as a participant in the plan.

        1. Noise Reduction
        All employees working on the aircraft ramp or in the retardant plant area during periods of activity must
        wear hearing protection.


                                                       105
        2. Audiograms
        Employees identified in the Forests Hearing Conservation Plan will receive annual audiograms.

        3. Training
        All employees in ramp or retardant plant positions receive annual training in the following:

            •   The effects of noise on hearing,
            •   The purpose of hearing protectors,
            •   The advantages and disadvantages of protectors and their abilities,
            •   Instruction on selection, fitting, use and care of devices.

        4. Record Keeping
        Copies of annual audiometric tests of identified employees will be placed in the employees’ Personnel
        Folders and maintained for the duration of the employees’ employment.

CONFINED SPACE

A. Introduction
The following plan provides employees and contractors with information on requirements, practices and
procedures to protect them from the hazards of entry into confined spaces located at the Klamath Falls Airtanker
Base.

All employee and project contractors are required, by the Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA)
to abide by the guidelines of 29 CFR 1910.146. It is the responsibility of Managers, CORs’, and work supervisors
to insure that personnel follow the procedures outlined for the KFATB.

B. Identified Confined Spaces

        1. Located in the Retardant Mixing Plant Area.
        Retardant Tank #1             Capacity 10,000 gallons
        Retardant Tank #2             Capacity 10,000 gallons
        Retardant Tank #3             Capacity 10,000 gallons
        Retardant Tank #4             Capacity 10,000 gallons
        Water Storage Tank            Capacity 20,000 gallons
        Offload Tank (Plastic)        Capacity 7,000 gallons
        Offload Tank (Metal)          Capacity 5,000 gallons

        *Note: Retardant tanks 1 through 4 and the metal off-load tank have access plates bolted to both ends.
        When these plates are removed the tanks are no longer considered non-entry confined spaces.

        2. Located at the Wash down Sand-Oil Separator System
        Sand-Oil Separator Tank (Buried)   Capacity 5000 gallons
        Spill recovery Tank (Buried)       Capacity 5000 gallons

All identified confined spaces at the base are non-entry. These locations are clearly marked with signs indicating
“Confined Space No Entry”.

C. Confined Space Policy
Employees and contractors working at the KFATB will, under no circumstances, enter the above-identified
confined spaces. Entry covers will remain locked and will only be opened for visually monitoring the contents of
the tanks. Any service work requiring entry into the identified confined spaces will be done so by a licensed,
equipped and authorized contracted service.

D. Retardant Tank Entry
The exception to this policy will be that when the access panels on both ends of a retardant tank and/or the metal
off-load tank are completely removed, workers may enter the tank to perform maintenance on the tanks and
recirculation system


                                                       106
E. Rescue and Emergency Procedure
In the event of an accidental entry into a confined space resulting in injury such as a fall, DO NOT enter the
confined space to attempt rescue. Call 9-1-1 immediately and initiate emergency response. Indicate the need
for confined space extraction equipment. The fire department maintains extraction equipment for confined space
emergencies. Direct the responding emergency services to the site. Provide an MSDS for the material in the
tanks to rescue crews.




                                                     107
                           APPENDIX 6-5

                JOB HAZARD ANALYSIS




Prepared by:   Don Cavin                  Date:   06/03/2009


Reviewed by:                              Date:


Approved by:                              Date:




                               108
                                                   JOB HAZARD ANALYSIS
                                               FIXED WING / AIRTANKER BASE
                                              KLAMATH FALLS AIRTANKER BASE


  U.S. Department of Agriculture             1. WORK PROJECT / ACTIVITY            2.LOCATION                        3. UNIT
         Forest Service                        FIXED WING / AIRTANKER           KLAMATH FALLS                   FREMONT / WINEMA
                                                    OPERATIONS                  AIRTANKER BASE                  NATIONAL FOREST

 JOB HAZARD ANALYSIS (JHA)                      4. NAME OF ANALYST                 5. JOB TITLE                 6. DATE REVIEWED
   References - FSH 6709.11                          DON CAVIN                         ATBM                          6/10/2010

 7. TASKS / PROCEDURES                         8. HAZARDS                                9. ABATEMENT ACTIONS


RAMP MANAGER/                       GENERAL                            Trained and authorized personnel only.
PARKING TENDER


Aircraft Directing                  COLLISIONS                         ESTABLISH POSITIVE COMMUNICATIONS THROUGH RADIO
Parking and Clearing                                                   OR HAND SIGNALS.
                                         •      With Aircraft
Aircraft, Vehicles, Pedestrian           •      With Vehicles          USE A WINGWALKER IN TIGHT PLACES.
Movement                                 •      With Ground
                                                Equipment              KEEP UNAUTHORIZED VEHICLES OFF THE RAMP.
                                         •      With Personnel
                                                                       MAINTAIN CONTROL AND SUPERVISION OF VEHICLES
                                                                       AUTHORIZED ON THE RAMP.

                                                                       USE A SPOTTER WHEN              BACKING      VEHICLES NEAR
                                                                       AIRCRAFT.

                                                                       CHOCK VEHICLES PARKED NEAR AIRCRAFT.

                                                                       LOWER FORKLIFT FORKS WHEN BACKING OR DRIVING.

                                                                       ONLY TRAINED AND AUTHORIZED PERSONS USE
                                                                       FORKLIFT AROUND AIRCRAFT.

                                                                       KEEP UNAUTHORIZED PERSONS OFF RAMP.

                                                                       ALL AUTHORIZED PERSONS ON RAMP UNDER
                                                                       SUPERVISION OR ESCORT.

                                                                       WEAR HIGH VISIBILITY VEST

                                                                       KEEP A SAFE DISTANCE FROM MOVING AIRCRAFT.

                                   PROPELLOR STRIKES                   STAY CLEAR OF PROPS AT ALL TIMES WHETHER TURNING
                                                                       OR NOT.
                                   With Personnel
                                                                       DO NOT APPROACH ANY AIRCRAFT UNTIL PROPELLORS
                                                                       HAVE STOPPED MOVING.

                                                                       WALK AROUND WING NOT UNDER IT IF AT ALL POSSIBLE.

                                                                       RAMP PERSONNEL SHOULD NEVER MOVE A PROPELLOR.

RAMP MANAGER /                      BLOWING DEBRIS /                   KEEP RAMP CLEAN.
PARKING TENDER (Cont.)              JET BLAST
                                                                       EYE PROTECTION AVAILBALE

                                                                       EYE WASH STATION AVAILABLE.

                                                                       LIGHT AIRCRAFT TIED DOWN OR PARKED AWAY FROM
                                                                       OPERATING AREAS.




                                                                 109
  U.S. Department of Agriculture        1. WORK PROJECT / ACTIVITY             2.LOCATION               3. UNIT
         Forest Service                   FIXED WING / AIRTANKER            KLAMATH FALLS          FREMONT / WINEMA
                                               OPERATIONS                   AIRTANKER BASE         NATIONAL FOREST

 JOB HAZARD ANALYSIS (JHA)                   4. NAME OF ANALYST               5. JOB TITLE         6. DATE REVIEWED
   References - FSH 6709.11                       DON CAVIN                       ATBM                  6/10/2011

7. TASKS / PROCEDURES              8. HAZARDS                         9.   ABATEMENT ACTIONS


RAMP MNAGER / PARKING              PROJECTIONS ON AIRCRAFT          WALK AROUND WINGS NOT UNDER THEM IF POSSIBLE.
TENDER (CON’T)                     SURFACES.
                                      •   Pitot tubes,              KEEP A SAFE DISTANCE FROM THE AIRCRAFT WHILE
                                      •   Flaps                     WORKING NEAR IT.
                                      •   Antennas, etc.
                                                                    WARN LOADING HELPERS ABOUT AIRCRAFT HAZARDS

                                   DRIPPING FLUIDS                  STAY OUT FROM UNDER WINGS AND ENGINES
                                       •   Fuel                     WHENEVER POSSIBLE.
                                       •   Oil
                                       •   Hydraulic fluids         WATCH FOR FLUID LEAKS, REPORT LEAKS TO THE PI

                                   FALLS                            DON'T RUN ON THE RAMP.

                                                                    FULL COVERAGE RUBBER SOLED SHOES REQUIRED
                                                                    (TENNIS SHOES)

                                                                    KEEP RETARDANT AND OIL SPILLS CLEANED UP.

                                   TURBINE NOISE                    HEARING PROTECTION REQUIRED AROUND TURBINE

                                                                    OPERATIONS. THIS INCLUDES VISITORS AND

                                                                    PASSENGERS.

                                   SUN EXPOSURE                     WEAR A HAT IF NEEDED.

                                                                    SUNSCREEN IS AVAILABLE USE IF NEEDED.

                                                                    KEEP WELL HYDRATED AND KEEP WATER AVAILABLE.

                                   AIRCRAFT DEFICIENCES             BEFORE CLEARING AIRCRAFT LOOK FOR OPEN HATCHES,
                                                                    LEAKS, OPEN ACCESS PLATES, REMOVE BEFORE FLIGHT
                                                                    BANNERS AND EQUIPMENT COVERS OR PLUGS.

                                   FUEL IGNITIONS /FIRE             NO SMOKING ON RAMP.

                                                                    KNOWLEDGE OF FIRE EXTINGUISHER USE REQUIRED.

                                                                    EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLAN UPDATED AND REVIEWED
                                                                    WITH ALL EMPLOYEES.

RAMP MANAGER /                     ALL HAZARDS ASSOCIATED           ALL ACTIONS TO ABATE HAZARDS WITH RAMP
PARKING TENDER                     WITH RAMP MANAGEMENT             MANAGEMENT AND PARKING.
                                   AND PARKING.
TRANSPORT AIRCRAFT

                                   PROPELLERS                       STAY OUT OF PROPELLER AREAS.

                                                                    ROUTE PASSENGERS AROUND THE WINGS.

                                                                    NO LOADING OF PASSENGER OR CARGO WITH PROPS
                                                                    TURNING.

                                   NOISE                            HEARING PROTECTION REQUIRED WHEN NEAR TURBINE
                                                                    OPERATIONS OR RUNNING APU’S




                                                              110
  U.S. Department of Agriculture        1. WORK PROJECT / ACTIVITY          2.LOCATION               3. UNIT
         Forest Service                   FIXED WING / AIRTANKER         KLAMATH FALLS          FREMONT / WINEMA
                                               OPERATIONS                AIRTANKER BASE         NATIONAL FOREST

 JOB HAZARD ANALYSIS (JHA)                 4. NAME OF ANALYST              5. JOB TITLE         6. DATE REVIEWED
   References - FSH 6709.11                     DON CAVIN                      ATBM                  6/10/2011


7. TASKS / PROCEDURES              8. HAZARDS                           9. ABATEMENT ACTIONS


RAMP MANAGER / PARKING             COLLISIONS                     KEEP ALL VEHICLES AND PERSONS AWAY FROM
TENDER                                                            AIRCRAFT UNTIL IT HAS STOPPED TAXIING.

TRANSPORT AIRCRAFT                                                POSITIVE COMMUNICATIONS THROUGH HAND SIGNALS
(CON’T)                                                           OR RADIO CONTACT.

                                                                  USE A WINGWALKER WHEN CONDITIONS ARE TIGHT.

                                   PROJECTIONS ON AIRCRAFT        WALK AROUND WINGS NOT UNDER THEM IF POSSIBLE.
                                   SURFACES..PITOT TUBES
                                   FLAPS ..ETC.                   WARN LOADING HELPERS ABOUT AIRCRAFT HAZARDS

                                                                  ALL PERSONS ON RAMP UNDER THE DIRECTION OF RAMP
                                                                  MANAGER.

                                   AIRSTAIRS AND DOORS            KEEP ALL PERSONNEL WAY FROM DOORWAYS UNTIL THE
                                   Opening into personnel         STAIRS HAVE FULLY DEPLOYED.

                                   LOW HEADROOM IN CARGO          WARN LOADING HELP OF LOW HEADROOM AND CRAMPED
                                   AREAS                          QUARTERS.

                                   LOOSE EQUIPMENT IN             ENSURE THAT BOOTS, SHOES, CANTEENS, HARDHATS,
                                   AIRCRAFT.                      ETC ARE INISIDE BAGS AND NOT LOOSE.

                                   FALLS                          NO RUNNING ON THE RAMP

                                                                  ROUTE PERSONS AROUND THE AIRTANKER LOADING
                                                                  HOSES

                                   NIGHT OPERATIONS, POOR         WEAR REFLECTIVE VEST AND USE LIGHTED WANDS TO
                                   VISIBILITY                     DIRECT AIRCRAFT IN THE EVENING.

                                                                  TURN ALL RAMP LIGHTS ON IN THE EVENING

PASSENGER LOADING                  NOISE                          HEARING PROTECTION FOR ALL PERSONS NEAR
                                                                  OPERATING APU.

                                                                  DO NOT ALLOW PASSENGERS ON RAMP PRIOR TO
                                                                  ENGINE SHUTDOWN.

                                   AIRCRAFT HAZARD AREAS          ALL PASSENGERS AUTHORIZED ON RAMP MUST BE
                                   NOT CONFINED TO:               UNDER SUPERVISION OR ESCORT.
                                   PROPELLERS, GTC'S, JET
                                   BLAST AREAS,                   NO WALKING UNDER WINGS.
                                   PROJECTIONS...ETC.

CARGO LOADING                      SHIFTING LOADS                 PROPERLY SECURE LOADS USE NETS AND STRAPS.

                                                                  NO LOOSE EQUIPMENT ON PACKS


                                   SLIVERS AND SMASHED            GLOVES AVAILABLE IF NEEDED
                                   FINGERS




                                                            111
 U.S. Department of Agriculture       1. WORK PROJECT / ACTIVITY          2.LOCATION                 3. UNIT
        Forest Service                  FIXED WING / AIRTANKER         KLAMATH FALLS            FREMONT / WINEMA
                                             OPERATIONS                AIRTANKER BASE           NATIONAL FOREST

JOB HAZARD ANALYSIS (JHA)                 4. NAME OF ANALYST             5. JOB TITLE            6. DATE REVIEWED
  References - FSH 6709.11                     DON CAVIN                     ATBM                     6/10/2011


 7. TASKS / PROCEDURES                   8. HAZARDS                           9. ABATEMENT ACTIONS


CARGO LOADING (CON’T)             BACK INJURY                   USE PROPER LIFTING TECHNIQUES

                                                                BACK SUPPORT BELTS ARE AVAILABLE

                                  VEHICLE COLLISIONS            USE A SPOTTER WHEN BACKING.

                                                                CHOCK VEHICLES PARKED NEAR AIRCRAFT.

                                  DAMAGE TO AIRCRAFT            CONFINE CARGO LOADING ACTIVITIES TO CARGO AREA.
                                  EXTERNAL PARTS
                                                                DON'T WALK OR DRIVE UNDER WINGS UNECESSARILY.

                                  HAZARDOUS MATERIALS           ALL TRANSPORT OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS WILL
                                                                CONDUCTED AS OUTLINED BY NFES 1068 AVIATION
                                                                TRANSPORT OF HAZARDOUS
                                                                MATERIALS GUIDE.

                                                                HAZARDOUS MATERIALS WILL ONLY BE LOADED BY
                                                                PERSONS TRAINED IN AIRCRAFT HAZMAT PROCEDURES.

AIRTANKER L.OADING                GENERAL                       AUTHORIZED AND TRAINED PERSONNEL ONLY.


                                  BACK INJURIES                 USE PROPER LIFTING TECHNIQUES.

                                                                BACK SUPPORT BRACE AVAILABLE

                                  HOSE BREAKS UNDER             INSPECT HOSES PERIODICALLY
                                  PRESSURE
                                                                DO NOT PUMP WITH VALVES SHUT.

                                                                DO NOT HAMMER VALVES SHUT AGAINST FLOW.

                                                                WEAR SAFETY GLASSES

                                  FALLS IN RETARDANT OR         WEAR FULL COVERAGE RUBBER SOLED SHOES.
                                  OIL.
                                                                KEEP RETARDANT AND OIL SPILLS CLEANED UP.

                                                                DO NOT RUN ON RAMP.

                                  RETARDANT ON PERSONS          CLOSE VALVES SECURELY BFORE DISCONNECTING.

                                                                EYE WASH AVAILABLE AND SHOWERS AVAILABLE.

                                                                WEAR COVERALLS WHEN LOADING RETARDANT.

                                  OIL ON PERSONS                DO NOT WALK UNDER THE ENGINES.

                                                                DO NOT WALK UNDER WINGS.




                                                          112
  U.S. Department of Agriculture       1. WORK PROJECT / ACTIVITY          2.LOCATION               3. UNIT
         Forest Service                  FIXED WING / AIRTANKER         KLAMATH FALLS          FREMONT / WINEMA
                                              OPERATIONS                AIRTANKER BASE         NATIONAL FOREST

 JOB HAZARD ANALYSIS (JHA)                 4. NAME OF ANALYST             5. JOB TITLE         6. DATE REVIEWED
   References - FSH 6709.11                     DON CAVIN                     ATBM                  6/10/2011


 7. TASKS / PROCEDURES                     8. HAZARDS                          9. ABATEMENT ACTIONS


AIRTANKER LOADING (HOT)            SAME AS ABOVE PLUS...         ONLY TRAINED AND AUTHORIZED PERSONS.

                                   RUNNING ENGINE                STAY AWAY FROM RUNNING ENGINE.
                                   PROPELLER
                                                                 KEEP PEOPLE AND VEHICLES AWAY FROM SIDE WITH
                                                                 RUNNING ENGINE.

                                   APU EXHAUST BURNS             STAY AWAY FROM APU'S AND HAZARD AREAS.

                                   HEARING DAMAGE                HEARING PROTECTION REQUIRED NEAR OPERATIONS

                                   BLOWING DEBRIS                KEEP RAMP CLEAN.

                                                                 EYE PROTECTION AVAILABLE IF NEEDED.

RETARDANT MIXING                   GENERAL                       TRAINED AND AUTHORIZED PERSONNEL ONLY

                                   FALLS                         TAKE CARE WALKING AMONG PIPES AND HOSES.

                                                                 DO NOT RUN OR JUMP OVER HOSES.

                                                                 USE CATWALKS WHEN ON TOP OF THE TANKS.

                                                                 KEEP THE MIXING AREA CLEAN OF SPILLED RETARDANT.

                                   OVERLOADING                   PAY ATTENTION TO MIX, AND VOLUME PUMPED

                                                                 DOWNLOAD THE AIRCRAFT ALWAYS IF OVERLOADED.

                                                                 CHECK WARNING HORN OPERATION PERIODICALLY.

                                   HOSE BREAKAGE UNDER           CHECK ALL VALVE POSITIONS OPEN BEFORE PUMPING.
                                   PRESSURE
                                                                 INSPECT EQUIPMENT PERIODICALLY

                                   RETARDANT ON PERSONS          TAKE CARE WHEN TAKING SAMPLES.

                                                                 EYEWASH AND SHOWERS AVAILABLE

                                                                 WEAR COVERALLS IF NEEDED.

AIRCRAFT FUELING                   GENERAL                       MONITOR COMMERCIAL FUELING OPERATIONS
                                                                 ENSURE ADHERENCE TO NFPA 407 STANDARDS.

                                                                 MAINTAIN RADIO CONTACT WITH DISPATCH.




                                                           113
  U.S. Department of Agriculture      1. WORK PROJECT / ACTIVITY          2.LOCATION                3. UNIT
         Forest Service                 FIXED WING / AIRTANKER         KLAMATH FALLS           FREMONT / WINEMA
                                             OPERATIONS                AIRTANKER BASE          NATIONAL FOREST

 JOB HAZARD ANALYSIS (JHA)                 4. NAME OF ANALYST             5. JOB TITLE         6. DATE REVIEWED
   References - FSH 6709.11                     DON CAVIN                     ATBM                  6/10/2011



 7. TASKS / PROCEDURES                     8. HAZARDS                           1.   ABATEMENT ACTION


AIRCRAFT FUELING (CON’T)           FUEL IGNITIONS               NO SMOKING ON RAMP.
                                                                CELL PHONE USE AWAY FROM FUELING OPS.

                                                                KNOWLEDGE OF FIRE EXTINGUISHERS REQUIRED.

                                                                ENSURE PROPER BONDING.

                                                                POSITIVE CONTACT WITH DISPATCH TO INITIATE
                                                                EMERGENCY RESPONSE.

                                                                NO RETARDANT OR PASSENGER LOADING WHILE FUELING

AIRCRAFT FUELING (CON’T)           FUEL SPILLS                  CHECK OPERATOR EQUIPMENT FOR LEAKS

                                                                STAND-BY FIRE EXTINGUISHERS IN PLACE

                                                                EMERGENCY AND RECOVERY PROCEDURES I PLACE

                                                                EYEWASH AND SHOWERS IN PLACE

                                                                KEEP CONTACT WITH DISPATCH TO ENGAGE EMERGENCY
                                                                RESPONSE IF NEEDED

HELICOPTER OPERATIONS              GENERAL                      TRAINED AND AUTHORIZED PERSONS ONLY.

                                   NOISE                        HEARING PROTECTION REQUIRED

                                   DUST AND DEBRIS              EYE PPROTECTION RECOMMENDED.

                                                                KEEP RAMPS CLEAN

                                   ROTOR STIKES                 USE PROPER HANDSIGNALS

                                                                MAINTAIN POSITIVE COMMUNICATION WITH HELICOPTER

                                                                SECURE LOOSE ITEMS ON HELIPORT.

                                                                KEEP HEAD DOWN WHEN APPROACHING HELICOPTER

                                                                DO NOT APPROACH HELICOPER FROM HIGHER TERRAIN.

                                                                STAY COMPLETELY AWAY FROM REAR OF HELICOPTER.

FORKLIFT OPERATIONS                GENERAL                      TRAINED AND AUTHORIZED PERSONNEL ONLY

                                   FALLING LOAD                 BE SURE LOAD IS SECURE BEFORE MOVING FORKLIFT
                                                                CARRY LOAD LOW

                                   TIPPING OVER                 CARRY LOAD LOW

                                                                DRIVE ON FLAT SMOOTH SURFACE ONLY.

                                   COLD FUEL BURNS              WEAR GLOVES WHILE FUELING

                                   FUEL FIRE                    NO SMOKING AROUND FORKLIFT AT ANY TIME.




                                                          114
 U.S. Department of Agriculture       1. WORK PROJECT / ACTIVITY           2.LOCATION                3. UNIT
        Forest Service                  FIXED WING / AIRTANKER          KLAMATH FALLS           FREMONT / WINEMA
                                             OPERATIONS                 AIRTANKER BASE          NATIONAL FOREST

JOB HAZARD ANALYSIS (JHA)                   4. NAME OF ANALYST            5. JOB TITLE          6. DATE REVIEWED
  References - FSH 6709.11                       DON CAVIN                    ATBM                   6/10/2011


 7. TASKS / PROCEDURES                    8. HAZARDS                           9. ABATEMENT ACTIONS


TOOL USE                          GENERAL                        TRAINED AND AUTHORIZED PERSONS ONLY.

                                  NOISE                          WEAR HEARING PROTECTION WHEN USING GRINDER ,
                                                                 POWER SAWS OR SANDERS.

                                  DUST                           WORK IN VENTILATED AREA

                                                                 USE A DUST MASK WHEN NEEDED.

                                  FLYING DEBRIS                  WEAR EYE PROTECTION AROUND GRINDER, SAWS,
                                                                 DRILLS,ETC.

                                  SHARP BLADES                   WEAR GLOVES WHEN USING SHARPENED TOOLS.

                                                                 KEEP HANDS CLEAR OF SPINNING BLADES ON ANY TOOL.

                                  ELECTRIC SHOCK                 CHECK CONDITION OF EQUIPMENT BEORE USING.

                                                                 DO NOT USE POWER EQUIPENT IN WET ENVIRONMENT.

LAWNMOWING /                      SPILLED FUEL                   USE A FUNNEL OR POUR SPOUT
WEEDEATER USE

                                  FUEL IGNITIONS                 ALLOW ENGINE TO COOL BEFORE FUELING.

                                                                 NO SMOKING

                                  NOISE                          WEAR HEARING PROTECTION

                                  DUST AND DEBRIS                WEAR EYE PROTECTION

                                                                 WEAR COVERALLS

                                                                 WEAR DUST MASK IF NEEDED.

VEHICLE OPERATIONS                GENERAL                        ONLY AUTHORIZED PERSONNEL WILL OPERATE FOREST
                                                                 SERVICE VEHICLES

                                                                 MUST POSSESS VALID U.S. GOVERNMENT MOTOR
                                                                 VEHICLE OPERATORS CARD.

                                  MOVING ACCIDENTS               ADHERE TO FSH 7109.18 AND CHAPTER 2-1 OF THE
                                                                 HEALTH AND SAFETY CODE HANDBOOK.

                                  FATIGUE                        STAY WITHIN REGIONAL GUIDELINES FOR REST VS
                                                                 HOURS OF OPERATION.

                                  VEHICLE ROLL AND               USE PARKING BRAKE AND CHOCK BLOCKS WHEN
                                  COLLISIONS                     PARKING ON AN INCLINE




                                                           115
                                                 APPENDIX 6-6

                                           AIRBASE SECURITY PLAN
A. Policy
The City of Klamath Falls Airport Authority oversees general security procedures at the airport through the Airport
Security Plan. The airport operates under Federal, State and local rules, procedures and ordinances, including
FAA security guidelines and Homeland Security Administration guidelines.

The Klamath Falls Airtanker Base follows Forest Service Manual policy regarding Aviation Facility Security. For
security procedures at KFATB refer to the Klamath Falls Interagency Fire Center Facility Security Plan,
page 106.




                                                       116
                                      Klamath Falls Interagency Fire Center
                                         Aviation Facility Security Plan

The Klamath Falls Interagency Fire Center (KFIFC) consists of the Klamath Falls Airtanker Base and the Klamath
Falls Zone Interagency Dispatch Center. The KFIFC facilities are located within the Operations Area of the City
of Klamath Falls airport.

A. Policy
The security plan for KFIFC incorporates and ensures compliance with direction from the Klamath Falls Airport
Security Plan, Forest Service Aviation Facility Security Policy located in Forest Service Handbook 5709.17
chapter 50, and the Fremont / Winema National Forest Facility Threat Advisory Guidelines.

B. Responsibilities

        a. Region Six Aviation Facilities Security Project Manager (AFSPM):
        The Region Six AFSPM is the focal point to track and document the Regions compliance with Forest
        Service Aviation Security policy.

        b. Site Security Manager:
        The ATBM is the Aviation Site Security Manager (SSM). The Dispatch Center Manager is the
        designated alternate. The Site Security Manager is responsible for the maintenance and revision of the
        security plan, for ensuring that all base personnel are trained in the content and procedures within the
        plan, for ensuring the maintenance of the facilities physical security measures and for ensuring that in-
        coming aircraft are met by base personnel.

        c. Unit Aviation Officer:
        The Unit Aviation Officer will insure that Forest Service policies and procedures for aviation security are
        in place. The UAO will ensure that facility risk assessments and plans are current and in effect and will
        act as a primary contact point for coordination with the Site Security Manager, SORO or Regional
        Aviation Group and Law Enforcement Representatives.

        d. Employees:
        Employees are responsible for being familiar with and following the procedures outlined in the security
        plan. Employees should be aware of potential security compromises and report suspicious activity to the
        SSM/SSO and/or their supervisors.

C. Contacts:
All emergency and non-emergency contact information is located in the Emergency Procedures Contact,
page 10.

D. Security Standard Level
A risk assessment as required by FSH 5709.16 chapter 50 and is conducted by the SSM, the UAO. Local unit
law enforcement has determined the KFIFC facility to be a security standard level II aviation facility. The risk
assessment is attached to this plan as appendix 6-6, page 114.

E. Restricted Areas:
With the exception of the main visitor parking lot, access to all areas of the KFIFC compound, buildings and
aircraft ramps is restricted to authorized persons only.

F. Locally based Aircraft:
All aircraft on site are transient in nature. Helicopters are intermittently based at KFATB throughout the fire
season. An Air Attack platform is based at KFATB for approximately 100 days during the fire season. Airtankers
and other aircraft remain at the base for short periods of time during periods of local fire activity. Aircraft security
is the responsibility of the flight crew.

G. Parking
Visitor and limited access employee parking is located in the main parking lot outside the perimeter fence.
Employees with full access keys may park inside the compound near the warehouse. Agency vehicles that
remain overnight should be parked inside the fence by the warehouse.

                                                          117
H. KFATB Security

        a. Fencing
        The airport operations area and KFIFC compound is located within an eight foot chain link fence with
        additional three strand barbed wire along the top. The fences are signed by the airport restricting access
        to “Authorized Personnel Only”.

        b. Hazardous Materials
        There are few hazardous materials kept at the KFATB. They consist mostly of flammable fuels and oils
        and are in flammable storage cabinets located in the warehouse.

        c. Retardant Plant Security:
        All retardant tank valves and access plates are secured with padlocks. The valves and access plates are
        kept locked until needed. Keys for the tank locks are in the possession of the ATBM and the retardant
        crew supervisor.

        d. Access Gates
        There are two designated access points to the KFATB operations area and KFIFC compound. One is
        through a self-closing walk through gate located at the east end of the main visitor parking area and the
        other is an electric drive through gate located east of the warehouse. The walk through gate is secured
        with a coded keypad lock and an electronic key issued to employees by the airport actuates the drive
        through gate.

        e. Access Lighting
        The compound access points and the doors to the buildings are kept lighted as needed.

        f. Monitoring
        Closed circuit cameras monitor both access gates. Monitors for the cameras are located in the dispatch
        and airtanker base operations buildings.

I. Employee and Visitor Access Procedures

        a. Full Employee Access
        Full access to the base is restricted to personnel identified as KFIFC employees or critical contract
        employees by the Site Security Manager. These employees are entered into the Airport Security System
        and issued control keys to the drive through gate and keypad codes for the walk through gate and
        buildings. Employees with full access to the base must comply with the Safety and Security Guidelines
        of the Airport Security Plan as well as the KFATB Security Plan.

        b. Limited Access
        The Site Security Manager or alternate may grant limited access to the facility to personnel who are
        employed temporarily or intermittently at KFIFC. Limited access consists of the walk through keypad
        code and keypad code for the building in which they are working.

         c. Visitor Access
         A KFIFC employee having full or limited access must grant access to visitors to the KFIFC facility.
         Positive visual identification must be made prior to granting access. The employee granting access is
         responsible for the visitor at all times.
J. Keypad Codes
Codes on the access gate and building keypads are changed periodically at the discretion of and with
concurrence of the Site Security Manager and KFIFC staff. Full-access employees and janitorial services will be
notified of the changes when they occur.

K. Aircraft Theft or Hijacking
In the event of an aircraft theft or hijacking, alert emergency services by calling 9-911 and relay as much
information to the police as possible. Notify the Site Security Manager.




                                                        118
L. KFIFC Homeland Security Advisory System Response Plan
As required by Forest Service policy the following are security procedures to be followed as the Homeland
Security Advisory System increases:
        a. Low Condition (Green)
        The following protocols and procedures will be in place under threat condition green and under all other
        threat levels.

                •   The Site Manager(s) will ensure that assessed security standards are in place and
                    maintained.

                •   The Site Manager(s) will continue to periodically conduct assessments of the facilities and
                    ensure employees are following protocols in the Regional and Aviation Facility Response
                    plans.

                •   Employees will be notified of the current threat condition through postings to bulletin boards
                    in the buildings.

                •   All visitors, public or employee, will be escorted or otherwise under the supervision and
                    responsibility of a KFIFC employee.

                •   Employees will be vigilant to any unusual items, activities or behaviors and report these to
                    law enforcement or the supervisor.

                •   Ensure that all doors, windows, gates and access points are locked and secure after hours.

                •   An emergency contact list will be maintained in each building.

                •   The current Vulnerability Assessment and Critical Asset Assessment of the facility will be
                    located in the KFATB operations area.

                •   Information will be forwarded to personnel relative to intelligence received.

        b. Guarded Condition (Blue)
        In addition to the procedures outlined for a Low threat level, the following protocols will be conducted:

                •   Regular checks of communication equipment will be conducted to ensure their operation.

        c. Elevated Condition (Yellow)
        In addition to the procedures outlined for Low and Guarded threat levels the following protocols will be
        conducted:

                •   The Site Manager will access additional security needs based on specific threats or targets.

                •   The Site Manager will evaluate any pertinent intelligence received with law enforcement if
                    necessary and disseminate any intelligence and security information to representatives.

                •   All packages and bags may be subject to inspection.

        d. High Condition (Orange)
        In addition to the procedures outlined for a Low, Guarded and Elevated threat level the following
        protocols will be conducted:

                •   Security procedures will be reviewed with employees.

                •   The Site Manager will determine if Homeland Security or Law Enforcement representatives
                    are needed to assess additional base security requirements of the high threat condition.



                                                        119
        •   The Site Manager will evaluate whether the base should be closed and if alternate bases
            should be readied for use.

        •   An evaluation of the status of agency and contract aircraft will be conducted to confirm crew
            assignments and responsibilities.
        •   A contingency plan will be prepared to relocate aircraft if necessary.

        •   KFIFC security codes may be updated at the transition to the high threat condition.

        •   The KFIFC drive through gate may be deactivated and locked if the Site Manager deems it
            necessary.

        •   Contact will be made with Air Traffic Control and the Airport Operations Director to determine
            if firefighting efforts will be affected.

        •   All public visitors will be escorted.

        •   No after hour use of meeting rooms by the public will be allowed.

        •   Additional patrols of the facilities by Law Enforcement may be requested.

e. Severe Condition (Red)
In addition to the procedures outlined for a Low, Guarded, Elevated and High threat levels the following
protocols will be conducted:

        •   Specific direction received from the State / Regional Office through the local line officer will
            be implemented.

        •   Employee presence will be reduced to essential personnel only.

        •   Access to the base will be restricted to assigned personnel only.

        •   Emergency response personnel may be assigned.

        •   The Site Managers will consider closing the KFIFC facility if determined necessary according
            to threat and ability to maintain security.

        •   Law Enforcement may be obtained for security if necessary to continue operations.

        •   KFIFC security codes may be updated at the transition to severe.




                                                    120
                              Klamath Falls Interagency Fire Center
                                 Aviation Facility Security Plan

                                         Attachments

                    Facility Security, Risk Assessments and Threat Rating

                         Bomb Threat Call Procedures and Checklist



          The Klamath Falls Interagency Fire Center has been determined to be of

                                     “Low Vulnerability”

A copy of the formal assessment and explanations is available in the operations areas.

The document is for “Official Use Only” and is not to be disclosed under the Freedom of
Information Act.

                    Assessment was reviewed and updated May 2011.




                                              121
                                              Appendix 6-7


                          Bomb Threat Call Procedures
RESPONDING TO BOMB THREATS

Procedures in the event of a bomb threat:

Recording a Telephone Bomb Threat:

If you receive a telephone call bomb threat:
        1. Behave in a calm and courteous manner.
        2. Do not attempt to transfer the call or place the caller on hold.
        3. Keep the caller on the line as long as possible.
        4. Record every word spoken by the person. Record time of call, sex of caller, speech pattern,
            and background sounds, etc.
        5. Notify the ATBM.

       NOTE: A Bomb Threat Checklist provides information to record upon receipt of a bomb threat.
       A copy should be under or near each telephone.

Bomb Threat Letter

If a written threat is received:

       1. After initial opening, do not handle the letter or envelope. Every possible effort must be
          made to retain evidence such as fingerprints, handwriting or typewriting, paper and postal
          marks.
       2. Notify the ATBM

When a Bomb or Suspicious Package is Discovered

If a suspicious looking package is received or found anywhere in the building:

     DO NOT HANDLE. If a package, briefcase, paper bag or other suspicious parcel is noticed,
DO NOT TOUCH IT OR OTHERWISE DISTURB IT! Immediately contact the ATBM with the
information and clear the area of all personnel, allowing no one to re-enter until the “all clear” signal
has been given.

Evacuation

       In the event of a bomb threat, the ATBM will determine if a building evacuation is required.
       The same evacuation procedures for a fire in the building will also apply to a bomb threat
       situation.

                                                   122
123
                  Appendix 6-8



    Fremont-Winema National Forests
         USDA Forest Service

   Emergency Spill Response Plan
(Covers Agency and Non-Agency Spill Incidents)




                      124
Recommended by: /s/ Cyrille A. Young                           12/18/09
                   Cyrille Young, Forest Safety Officer         Date



Recommended by: /s/ Richard H. Kehr, Jr.                       12/16/09
                   Richard H. Kehr, Jr., REALM Staff Officer    Date



Approved by:   /s/ J. Rick Newton                               1/4/10
                      Karen Shimamoto, Forest Supervisor        Date




                                        125
Hazardous Spill Contacts
Report all known or suspected hazardous material spills or discoveries on public lands administered by
the Fremont-Winema National Forests to the hazardous Materials Spill On-Scene Coordinator and
District Ranger for the Ranger District where the spill has occurred.

       Hazardous Material Emergency Notification List
                             (Notification is normally through LIFC or KFIFC)
        1.    Lakeview Interagency Fire Center (LIFC)………………………..1-541-947-6315
        2.    Kingsley Interagency Fire Center (KIFC)……………..………….1-541-883-6850
        3.    On Scene Coordinator – Waiyen “Yogi” Yee……………...……..1-541-891-6977
         4.   Notify the County in which the spill has occurred............................. 9-1-1
        5.    Oregon Emergency Response System (OERS) ....................1-800-452-0311
        6.    Department of Environmental Quality ................................1-800-452-0311
        7.    National Response Center .................................................1-800-424-8802
        8.    Chemtrec (Chemical Transportation Emergency Center)......1-800-424-9300
        9.    Oregon Poison Control Center ...........................................1-800-222-1222




                                                      126
                                    Forest Contacts


                  Name                        Office Phone            Cell
             Forest On Scene Coordinator for Hazardous Spills
  Waiyen “Yogi” Yee                       (541) 883-6813         (541) 891-6977
                            Supervisor’s Office Contacts
  Vacant – Safety Officer                 (541) 947-6170         (541) 219-0754
  Rich Kehr – REALM Staff                 (541) 883-6722         (541) 891-0143
Tom Cottingham – Interagency Hazmat       (541) 885-4141         (541) 974-4958
              Officer
  Kimberly Anderson – Acting Deputy       (541) 947-6205         (541) 892-0487
      Forest Supervisor
  Fred Way – Forest Supervisor            (541) 947-6201         (541) 219-0752
                    Lakeview/Bly Ranger Districts Contact
  Al Hahn                                 (541) 947-6328, 353-   (541) 219-0476
                                          2427
                  Silver Lake/Paisley Ranger Districts Contact
  Barbara Machado                         (541) 576-7501, 943-   (541) 219-1863
                                          4401
                         Chemult Ranger District Contact
  Acting Ranger                            (541) 365-7020        (541) 891-3903
                         Chiloquin Ranger District Contact
  Mike Lawrence                           (541) 783-4020         (541) 788-3428
                         Klamath Ranger District Contact
  Margaret Bailey                         (541) 885-3406         (541) 274-0226




                                        127
PURPOSE

The Fremont-Winema National Forests Emergency Response Plan (Plan) documents the
protocol in the event of an incident which may involve a spill, release, or potential spill of a
hazardous material, hazardous waste or an oil product (hazmat) that would impact human
health, safety, property and the environment.

Forest Service lands and facilities have the potential of being a hazmat incident site from
either mismanagement of products, accidental spills or hazmat being introduced into the lands
and facilities from non-Forest Service actions. Non-Forest Service incidents may be highway
accidents or train derailment on transportation rights-of-way crossing Forest Service land, or
the illegal dumping of hazardous waste on Forest Service land. Training and equipping of
employees before these incidents or potential releases occur is paramount.

Employee training and hazardous material awareness are vital to the safety of the employees,
the public and the environment. Reference: Forest Service Manual 2160; Forest Service
Handbook 6709.11, Section 61.11 of the Health and Safety Code Handbook. Appendix D
describes required training in more detail.

This Plan will assist with the notification requirements of Forest Service Handbook 6709.12,
Safety and Health Program Handbook, Chapter 30, ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION AND
REPORTING, Section 32.1, Notification Criteria and Process, Exhibit 4; and Section 32.2,
Content of Notification, Item 16.

The Fremont-Winema National Forest intends that this Hazardous Material Spill Contingency
Plan be in compliance with appropriate Federal laws. The design of this plan is compatible
with all Co-operating Local, State, and Federal agency plans.

Plan Objectives:

       The objectives of this plan are:

              1.     To prevent the contamination of waters and soils within the Fremont-
                     Winema National Forest
              2.     To reduce human health hazards posed by a hazardous material incident
                     occurring within the jurisdiction of the Fremont-Winema National Forest.
              3.     To provide a plan for the reporting of Hazmat incidents within the
                     Fremont-Winema National Forest.
              4.     To provide for safe corrective actions and the containment and cleanup of
                     all accidental or other discharges of hazardous materials that are either
                     on, or threatening, Fremont-Winema National Forest Lands.
              5.     To set up lines of authority and coordination in the handling of Hazmat
                     spill/discovery incidents.
              6.     To insure that the most technically qualified personnel are available to aid
                     the On Scene Coordinator in the management of Hazmat spills.
              7.     To provide accurate and timely information concerning Hazmat incidents
                     to the news media, interested public, and Forest Service management.
                                                128
Key Elements

    - Hazmat incidents are not like routine calls. Contact Forest Dispatcher, Kingsley
      (KIFC) or Lakeview (LIFC) Interagency Fire Centers for additional resources.

    - Consider all unknown substances as life threatening and manage the incident as such
      until the materials are identified.

    -    If the substances are unknown and cannot be identified from a safe distance, secure
        the area and prevent others from entering.

    -   If you can detect an odor, you are too close...back off immediately. Other indicators
        of a hazmat incident include collapsed victims, people running from a hazardous
        area, flames or smoke, rising sound from a venting safety device, hissing sound,
        unusual smells, dead wildlife and insects, and dead vegetation.

    -    Do not attempt to rescue victims if there is a chance that hazardous substances are
        involved. You can only compound the problem and become part of the incident.

    -   Do not introduce any ignition sources, such as vehicles (catalytic converters), road
        flares, open flame or spark, and others.

    -   The Forest Service role is one of minimizing exposure to our employees, the public
        and the environment when possible, NOT clean-up. The lead for transportation
        incidents, such as highway accidents or train derailments, is handled by the agency
        with jurisdiction, Oregon Department of Transportation or the railroad. Clean-up will
        be done by professionally trained contractors. When a Forest Service employee
        discovers an unknown substance, regardless of location, that person will treat the
        substance as if it were hazardous until identified. This identification must be made by
        a qualified HAZMAT identification team or person (Local, State, Federal or private).
        The exception to this is small spills of oil, gas, diesel and known hazardous materials
        using appropriate personal protective equipment.

    -   Forest employees may mitigate minor spills as long as they do not exceed the limits
        of the spill kits immediately available in work vehicles or at District offices. Any
        employee that may be in place to take action at a spill site must be trained in the
        proper use of said kits and have attended a minimum of eight hours HazMat
        awareness training. Forest employees may use absorbent pads and/or booms to
        contain minor fuel or oil spills that exceed the limits of kits on hand until a qualified
        contractor is on site to control and mitigate any spill that may occurred.

    -   By Federal and State law, the party responsible for any spill of a
        Hazardous Material is responsible for reporting the spill and all clean up
        and mitigation measures.



                                             129
PREVENTION

Prevention of contamination by or spills of, hazardous materials shall receive the same priority
as Fire Prevention and Pre-Suppression planning. Most contamination and spills can be pre-
vented through proper planning and awareness.

Projects:

When planning projects, requirements for storage, handling, and use of hazardous substances
must be recognized. If Hazardous Substances are to be used on the project, the Project
Manager should make sure that the Plan Agreement contains the following information:

      1.     Responsibility of Contractor to comply with applicable Federal and State
             Hazardous Material requirements.
      2.     Establishment of a spill cleanup cache appropriate for the Project, if use and/or
             handling and storage of Hazardous Materials pose a greater than normal risk to
             the Project and Forest Service Lands.
      3.     Assurance that health and safety of all involved in Project will be maintained. All
             project agreements should include a Spill Contingency plan. In addition, Project
             Managers shall keep the Zone Spill Coordinator advised of any planned or active
             projects that involve the storage, handling or use of Hazardous Materials.

The reduction of hazards in the use, handling or storage of Hazardous Materials can be
accomplished by redesign of project, or taking additional mitigation measures. Consultation
with the Zone Spill Coordinator or Regional HAZMAT Coordinator is recommended when
reviewing mitigation measures or alternatives. If a project requires a contractor use and
maintain heavy equipment, the project plan should specify sites for equipment fueling, fuel
storage, or transportation routes. If other types of Hazardous Materials are to be used
(pesticides, herbicides, toxic materials) then specific requirements should be detailed in the
Plan. The planning stage provides the most cost and time effective way of preventing
Hazardous Material incidents.

When projects are carried out, the project supervisor must see that actions are according to
plan. This guarantees that safeguards against contaminant spills can work. The project
supervisor should know when potential hazardous materials are scheduled for transport and
use. If the plan calls for a specific contractor-fueling site, the project supervisor should be
aware of the contractors operating hours. The project supervisor can then make on-site
inspections necessary to affirm that project plans are being followed. The project supervisor
must also be aware of current conditions that may affect plans.

PROTOCOLS

1. First-on-scene personnel
  If a forest contractor causes the spill, by law, the contractor is responsible for notifying the
  proper Forest Service and other authorities and arranging for clean up and mitigation
  measures.

                                              130
  If a Forest employee or equipment causes the spill, the Zone spill coordinator will be
  contacted immediately.

  If a Forest Employee discovers a hazardous material site, such as a clandestine drug lab or
  dumpsite, they will immediately back away to a safe distance and follow the precautions
  listed below.
   a. If the released or abandoned substances are unknown, or thought to be hazardous, DO
      NOT APPROACH.
   b. Report ALL spills, releases, discharges, or discoveries of abandoned hazardous
      substances, or oil products and fuels, regardless of amount or location, to the
      appropriate Forest Dispatcher. If the incident is an accident or emergency event call
      911. If Dispatch is not available report incident to Forest On Scene Coordinator or the
      REALM Staff Officer.
   c. Secure the area and seal off access at least one-half mile away. Stay upwind and keep
      other people upwind. Stay on the scene until relieved by qualified personnel.
   d. If you are not sure of the hazards of the substance released, do not attempt
      containment or identification. Do not contact the substance in any way. You are not
      required, expected or authorized to do work you are not trained to do. Stay away until
      it has been positively identified. Safety is the #1 priority.
   e. Generally, the first Forest employee at the scene of a spill/discovery will serve as the
      INCIDENT COMMANDER (IC) until replaced by the On Scene Coordinator. Use the
      form in Appendix F to document incident.

2. Forest Dispatcher – KIFC or LIFC
   a. Receives report of spill from first-on-scene personnel. Initiates an incident report,
      assigns incident number and records pertinent information such as location, resources
      threatened, identification of materials involved, times, safe routes for approaching the
      scene, etc.
   b. Notifies the Forest On Scene Coordinator and/or Statewide On-Scene Coordinator
      (OSC), with the information given by the first-on-scene personnel. Notifies Regional
      Environmental Engineer if Forest On Scene Coordinator and/or Statewide On-Scene
      Coordinator are unavailable.
   c. Notifies the District Ranger of the incident.
   d. Keep accurate records regarding times, personnel, and equipment on initial incident
      report, and provides the information to follow-up investigators.
   e. Coordinates with the Forest OSC. The Forest Dispatcher will dispatch the needed
      resources, i.e. fire suppression equipment, law enforcement, and equipment and
      resources as requested.

3. Forest On Scene Coordinator and/or Statewide On Scene Coordinator (OSC)

   Many incidents involve transportation of hazardous materials, such as truck accidents or a
   train derailment. In these cases the agency with jurisdiction will take on the role of On
                                             131
   Scene Coordinator. If the accident occurs on a right-of-way crossing National Forest
   lands, the forest will coordinate with the assigned OSC for the incident to insure resources
   are protected or restored. Typically the forest trained OSC will assume the coordination
   role with the incident OSC.

   Incidents for which the forest is often responsible include illegal dump sites, which have     Deleted: sites which

   hazardous or suspicious substances. The forest OSC will be the lead for responding and
   arranging cleanup services.

   a. Implements the Forest's alert and notification plan by notifying appropriate staff,
      personnel and agencies.
   b. Provides initial coordination of the incident. On incidents that pose immediate threat to
      public health an incident commander shall be designated. Typically this is the District
      Fire Management Officer (FMO) or other qualified individual. The Forest or Statewide
      OSC represents the Hazardous Materials branch under Operations.
   c. Makes a determination as to the magnitude of the incident for notification purposes. If
      the incident is beyond the resources of the FS, the roles and responsibilities will be
      turned over to EPA and/or the State with FS oversight of natural resources.(See FSM
      2160)
   d. Notifies the Forest Public Information Specialist of the incident.       Coordinates all
      contacts with the news media through the information specialist.
   e. Coordinates the acquisition and supply of human and equipment resources for the
      incident. Notifies the Forest Service spill control contractor for spills resulting from
      Forest Service related activities, where needed.
   f. Coordinates with the District First Responder personnel, if available, to determine the
      need for specialists and needed notifications.
   g. Works with the District First Responder during all containment and cleanup operations.
   h. Responsible for coordinating and documenting cost recovery.
   i. Conduct and document After Action Reviews.

4. District First Responder

   Often this responsibility is assigned to field going personnel, typically an engine boss or
   someone else in the fire organization.
   a. Coordinates with the Forest OSC.
   b. Proceeds to the incident to act as the Incident Commander until officially relieved, then
      acts as the District Representative.
   c. Uses all resources available to identify the released substances, without incurring
      undue risk for personal safety and health. e.g., shipping papers, using binoculars to
      identify placards, labels, reactions, etc.
   d. Conducts a situation size-up for the incident and completes the initial Hazardous

                                             132
      Materials Incident Report, Appendix B. Relays the Report information to the Forest
      Dispatcher.
   e. Communicates directly with the Forest OSC for assistance, supplies and information.
   f. Requests an on-scene Public Information Specialist if necessary.
   g. Maintains on-scene records giving times and events (see Appendix F).
   h. Coordinates with local law enforcement authorities to warn downstream and downwind
      users of health hazards and evacuation if necessary.
   i. Completes and transmits the final Report of Release to the Forest-On-Scene
      Coordinator at the completion of the incident.


5. Public Information Specialist

      The Forest-On-Scene Coordinator will notify the public information specialist after the
      initial response contacts have been made. Together they will prepare a news release
      detailing such information as: the type of release, how it occurred, USFS response
      action, staffing and equipment at the scene, expected containment and control time,
      and health hazards to the public. This last section is very delicate in terms of public
      apprehension; therefore, the facts about the released substance and its possible health
      problems must be thoroughly checked with the EPA and public health officials.

      The working organization and operations are the same as those for other emergency
      responses, mainly ICS. Communications are primarily the forest radio network and the
      commercial telephone system.


MONITORING

The-On-Scene Coordinator shall monitor a spill cleanup operation until hazardous material is
removed and resource mitigation work is complete.




                                             133
                              Attachment A

               ALERT AND NOTIFICATION STEPS


                        First Personnel-On-Scene Notify the Forest
                        Dispatcher



                        Do not approach. Secure site from entry.




       Notify Forest On Scene Coordinator (OSC) and/or the Statewide OSC, and District
                          Ranger and/or Law Enforcement personnel




        Forest OSC and/or the Statewide OSC notifies Forest Supervisor within 24 hours




      Forest OSC and/or the Statewide OSC notifies National Response Center 1-800-424-
       8802, if Reportable Quantity. Request an Environmental Protection Agency OSC if
        deemed necessary. Call State Emergency Response, Duty Phone for assistance




         Forest OSC and/or the Statewide OSC contacts Regional Environmental
                                       Engineer


If incident impacts NFS lands or is the result of an operation that the Forest Service
     has responsibility for, the Forest OSC and/or the Statewide OSC initiates an
   emergency response by one of the Regional Response Contractors. Exception:
  Potentially Responsible Party is present as in a tanker truck accident. In case of
             incident within State right-of-way, contact DPS Duty Officer.



 Forest OSC and/or the Statewide OSC may contact CHEMTREC at 1-800-424-9300
     for additional information if the incident involves a transportation incident.



  Forest OSC completes incident report and recording of costs for reimbursement.
                                  134
                                                     Appendix B


                              Hazardous Materials Incident Report

Date                             Time                           Agency Incident Number
District                                               Incident Commander
Reported to:       District                                                  SO
Reported by:       Name                                            Organization

LOCATION                                                                              County
Road #                        Name                              Legal   T         R         S         ¼
                                                 from Geographic Landmark
Miles               N S E W (circle one)         (bridge, road junctions, landform)
Stream Name                                          Land Status (Federal, private, etc.)

OREGON Emergency Response System                                    Required:         Yes θ        No θ
           Reported to OERS 1-800-452-0311                     Date                         Time
           Report received by
           Assigned Report Number

NATIONAL RESPONSE CENTER                                            Required:         Yes θ        No θ
           Reported to NRC 1-800-424-8802                      Date                         Time
           Report received by
           Assigned Report Number

MATERIAL DISCHARGED                  Identity or name (if known)
           Nature of Incident
           Quantity discharged
           Discharge occurred or first observed                Date                         Time

RESOURCES AFFECTED (or potentially affected)
           Public Health
           Environment        Air
                              Water
                              Soil
           Other resources involved


                                                           135
                  HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INCIDENT REPORT (CONTINUED)

        Number and type of injured or fatalities
        Have evacuations occurred?

DISCHARGER
        Name of Discharger
        Telephone Number
        Address
        Other Identification
        Cause

        Intent and capability regarding containment and cleanup




STATUS OF CONTAINMENT AND CLEANUP
        Responsible Agency
        On Scene Coordinator
        Resources (equipment, supplies, personnel) on scene


        Resources ordered



        Estimated dollar amount of property damage
        Type of assistance you require (air monitoring, emergency response, medical)




Comments




(please attach any additional comments)


SIGNATURE                                  DATE                         TITLE




                                                    136
                                                       Appendix C
                           Hazardous Material Spill Incident Daily Costs
Note: This is a guide for recording daily costs. Documentation of these costs should be attached. A description of the
work performed each day should also be attached.

Unit                                            Date
Incident Name                                   Management Code
Name of Person Reporting
Position

PERSONNEL                                              TOTAL for this date: $____________
                                                                   Hourly Cost
Name                  Title                   Grade      Hours     to Government   Amount



EQUIPMENT                                              TOTAL for this date: $____________
Item Description                     Unit Rate Basis     # Units     Rate/Unit     Amount



PURCHASES                                              TOTAL for this date: $____________
Item Description                                         Requisition Number        Amount



TRAVEL                                                 TOTAL for this date: $____________
                                         AD-616 or SF-1164 submitted for payment?
Name                                     If yes, list amount of voucher



CONTRACTORS                                        TOTAL for this date: $____________
      Were contractor services authorized for this date? If yes, list contractors
Name                               Address                              Contract Number



OTHER AGENCY INVOLVEMENT                            TOTAL for this date: $____________
      Were other agencies (Federal, State and/or County) working on the site this date?
Name                                            Agreement Number
                                               Appendix D

                                        Employee Training

The Forest Safety Officer will track employee training and certifications.
•   Line Officers annually provide hazardous material awareness training for employees. This
    training shall provide general awareness for employees of what to watch for in the field or office
    and what to do when encountering unknown or hazardous substances. This training is usually
    four hours. There are video sessions available to include with broader training programs, such as
    the June Safety Week.
•   First Responder Operations Level - First responders at the operations level are individuals
    who respond to releases or potential releases of hazardous substances as part of the initial
    response to the site for the purpose of protecting nearby persons, property, or the environment
    from the effects of the release. They are trained to respond in a defensive fashion without
    actually trying to stop the release. Their function is to contain the release from a safe distance,
    keep it from spreading, and prevent exposures. First responders at the operational level shall
    have received at least eight hours of training or have had sufficient experience to objectively
    demonstrate competency as defined in 29CFR1910.120 (q)(6)(ii) First Responders at the
    Operations Level shall be certified by the forest. Often this responsibility is assigned to field going
    personnel such as an engine captain or someone else in the fire organization.
•   On-Scene Coordinators are required to have “HAZWOPER” training and display the
    competencies outlined in 29CFR1910.120(q)(6) and be certified. On-Scene Coordinators on the
    Fremont-Winema will be responsible for obtaining qualified spill cleanup services, primarily
    contractors. On-Scene Coordinators will not be physically involved with clean up actions.
•   Recertification and Continuing Education Requirements for On Scene Coordinators
    and First Responders at the Operations Level: 29 CFR 1910.120 (q) (8) (i) states that
    employees “shall receive refresher training of sufficient content and duration to maintain their
    competencies or shall demonstrate competency in those areas at least yearly.” Section (ii) states
    that the “employer shall keep a record of the methodology used to demonstrate competency.
    ”The Fremont-Winema National Forests requirements for recertification are as follows:
       •   Awareness Training: Refresher training offered annually to employees. This training is
           also available on line.
       •   First Responder at the Operations Level: Appropriate refresher training annually or
           demonstrate competency through incident management. This training is available on line.
       •   On Scene Coordinator: Eight (8) hour annual refresher training annually or demonstrate
           competency through incident management. This training is available on line.
       •   Training Record Keeping: The Forest Safety Program Support Assistant (currently Deanna
           Murphy) shall keep the Forest record of training qualifications and certification for those
           who are qualified as On-Scene Coordinators and First Responders Operations Level, and for
           Hazardous Materials Awareness Training.




                                                    138
                                                     APPENDIX E
                                         SPILL CLASSIFICATIONS

The following classifications are for the purpose of reporting and response consistency. They are
based in part on Federal classifications for Hazardous Material spills.

Classification of spills will require professional judgment on the part of the Incident Commander. Classifications are to be
based on the most current knowledge available and expected changes to the incident based upon past experience. These
classifications are not meant to be permanent but will change to reflect changes in available knowledge.

The minor, medium, and major classes are intended to reflect quantity of material only. These
classifications are used in conjunction with significant/non-significant qualitative classifications to
denote actual or potential public or environmental impact. All spills incidents will be reported to
the Oregon Emergency Response System (OERS).

                                                 CLASSIFICATIONS1:
                MINOR:
                      Oil: <1,000 gallons on inland waters.
                           <10,000 gallons on coastal waters.
      Hazardous Materials:    <Federal reportable quantities, or materials in sound containers

                 MEDIUM:
                     Oil:  1,000 to 10,000 gallons inland.
                           10,000 to 100,000 gallons coastal.
      Hazardous Materials: >Federal reportable quantities and not in sound containers

                MAJOR:
                     Oil:  >10,000 gallons inland.
                           >100,000 gallons coastal.
      Hazardous Materials: >10X Federal reportable quantities and not in sound containers.

QUALITATIVE:
    Significant:        Any spill in which there is potential for widespread public concern (including
                        media attention) for health, safety, or the environment. All medium and major
                        spills will be classified as "significant".




                                                           139
                                                          APPENDIX F
                     HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INCIDENT – VEHICLE CARD
(Remember: A hazardous material is any material that can, under certain conditions, create an unreasonable risk to health, safety or   Deleted: material which
property.)


          Is it an emergency?
                  ³
        Yes       ³                No
ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ▼ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿
³Public Health                     Public Health Not ³
³ Threatened                         Threatened      ³
³                                                    ³
³                                                    ▼
³                                  Is there resource contamination?
³                                 (Major leak or spill to water, soil,
³                                  or air?)
³                                            ³
³                        Yes                 ³      No
³     ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ▼ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿
³     ³                                                       ³
³     ³                                                       ³
³     ³                                                       ³
▼     ▼                                                       ▼

       EMERGENCY OR RESOURCE                                             NON-EMERGENCY
           CONTAMINATION
1. Record Pertinent Information                       1. Complete the Hazardous Waste
Specified on the Hazardous                            Incident Worksheet
Materials Incident Worksheet Prior
to Calling the Following:                             2. Call HazMat Coordinator
                                                      Waiyen “Yogi” Yee – 541-883-6813                  (work)
2. First Radio Dispatch, then call                                        541-891-6977                  (cell)
Oregon Emergency Response System at                                       541-882-9981                  (home)
1-800-452-0311 and describe the                       Alternate:
incident.                                             Cyrille Young     - 541-947-6170                  (work)
                                                                          541-219-0754                  (cell)
3. Call Local Law Enforcement
Agency - 911

4. Keep yourself and the Public a
safe distance from the site.

5. Call HazMat Coordinator listed
under the Non-Emergency column as
soon as possible.




                                                                140
               FIRST RESPONDER - HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INCIDENT WORKSHEET

Worksheet completed by:


Location of Incident (Examples – Road No., Twn. Rng. Sec., GPS Coord., etc.):


Date and time incident was observed:

Description of incident (Describe in detail everything you see at the incident site and adjacent to the site and
submit any photos if possible. Examples of what to try and report include type of material and extent of spill,
relationship of spill to roads and watercourses, and weather conditions and wind direction.):




Number and degree of injured or exposed persons:




Location and phone number where you can be reached in case additional information is
required:




                                                                 141
AIRTANKER BASE REFERENCE LIBRARY
Klamath Falls Airtanker Base has a reference library that includes the following publications:

Aviation Fuel Handling Guide #407                Hardcopy available in the operations area.
Aviation Life Support Equipment Handbook         http://amd.nbc.gov/safety/library/alsehb.pdf
Aviation Management, FSM 5700                    http://www.fs.fed.us/fire/aviation/av_library/index.html#b
Aviation Operations Procedures, DOI Manual       http://amd.nbc.gov/library/index.htm
350-354
Aviation Training                                http://www.iat.gov/
Contract Administration Manual, FSH 6309.11      http://www.fs.fed.us/cgi-bin/Directives/get_dirs/fsh?6309.11!
Dispatch Maps                                    Available in the dispatch office.
Flight Operations Handbook, FSH 5709.16          http://fsweb.wo.fs.fed.us/directives/fsh/5709.16/
Fremont-Winema Forest Aviation Operations        Hardcopy available in the operations area.
    Plan
Health and Safety Code (HSC) (FSH 6709.11)       http://fsweb.wo.fs.fed.us/directives/fsh/6709.11/
Interagency Aerial Supervision Guide             http://www.fs.fed.us/fire/aviation/av_library/iasg.pdf
Interagency Airspace Coordination Guide          http://www.fs.fed.us/r6/fire/aviation/airspace/web/guide/index.htm
Interagency Airtanker Base Operations Guide      http://www.fs.fed.us/fire.aviation/av_lirary/iabog/iabog.pdf
                                                 Hardcopy available in the operations area.
Interagency Aviation Mishap Response Guide       http://amd.nbc.gov/safety/library/iamrp.html
    and Checklist                                Hardcopy available in the operations area.
Interagency Aviation Technical Assistance        http://www.nwcg.gov/pms/pubs/pms504.pdf
    Directory
Interagency Aviation Transport of Hazardous      http://amd.nbc.gov/safety/library/hazmathb0105.pdf
    Materials
Interagency Helicopter Operations Guide          http://www.nifc.gov/PUBLICATIONS/ihog/2009_IHOG.pdf                   Deleted: http://www.nifc.gov/ihog/
Interagency Retardant Base Planning Guide –      http://www.fs.fed.us/fire/contracting/retardant/retardant.htm
    Fixed and Rotor Wing
Interagency Single Engine Airtanker Operations   http://www.nwcg.gov/pms/pubs/pms506.pdf
    Guide
Interagency Standards for Fire and Aviation      http://www.fs.fed.us/fire/publications/index.html                     Deleted: http://www.nifc.gov/policie
    Operations (Redbook)                                                                                               s/red_book.htm
Klamath Falls Airtanker Base Operations Plan     http://www.scofmp.org/kfifc/airtank/OpsPlan.pdf
                                                 Hardcopy available in the operations area
Lot Acceptance, Quality Assurance, and Field     http://fsweb.mtdc.wo.fs.fed.us/php/library_card.php?p_num=NFES%2
Quality Control for Fire Retardant Chemicals     01245
                                                 Hardcopy available in the operations area
Military Use Handbook                            http://www.nifc.gov/nicc/predictive/intelligence/milit
                                                 ary/Military_Use_Handbook_2006_2.pdf                                  Deleted: http://www.nifc.gov/nicc/pr
National Airtanker Contract, Current             http://www.fs.fed.us/fire/contracting/airtankers/airta                edictive/inyetlligence/military/Military
                                                                                                                       _Use_Handbook_2006_2.pdf
                                                 nkers.htm
                                                 Hardcopy available in the operations area.                            Deleted: http://www.fs.fed.us/fire/c
                                                                                                                       ontracting/airtankers/airtankers/htm
National Aviation Safety and Management Plan     http://www.fs.fed.us/fire/aviation/av_library/2011%20National%20Avi
                                                 ation%20Safety%20and%20Management%20Plan.pdf
National Mobilization Guide                      http://www.nifc.gov/nicc/mobguide/index.html
                                                 Hardcopy available in the operations area.
National Retardant Contract, Current             http://www.fs.fed.us/fire/contracting/retardant/retardant.htm
Oregon Department of Forestry Aviation           http://www.fs.fed.us/r6/fire/pnwcg/aviation/2008/08MasterAPM-
    Procedures Manual                            Edition.pdf
Pacific Northwest Aviation Frequency Guide       Hardcopy available in the operations area.
Pacific Northwest Aviation Plan                  https://fs.usda.gov/Internet/FSE_DOCUMENTS/stelprdb5291995.pdf

Safecom                                          http://www.safecom.gov
South Central Oregon Fire Management             http://www.scofmp.org/channelplan.pdf
    Partnership Radio Frequency Guide


                                                        142

				
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