Resource Guide for - Indiana School Counselor Association by pengxuebo

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									    Resource Guide for
Elementary School Counselors
           (Updated 2011)
Resource Guide for Elementary School Counselors
Contributing Members:

Sarah Altman
ISCA Elementary VP 2011-2012
Sycamore Elementary School Counselor
sealtman@avon-schools.org

Melissa Flager
ISCA Elementary VP 2010-2011
mflager@concord.k12.in.us

Lisa Crick
ISCA Membership Chair 2011-2012
West Noble Elementary Counselor
crickl@westnoble.k12.in.us

Amanda Culhan
School Counseling Consultant
Indiana Department of Education
aculhan@doe.in.gov

Attendees of the 2010 and 2011 Elementary School Counselor Retreat
Resource Guide for Elementary School Counselors

Contents:

     Letter and Welcome from the ISCA President

     Comprehensive Guidance

     Academic Guidance

     Career Guidance

     Personal/Social Guidance

     Legal Information

     Licensure

     Professional Development

     Appendix
                Indiana School Counselor Association
                                         “Counselors Care”
                 9820 W. 450 South, South Whitley, IN 46787
                 Phone: 260-723-5413
                 lmetzger@nremc.net
______________________________________________________________________



Dear Colleagues,
        ISCA, in conjunction with the IDOE, is pleased to continue to provide this level guide
for all professional school counselors, but this is only the beginning. Each year ISCA
sponsors an Elementary Retreat, the Fall ISCA Conference, the ISCA website, and legislative
activities, but it still won’t stop there. We realize that each school year will introduce a
variety of changes and challenges for school counselors, but we can conquer each new
challenge with the support of our ISCA relationships. As we embrace our role as school
counselors, ISCA will continue to work to support all Indiana school counselors.
        Thank you to the ISCA members who join each year and to those who choose to join
as new ISCA members. Without your membership, ISCA cannot succeed in meeting the
notable goals listed in our strategic plan. If you have questions or concerns, please contact
me at smatzat@njsp.k12.in.us ISCA cannot communicate, advocate, relate, or educate
without your involvement or input. Every member is important.
        May you each have a successful school year as you embrace your role in the
profession of school counseling! Don’t forget to visit the ISCA website at www.isca-in.org
for additional resources and information. Let’s continue to work together to achieve
success. Best wishes!


Susie Matzat,
2011-2012 ISCA President
             Comprehensive Guidance
Calendar of Events/Responsibilities (Appendix A)

Data Collection
   o IDOE Website Information
   o Data-Driven Decision Making: The Engine of Accountability
   o Use of Time-Use Log (Appendix C)
   o ASCA website (www.schoolcounselor.org) contains documents, articles,
      websites, and publications related to “Accountability/Advocacy” – you must
      be an ASCA member to access the resources
   o American Student Achievement Institute provides tools for counselors to
      track data and effectiveness of their program
           User name and password required
   o Research and Evidence-Based School Counseling
   o EZAnalyze is a free program (used on both Mac and PC) that can be used by
      elementary counselors to track data related to their counseling program and
      based on the ASCA National Standards.

Gold Star
   o Recipients of the Indiana Gold Star School Counseling Award have
       demonstrated that their guidance and counseling program is in compliance
       with the Indiana Program Standards for School Counseling and the National
       Model.
   o Recipients of the Gold Star Award have also met the standards for the
       national RAMP award.

Guidance Lesson Plan Template (Appendix B)

Guidance Logs, (Appendix C)

Recognized ASCA Model Program (RAMP)
   o The American School Counselor Association (ASCA) established RAMP to
      promote exemplary, comprehensive school counseling programs. RAMP is
      based on the ASCA National Model.

Role of the School Counselor Brochure

School Counselor Job Description Sample (Appendix D)

School Counselor Evaluation Sample (Appendix E)

Sample Counseling Curriculum Guides and Resources
   o Pittsylvania County
   o Timberlake Regional School District
   o Texas Public Schools
   o South Carolina Schools
   o School Counseling Toolkit

Standards
   o Indiana Student Standards for Guidance
           Aligned with academic standards (see Appendix J)
   o Indiana Program Standards for School Counselors
   o ASCA National Standards for Students
   o School Counselor National Competencies
                   Academic Guidance
LAS Links
   o The LAS Links assessment is administered to determine a student's level of
       English proficiency. The placement test, administered upon the student's
       arrival in the United States, is used to determine the ELL services
       appropriate for the student. The annual assessment, administered in January
       and February, is used to determine the student's current level of English
       proficiency and is used for accountability purposes.
   o The LAS Links assesses students in grades K-12 on four domains: Listening,
       Speaking, Reading, and Writing. This assessment is administered in five
       grade bands: K-1, 2-3, 4-5, 6-8 and 9-12.
   o Levels 1 – 5 are assigned to each of the four domains. Level 5 is proficient.
   o Enrollment forms, testing records, Individual Learning Plans (ILP), and any
       teacher evaluation data should be updated at least annually. Some
       counselors may be in charge of collecting and maintaining this data.
   o Trainings are offered to teachers and counselors who administer the tests.
       Please look for dates of these trainings.
   o Do not forget to consider ELL students and their accommodations when
       planning for the ISTEP test.

Academic-based guidance lessons and small groups
   o Guidance lessons can be implemented to meet the Grades K-5 Academic
     Guidance Standards.
   o Sample lessons can be found based on standard and grade level on the IDOE
     website.
   o The topic of study skills can be incorporated into lessons and small groups.

ISTEP+ Guidelines
      Because ISTEP+ information can change every year, it’s important to first
      take a look at the latest information on the Indiana Department of
      Education’s ISTEP+ website at www.doe.in.gov/istep.
         o Almost all questions about ISTEP+ administration can be answered by
             downloading and reading through the ISTEP+ Program Manual. The
             manual is updated annually and provides detailed information about
             test preparation, security, testing students with disabilities, dealing
             with testing anomalies and much more.
        o All Indiana students in grades 3-8 must participate in the state ISTEP+
            assessment. All high school students must take and meet the
            requirements of the ISTEP+ Algebra I and English 10 end-of-course
            assessments (ECAs) in order to graduate. High school students are
            required to take the Biology I ECA but passage is not required for
            graduation.
      Who to Contact
        o Every Indiana public school corporation identifies a Corporation
            Testing Coordinator (CTC) who can provide you with guidance and
            assistance with any ISTEP+ questions you might have.
        o Find general contact information for the IDOE Office of Student
            Assessment at http://www.doe.in.gov/assessment/

      Parent Resources
         o Substantial information about ISTEP+ testing is available for parents
             at http://www.doe.in.gov/assessment/parent.html
         o Parents can find ISTEP+ assessment results and helpful information
             on the ISTEP+ Parent Network at
             https://www.stage.inparentnetwork.com/pn/pages/login.seam

Graduation Plan
All Indiana students are required to develop initial graduation plans with their
parents/guardians by the end of 6th grade. The plans are then considered part of
students’ permanent records. School counselors are required to further develop the
graduation plans—with the students and parents—by the end of 9th grade and then
annually review them with the students until they graduate.
o Indiana Statute
o Online Samples (Printable sample can also be found within the student’s profile in
    the Indiana Career Explorer)
o FAQ

Graduation Requirements
   o Diploma Types
   Completion of Core 40 is a graduation requirement for all Indiana students. The
   legislation includes an opt-out provision for parents who determine that their
   student could benefit more from the General Diploma. The Core 40 diploma is
   also the minimum college admission requirement for the state’s public four-year
   universities.
   o General Diploma, 511 IAC 6-7.1-4 (Opt out process required),
   o Core 40 (511 IAC 6-7.1-5),
   o Core 40 with Academic Honors (511 IAC 6-7.1-6), or
   o Core 40 with Technical Honors (511 IAC 6-7.1-7)
   o Opt Out Process
          o Required Courses
          o Course descriptions provide brief statements of the content of high school
              curricular areas. These descriptions will assist in communicating, in a broad
              context, the content standards of courses.
          o Code numbers listed before each course description should be used when
              reporting courses on Indiana Department of Education documents.
          o The maximum number of credits that may be granted for each course is
              listed in the course description bullets.
          o Course description bullets identify those courses in which students may
              receive credit for successive semesters of instruction.
          o Minimum and recommended prerequisites are listed for some courses. Local
              schools and districts may require additional prerequisites.
          o State Approved Course Titles & Description Packet
              Course descriptions in this document are based upon State Board approved
              course titles.
          o Non-Standard Courses (courses not included in the state approved course
              packet)
          o Schools may create and offer courses that are not included in the list of state
              approved courses. To do so, schools can apply for a non-standard course
              waiver (appendix F).
       Testing Requirements (see ISTEP+ ECA section below)
          o Waiver Options
       Transcript Requirements and Guidance
          o e-transcripts
       Non-Diplomas (Certificates)

Testing
      Advanced Placement (AP) – Every school corporation has a designated AP
      Coordinator
      Students that earn a score of 3 or higher on an AP exam shall receive college credit
      towards their degree if they attend any Indiana public institution of higher
      education; this includes all two and four year schools and any accompanying
      satellites.
      Indiana public institutions of higher education may require a score higher than 3 to
      award credit for a course that is part of a student’s major but the student will still
      receive elective credit that counts toward their overall degree requirements to
      graduate from college.
         o IC 20-36-3 Advanced Placement Courses
         o AP Courses & Exams
         o Online AP Courses
      Indiana has an agreement with Pearson K-12 Virtual Learning Powered
      by Florida Virtual School (FLVS) to provide online College Board approved
      Advanced Placement (AP) courses throughout Indiana. The purpose of this
      agreement is to supplement current or help provide AP course offerings at
      various schools throughout the state.

College Entrance
    o PLAN/ACT
    o PSAT/SAT

      Opportunity to Learn (OTL)
         o Students must complete the Algebra I class before taking the Algebra I
            ECA and the English 10 class before taking the English 10 ECA.
         o Before retesting, students should have sufficient “opportunity to
            learn” (OTL) in order to have a better chance of meeting the ECA
            requirement.

      ECAs and GQEs
         o The ISTEP+ Algebra I and English 10 end-of-course assessments
            (ECAs) are often just referred to by educators as “ECAs.”
         o Prior to the 2011-12 school year, all high school students were
            required to meet the requirements of the state’s Graduation
            Qualifying Exam (GQE) in order to graduate. The last administration
            of the GQE was in the spring of 2011. Students who have left high
            school but have not met one or both of the ISTEP+ GQE requirements
            will be able to meet the requirements by completing the appropriate
            ECA.

      Waivers
        o Students who complete the Algebra I, English 10 or Biology I courses
            are required to take the respective end-of-course assessment (ECA).
            Students who are unsuccessful in passing the ECA by the end of their
            senior year, may be eligible for one of two state waivers:
                1. Evidence-Based Waiver, or
                2. Work Readiness Waiver
        o A brief description of the requirements for these waivers is available
            at http://www.doe.in.gov/assessment/meetinggqe.html
                     Career Guidance
IDOE Elementary School Career Guidance resources
Indiana Pathways to College Network provides career development curricula and
instructional materials.
    o Activities correlated with guidance standards.
The Development of Elementary-Aged Children’s Career Aspirations and Expectations
Mr. Breitsprecher’s Career Exploration website
Pennsylvania Department of Education provides lesson plans and coloring books
specific to K-3 and 4-5 grade levels.
    o These can all be downloaded free online.
Counselors can either create or use a pre-existing assessment for students to
determine their career interests. In conjunction with the Holland Code, counselors
can guide students to explore their career knowledge through Interest Inventories.
    o Career Zone – Pennsylvania
    o Learn More Indiana – Indiana
    o Paws In Jobland
    o Tiger Woods Foundation
Counselors can keep career portfolios for all students.
    o Each year, the counselor adds that year’s career activity to the portfolio.
    o The portfolio can be given to the student prior to leaving the elementary
        school.
    o Oklahoma Department of Career and Technology Education sample guide
Career Days can be held in elementary, middle, or high schools.
    o This is when it is important to have a good relationship with community
        members and parents in your school.
    o EHow Family (online) provides counselors and teachers some good
        examples of activities.
            Personal/Social Guidance
Social and affective development of elementary-aged children
   o There are research articles that discuss the importance of addressing
        affective development in schools.
   o There is also discussion of social and affective curriculum related to gifted
        students’ education. The Indiana Department of Education has created a
        document that aligns code requirements to meeting the needs of gifted
        students.
             Supporting the Emotional Needs of the Gifted article
Guidance Lesson Ideas
   o Meeting the Indiana Guidance Standards
   o Teacher, Student, and Parent Needs Assessments can be given at the
        beginning of the year to determine specific needs for a specific group.
             You can create your own surveys at www.surveymonkey.com. It is a
                free and easy way to include your own topics and concerns. Surveys
                can be emailed to parents and teachers, and they can be linked on
                your webpage to be completed by students. These surveys could also
                be used to evaluate the effectiveness of your guidance program.
             Samples can be found on www.schoolcounselor.org website. You
                must be an ASCA member to access samples.
   o Scheduling Lessons
             At the beginning of the year, it is important to plan a year-long
                schedule of your guidance lessons.
             Appendix I includes a sample Beginning-of-the-Year form that can be
                given to teachers to schedule your guidance lessons.
             You may be asked to visit classrooms once a week, or you may only
                have enough time to visit every month or every other month. Either
                way, it is important to communicate with the teachers to determine
                their needs.
   o Free Curriculum and Resources (see Appendix F)
             Operation Respect – Don’t Laugh at Me
             Tiger Woods Foundation
             Disabilities Awareness Month
             Internet Safety
             Missouri Career Education curriculum

Small Group Counseling
  o Scheduling/Marketing/Recruiting/Topics
           Small groups are a great way to meet the more specific needs of
             students.
           Groups can begin as soon as you receive recommendations from
             teachers, parents, and students themselves.
           At the beginning of the year, counselors can inform the students of
            what groups will be run throughout the year. Any former group
            members can be reminded of groups
         Depending on your school’s schedule, groups can be run throughout
            the day.
                 Lunch groups = groups can be held in the counselor’s office
                   during students’ lunch times.
                 Flex time = groups can be held during a flex time in the
                   students’ schedule.
                 Study hall = if your school has a study hall period, groups can
                   be run during that time.
         It is imperative to receive recommendations for your groups from
            teachers.    Counselors can ask teachers to complete a needs
            assessment to determine the needs of the students.
                 A SAMPLE REFERRAL FORM is in Appendix G.
         Parent permission is an important part of small group counseling.
            Written (or verbal) permission should be received prior to the first
            group meeting.
                 A SAMPLE PERMISSION FORM is in Appendix H.
   o Curriculum and Resources
         Depending on the topic of the group, different resources can be used
            to meet the goals of the group.
         See Appendix F for lists of resources (compiled by Indiana
            elementary counselors)
         Research-based curriculum
                 School Counselor Curriculum Objectives
                 Center for School Counseling Outcome Research
                 Indiana Department of Education Counseling Best Practices
                 Violence Prevention Curriculum
                 Research on School Counseling Effectiveness
                 Second Step Curriculum (See Appendix F)

Individual Counseling
   o It will be necessary to meet with individual students throughout the school
       year based on the needs of the student.
   o Counselors may opt to have set times when they meet with students, while
       others may keep an open schedule to see kids as needed.
            Either way, it will be important to have some times available, apart
              from lessons and groups, to meet individual students’ needs.
   o Students can access the Counselor as determined by the teacher. One way
       for students to gain access is through a “Counselor Pass.”
            http://www.bisd.us/martin/Documents/Counselors%20Stuff/couns
              elor%20pass.pdf (Completed by teacher prior to leaving classroom.)
            They can be purchased at your local teachers’ store.
            If the counselor is not available when the student walks to the office,
             then there should be a note that the student can complete. (see
             Appendix K)
   o Ethics
         Refer to Ethical Standards for School Counselors
         Reporting child abuse (See Legal Information)
   o Resources
         Depending on the student’s needs, the counselor can use a variety of
            resources.
         Games, such as Uno, Jenga, Play-Doh, Lego’s, and bouncy balls, can be
            used to encourage communication between counselor and student
         There are also several resource books that are specific to elementary
            school counseling.
                http://www.marcoproducts.com/individual-counseling-
                   4pk.html

Positive Behavior Supports
   o Counselors may be involved in Behavior Support Teams, also known as
       Student Success Teams or Response to Instruction (RtI) Teams.
   o RtI and Positive Behavior Supports are “programs” that are designed to help
       educators intervene with research-based strategies related to both
       academics and behavior.
            www.pbis.org – a website with the overviews of Positive Behavior
             Supports
            The Indiana Department of Education has created a webpage with
             guidance related to RtI.
            http://www.doe.in.gov/sservices/discipline/

Behavior Plans
   o As part of Positive Behavior Supports is the strategy of creating,
      implementing, and evaluating individual behavior plans with students.
   o Appendix F includes websites that contain sample behavior plans
                     Legal Information
Indiana Register (Search for Indiana laws)
Article 4 (Indiana’s Student Services Rule)
Article 7 (Indiana’s Special Education Rule)
   o Navigating the Course: Finding Your Way Through Indiana’s Special Education Rules
Ethical Standards for School Counselors
Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA)
   o Forum Guide to Protecting the Privacy of Student Information
Laws & Rules of Interest to Indiana School Counselors
Liability Insurance (through ASCA)
Mandatory Reporting
   o Child Abuse and Neglect IC 31-33-5
   o Duty to Warn IC 34-30-16-2
   o Privileged Communication IC 20-28-10-17
Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act (504 Plans)
                          Licensure
Counselor Education Programs in Indiana
License Requirements, 515 IAC 8-1-45
Original License
   o IMAP
License Types
   o Initial Practitioner, 515 IAC 8-1-1.1
   o Proficient (5 year)
   o Accomplished Practitioner (10 year)
License Renewal
   o Professional Growth Plan
   o List specific school building for online renewal
   o Complete 2 months prior to license expiration date
   o Accomplished Practitioner License (10 year license)
   o http://www.doe.in.gov/educatorlicensing//LVIS.html – website for renewal
NBCC (National Board Certified Counselor)
            Professional Development
Professional Associations for School Counselors
Indiana is fortunate to have multiple professional associations that support the
work of school counselors. Contact information for many of these organizations is
listed below:
    o American School Counselor Association – ASCA – www.schoolcounselor.org
    o Indiana School Counselor Association – ISCA – http://isca-in.org
        ISCA serves Indiana K-12 school counselors with multiple conferences and
        workshops, a website, legislative advocacy and more.
    o Indiana Association of College Admission Counseling – IACAC –
        http://www.iacac.net
         IACAC membership includes high school counselors, administrators, college
        admission counselors, and other representatives from secondary and higher
        education. IACAC offers a fall conference and spring workshop, a website
        with access to multiple resources (including the popular guidebook of
        secondary and postsecondary contacts), information on college fairs, and
        much more.
    o Indiana Counseling Association – ICA – www.indianacounseling.org
        ICA members include both K-12 school counselors as well as counselors and
        mental health professionals from around the state. ICA hosts a spring
        conference, multiple workshops, and has a website with more information.

Important Organizations
   o College Board – www.collegeboard.com Look for their annual fall workshops
      for high school counselors.
   o ACT – www.act.org Look for their annual fall workshops for high school
      counselors and dates of the Spring ACT Conference in Indianapolis.
   o Independent Colleges of Indiana – ICI – www.icindiana.org
   o State Student Assistance Commission for Indiana - SSACI – www.in.gov/ssaci
      Your Indiana source for financial aid for Hoosier students.
   o Indiana Department of Education – IDOE -
      www.doe.in.gov/sservices/counseling Amanda Culhan is Indiana’s School
      Counselor Consultant– aculhan@doe.in.gov or 317-232-0510
   o Indiana Commission for Higher Education – ICHE – www.in.gov/che
   o IYI
   o Learn More


Listservs & Communication
    o ASCA Scene
    o CounselorTalk – To register, send an email to stocktor@indiana.edu
    o Learning Connection
  After registering for an account, you can join any of the three communities
  specifically for school counselors:
  IDOE - Elementary School Counselors
  IDOE – Middle School Counselors
  IDOE – High School Counselors
     o SSIntouch is a monthly newsletter for school counselors and includes
          updates from the state. To access these updates you can join one of
          the learning connection counseling communities noted above or visit
          the archive.
o Yahoo Groups
o Facebook also has several School Counseling blogs
                                    Appendix A
                                    Calendar of Events
                        (Created by Elementary Counselors at 2010 Retreat)


August:                                              November
      Give counseling standards to teachers               High Ability testing
      to determine who delivers                           ISCA Conference
      New students                                        Mix It Up Day @ Lunch
      Counselor introductions                             Community Resources for holiday
      Lessons for Kindergarten orientation                needs/service learning
      (Off to School)
      Consult with Teachers
      Organize Student Assistance /RtI               December
      team                                                Kids Count Conference
      Student Ambassadors                                 Holiday Help
      High School Mentors                                 Academic Checks
      Orient teachers/Advocate
      Staff Morale                                   January
      Needs Assessment                                     NWEA
                                                           Transient new students
September                                                  Gr. Level Transition discussions
      Finish LAS Links testing
      NWEA                                           February
      Needs Assessments                                    Test Taking Skills
      Student Assistance/RtI team                          LAS Links
      Elementary Counselors’ Retreat                       Food Drive
      Records Reviews                                      Black History/Cultural Awareness
      Professional Goals                                   Diversity (Teaching Tolerance)
      Start groups, clubs                                  Nat. School Counseling Week
      Guidance Lesson Rotations
      Individual counseling                          March
      Teaching Tolerance                                     ISTEP
      Kids’ Hope                                             National Disabilities Awareness
                                                             Month
October
      Red Ribbon Week                                April/May
      Parent Teacher Conferences                            Transitions to Middle School
      Track data                                            ISTEP
      504/Special Ed. conferences                           Sex Ed.
      High Ability evaluations                              Child Abuse
      21st Century Parent Night                             Summer Safety (“Little Obie” for
      Go M.A.D.                                             Railroad Crossing Safety)
      Regional Conferences
                                         Appendix B

                                   Guidance Lesson Plan Template
School Corporation:

School Name:
Contact:
Telephone, Email:
Indiana Student Standards for Guidance Addressed

Standard(s) addressed:                              Indicator(s) addressed:


I.        Instructional Development
Grade Level(s):

Title:

Summary:

Time Frame:

Lesson:


II.       Evaluation
How will mastery of the guidance
indicator(s) be evaluated?

Learning Resources
Resources needed:
e.g., technology resources, media
resources, books, web sites
Citation(s):
You may include copyrighted
materials in “resources needed,”
but do not reproduce copyrighted
materials in your lesson plan. Non-
copyrighted materials need to be
reproduced and included with your
lesson plan. Cite sources here.
Collaborative Partners: e.g.,
advisory teachers, other
teachers, community
resource people
                                          Appendix C
                           Weekly Counselor Time-Use Log Sample
                     G = Guidance / C = Counseling / A = Advocacy / M = Management / N = Non-Program

              MONDAY              TUESDAY              WEDNESDAY                THURSDAY                 FRIDAY
  7:00
  7:20
  7:40
  8:00
  8:20
  8:40
  9:00
  9:20
  9:40
 10:00
 10:20
 10:40
 11:00
 11:20
 11:40
 12:00
 12:20
 12:40
  1:00
  1:20
  1:40
  2:00
  2:20
  2:40
  3:00
  3:20
  3:40
Additiona
    l

                                                                                                          TOTAL
                         TOTAL BOXES FOR THE WEEK                                                      OUTSIDE-OF-
                                                                                                        CONTRACT
            COUNSELING       ADVOCACY            MANAGEMENT          NON-PROGRAM                          BOXES
GUIDANCE


                 ANNUAL TIME USE GOALS (percent of time use)
                                       Appendix D

                     School Counselor Job Description Sample

                             Community School Corporation
                                           Job Description

Title:                                  Middle School Counselor
Reports to:                             Principal, Assistant Principal
Employment Status:                      Contract, 190 days
Fair Labor Standards Act Status:        Exempt

Qualifications:

    1.   Appropriate state of Indiana school counseling license.
    2.   A sincere desire to aid all students with social, emotional, and academic needs.
    3.   Strong human relation skills, including professional tact, diplomacy, and presentation.
    4.   Good health, high moral character, and a good attendance record.
    5.   Good communication skills.
    6.   Multi-tasking ability and strong organizational skills.
    7.   Valid Indiana driver’s license.

General Description:

Promotes educational success for all students by developing and managing school counseling
programming related to academic, career, social, and emotional growth. School counselors use
facilitative, consultative, and collaborative leadership skills to provide a certainty of educational
opportunities for all students.

Essential Functions:

    1. Maintains respect at all times for confidential information.
    2. Develops, manages, and evaluates the school counseling program in the context of the
        community culture and the total educational program.
    3. Encourages students to evaluate alternatives, formulate realistic goals and become
        increasingly self-directed; help students understand themselves and enhance positive self-
        concepts.
    4. Maintains non-punitive relationships with students and respects their confidences.
    5. Promotes positive relationships among members of the school community.
    6. Models and practices advocacy for all students.
    7. Promotes teaching, learning, and behavioral strategies that reach all students.
    8. Analyzes, interprets, and utilizes data for decision-making and program development.
    9. Provides an orientation program for all students new to the building.
    10. Provides preventative guidance materials and/or activities for the classroom.
    11. Provides solution-based counseling with students.
    12. Maintains liaison with community services and referral services.
   13. Maintains a current referral list of community resources and assists individuals and families
       to access those resources.
   14. Conducts, supervises, and interprets the standardized testing program with the school staff.
   15. Teams and collaborates with other educators, community leaders, and parents for the good
       of students, i.e. attend a rotation of team meetings.
   16. Provides school counseling services, which are appropriately balanced among leadership,
       student assistance services, and educational and career services.
   17. Implements prevention programming to support healthy physical, social, emotional, and
       academic development for all students.
   18. Identifies and intervenes with individuals exhibiting at-risk behaviors, including people
       affected by alcohol and/or drug use.
   19. Assesses the physical, emotional, and social level of individuals and makes and follows up
       on referrals as appropriate.
   20. Implements individual and group counseling strategies.
   21. Implements the conflict resolution/peer mediation program. Assesses for effectiveness on
       an ongoing basis.
   22. Develops, coordinates, and evaluates advisement and mentoring services.
   23. Coordinates the placement and/or monitoring of students within the gifted and talented
       program.
   24. Plans for the annual awards night.
   25. Involves all educators and community members in the collaborative development and
       delivery of educational and career services.
   26. Helps students and families understand a variety of educational opportunities and how to
       prepare for them.
   27. Increase student awareness of the relationship among personal interests, values, and
       talents and their application to educational and career choices.
   28. Assists teachers with developing student educational and career goals and specific plans for
       reaching those goals.
   29. Serves as a consultant in the application of teaching/learning strategies to enhance
       educational achievement of all students.
   30. Supervises and evaluates the counseling office secretary.
   31. Uses current literature, research, and resources, such as laws, ethical standards, and
       position statements, to promote school counseling programming.

Other Duties and Responsibilities:

   1. Conducts other duties as assigned by the administration on a temporary or emergency basis
      to facilitate the operation processes of the school and/or School Corporation.
   2. Serves as a role model for students in how to conduct themselves as citizens and as
      responsible, intelligent human beings.
   3. Helps instill in students the belief and practice of ethical principles and democratic values.

Additional Working Conditions:
   1. Occasional or possible interaction with unruly children or adolescents.
   2. Occasional or possible interaction with hostile parents.
   3. Possible exposure to blood, bodily fluids, and tissue.

Typical Physical Demands:
   1. Requires corrected hearing and vision to normal range.
   2. Requires occasional lifting of boxes or other items weighing up to 50 pounds.
                Appendix E
Professional School Counselor Effectiveness Rubric
                 (Finalized August 2011)
                           Appendix F

          Elementary Counselor Resources
          (compiled at the 2011 Elementary School Counselor Retreat)

https://www.counselingtechnology.net - it provides free surveys that can be put
into EZ Analyze
www.vaview.vt.edu/k5/<http://www.vaview.vt.edu/k5/> - a free, interactive
website for exploring careers.
http://www.madsec.org/LinkClick.aspx?fileticket=5DdGJDU%2BPlQ%3D&tabid=10
2 - This website has power point slides for an FBA.
Paws in Jobland -
http://www.xap.com/images/_uploaded_content/documents_library/product_spec
ific_docs/PAWS/PawsUS2011_GrK-2.pdf;
http://www.xap.com/images/_uploaded_content/documents_library/product_spec
ific_docs/PAWS/PawsUS2011_Gr3-5.pdf; http://paws.bridges.com/cfnc1.htm -
online surveys
I-Care Cat – mediation section; http://store.peaceeducation.org/
6 Pillars of character education
Why am I Here? Matthew Kelly Foundation
Bubber - http://www.timberdoodle.com/Bubber_s/408.htm
Biodots
BIGS – Big Brothers, Big Sisters
National Center for College Costs – Learn More Indiana
BAL-A-VIS-X – Balance board - http://www.bal-a-vis-x.com/material.htm
DEBUG – Tattling/Reporting; Did you try to DEBUG?
Student Success Skills/Ready for Success -
http://www.studentsuccessskills.com/ReadyForSuccess_overview.htm
Coping Cat – Cognitive behavioral therapy for kids -
http://www.workbookpublishing.com/information.php?info_id=8
www.simpletruths.com
Warm Fuzzy book – in conjunction with Bucket Filling
www.bucketfillers101.com – books, resources, materials
Indigo Dreams – relaxation CD
Tiger Woods Foundation (career lessons) -
http://web.tigerwoodsfoundation.org/programs/twlcLessons/index
Chrissa Stands Strong – American Girl curriculum
G.I.R.L.S. curriculum - http://www.amazon.com/Girls-Real-Life-Situations-
Development/dp/0878225439
Project Peace – peer mediators = train students
Day of Play - http://www.nick.com/thebighelp/worldwide-day-of-play; T.V. Turnoff
Week 2 times a year
Different “hats” for ISTEP – beach, baseball, etc.
Characters in the Movies – short video clips for elementary students
Peaceful Hut Day – get boxes from Pizza Hut – during lunch time
Mix It Up Day at lunch and other Tolerance resources -
http://www.tolerance.org/activities
Raspberries to Rhinos curriculum is free to counselors and educators
Lunch and Learn time – go into lunch room and reinforce character skills; show
video, do skits, reminders
Bullying videos - www.stopbullying.org/kids/webisodes/index.html
First Grade Takes a Test - http://www.amazon.com/First-Grade-Takes-Miriam-
Cohen/dp/1595720553
Intervention Central – website with a variety of behavioral interventions
Drive of Your Life – career exploration for upper elementary and middle school
students
Staff Building activities can help enhance the issue of community within your school
– these can be done at beginning-of-the-year meetings or monthly staff meetings
Second Step Curriculum – the Committee for Children organization has developed
research-based curriculum
Helping students understand death is an important topic -
http://www.nasponline.org/resources/crisis_safety/griefwar.pdf,
http://www.nncc.org/guidance/understand.death.html,
http://www.counselingstlouis.net/bibliotherapy.html,
http://www.compassionatefriends.org/home.aspx,
http://www.dcoe.health.mil/ForFamilies/HelpingBereavedMilitaryChildren.aspx,
http://www.thetrevorproject.org/,
http://www.schoolcounselor.org/files/When%20Kids%20Grieve.pdf (curriculum)
School Counselor website with lesson plans by topic
The PATINS Project provides a range of support services for impacting both the
organizational capacity and the professional capabilities of Indiana’s local
educational agencies in serving students with unique learning needs. These services
include:
    o Operation of the Indiana Center for Accessible Instructional Materials
        www.icam.k12.in.us
    o Regional Lending Libraries
    o Technical Assistance and Training
    o Vendor Offered Discounts
    o PATINS Rapid Fire Blog
    o Universal Design for Learning (UDL) Blog
    o PATINS Refurbished Computer Program
    o Family Resources
http://patins-
training.wikispaces.com/Free+Online+Resources+for+Teaching+Across+the+Curric
ulum
    o This has a very comprehensive listing of web links to educational sites,
       categorized by subject (Math, Science, Lang Arts, Special Ed, ELL, etc). All
       sites have been fully screened for content and safety both to viewers and to
       school networks!
                                            Appendix G

                Small Group Counseling Teacher Referral Form

                        School Counseling Program Information
                    *Please return this completed form to Counselor’s mailbox by xxx!

      Teacher: ________________________________

          o Group Counseling: If you have a student who you believe would benefit from
            participating in group, please place their name in appropriate space. I will be in
            contact with parents for permission once I get referrals from. Groups will, once
            again, be done during the lunch time, and, therefore, class time won’t be missed.
            Here are the groups that I will be leading, so please list student names where
            appropriate.

   Seasons          Social Skills       School Success   Girls’ Friendship    Boys’ Social Skills    Higher Ability
 (grades K-4)      (grades K-2)          (grades 3-4)      (grades 3-4)         (grades 3-4)         (grades 3-4)

   Help with          Help with           Help with        Help with self-         Help with            Help with
  coping with      understanding        organization,        esteem or             initiating       social/emotional
family changes       social cues         homework        friendship issues.    friendships and        aspects of HA
   (divorce,                            planning, test                          understanding           students
    military,                              anxiety                                social cues
   adoption,
    death)
                                          Appendix H

   Sample Small Group Counseling Parent Permission Form
Dear Sycamore Parent(s)/Guardian(s),

The Sycamore Elementary counseling program offers students the chance to meet with their peers to discuss
feelings, behaviors, and situations. Groups will last for 2-week increments during your child’s lunch time;
therefore, your child will eat lunch with me for two straight weeks. The next group will start when the
previous one finishes. During the group meetings, students will participate in discussions, hands-on
activities, role-plays, etc. that enhance their academic or personal and social development.

There will be four different groups offered this school year. Either your child’s teacher or I would like your
child to participate based on our observations of the child’s behavior, or based on discussions we have had.
Also, some students have previously been in groups, and either I or the child would like to continue
involvement in the group. (*Your child has been referred to the group(s) highlighted.)

    1.   Family Changes Group (grades K-4 boys and girls): This group is for students whose families are
         experiencing changes within the home, such as divorce, death, adoption, or military leave.
    2.   Social Skills Group (grades K-4 boys and girls): This group is for students who could benefit from
         additional support in enhancing their interpersonal relationships. A research-based curriculum is
         used to facilitate the learning of these skills.
    3.   Girls’ Friendship Group (grades 3-4 girls): This group is for girls who could benefit from extra time
         to discuss developmental issues related to growing up (e.g., friendship changes, self-esteem).
    4.   School Success Group(grades 3-4 boys and girls): This group is for students who could benefit from
         additional strategies to overcome slight challenges at school related to organization, test anxiety, or
         study skills.

All of the students are encouraged to talk about meetings at home, but to only share what they themselves
have learned and not what others have discussed. I lead the groups, and you will be notified of any serious
unresolved issues with your child. A key component of students participating in groups is parent permission.
I believe that parents have the right to know what their children are doing during school hours, and the
students like to know that their parents are concerned with their well-being. If you agree that your child
would benefit from attending group sessions, please complete the form below and return to school. If you
have any questions, please contact me at school either by phone or email (544-6600, ext. 6620) or
sealtman@avon-schools.org.

Sincerely,

Sarah Altman
School Counselor

                  PARENT PERMISSION FOR COUNSELING GROUP PARTICIPATION
   If you are interested in having your child participate in a counseling group during 2011-2012
         school year, please complete this form and return to the school counselor’s office.

Student’s Name _____________________ Parent/Guardian's Signature ____________________
                                      Appendix I

 Sample Beginning-of-the-Year Guidance Lesson Scheduling Form

Teacher: ________________________________
  o Guidance Lessons: I will come to your rooms monthly, unless you have an
    immediate concern. In scheduling the lessons, it would be helpful for you to pick a
    day and time of each month, and we will follow that as best as possible. I will send
    you an email reminder the week before your lesson!

                          Day                             Time

     Choice 1: ____________________     ____________________

     Choice 2: ____________________     ____________________
                                     Appendix J

    Indiana Guidance Standards aligned with Academic Standards

                         Indiana Student Standards for Guidance

Kindergarten – Grade 2

Standard 1
Academic Development
Students gain knowledge and develop skills required to experience academic success,
maximize learning through commitment, produce high quality work, and be prepared for a
full range of options and opportunities following high school.

Effective Learning
K-2.1.1     Describe qualities of effective learners (e.g., effort, perseverance, responsibility).
K-2.1.2     Explain how people can learn from their mistakes.
K-2.1.3     Describe why working hard helps people achieve goals.
K-2.1.4     Describe how responsible students use their time.
K-2.1.5     Explain how students have the ability to choose their behaviors.
K-2.1.6     Identify people who can help when a student has a problem.
K-2.1.7     Demonstrate the ability to ask for help when needed.
K-2.1.8     List academic tasks that students do independently.
K-2.1.9     Specify the skills needed to work independently.
K-2.1.10 List academic tasks that students do as a group.
K-2.1.11 Specify the skills needed to work in a group.
K-2.1.12 Discuss the different ways that people learn.
Preparation for Postsecondary Education Options
K.3.1.13    Demonstrate an understanding that education continues throughout a lifetime.
Relationship of Academics to Work and Life
K-2.1.14 Identify the similarities between the behaviors expected at school and those
            expected in the work place.

Standard 2

        A.     Career Development
Students develop a positive attitude toward work; develop the necessary skills to make a
successful transition from school to the world of work, and from job to job across the life
career span; and gain an understanding of the relationship between success in school and
future success in the world of work.

Career Awareness (Self Knowledge, Career Exploration, Career Planning)
K-2.2.1   Describe one or more jobs they find interesting.
K-2.2.2      Identify different types of job environments.
K-2.2.3      Discuss occupations held by adults in their community.
     SS K.4.1     Explain that people work to earn money to buy the things they want.
     SS K.4.2     Identify different kinds of jobs that people do.
     SS K.4.3     Explain why people in a community have different jobs.
     SS 2.4.2     Identify community workers who provide goods and services for the rest of the
                  community and explain how their jobs benefit people in the community.
     SS 2.5.5     Identify people of different ages, cultural backgrounds, traditions, and careers
                  and explain how they contribute to the community.
K-2.2.4      Identify examples of traditional careers and non-traditional careers.
     SS 2.4.6     Define specialization and identify specialized jobs in the school and community.
Preparation for Career Options
K-2.2.5      Discuss the importance of attendance, punctuality, and doing one’s best.
Relationship of Careers to Academics and Life
K-2.2.6      Discuss the importance of learning new skills throughout one’s lifetime.

Standard 3
Citizenship Development
Students develop the personal management and team-building skills needed to become
successful learners, responsible citizens, and productive workers.
Respecting Self and Others
K-2.3.1      Identify ways in which people are similar and different.
     SS K.5.1      Identify ways in which people are alike and different.
     SS K.5.3      Give examples of how families in the community are similar and different,
                   yet are part of the community.
     SS 2.5.2      Explain how individuals are members of many different groups and compare
                   and contrast the expectations of behavior in different groups.
K-2.3.2      Discuss the importance of showing respect for all people.
     SS K.5.2      Identify individuals who are important in students’ lives — such as parents,
                   grandparents, guardians, and teachers — and give examples of how families
                   cooperate and work together.
     H K.5.2       Describe characteristics needed to be a responsible friend and family member.
     H K.5.4       Demonstrate ways to communicate care, consideration, and respect of self
                   and others.
     H 1.5.2       Describe characteristics needed to be a responsible friend and family
                   member.
     H 1.5.4       Demonstrate ways to communicate care, consideration, and respect of self
                   and others.
     H 2.5.2       Describe characteristics needed to be a responsible friend and family member.
     H 2.5.4       Demonstrate ways to communicate care, consideration, and respect of self
                   and others.
K-2.3.3      List ways to demonstrate respect for others at school.
K-2.3.4      Identify situations that make them angry.
K-2.3.5      Practice strategies for reducing anger.
     H K.3.2       Demonstrate how to apply coping strategies when feeling anxious, upset,
                   angry, too excited, or out of control.
     H 1.3.2      Demonstrate how to apply coping strategies when feeling anxious, upset,
                  angry, too excited, or out of control.
K-2.3.6      Describe simple ways to resolve conflicts.
     H K.5.7      Demonstrate positive ways to resolve conflicts.
     H 1.5.7      Demonstrate positive ways to resolve conflicts.
     H 2.5.7      Demonstrate positive ways to resolve conflicts.
K-2.3.7      Demonstrate healthy ways to express needs, wants, and feelings using “I” messages.
     H K.5.1      Describe verbal and nonverbal communication.
     H K.5.3      Demonstrate healthy ways to express needs, wants, and feelings including I
                  messages and assertive communication strategies.
     H 1.5.1      Distinguish between verbal and nonverbal communication.
     H 1.5.3      Demonstrate healthy ways to express needs, wants, and feelings including I
                  messages and assertive communication strategies.
     H 2.1.4      Describe the relationship between physical health and emotional health.
     H 2.5.1      Demonstrate effective verbal and nonverbal communication skills to enhance
                  health.
     H 2.5.3      Demonstrate healthy ways to express needs, wants, and feelings
                  including I messages and assertive communication strategies.
K-2.3.8      Explain the benefits of good listening.
     H K.5.5      Demonstrate attentive listening skills to build and maintain healthy relationships.
     H 1.5.5      Demonstrate attentive listening skills to build and maintain healthy relationships.
     H 2.5.5      Demonstrate attentive listening skills to build and maintain healthy relationships.
K-2.3.9      Identify student responsibilities at school.
     SS K.2.2     Give example of rules in the classroom and school and provide reasons for the
                  specific rules.
     SS K.2.4     Identify examples of responsible citizenship in the school setting and in
                  stories about the past and present.
     SS K.2.5     Identify and follow school rules to ensure order and safety.
     SS 2.2.1     Discuss the rights and responsibilities of citizens in the school and the
                  community.
     SS 2.5.1     Identify some of the responsibilities that individuals have to themselves and
                  others.
Preparation for Good Citizenship
K-2.3.10      Identify three things that they do well.
     SS 1.2.6     Identify civic virtues that are needed to be a good citizen.
     H 2.1.3      Identify examples of emotional, social, and physical health during childhood.
     H 1.3.4      Demonstrate the ability to assess personal health perceptions and behaviors.
K-2.3.11      Identify at least one area in which they would like to improve.
K-2.3.12      Describe the benefits of behaving appropriately at school.
     SS 1.2.5     Suggest ways that students’ actions can contribute to the common good
                  of the community.
K-2.3.13      Describe the consequences of behaving inappropriately at school.
K-2.4.14      Identify a work activity and a leisure activity in which they participate.
     SS K.4.4     Give examples of work activities that people do at home.
K-2.4.15      Describe the benefits of being honest.
Safety and Survival
K-2.3.16     Demonstrate refusal skills.
     H K.5.6     Demonstrate refusal skills to enhance health.
     H 1.5.6     Demonstrate refusal skills to enhance health.
     H 2.5.6     Demonstrate refusal skills to enhance health.
K-2.3.17     Demonstrate techniques for managing stress.
     H K.3.1     Demonstrate how to apply skills to manage stress.
     H 1.3.1     Demonstrate how to apply skills to manage stress.
     H 2.3.1     Demonstrate how to apply skills to manage stress.
     H 2.3.2     Demonstrate how to apply coping strategies when feeling anxious,
                 upset, angry, too excited, or out of control.
K-2.3.18     Describe situations in which it is appropriate to seek help and to whom the
             students may turn to for help in each of those situations (e.g., threat of self-harm,
             weapon possession at school, physical abuse, emotional abuse, neglect).
     H 1.3.3     Demonstrate ways to avoid and seek help in threatening situations.
     H 2.3.3     Demonstrate ways to avoid trouble and seek help in threatening situations.

Grades 3-5

Standard 1
Academic Development
Students gain knowledge and develop skills required to experience academic1 success,
maximize learning through commitment, produce high quality work, and be prepared for a
full range of options and opportunities following high school.

Effective Learning
3-5.1.1      Demonstrate learning skills (e.g., taking notes, reading texts, memorization
             techniques, test taking strategies, active listening).
3-5.1.2      Describe qualities they possess that make them effective learners at school
             (e.g., effort, perseverance, responsibility).
3-5.1.3      Identify a situation in which they have learned from a mistake.
3-5.1.4      Describe an experience where hard work resulted in achievement of a goal.
3-5.1.5      Discuss how time-use affects student learning.
3-5.1.6      Develop a plan for bringing about a desired change in academic performance.
3-5.1.7      Analyze their use of skills needed to work independently.
3-5.1.8      Evaluate their use of skills needed to work as a group.
3-5.1.9      Identify their learning style(s).
3-5.1.10     Identify educational opportunities that exist outside the classroom.
3-5.1.11     Describe how not turning in assignments impacts one’s grades in school.
3-5.1.12     Identify sources of extra help available to students in grades 3-5 needing
             academic support.
3-5.1.13     Develop a plan for academic improvement based on their classroom work,
             report card grades, standardized test results, teacher comments, and life
             experiences.
Preparation for Postsecondary Education Options
3-5.1.14      Explain the importance of earning a high school diploma.
3-5.1.15      Describe the Core 40 Diploma in general terms, and what they can do to prepare
            for it.
3-5.1.16    Explain why it is important to continue one’s education after high school.
3-5.1.17    Describe in general terms the options that exist for continuing one’s education
            after high school.
3-5.1.18    Discuss ways people with limited financial resources are able to continue their
            education after high school.
Relationship of Academics to Work and Life
3-5.1.19    Describe how academic performance at school can open or close future career
            opportunities.

Standard 2
Career Development
Students develop a positive attitude toward work; develop the necessary skills to make a
successful transition from school to the world of work, and from job to job across the life
career span; and gain an understanding of the relationship between success in school and
future success in the world of work.

Career Awareness (Self Knowledge, Career Exploration, Career Planning)
3-5.2.1     Use a career interest inventory to identify career interests.
3-5.2.2     Identify factors to consider when selecting a job (e.g., income, working
            conditions, employment outlook).
3-5.2.3     Identify their needs and preferences within job factors (e.g., income, working
            conditions, employment outlook).
3-5.2.4     Use personal, print, and electronic resources to research an occupation.
3-5.2.5     Discuss the availability of high-skill and low-skill jobs locally, statewide, and globally.
3-5.2.6     Identify criteria that employers consider and don’t consider (e.g., gender) when
            hiring new employees.
3-5.2.7     List jobs that relate to their hobbies and/or leisure activities.
Preparation for Career Options
3-5.2.8     Discuss how attendance, punctuality, and completing schoolwork on time are
            habits that transfer to the workforce.
Relationship of Careers to Academics and Life
3-5.2.9     Discuss how jobs change over time and the resulting need for life-long learning.

Standard 3
Citizenship Development
Students develop the personal management and team-building skills needed to become
successful learners, responsible citizens, and productive workers.

Respecting Self and Others
3-5.3.1     Describe how to predict and prevent inappropriate expressions of anger.
3-5.3.2     Identify cultural groups (e.g., gender, ethnicity) and give examples of the
            challenges faced by various cultural groups.
3-5.3.3     Discuss the benefits of consensus building.
3-5.3.4     Describe a situation at school in which they have reached consensus with a group.
3-5.3.5     Describe the steps of a conflict management model.
     H 3.3.1        Demonstrate how to apply skills to manage stress.
     H 3.5.6        Demonstrate refusal and negotiation skills to enhance health.
     H 3.5.7        Differentiate between negative and positive behaviors used in conflict situations.
     H 3.5.8        Demonstrate nonviolent strategies to resolve conflicts.
     H 4.3.1        Demonstrate how to apply skills to manage stress.
     H 4.5.6        Demonstrate refusal and negotiation skills to enhance health.
     H 4.5.7        Differentiate between negative and positive behaviors used in conflict situations.
     H 4.5.8        Demonstrate nonviolent strategies to resolve conflicts.
3-5.3.6         Relate a situation at school in someone has been kind to others.
3-5.3.7         Demonstrate the characteristics of active listening.
     H 3.5.5        Demonstrate attentive listening skills to build and maintain healthy relationships.
     H 4.5.5        Demonstrate attentive listening skills to build and maintain healthy relationships.
3-5.3.8         Tell how they have practiced active listening at school.
3-5.3.9         Demonstrate verbal and non-verbal communications.
     H 3.5.1        Demonstrate effective verbal and nonverbal communication skills to
                    enhance health.
     H 4.5.1        Demonstrate effective verbal and nonverbal communication skills to
                    enhance health.
3-5.3.10        Describe how people act when they are aggressive, passive, and assertive.
     H 3.3.2        Demonstrate how to apply coping strategies when feeling anxious, upset,
                    angry, or out of control.
3-5.3.11        Describe the steps of being assertive.
     H 3.5.3        Demonstrate healthy ways to express needs, wants, and feelings including I
                    messages and assertive communication strategies.
     H 4.5.3        Demonstrate healthy ways to express needs, wants, and feelings including I
                    messages and assertive communication strategies.
3-5.3.12        Describe a situation in which assertiveness is appropriate.
3-5.3.13        Identify student rights (e.g., the right to attend school, safe learning
                environment, respect from others).
     H 3.3.3        Demonstrate ways to avoid, reduce, and report threatening situations.
     H 4.3.3        Demonstrate ways to avoid, reduce, and report threatening situations.
3-5.3.14        Describe how students can lose their rights if they act irresponsibly.
     SS 3.2.1       Explain that people are citizens of their community, state, and nation and
                    explain the importance of good citizenship.
3-5.3.15        Describe ways in which a student can demonstrate respect for oneself.
     H 3.5.4        Demonstrate ways to communicate care, consideration, and respect of self
                    and others.
     H 4.1.1        Identify responsible health behaviors.
     H 4.5.4        Demonstrate ways to communicate care, consideration, and respect of self
                    and others.
3-5.3.16        Describe ways in which students demonstrate respect for other students.
3-5.3.17        Describe ways in which students demonstrate respect for authority.
3-5.3.18        Describe ways in which students demonstrate respect for their parents and home.
     H 3.5.2        Describe characteristics needed to be a responsible friend and family member.
     H 4.4.1        Describe how the family and school influences personal health behaviors.
     H 4.5.2        Describe characteristics needed to be a responsible friend and family member.
3-5.3.19      Describe ways in which students demonstrate respect for others’ views and
              religious beliefs.
3-5.3.20      Describe ways in which students’ respect the property of others.
3-5.3.21      Describe the process of grieving.
     H 4.3.2      Demonstrate how to apply skills to manage grief and anger.
Preparation for Good Citizenship
3-5.3.22       Describe the importance of focusing on one’s strengths.
3-5.3.23       Discuss the relationship between behaviors and consequences.
3-5.3.24       Apply the steps of a decision-making process.
3-5.3.25       Describe the benefits of goal-setting.
3-5.3.26       Identify the qualities of a well-written goal.
3-5.3.27       Write a goal for a specific timeframe.
3-5.3.28       Develop an action plan related to one of their goals.
3-5.3.29       Describe a healthy balance between work and healthy leisure activities.
     H 3.1.6      Describe ways in which a healthful school and community environment
                  influences personal health.
     H 4.1.2      Describes relationships between personal health behaviors and individual
                  well-being.
     H 4.1.6      Describe how physical, social, and emotional environments influence
                  personal health.
3-5.3.30       Describe the importance of persistence in doing one’s best.
3-5.3.31       Identify ways in which students can provide service in the community.
     SS 3.2.6     Discuss and explain the meaning of the Pledge of Allegiance. Explain other
                  ways citizens can affirm their citizenship.
     SS 4.2.6     Give examples of how citizens can participate in their state government and
                  explain the right and responsibility of voting.
     SS 4.2.7     Define and provide examples of civic virtues in a democracy.
Safety and Survival
3-5.3.32       Discuss the emotional and physical dangers of alcohol and other substance abuse.
     H 3.1.3      Identify examples of mental, emotional, social, and physical health during
                  childhood.
     H 3.1.4      Describe the relationship between physical health and emotional health.
     H 4.1.4      Describe the relationship between physical health and emotional health.
                                    Appendix K

            Student Individual Counseling Referral

                            I want to talk to the Counselor

               Name ________________________        Teacher______________

I want to talk about: (check one)
   friends            family              school and class          other

I am feeling: (check one)
   sad      confused          mad         scared        worried     happy

This situation is: (check one)
   EMERGENCY: I must see you today.              VERY IMPORTANT: I want to see you soon.

								
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