Teacher Education Program Handbook - Morehead State University

Document Sample
Teacher Education Program Handbook - Morehead State University Powered By Docstoc
					Teacher Education Program Handbook
             2010-2011
Table of Contents
Introduction ............................................................................................................ 4
KY Teacher Standards…. ...................................................................................... 4
Academic Acknowledgements ............................................................................... 5
Contextual Framework ........................................................................................ 6
Teacher Education Council ................................................................................. 11
Professional Code of Ethics ............................................................................... 13
Teacher Education Academic & Professional Standards Committee .................. 15
Undergraduate Teacher Education Candidate Gates .......................................... 19

GATE I: Admission to the Teacher Education Program ...................... 20
TEP Admission Requirements ............................................................................. 21
Formal Application Process ................................................................................. 22
Restricted Courses............................................................................................... 25

GATE II: Prior to Clinical Practice ...............………………………………27
Field Experiences................................................................................................. 28
Application for Clinical Practice ............................................................................ 41
Policies and Guidelines ..................................................................................... 47

GATE III: Clinical Practice Experience .............. …………………………49
Duties of Clinical Practice Candidate ................................................................... 50
Duties of Cooperating Teacher ............................................................................ 55
Duties of the Director, Educational Service Unit .................................................. 60
Duties of University Supervisor ............................................................................ 61
Duties of School Principal .................................................................................... 62
Duties of Superintendent...................................................................................... 63
Classroom Responsibilities .................................................................................. 64
General Policies ................................................................................................... 65
Teacher Performance Assessment...................................................................... 68
Teacher Performance Assessment Rubric ................. …………….………………92

GATE IV: Program Completion ................................................................. 97
Applying for Teacher Certification ........................................................................ 98
Kentucky Teacher Internship Program .............................................................. 100

Local, State, & National Regulations ... …………………………………………101
Clarification of Attorney General’s Opinion ........................................................ 102
Further Clarification of Attorney General’s Opinion ........................................... 103
Curriculum .......................................................................................................... 104
Kentucky’s Learning Goals ................................................................................ 110
Provisions for National Enforcement Constitution ............................................. 112

Appendix ........................................................................................................... 114
Resume Example ............................................................................................... 115
Philosophy of Education Example ..................................................................... 116
Disposition Evaluation Process Instructions ...................................................... 117
Dress Code Example……………………………………………............................ 120
TEP Hearing Procedures ................................................................................... 121
Waiver Form for Restricted TEP Courses.......................................................... 122
Record of Performance Evaluation Form........................................................... 123
Clinical Practice Time Card ................................................................................ 124
Tort Liability Form .............................................................................................. 125



                                                                               1
Praxis Re-Testing Preparation Plan ................................................................... 126
Medical History Form ......................................................................................... 127
Lesson Plan Format ........................................................................................... 129
Clinical Practice Withdrawal/Failure Form ......................................................... 132
Clinical Practice Terminology ............................................................................. 133
Glossary ............................................................................................................. 134




                                                                              1
ABOUT THIS HANDBOOK
The main objective of the Teacher Education Program Handbook is to provide easy access and a reader
friendly approach to securing information. The design uniquely imbeds policies, processes, procedures,
curriculum and resources, by category, based on the MSU Conceptual Framework Gates, e.g.,
“Admission to the Teacher Education Program”, “Prior to Clinical Practice”, “Clinical Practice Experience”
and “Program Completion.” Local State and National Regulations are included to provide clarification of
regulations, curriculum, design and content and Kentucky Learning Goals. Other resources include the
Kentucky Teacher Code of Ethics, Kentucky Teacher Standards and information about the MSU Teacher
Education Council.       A copy of the handbook is readily available at the following site:
www.moreheadstate.edu/esu.

The cover of the handbook reflects the MSU Conceptual Framework theme, “A Light To and From the
Mountains.” The framework, appropriately symbolizes what the MSU College of Education aspires to be.

MSU faculty and staff continue to analyze data and assess programs, procedures and policies because of
a willingness to do what it takes to elevate levels of successes, related to teaching and learning in 21st
century classrooms.




Kentucky Teacher Standards
http://www.kyepsb.net/teacherprep/standards.asp




                                                    1
    Morehead State University
    Academic Acknowledgements
    Academic and Administrative Affairs
   Dr. Wayne D. Andrews, President
   Dr. Karla Hughes, Executive Vice President, Academic Affairs and Dean of Faculty
   Dr. Cathy Gunn, Dean, College of Education
   Dr. Gerald Demoss, Dean, College of Science & Technology
   Dr. Scott McBride, Dean, Caudill College of Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences
   Dr. Robert Albert, Dean, College of Business & Public Affairs

    Educational Service Unit
   Ms. Rosemarie Gold, Director
   Ms. Sue Vencill, TEP Admissions Coordinator/Certification Officer
   Mr. Jerry Brunker, Field Experience & Internship Coordinator
   Ms. Farrah Baldwin, Educational Services Coordinator
   Ms. Krista Caskey, Educational Support Assistant
   Ms. Joan Callaham, Teacher Recruitment Program Coordinator
   Ms. Carry Harris, Education Support Specialist
   Ms. Kimberly Terry, Secretary

    University Supervisors
   Assigned by Department Chairs of each college with an approved Teacher Education Program




                                                       1
                              More     State University
                                 ehead S
                  ofessional Education Unit – Conceptual F
                Pro                                              k
                                                         Framework
             “Community Enga                    and      the
                            agement: A Light to a from t Mounta  ains”
                                  o            ,
“Handed down from generation to generation, quilts are more than a                   pleasing blan
                                                                       aesthetically p           nkets.
Whether by tradition or resistance to wear, quilts have acq
                     o                                                 que place with the family and
                                                           quired a uniq             hin         y
society: th connect our past to ou future.” Provost Karla Hu
          hey        o           ur                        ughes

About the Quilt Square We selecte a quilt squ
           e                          ed           uare called “M                e             o
                                                                 Moon Over the Mountain” to graphically
          t           onceptual fram
represent our Unit’s co             mework. A Pr    rofessional Ed               t
                                                                  ducation Unit compares fa   avorably to a qquilt:
its program (pieces) form unique d
           ms         fo            departments (s (squares). In a                the
                                                                  addition, it is t common body of
         ge
knowledg within educ  cator preparat                s
                                     tion that binds these progr rams and academic depart      tments into a
                      u
cohesive and unique unit.
         What distinguis
         W             shes the prof fession of eduucation from o                nes           ys
                                                                 other disciplin has alway been its foc of   cus
engaging with commun                ke             s             e                rns                       rest
                      nities. And lik the borders that bind the larger patter of a quilt, it is this intere of
engaging with our entir community that is respo
                       re           y                            e
                                                   onsible for the successful li               n
                                                                                  inkages within the Unit.
         The                          ,
         T collection of integrated, synergistic, and holistic p                 hin
                                                                 programs with this Profes     ssional Educaation
          ded         u
Unit blend with the unique and cu                  backgrounds o our candida
                                    ulturally rich b              of                           nts
                                                                                  ates represen a proud
           And        e
heritage. A because education re    epresent the fafabric of our s
                                                                 society, the Pr               ducation Unit
                                                                                  rofessional Ed            t
          the                       es             day
believes t education its candidate receive tod should pre                        o             y
                                                                  epare them to successfully address soc    ciety’s
needs tommorrow.

         What is a con
         W              nceptual Frammework? Mo     orehead State University’s Professional Education Unit
                                                                  e
                          k
Conceptual Framework is the overa                   ure
                                     arching structu that prom   motes the cons                           e
                                                                               sideration of a broad range of
philosophical perspectives that esta ablishes param               e           al             l
                                                    meters for the Professiona Educational Unit’s values  s,
goals, and strategies. Conceptual f
          d                          frameworks are dynamic because they reflect and ac                   anges
                                                                                             ccount for cha
over time in the Profes              ation Unit and in standards set forth by s
                         ssional Educa                                         state and national professional
associatio               on
         ons. In additio to establish               n                          ual           k            s
                                      hing the vision of the Unit, this conceptu framework also clarifies how
                          d
our vision is manifested in 1) the gooals of the Unit, 2) the foun            owledge, skills and dispositions
                                                                 ndation of kno              s,
                         e            on            g
that underlie candidate demonstratio of learning through perf      formance, 3) and the meth hods and systtems
created to implement and assess all aspects of e
         o               a                                       m.
                                                    each program This docum                 esult of
                                                                               ment is the re
collaborat               volving MSU f
          tive efforts inv            faculty, admin              ofessional edu
                                                    nistrators, pro            ucation candidates, and pu ublic
school praactitioners.




                                                        1
                                 Community Engagement
                            A Light to and from the Mountains
         It is our mission to prepare engaged educators in Eastern Kentucky and beyond as we promote
the flow of “light to and from the mountains” in the form of many voices (perspectives) and resources that
contribute to the generation of knowledge. We recognize that integrating these resources in curricula
leads to the effective preparation of educators who are interculturally competent and serve as regional
stewards.
         The “light to the mountains” metaphor has been a longstanding theme in Morehead State
University’s mission. The earliest reference to MSU as a light to the mountains may have come from
Charles S. Loos’ baccalaureate address in 1902 where he characterized the founding of this institution as
"…pharos of intellectual and spiritual light, that should send its illuminating and awakening rays of
knowledge, and of hope through the valley, and over the mountains beyond it" (Flatt, 1997, pp. 10-11).
Flatt used the expression "A Light to the Mountains" as the title to his history of MSU. In 1962 Harry
Caudill published his highly controversial book, Night Comes to the Cumberlands, highlighting the history
of some of our region’s most serious problems. It is our dream that, as we pursue our hopeful vision
together, the good we do will ripple through our candidates/graduates and their students and clients and
the communities they serve so that a generation from now the darkest elements of our history will be
mere history and America will see, not night coming to the Cumberlands, but a light shining out from
them—a reflection of the best and brightest Appalachia and America have to offer.
         To build on this theme, the Unit has expanded the metaphor to embrace the idea that the
preparation of educators is not a one-way flow of teaching and learning, but that our candidates and their
P-12 students bring with them and take back home with them their rich traditions, background knowledge,
and cultural heritages that are essential to any learning environment.
         The Professional Education Unit at Morehead State University strives to promote the flow of
“Light to and from the Mountains” through engaging with communities of learners at all levels – P-12
students, preservice and inservice educators, university faculty and staff, and community members. With
the metaphor “Community Engagement: A Light to and from the Mountains” we strive to deliver relevant
and high quality programs that are informed by significant national and international scholarship. Our
location and history require that our curricula integrate research, literature, and experience of Appalachia.
Such cultural emphasis informs the preparation of initial and advanced level graduates who are equipped
with knowledge and skills to improve the schools, quality of life, and communities in Eastern Kentucky
and beyond and serve as a reflection of the rich resources of rural America within the global community.
While we prepare approximately eighty percent of the teachers and school leaders who work in Eastern
Kentucky and who have strong ties to Appalachia, we also educate candidates and engage in diverse
communities outside of Eastern Kentucky who benefit from our programs’ foci on student-centered
experiential instruction, intercultural competence, and regional stewardship.
         The give and take between diverse backgrounds, experiences, values, and beliefs—the social
and cultural perspectives—that candidates, faculty, and community members bring to the learning
community and what candidates gain from participation in our programs and take with them as they leave
our programs illustrate the value we place on the promotion of the flow of “Light to and from the
Mountains.” The social fabric that results is represented in the growing collaborative quilt of student and
community development that emanates from the diverse individuals’ contributions to the learning
community.




                                                      1
  The Concepts

           To provide an intellectual framework and coherence for the pursuit of Unit goals and to support
  candidates, colleagues, public school practitioners and stakeholders’ understanding of the Unit’s
  commitment to engage with multiple communities and to prepare educators who are equipped to bring
  “Light to and from the Mountains,” the following four grounding concepts have been identified.

1. Community Engagement Through INFORMED DECISION-MAKING
           Our graduates are broadly trained and educated professionals who can make sound, professional
  judgments about the best instruction for a given student, or services for a client, within a given social
  context – they are not merely implementers of a particular “canned” curriculum or method. Effective
  schooling requires thorough professional knowledge based on current research in academic disciplines
  and takes into account the social contexts—the ethos of these professional judgments—in which the
  educator finds himself/herself. These professional judgments, which create best practices, must be
  informed by the careful analysis of accurate data; the best scientific research and theoretical insights
  available to the profession; the educators’ own understanding of their personal beliefs, strengths and
  limitations; the content of the disciplines in which they teach; and the social contexts of the learning
  communities. These professional judgments are rooted in the habit of reflection, a “virtue of the mind”
  (Trinkaus-Zagzebski, 1996) that the Unit cultivates among faculty members and candidates. Candidates
  are asked to reflect, to apply, and to make sense of theories with respect to the real life of the classroom
  and the diverse learners’ lives and to utilize creative problem solving to address educational barriers they
  encounter. This reflection aids candidates in making decisions during the course of their own schooling,
  field experiences in birth to advanced learning environments, clinical practice, and in their careers after
  graduation. MSU professors also reflect on their personal beliefs and understandings of education and
  new developments in their specific fields of study, and on their instruction with candidates in order to
  improve the preparation of teachers, school counselors and administrators, and other educational
  leaders. Information technologies support the use of data-driven decision-making as faculty and
  candidates use an ever-growing array of new tools.

2. Community Engagement Through DIVERSITY and HOLISTIC EDUCATION
            At MSU, future and practicing professionals learn that education should be connected to all of life
  – the whole student in the everyday social contexts of life in the community. In fact, through holistic
  education “…each person finds identity, meaning, and purpose in life through connections to their world”
  (Miller, 1997). Candidates study the various domains of human development and ways to structure the
  educational environment so as to encourage growth across the physical, emotional, moral, cultural, and
  intellectual dimensions of life.
            Nurturing and cultivating the whole student requires a knowledge and appreciation of the diversity
  of students and the understanding of cultures in our world. MSU has defined a commitment to diversity
  and social justice that involves
  …the intentional creation of an inclusive educational community that values and promotes the
  development of individuals through active recognition, appreciation, respect for, and the utilization
  of their unique talents and contributions and the talent and contributions of diverse others. We
  embrace cultural, ethnic, racial, gender, language, age, marital status, ability status, national
  origin, sexual orientation, socio-economic status, spiritual practice, veteran status, and other
  forms of human difference and perspectives (MSU, 2008c).
  This broad definition of diversity provides guidance to the Professional Education Unit ensuring that
  curricula within the Unit, practical experiences, and membership of the Unit’s faculty and student body
  reflect a commitment to diversity.




                                                        1
3. Community Engagement Through COLLABORATION/COALITION
   BUILDING
          When classroom teachers foster collaboration through professional learning communities the
  potential for stimulating an individual’s sense of connection to and responsibility for others in the school,
  community, and world is likely to emerge (Roberts & Pruitt, 2003). Professional learning community
  environments, in which educators at all levels continuously seek and share learning and then act on what
  they learn, benefit students. This arrangement has also been termed “…communities of continuous
  inquiry and improvement” (SEDL, 1997). In furtherance of this end, we recognize that individuals learn
  best when students, teachers, parents, administrators, school support staff, and, indeed, wider
  communities, work together to create a culturally rich and socially interactive learning environment.
  Students must be seen (or see themselves) as active creators of knowledge; educators must see their
  roles as more than dispensing academic culture; other community members must see themselves as
  crucial partners in the process of schooling (Cajete, 1994).
           Additionally, we believe that education at all levels is the responsibility of a collaborative
  community and therefore requires committed partnerships. We recognize the critical role of our partners
  in the delivery of professional education preparation – that of our colleagues across the MSU campus,
  parents, P-12 schools, community and technical colleges, agencies, businesses, and communities in our
  service region. We view the conceptual framework as a vehicle to communicate with our partners as we
  deepen and extend critical partnerships. Electronic communication applications such as wiki, blog, and
  video conferencing environments, along with field experiences and community engagement, are critical to
  our building and maintaining these professional learning communities.

4. Community Engagement Through EMPOWERMENT
            At MSU, future teachers, counselors, school administrators, and other educational leaders are
  made aware that education is an essentially political act and that they will be leaders in the community by
  virtue of their positions. Appalachian citizens historically have been vulnerable to exploitation by outside
  economic interests, and as part of its stewardship, the Unit is committed to helping future generations
  recognize oppression and promote their interests and cultural resources both in and beyond Appalachia.
  Freire (2000) expressed the idea that, as long as “…the oppressed remain unaware of the causes of their
  condition, they fatalistically ‘accept’ their exploitation” (p. 64). It is our intention that graduates of the Unit
  be exposed to realities (positive and negative) that have helped to shape the work, lives, and status of the
  Eastern Kentucky region. Inherent in this intention is that MSU’s graduates will learn about and practice
  strategies that will develop their leadership skills as interculturally competent educators. We expect our
  graduates to continue their development as professionals and as stewards of their communities, modeling
  for their students and colleagues as they engage in professional and community leadership roles,
  become policy makers, conduct critical inquiry and continually examine their practice, and collaborate to
  improve their practice and profession.

  Demonstration of the Concepts: Candidate Proficiencies Aligned with
  Professional and State Standards
           To empower graduates to fulfill our stewardship vision of “Community Engagement: A Light to
  and from the Mountains the following five critical performance areas are found linked to the content,
  objectives, activities, and assessments of the courses and experiences that frame and document
  candidate learning in all domains. The following list indicate how these performance areas align with
  Morehead State University’s Strategic Goals (MSU) and the Professional Education Unit’s (PEU) four
  core concepts described above. Additionally, the acronym and standard numbers below note links to
  educator preparation standards, including the Kentucky Teacher Standards (KTS), School Counselor
  Standards (GCS), and/or Interstate School Leaders Licensure Consortium (ISLLC). The Unit and the
  faculty within individual programs assess the degree to which its graduates:




                                                          1
1) Master the content knowledge, professional and the twenty first century skills needed to make an optimal
   contribution to “whole” student learning in educational settings. (MSU A to G: Goal 1 – Academic
   Excellence and Goal 2 – Student Success; PEU Decision Making and Holism; KTS 1,2, and 4; ISLLC 2:
   GCS A,C)
2) Are competent in the collection and use of data to inform decision- making and to demonstrate
   accountability for student learning. (MSU A to G: Goal 1- Academic Excellence and Goal 2 – Student
   Success; PEU Informed Decision Making; PEU Diversity and Holistic Education; PEU Empowerment;
   ISLLC 2, 5; GSC A; KTS 5, 6, 7)
3) Demonstrate professional dispositions. (MSU A to G: Goal 1 – Academic Excellence and Goal 2- Student
   Success; PEU Informed Decision Making; PEU Diversity and Holistic Education; PEU Empowerment;
   ISLLC 4, 6; GCS C, D; KTS 3, 7, 9)
4) Are culturally competent and understand the regions from which they have come utilizing knowledge and
   experiences to effectively “bridge the gaps” (economic, achievement, and geographic) ensuring optimal
   learning for all students. (MSU A to G: Goal 1 - Academic Excellence and Goal 2 – Student Success;
   PEU Diversity, Collaboration and Coalition Building; ISLLC 2,4,6; GCS A,B; and KTS 1,2,3,4,8)
5) Engage in authentic field experiences in collaboration with committed school based partners and are
   empowered to improve the quality of education throughout this region and beyond. (MSU A to G: Goal 1-
   Academic Excellence, Goal 2: Student Success, Goal 3 – Productive Partnerships; PEU Diversity and
   Holistic Education; PEU Collaborations/Coalition Building; ISLLC 1, 2; GCS B, D; KTS 8, 9, 10)
             In addition, we believe that continuous assessment is essential because it provides the basis for
    determining the quality of all programs, faculty, and candidates. The Unit’s Continuous Assessment Plan
    fully describes the Unit’s assessment system.
    The entire Conceptual Framework document, including references found in this summary may be
    accessed by the following link: www.moreheadstate.edu/ncate/index.aspx?id=35818




                                                         1
Teacher Education Council (TEC)
The Teacher Education Council (TEC) is the governing body for the teacher education program. It is
comprised of faculty, staff, students and public schools’ practitioners. This group acts on
recommendations from interview committees and confirms or denies students’ admissions to the
Teacher Education Program as well as approved TEC policies and programs.

Teacher Education Program Mission Statement: The Teacher Education Program at Morehead State
University is based on the following fundamental assumptions:
1. Teachers need in-depth preparation in a chosen field of study to be able to challenge and to direct
    the youth of today.
2. Teachers need understanding and appreciation of the culturally, physically, and intellectually diverse
    people in our society, including disenfranchised members of society.
3. Teachers need fundamental knowledge, skills and understanding of human growth and
    development; learning theory; historical, philosophical, and sociological foundations of education;
    and evaluation and assessment of learning.
4. Teachers need understanding of themselves, their values, and their effect on others.
5. Teacher education is a process requiring preparation through course work and laboratory and field
    experiences throughout the entire preparation program.

Policy on Admission, Suspension, Expulsion and Probation: The Board of Regents, President, and
faculty of Morehead State University have entrusted in the Chairperson of the University Teacher
Education Council the authority to suspend, expel, or place on professional probation any student in the
Teacher Education Program for violation of its regulations, insubordination, immoral conduct, or for any
other reason, both written and implied.
During the process of admission, expulsion, suspension or professional probation, students shall be
advised of their right of appeal to the University Teacher Education Council. The decisions of the
University Teacher Education Council are final in matters pertaining to students in the Teacher
Education Program.
 In matters involving violation of civil or criminal law with possible fines or sentence imposed, the student
may be suspended until the issue is resolved. When found guilty of improper conduct a student is
subject to expulsion from the Teacher Education Program. Upon being suspended on probation, a
student must reapply to the University Teacher Education Council for review and reconsideration for
continuing in the Teacher Education Program. Students shall be advised of their right to request a case
review by the Vice President of Academic Affairs and may further request to consult with the President of
the University.

Demands of the Program: In an attempt to be fair to all students seeking teacher certification, the
following should be considered carefully by students in, or applying for admission to the Teacher
Education Program:
1. The program requires rigorous academic performance and professional commitment.
2. Teacher Education students will be required to complete the number of field experience hours as
designated by course requirements. The field experience is a necessary component of the Teacher
Education Program. Students must be available during the school day, which is 8:00 AM until 3:00 PM,
and when both the school/district and the university are in session. Students may, with the permission of
the instructor and the proper form from the office of the Coordinator of Field Experiences, complete the
experience in a public school district other than Rowan County. These field experiences must include
15-hours of approved activities related to diversity. Students are expected to allot ample time in their
schedule to complete the required hours of field experiences. Students are expected to make time for
the field experience, just as they make time for classes, project assignments, and study. Work related
activities, parking issues, lack of transportation, etc. are not legitimate reasons for failure to complete a
requirement as important as the clinical practice and/or field experience.
3. The career being pursued will be rewarding for those who find joy in working with young people. The
career, however, makes long-term physical, cognitive and emotional demands on its practitioners.




                                                  11
Teacher Education Advisor:
Upon an expression of intent to enter the Teacher Education Program, the teacher candidate shall be
assigned an advisor who shall provide information about the employment conditions and demands of the
teaching field the candidate wishes to enter, the wide range of skills essential to the teaching field, the
amount and nature of required class work, the necessity for becoming involved in field experiences and
the increasing complexity of the teaching profession today.




                                                 12
                Professional Code of Ethics for Kentucky School Personnel
                                           704 KAR 20:680

                        Section 1. Certified Personnel in the Commonwealth:

      1)Shall strive toward excellence, recognize the importance of the pursuit of truth, nurture
        democratic citizenship, and safeguard the freedom to learn and to teach;
      2)Shall believe in the worth and dignity of each human being and in educational opportunities
        for all;
      3)Shall strive to uphold the responsibilities of the education profession, including the following
        obligations to students, to parents, and to the education profession:

TO STUDENTS
      Shall provide students with professional education services in a non-discriminatory manner
       and in consonance with accepted best practice known to the educator.
      Shall respect the constitutional rights of all students.
      Shall take reasonable measures to protect the health, safety, and emotional well being of
       students.
      Shall not use professional relationships or authority with students for personal advantage.
      Shall keep in confidence information about students which has been obtained in the course of
       professional service, unless disclosure serves professional purposes or is required by law.
      Shall not knowingly make false or malicious statements about students or colleagues.
      Shall refrain from subjecting students to embarrassment or disparagement.
      Shall not engage in any sexually related behavior with a student with or without consent, but
       shall maintain a professional approach with students. Sexually related behavior shall include
       such behaviors as sexual jokes; sexual remarks: sexual kidding or teasing; sexual innuendo;
       pressure for dates or sexual favors; inappropriate physical touching, kissing, or grabbing; rape;
       threats or physical harm; and sexual assault.

TO PARENTS
      Shall make reasonable effort to communicate to parents information which should be revealed
       in the interest of the student.
      Shall endeavor to understand community cultures and diverse home environments of
       students.
      Shall not knowingly distort or misrepresent facts concerning educational issues.
      Shall distinguish between personal views and the views of the employing educational agency.
      Shall not use institutional privileges for private gain, for the promotion of political candidates,
       or for partisan political activities.
      Shall not accept gratuities, gifts, or favors that might impair or appear to impair professional
       judgment, and shall not offer any of these to obtain special advantage.

TO EDUCATION PROFESSION
      Shall exemplify behaviors which maintain the dignity and integrity of the profession.
      Shall accord just and equitable treatment to all members of the profession in the exercise of
       their professional rights and responsibilities.
      Shall keep in confidence information acquired about colleagues in the course of employment,
       unless disclosure serves professional purposes or is required by law.
      Shall not use coercive means or give special treatment in order to influence professional
       decisions.
      Shall apply for, accept, offer, or assign a position or responsibility only on the basis of
       professional preparation and legal qualifications.
      Shall not knowingly falsify or misrepresent records of facts relating to the educator’s own
       qualifications or those of other professionals.




                                                 13
Teacher Education Admission Assurances
At this time when candidates apply for the TEP they are required to sign off on the following
assurance by reading the following and clicking on “yes” after each statements.
    I understand the following are required to be eligible to apply for the TEP. By selecting "Yes", I
    certify that the statements are true.
            I have read the Teacher Education Program Handbook.
            I have read, understand and support the Professional Code of Ethics for Kentucky School
            Personnel.
            I am aware of what I need to do to become state certified in my major or area of
            concentration.
            I am aware that the admission process will not be complete until I attend the REQUIRED
            orientation session after the interviewing period is completed.
I have read, understand, and support the Morehead State University's professional dispositions for
teachers.

I understand that my continued status in the Teacher Education Program is contingent upon
maintaining the required level of academic performance and demonstration of behavior consistent
with professional dispositions and the Professional Code of Ethics for Kentucky School Personnel. If
there is a serious question about my maintenance of these standards my continued membership in
the Teacher Education Program is subject to review by my program’s Teacher Education Academic
and Professional Standards Committee.




                                                 14
TEACHER EDUCATION ACADEMIC AND PROFESSIONAL STANDARDS COMMITTEE
Committee Charge. Teacher education candidates are responsible to maintain high levels of academic
performance and adhere to the ethical and behavioral standards outlined in Morehead State University's
Teacher Education Dispositions and the Professional Code of Ethics for Kentucky School Personnel. In
cases where these standards are not maintained, the candidate's continued membership in Morehead
State University's Teacher Education Program is subject to review. To monitor the standards and provide
a mechanism for intervening with candidates who are failing, or are at risk of failing to maintain these
standards, the academic programs in teacher education will establish Teacher Education Academic and
Professional Standards Committees.
Committee Location. At the discretion of the department and program and with the approval of the
Dean of the College of Education these Committees may be at either the departmental or the program
level. Specifically,
     The Department of Early Childhood, Elementary and Special Education will be responsible for
        monitoring initial teacher education programs located in that department (Interdisciplinary Early
        Childhood Education, Elementary Education [P-5], Special Education [LBD/MSD & P-5 and 5-9;
        MAT Special Education]) and
        The Department of Middle Grades and Secondary Education will be responsible for the programs
        located in that department (Middle Grades Education [5-9], Secondary Education [all P-12, 5-12,
        and 8-12 programs with majors housed in other colleges], and MAT Middle Grades and
        Secondary).

Committee Structure. Each of these Committees will be made up of three full-time faculty members in
the department/program. Committee members will be elected by the department/program faculty for a
three-year term with a regular rotation in which one new member would be elected each year. A
committee chair and a secretary will be elected by the committee at the initial organizational meeting at
the beginning of the academic year. The sole exception to the three member structure will be the
committee charged with reviewing students in P-12, 5-12, and 8-12 programs in which the major is
located outside the College of Education. In this case when the Committee is convened to consider the
case of an individual with a major outside of the College of Education, this Committee will be made up of
four members. The fourth member will be an ad hoc member selected from the candidate's home
department and either be appointed by the department chair or elected by the program faculty. These
individuals will only hear cases involving students from their program.
Committee Procedures. The Committee will hold an individual hearing with any student who has been
admitted to the teacher education programs for which they are responsible and meets one or more of the
following conditions:
     1. Has not maintained a cumulative GPA of 2.5 or higher.
     2. Has obtained at least one "D" in a teacher education course requiring a field experience.
     3. Is evaluated by a course instructor as not meeting the expected level of performance on one or
        more of the dispositions outlined in Morehead State University's dispositions for teacher
        education candidates.
     4. Is reported to a member of the faculty, or administration, in the College of Education by an
        instructor, staff person, cooperating teacher, or other as failing to exhibit behavior which reflects
        appropriate teacher dispositions or adherence to the Professional Code of Ethics for Kentucky
        School Personnel. (In these cases a formal dispositional concern will be placed in the students
        file in the College of Education's data management system).

At the outset of each semester the College of Education Assessment Office will run a report through the
College of Education's data management system which will identify all students who fall under one of the
conditions outlined above. This report will be forwarded to the chair of the appropriate department who
will forward the list of names to the members of the Teacher Education Academic and Professional
Standards Committee. The chair will work with the Committee to schedule appropriate meeting times and
notify the affected students of the requirement to meet with the Committee. This process of scheduling
and notification shall be completed within two weeks after receipt of the report from the College of
Education Assessment Office.

                                                     15
While a candidate’s status is being reviewed by the Teacher Education Academic and Professional
Standards Committee and a plan of remediation is being implemented the candidate will continue in good
standing in the Teacher Education Program. With this in mind the Committee will attempt to resolve all
issues within the semester in which they are reported, so that any needed change in candidate status
may be implemented before the start of the next semester. The sole exception to this procedure will be
the rare circumstance in which the serious nature of the candidate’s behavior, or ethical violation, requires
that he or she immediately be suspended from the Teacher Education Program. In most cases, these
actions will have been taken by other university authorities and the Teacher Education Academic and
Professional Standards Committee will be acting as a review body charged with determining whether the
possibility of remediation and reapplication to the Teacher Education Program is possible.
In a case where a candidate’s cumulative GPA has fallen below 2.5, he or she will be on probation during
the semester in which he or she is being reviewed by the Teacher Education Academic and Professional
Standards Committee. If at the conclusion of the semester, the candidate has not attained a GPA of
more than 2.5, the candidate will be suspended from the Teacher Education Program. Such candidates
can reapply for re- admission to the Teacher Education Program at the time they have attained the
required GPA.
The written notification (delivered by both mail and e-mail) to students and their advisors must include the
following:
     1. the specific issue for which the hearing is being held,
     2. a list of the members of the committee,
     3. the date, time, and location at which a hearing will be held,
     4. the procedure that the student must follow if, for some reason, he or she is unable to meet with
         the Committee at the appointed time,
     5. indicate that they may be accompanied to the hearing by their advisor,
     6. notification that they must acknowledge receipt of the notice and confirm the hearing date in the
         communication to the department chair within five days, and
     7. notification that failure to acknowledge this notice and participate in the hearing can result in their
         immediate suspension from the Teacher Education Program at Morehead State University.

Prior to the hearing, the Committee will be provided with all supporting information and may, at its
discretion, invite the individual who has filed a disposition or ethical concern about the student, or the
instructor for the course in which the student failed to meet the appropriate academic standards to
participate in the hearing.
At the hearing, the Committee and any invited witnesses will present the candidate with the basis for the
concerns that have led to this hearing. The candidate will be provided with an opportunity to respond to
the issues presented. After a fair hearing of all of the issues involved, the committee will deliberate in
private and render a decision, which, when appropriate, will include a plan for remediation (see
accompanying form). The committee may arrive at one of three following findings.
     1. Issues resolved, no further action required.
     2. Remediation plan needed. In these cases, the Committee will outline a specific plan of
         remediation with timelines and a designated date at which the Committee will reconvene with the
         candidate to review progress toward resolving the issue.
     3. Serious concern or a lack of candidate response to concerns. In this case, the Committee can
         recommend immediate suspension from the Teacher Education Program. When the Committee
         arrives at this finding, supporting documentation will be attached to the report and it will be
         forwarded to the Office of the Dean of the College of Education for further action.

A record of all Academic and Professional Standards Committee hearings will be provided to the
candidate, to his or her advisor, to the department chair, and to the Office of the Dean of the College of
Education for inclusion in the candidate's Teacher Education Program record.
At the time the Committee convenes to review progress on the plan of remediation, the general
procedures followed will be identical to the initial meeting. The hearing record form, with the notation that
this meeting is convened to review a plan of remediation, should be used to document the results of this
meeting. As with the previous meeting, the Committee can arrive at three decisions.
     1. The candidate has successfully implemented the plan of remediation. Issue has been resolved.
         And no further action is needed.

                                                      16
    2. The candidate has made progress toward remediation of the issue, but additional work remains to
       be done. The remediation plan will be revised, as needed, with a new review date established.
       The candidate remains in good standing in the Teacher Education Program, while he or she
       continues to dutifully pursue a plan of remediation.
    3. The student has not made sufficient progress or has not implemented the plan of remediation and
       the Committee makes a recommendation that he or she be suspended from the Teacher
       Education Program in at Morehead State University with the option of reapplying at the time the
       identified issues are fully resolved. This result, along with supporting documentation, is
       forwarded to the Office of the Dean of the College of Education for action.

Right of Appeal. Candidates have a right to appeal the underlying issue which has led to their being
referred to the Teacher Education Academic and Professional Standards Committee or the decisions of
the Committee to the Morehead State University Teacher Education Council. Such appeals can be
based upon either substantive or procedural matters. To undertake such an appeal the candidate must
submit a written letter to the Dean of the College of Education, outlining the basis for the appeal within 10
business days after the action of the Committee. Such appeals will follow the teacher education program
hearing procedures outlined in the Teacher Education Program Handbook.
Students also retain the right to appeal decisions of the Teacher Education Council to the University
Academic Standards and Appeals Committee using the standard procedure outlined for all academic
grievances (UAR 112). Since prior review has been conducted this next level of grievance procedure will
begin at step 3 as out lined in the UAR 112. To initiate such an appeal the student must submit a Student
Grievance Form and a petition for a hearing before the University’s Academic Standards and Appeals
Committee directly to the Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs within one week after the
decision of the Teacher Education Council. Additionally, a student retains the right to appeal due
process to the President of the University.




                                                     17
                     Record of Teacher Education Academic and Professional Standards Hearing
                          indicate whether this is an initial meeting or a follow-up meeting


Student Name

Standard(s)
not met:
(with explanation)


Findings:                    Issue resolved, no further action required
                             Remediation plan needed
                             Serious concern or lack of candidate response to concerns.
                              Recommend immediate suspension from teacher education program
                              (Supporting information attached)

                                          Plan for remediation (include timeline)




 Date for review of remediation plan

I understand that if I do not meet the conditions of this remediation plan in the time frame indicated, I can be
placed on probation or discontinued in the program.

Student Signature_____________________________________ Date_____________

___________________________________                                 _______________________________
Chair of Departmental Standards Committee                           Standards Committee Member

___________________________________                                 _______________________________
Standards Committee Member                                          Program Representative (As required)

Date_____________
Copies to Student, Advisor, Dept Chair, & Dean of College of Education
                   UNDERGRADUATE TEACHER EDUCATION CANDIDATE GATES
Individuals admitted to MSU seeking to pursue programs leading to initial teacher certification must meet specific
qualifying requirements at four Gates:

1)     Admission to the Teacher Education Program
2)     Prior to Clinical Practice
3)     Clinical Practice Experience
4)     Program Completion



     Gates                  Assessment Data                 Decision Maker(s)               Outcome Options
                            Considered
     1) Admission to         ACT, SAT, GRE, or              Teacher Education Council      Department/Program
     TEP                    PRAXIS Content Area Test                                        Committee recommends students
                            Score(s)                                                        for admission to Program.
                             PPST Writing Proficiency                                       TEP Coordinator compiles lists
                             Overall GPA (2.5)                                             from each program and presents
                             Successful completion (“C”                                    whole list to Teacher Education
                            or better) ENG 100, 200,                                        Council
                            CMSP 108,EDF 207, and                                            Teacher Education Council
                            211                                                             approves or does not approve
                             Department Interview                                          recommendation made and student
                            Results                                                         informed in writing of the
                                                                                            recommendation
     2) Prior to Clinical    GPA (2.5), in all areas           Director of Educational     Eligible or not eligible for
        Practice             No grade lower than “C” in         Services Unit (DESU)       Enrollment in Clinical Practice.
                            ALL methods courses                                             Candidates informed in writing by
                             Completion of Required                                        DESU. When ineligible,
                            Coursework                                                      deficiencies described in writing in
                             Completion of required                                        TK20
                            PRAXIS Exam(s)
                             Disposition Evaluations

     3) Clinical Practice    KTIP or Other Observation      MSU Supervisor                 Successful completion of Clinical
     Experience             Feedback                         Cooperating Teacher           Practice and Capstone
                             Teacher Performance
                            Assessment


     4) Program              Fulfilled all program          Office of the Registrar        Eligible for graduation, diploma.
     Completion             requirements (transcript)                                       (Informed in writing if ineligible for
                                                                                            graduation)

                                                             Certification Officer (MSU)    Notified, in writing, (at last
                             Fulfilled all certification   tracks                          meeting of 499c classes) of any
                            eligibility requirements                                        deficiencies that need to be
                                                                                            handled to be recommended for
                                                             State                         certification.
                                                                                             Letter of eligibility stating
                                                                                            certification area(s)




                                                                      19
                 Gate I:

Admission to the Teacher Education Program




                      20
                 GATE I: Admission to the Teacher Education Program (TEP)

   Under policies established by the Teacher Education Council, regular TEP application cycles are scheduled
   by the Education Service Unit (ESU) each fall and spring. Inquiries regarding emergency TEP applications*
   should be directed to the candidate’s academic department and will be arranged as the department deems
   appropriate. (Please note that the Department of Early Childhood, Elementary, and Special Education
   DOES NOT grant emergency interviews.) Dates/deadlines for the fall and spring application cycles may be
   found at www.moreheadstate.edu/esu. Select the “Teacher Education Program” tab on the left side of the
   screen. Then, select “Important 2010-2011 TEP Dates” from the list in the middle of the screen.

   *A disposition Evaluation Form will be created for each candidate applying for an emergency TEP
   interview.

   The TEP application process is completed electronically through the College of Education’s electronic data
   system, TK20. All students enrolled in programs leading to teacher certification must purchase a TK20
   account. Information regarding TK20 may be found at www.moreheadstate.edu/esu. Please select the
   “TK20” tab on the left side of the screen. After purchasing a TK20 account, it may take one to two weeks to
   obtain a user ID and password. Please allow ample time to purchase a TK20 account and obtain a user ID
   and password before the TEP application deadline.

I. CANDIDATES MUST MEET THE FOLLOWING REQUIREMENTS BEFORE APPLYING TO
           THE TEP:

     A. GPA AND COURSE REQUIREMENTS

             Admission to MSU – In pursuit of completing a program leading to teacher certification

             Completion of minimum semester hours
                 30 hours for P-5, Middle Grades or Special Education
                 45 hours for secondary, 5-12 or P-12 programs

             Minimum GPA of 2.5 on ALL course work completed at MSU and other accredited and approved
              institutions

             Completion of the following five core courses with grades of “C” or better:
                 ENG 100 Writing I
                 ENG 200 Writing II
                 CMSP 108 Fundamentals of Speech Communication
                 EDF 207 Foundations of Education
                 EDF 211 Human Growth & Development (IECE candidates may substitute HS 253)

      B. TESTING REQUIREMENTS

              One of the following five test options must be achieved successfully and documented on a
              candidate’s university records. Information regarding test dates, registration, test
              preparation suggestions, etc. may be found at: ACT - MSU’s Testing Center’s web site,
              www.moreheadstate.edu/testing
              PRAXIS PPST, PLT and Subject Assessments – ESU’s web site,
             www.moreheadstate.edu/esu
              (select “Teacher Education Program” tab on left side of screen, then select PRAXIS Exams)

             Option 1
              21 ACT Composite with a minimum of 10 on each subtest




                                                          21
           Option 2*
            18, 19 or 20 ACT Composite with a minimum of 10 on each subtest AND PPST scores of 173 for
            Reading, 172 for Writing (candidates obtaining grades of “B” or better of “CLEP” in both ENG 100
            and ENG 200 are exempt from the PPST Writing Test), and 173 for Math.
     *This option is not available for candidates seeking admission to the P-5, P-5/LBD, P-5/MSD, or IECE
            programs.

           Option 3
            750 on the Graduate Record Exam (GRE)

           Option 4
            990 on the SAT

           Option 5
            18, 19 or 20 ACT Composite with a minimum of 10 on each subtest AND passing scores on the
            PRAXIS      Content Area test(s) required for the candidate’s area(s) of certification

   C. WRITING REQUIREMENT

           Grades of “B” or better or CLEP of both ENG 100 and ENG 200 OR
            Grades of “C” in both ENG 100 and ENG 200 AND score of 172 or better on the PPST Writing Test

II. COMPLETION OF THE TEP APPLICATION PROCESS WILL REQUIRE THE
          FOLLOWING:

            EXAMPLES OF AND/OR DIRECTIONS for completion of the documents may be found on the ESU
            web page, www.moreheadstate.edu/esu (select “Teacher Education Program” tab on left side of
            screen, then select the relevant link from the list in the center of the screen).

           Candidate’s on-line Program Evaluation/Checksheet must do the following:
            Indicate an academic advisor
            Indicate a major or area of concentration leading to teacher certification
            Indicate an academic component, if required by program
            Reflect all MSU and transfer coursework completed to date
            Indicate all approved program course substitutions.

           A resume (created and saved as a Word file)

           A statement of the candidate’s philosophy of education (maximum of three, double-spaced
            pages) (saved as a Word file)

           A statement of the candidate’s relevant experience in working with children at the age level the
            candidate plans to teach (maximum of one-half page, double spaced) (saved as a Word file)

III. FORMAL APPLICATION PROCEDURE
            Application for admission to the Teacher Education Program is made on-line through TK20.
            Application to the TEP includes the following two-steps:

           Step 1 After meeting all eligibility requirements (GPA & course requirements; Testing requirement;
            and Writing requirement), complete the on-line TK20 TEP Interview Eligibility Application Form.
            Deadlines for submission of the application and directions for its completion may be found on line at
            www.moreheadstate.edu/esu. The application will be submitted to and reviewed by the TEP
            Admissions Coordinator to confirm that the candidate has met the eligibility requirements.



                                                          22
           Via TK-20 eligible candidates will receive notification confirming approval for a TEP interview.
           Candidates will also receive a TEP portfolio template when distributed. Candidates whose
           eligibility can not be confirmed will be notified through TK20 that their applications have been
           declined. Candidates receiving notice that their applications have been declined will be informed of
           why their applications were declined. Candidates whose applications are declined may make
           changes and/or additions to their applications and resubmit them to the TEP Admissions
           Coordinator no later than the application deadline.


          Step 2
           Candidates who received notice that their TEP Interview Eligibility Application Forms were
           approved will receive a TEP Portfolio Template through TK20. Deadlines for the electronic
           submission of the Portfolios to the TEP Interview Committees, directions for their completion; and
           rubrics for assessing the portfolios and the interviews may be found on line at
           www.moreheadstate.edu/esu.


IV. TEP INTERVIEW PROCESS
           Each college shall have TEP Admission Interview Committees. Their duties shall be to interview
           teacher education program applicants and complete assessments of those applicants’ portfolios
           and interview performances.

           Instructions for the committees’ use of the assessment instruments may be found on the ESU web
           page. No particular interview score necessarily guarantees or defers admission. Still, these
           instruments will serve to facilitate and document the Interview Committees’ assessment of
           candidates’ professional qualities for the classroom (i.e. work ethic, integrity and maturity, decision-
           making and reasoning skills, verbal fluency and articulation, caring and enthusiasm, etc.) and they
           must be fully scored by the Committee. Beyond determining candidate preparedness, the interview
           should serve to orient candidates to the rigors and expectations of the TEP.

           The Interview Committee Chairperson’s assessment form will indicate that the committee’s
           recommendation is (1) immediate candidate admission to the TEP; or (2) deferral of candidate
           admission for at least one academic semester. In the event that a candidate is to be deferred
           admission, that individual shall be provided written feedback which carefully identifies the area(s) of
           deficiency as well as a strategy for remediation. A deferred candidate may reapply the following
           semester and could continue to reapply thereafter.

V. MANDATORY TEP ORIENTATION SESSIONS
         TO FINALIZE THE TEP APPLICATION PROCESS:
           CANDIDATES RECOMMENDED FOR ADMISSION TO THE TEP BY THEIR INTERVIEW
           COMMITTEES MUST ATTEND A TEP ORIENTATION SESSION BEFORE THEY WILL BE
           ALLOWED TO REGISTER FOR TEP RESTRICTED COURSES. DATES, ETC FOR THE
           ORIENTATION SESSIONS MAY BE FOUND ON LINE AT www.moreheadstate.edu/esu.


VI. TEP APPEALS PROCESS
           The candidate whose admission to the TEP has been deferred by the interview committee during
           the regular fall or spring application cycle will have the option to file an appeal. Please note that
           candidates interviewed outside the fall or spring application cycle (emergency interviews)
           will not be considered for an appeal.

       1. Following the TEP interview, the Department Interview Committee must provide the candidate
          whose admission to the TEP is deferred a written statement. This statement will include: (1) the



                                                          23
      reason(s) why the candidate is being deferred at this time, (2) a strategy for remediation, and (3) a
      copy of the appeals process.

  2. Applicants who wish to appeal deferrals will have ten working days from the date of the TEP
     interview to file an official request for an appeal. All requests will go to the Office of the Teacher
     Education Program Admissions Coordinator. A request for an appeal must outline specific reasons
     the candidate believes the interview committee has been incorrect in making the decision to defer
     admission. This request will be forwarded to the Teacher Education Council Chairperson.
     (Reasons outside the control of the interview committee—e.g. admissions essay scores, GPA, test
     scores—shall not be considered valid reasons for appealing the decision.).

  3. The TEC Chairperson will review the request to determine if further consideration is appropriate
     and forward these findings to the TEP Appeals Committee Chairperson.

  4. The Chair of the Appeals Committee (TEC Vice Chair) will convene a meeting of the TEP Appeals
     Committee to discuss the request. The committee shall be appointed by the Vice-Chair of the TEC.
     All members shall be current members of the TEC. The committee shall be a standing committee
     and members shall serve a term of one year. Members shall be as follows: one public school
     practitioner, one representative from the College of Education, and one representative from outside
     the College of Education. Within five faculty working days of the appeals hearing, the candidate
     and the Interview Committee members will be notified of the Appeals Committee’s decision.

  5. The appeals process will be completed by the end of registration for the next semester, including
     Summer I.

TRANSFER STUDENTS ADMITTED TO THE TEP AT ANOTHER KENTUCKY INSTITUTION
    Transfer students admitted to the TEP at another Kentucky institution will be exempt from the TEP
    interview requirement. They must meet all other admission requirements in place at the time they
    apply (e.g. GPA, testing, and writing requirements). These candidates should submit a portfolio to
    the TEP Admissions Coordinator in 801 Ginger Hall. The portfolio should include: MSU transcripts
    obtained from the Registrar’s Office that reflect all transfer hours and official checksheets indicating
    all substitutions of transfer courses for courses required in MSU programs. Test scores must be on
    file on the students’ MSU academic records. The portfolio should also include a one-page
    autobiography and verification of the applicants’ admission to the TEP at another Kentucky
    institution. TRANSFER STUDENT CANDIDATES MUST ALSO ATTEND A MANDATORY TEP
    ORIENTATION SESSION TO FINALIZE ADMISSION.

PETITION FOR A WAIVER TO TAKE RESTRICTED TEP COURSES PRIOR TO TEP ADMISSION
     Candidates who have met ALL eligibility requirements for admission to the TEP who have been
     unable to schedule a TEP interview may be considered for a waiver to take up to two restricted
     courses (maximum of six credit hours) during one academic term only prior to admission to the
     program. Candidates for the waiver must have completed a minimum of 60 semester hours and
     have the approval of their advisors. A waiver is not automatically granted to all applicants. In order
     to register for subsequent restricted courses, the candidate must be admitted to the TEP. The
     waiver will be invalid without the advisor’s signature and/or if any of the information supplied on the
     petition is found to be inaccurate. To petition for the waiver:

    1. Complete the 2010-2011 Petition for Waiver to Take Restricted Courses Form. The form may be
       found on the ESU web page at www.moreheadstate.edu/esu under the Teacher Education
       Program Tab.

    2. Attach a copy of current, official checksheet/program evaluation. Graduate students pursuing initial
       certification programs must also attach copies of their graduate and undergraduate transcripts
       (these may be photocopies)




                                                     24
3. Obtain advisor’s signature

4. Submit form and attachments to TEP Admissions Coordinator 801 Ginger Hall

  Note: A Disposition Evaluation Form will be completed for each candidate who applies for a waiver
  to take restricted courses.

  TEP Restricted Courses
  Admission to Teacher Education Program required as a Prerequisite to
  Enrollment:
  AGR       392      Methods of Instructional Technology
  AGR       470      Methods of Instruction
  AGR       478      Clinical Practice in Agriculture
  ART       300      Elementary Materials and Methods
  ART       301      Field Experience in Art Education
  ART       321      Materials and Methods for Secondary Art
  BIS       499C     Teaching Methods in Business and Information Technology Education
  BIOL      402      Integrated Biology Teaching Methods
  BIOL      403      Integrated Biology Field Experiences
  CTE       392      Methods of Instructional Technology
  CTE       470      Methods of Instruction
  CTE       478      Clinical Practice
  EDEC      426      Activities and Materials: Infants & Toddlers
  EDEC      426      Practicum in Early Childhood Education
  EDEE      321      Teaching Math in Early Elementary Grades
  EDEE      322      Teaching Social Studies in Early Elementary Grades
  EDEE      323      Language Arts for Early Elementary
  EDEE      331      Reading for Early Elementary Teachers
  EDEE      423      Supervised Student Teaching Practicum (P-5)
  EDEL      333      Fundamentals of Elementary Education
  EDF       311      Learning Theories and Assessment in Education
  EDMG      332      Reading Strategies for Middle Grades
  EDMG      341      Teaching Math in Middle Grades
  EDMG      342      Teaching Social Studies in Middle Grades
  EDMG      343      Language Arts in Middle Grades
  EDMG      446      Supervised Student Teaching Practicum (5-9)
  EDSE      312      Educational Methods and Technology
  EDSE      416      Clinical Practice Secondary
  EDSP      356      Applied Behavior Analysis
  EDSP      365      Including Students with Diverse Needs in the Classroom
  EDSP      367      Educational Assessment of Exceptional Students
  EDSP      373      Curriculum for Students with MSD
  EDSP      374      Teaching Students with Moderate and Severe Disabilities
  EDSP      375      Practicum in Education of Students with MSD
  EDSP      435      Supervised Clinical Practice (LBD)
  EDSP      437      Supervised Clinical Practice (MSD)
  EDSP      353      Language Arts for Students with Learning and Behavior Disorders
  EDSP      355      Teaching Students with LBD
  EDSP      357      Mathematics and Content Area Teaching for Students with LBD
  EDSP      359      Practicum in Teaching Students with LBD
  EDUC      476      Reading in the Secondary School
  EDUC      482      Classroom Management/Assessment
  ENG       382      Teaching Writing in Secondary Schools
  ENG       400      Studies in English for Teachers
  FRN       405      Linguistics and Language Teaching



                                              25
HIS      451      Curriculum and Instruction for Social Studies
HIS      499D     Teaching of Social Studies
HLTH     301      Health, Safety and Nutrition for Early Elem.
HPE      300      Methods of Teaching Health and Physical Education to Elementary
                  Students
HPE      303      Health and Physical Education in the Secondary School
HPE      499C     Senior Seminar in Health/Physical Education Teacher Education
HS       392      Methods of Instructional Technology
HS       470      Methods of Instruction
HS       478      Clinical Practice Human Sciences
HS       473      Curriculum Development in Home Economics
IECE     410      The Role of the Teacher: Designing Language and Cognitive
                 Activities for Diverse Groups
IECE     411      The role of the Teacher: Creating a Learning Environment for Diverse Groups
IECE     412      The Role of the Teacher: Designing the Implementation of Creative Play
                   Activities for Young Children
IECE     425      Clinical Practice (Birth-5)
IET      420      Industrial Arts for the Elementary Teacher
MATH     402      Integrated Teaching Methods
MATH     403      Integrated Field Experience
SCI      402      Integrated Science Teaching Methods
SCI      403      Integrated Science Field Experiences
SCI      490      Science for the Elementary Teacher
SCI      591      Science for the Middle School Teacher
SPA      405      Linguistics and Language Teaching
EDEE     321     Admission to T.E.P. and MATH 231
EDEE     322     Admission to T.E.P., EDEM 330
EDEE     323      Admission to T.E.P., EDEM 330, EDEE 327
EDEE     331      Admission to T.E.P., EDEM 330
EDMG     341     Admission to T.E.P. and MATH 231
EDMG     342     Admission to T.E.P., EDEM 330
EDMG     343     Admission to T.E.P., EDEM 330, EDMG 306, EDMG 347, EDSP 230
EDEM     330     EDEE 305, 327 or EDMG 306, EDMG 347, EDSP 230
EDMG     332     Admission to T.E.P., EDEM 330
EDUC     482     Admission to T.E.P., Enrollment limited to semester prior to clinical practice
MUSE     221     MUST 100
SCI      490     Admission to T.E.P., SCI 111 or SCI 112 or SCI 109

*IET candidates may take EDEM 330 without any prerequisites.




                                           26
        Gate II:

Prior to Clinical Practice




           27
    Gate II: Prior to Clinical Practice

    Field Experiences
    Each student is required to complete the number of clock hours of field experiences as
    designated by their individual program of study prior to clinical practice.

    Field Experiences are a vital part of the teaching curriculum established by Morehead State
    University and the Kentucky Department of Education. Each student is required to complete
    the number of field experience hours as designated by their program of study prior to
    clinical practice.

    It is important that MSU students contribute to a positive learning environment in the schools by:
   Keeping the appointment scheduled. Teachers and their students depend on MSU student
    presence and participation. Please arrive at the designated time and do not leave before the
    scheduled departure time. Note – The Middle School & High School operate on a bell
    schedule. MSU students will not be permitted to enter a classroom after the bell rings to
    start a class period.
   Entering classrooms quietly and with as little disruption as possible.
   Being properly dressed – dress more like a teacher and less like a student. Note – Improper
    student dress or student behavior may cause scheduled field experiences for a student to be
    terminated. (Appendix, p. 119)
   Maintaining student confidentiality – students’ names and personalities should not be discussed.
    (MSU students must have a signed Confidentiality Agreement on file in the Office of Field
    Experiences.)
   Displaying student MSU ID card in a clear plastic badge during all scheduled
    observation/participation experiences. A neck-hanging badge may be purchased at the
    University Store.
   Remembering that MSU students are guests in the school and that they represent themselves
    and MSU.

    Planned Field Experience Sequence
     Level                     Courses                   Primary Activity
                               Clinical Practice         Full Responsibility for Classroom
     Level IV                  Semester
     Field Experiences
                               Advanced and Content-     Guided Observation
     Level III                 Based Methods Courses     Tutoring
                                                         Working with Small Groups
     Field Experiences
                                                         Whole Class and Large Group Teaching
                                                         Teaching Full Period
                               Applied Theory classes    Content Specific Observation
     Level II                  and introductory          Tutor Small Groups
                               pedagogy classes in       Whole Class Instruction
     Field Experiences
                               content disciplines
                               Education/ Theory         General Observation
     Level I                   Classes                   Tutoring
                                                         Aiding, Grading
     Field Experiences
                                                         Attend School Board Meeting and Site-
                                                         Base Council Meeting




    The MSU instructors for Level II and Level III courses are to:




                                                   28
   Contact the teacher(s) with whom they partner to plan field experiences.
   Arrange the specific activities, dates, and times for their students. Cont….
   Communicate to the public school teachers very clearly the field experience activity. Field
    experiences should be meaningful for our MSU students while meeting the instructional needs of
    t he students in the public school.


    Required Field Experience Hours
    *These hours reflect the minimum required for the course and students should refer to the
    syllabus for actual hours.

    ART      121      School Art I                                     Level I       4
    ART      221      School Art II                                    Level II      7
    ART      300      Elementary Materials & Methods                   Level III     18
    ART      301      Field Experience Art Education                   Level III     20
    ART      321      Materials & Methods for Sec Art                  Level III     18
    BIOL     402      Integrated Teaching Methods                      Level III     14
    BIOL     403      Integrated Teaching Methods                      Level III     56
    BIS      499C     Teaching Methods Bus/Info Tech                   Level III     65
    CMSP     495      Admin the Communication Program                  Level III     24
    CTE      207      Foundation of Vocational Ed                      Level I       16
    CTE      388      Methods of Curriculum Development                Level II      20
    CTE      392      Methods of Instructional Technology              Level II      20
    CTE      470      Methods of Instruction                           Level III     10
    EDEC     253      Child Growth & Development                       Level II      20
    EDEC     254      Preschool Administration                         Level II      35
    EDEC     255      Assessment of Young Children                     Level II      10
    EDEE     305      Learn Theo & Prac Early Elem                     Level II      8
    EDEE     321      Teaching Math Early Elementary Grades            Level III     10
    EDEE     322      Teaching Social Studies in Early Elem Grades     Level III     10
    EDEE     323      Language Arts for Early Elementary               Level III     16
    EDEE     327      Literature & Materials for Young Readers         Level II      2
    EDEE     331      Reading for Early Elementary Teachers            Level III     20
    EDEL     302      Integrated Technology in Classroom               Level II      10
    EDEM     330      Foundations of Reading                           Level II      15
    EDF      207      Foundations of Education                         Level I       10
    EDF      211      Human Growth and Development                     Level I       8
    EDF      311      Learning Theories for Teachers                   Level II      12
    EDMG     306      Development & Learning in the Middle Grades      Level II      8
    EDMG     332      Reading Strategies for the Middle Grade          Level III     20
                      Teacher
    EDMG     341      Teaching Math in the Middle Grades               Level III     10
    EDMG     342      Teaching Social Studies in the Middle Grades     Level III     7
    EDMG     343      Language Arts in the Middle Grades               Level III     10
    EDMG     347      Literature & Materials for the Preadolescent     Level II      3
    EDSE     312      Teaching Skills & Media                          Level III     14
    EDSE     483      Classroom Org & Management for Sec Teach         Level III     24
    EDSP     230      Education of Exceptional Children                Level I       10
    EDSP     320      Introduction of Corrective Speech                Level II      2
    EDSP     350      Char of Ind w/ Mental Ret & Ortho Handicaps      Level II      10
    EDSP     356      Applied Behavior Analysis                        Level III     20
    EDSP     360      Characteristics of Individuals w/ LD & BD        Level II      10
    EDSP     363      Assistive Technology                             Level II      2



                                                29
EDSP   365    Including Students with Diverse Needs in the      Level III   10
              Classroom
EDSP   367    Educational Assessment of Students w/ MSD         Level III   10
EDSP   371    Field Exp in Assess of Students w/ MSD            Level III   30
EDSP   372    Transition to Adult Life                          Level II    20
EDSP   373    Curriculum Students with MSD                      Level III   EDSP 373,
EDSP   374    Teaching Students with MSD                        Level III   374,375
EDSP   375    MSD Student Practicum                             Level III   Total of 60 hours
                                                                            combined

EDSP   353    Language Arts for Exceptional Students            Level III   10
EDSP   355    Prescriptive Teaching for students with LBD       Level III   10
EDSP   359    Practicum in Teaching Students w/ LBD             Level III   30
EDSP   357    Content Area & Career Prep for Except             Level III   10
              Students
EDUC   482    Classroom Management & Assessment                 Level III   10
ENG    280    Intro to Teaching Secondary Language Arts         Level II    15
ENG    381    Teaching Literature in Sec Schools                Level III   10
ENG    382    Teaching Writing in Sec Schools                   Level III   10
ENG    400    Studies in English for Teachers                   Level III   15
FRN    405    Linguistics & Language Teaching                   Level III   45
HIS    451    Curr and Instruction in Social Studies            Level III   15
HIS    499D   Teaching Social Studies                           Level III   15
HPE    300    Methods of Teaching Elem. Physical Ed             Level III   12
HLTH   301    Health, Safety & Nutrition for Early Elementary   Level II    6
HPE    302    Methods of teaching Elementary Health Ed.         Level III   12
HPE    303    Methods of Teaching Secondary Physical Ed         Level III   12
HPE    304    Methods of Teaching Secondary Health Ed.          Level III   12
PHED   212    Elem. Games and Rhythms                           Level II    10
PHED   311    Movement Exploration                              Level II    6
PHED   475    Adapted Physical Education                        Level III   24
IECE   301    At-Risk Infants and Toddlers                      Level II    15
IECE   311    Introduction to Early Childhood Education         Level II    10
IECE   345    Preschool Prog Spec Needs                         Level II    10
IECE   360    Families in Early Childhood Education             Level II    20
IECE   361    Positive Child Guidance                           Level II    20
IECE   416    Act. & Mat Infants & Toddlers                     Level III   15
IECE   418    Act. & Mat 3-5 Yr olds                            Level III   15
IET    388    Methods of Curr Devel in Ind Ed                   Level II    20
IET    392    Methods of Instructional Technology               Level II    20
IET    470    Methods of Instruction                            Level III   10
IET    496    Organ & Mgmt of Lab                               Level III   20
MATH   402    Integrated Teaching Methods                       Level III   14
MATH   403    Integrated Teaching Methods Lab                   Level III   56
MUSE   207    Foundations of Music Education                    Level II    12
MUSE   222    Music for Elem Teachers                           Level I     3
MUSE   325    Mat & Methods for Elem Grades                     Level III   18 to 12
MUSE   375    Vocal Materials & Methods                         Level III   16 to 12
MUSE   376    Inst Materials & Methods                          Level III   16 to 12
SCI    402    Integrated Teaching Methods                       Level III   14
SCI    403    Integrated Teaching Methods Lab                   Level III   56
SCI    490    Science for the Elem Teacher                      Level III   5
SCI    491    Science for the Middle Sch Teacher                Level III   10
SPA    405    Linguist & Language Teaching                      Level III   30


                                          30
THEA   311   Theatre Practicum         Level III   28
THEA   375   Creative Dramatics        Level II    20




                                  31
Four Tiers of the Field and Clinical Experience Hours
By Certification Program
More complete information about the specific nature and requirements of the field or clinical
experiences can be located on the course syllabi.

Interdisciplinary Early Childhood Education
                          Level                    Course Information                # of Field Hrs Required


                           I                             Art 121                               4
                           I                             EDF 207                               10
                           I                            EDSP 230                               10
                           I                            MUSE 221                               3
                           II                           EDEC 253                               20
                           II                           EDEC 254                               35
                           II                           EDEC 255                               10
                           II                           EDEE 327                               2
                           II                           EDEE 305                               8
                           II                           EDSP 320                               2
                           II                           EDSP 350                               10
                           II                           IECE 301                               15
                           II                           IECE 311                               10
                           II                           IECE 345                               10
                           II                           IECE 360                               20
                           II                           IECE 361                               20
                           II                           PHED 311                               6
                           II                           EDSP 363                               2
                           III                         EDSP 371**                              30
                           III                         IECE 411**                              25
                           III                          IECE 416                               15
                           III                          IECE 418                               15
                           IV                           IECE 425                        Clinical Practice



**Restricted courses, TEP Admission required prior to enrollment in these courses.

                          Elementary Grades P-5

                         Level                     Course Information                # of Field Hrs Required


                           I                             EDF 207                               10
                           I                             EDF 211                               8
                           I                            EDSP 230                               10
                           I                             ART 121                               4
                           I                            MUSE 221                               3
                           II                           HLTH 301                               6
                           II                           PHED 311                               6
                           II                           EDEE 305                               8




                                                        32
                       II                           EDEE 327                             2
                       II                           EDEE 330                             10
                       II                           EDEL 302                             5
                       III                          EDEE 321                             10
                       III                          EDEE 322                             7
                       III                          EDEE 323                             10
                       III                          EDEE 331                            15`
                       III                          EDUC 482                             10
                       III                           SCI 490                             5
                       IV                           EDEE 423                      Clinical Practice
                     Academic Component may contain Field Experiences

Middle School Grades 5-9 (Dual Placement during Clinical Practice)

                     Level                     Course Information              # of Field Hrs Required


                        I                           EDF 207                              10
                        I                           EDF 211                              8
                        I                           EDSP 230                             10
                       II                          EDEM 330                              10
                       II                          EDMG 306                              8
                       II                          EDMG 347                              3
                       III                         EDMG 332                              20
                       III                         EDMG 341                              10
                       III                         EDMG 342                              7
                       III                         EDMG 343                              10
                       III                          EDUC 482                             10
                       III                           SCI 491                             10
                       IV                          EDMG 446                       Clinical Practice
                            Academic Component may contain Field Experiences



Secondary Grades Certification

  Biology Grades 8-12
                     Level                     Course Information              # of Field Hrs Required


                        I                           EDF 207                              10
                        I                           EDF 211                              8
                        I                           EDSP 230                             10
                       II                           EDF 311                              12
                       III                          EDSE 312                             14
                       III                          BIOL 402                             14
                       III                          BIOL 403                             56
                       III                          EDSE 483                             24
                       IV                           EDSE 416                      Clinical Practice




                                                    33
  Chemistry Grades 8-12
  Earth Space Science Grades 8-12
  Physics Grades 8-12
                      Level         Course Information   # of Field Hrs Required


                           I            EDF 207                    10
                           I            EDF 211                    8
                           I            EDSP 230                   10
                          II            EDF 311                    12
                          III           EDSE 312                   14

                          III            SCI 402                   14
                          III            SCI 403                   56
                          III           EDSE 483                   24
                          IV            EDSE 416            Clinical Practice


   English Grade 8-12

                        Level       Course Information   # of Field Hrs Required


                           I            EDF 207                    10
                           I            EDF 211                    8
                           I            EDSP 230                   10
                          II            EDF 311                    12
                          III           EDSE 312                   14
                          III          EDUC 482                    10
                          III           EDSE 483                   24
                          III           ENG 280                    15
                          III           ENG 381                    10
                          III           ENG 382                    10
                          III           ENG 400                    15
                          IV            EDSE 416            Clinical Practice


Mathematics Grades 8-12

                        Level       Course Information   # of Field Hrs Required


                           I            EDF 207                    10
                           I            EDF 211                    8
                           I            EDSP 230                   10
                          II            EDF 311                    12

                          III           EDSE 312                   14
                          III          MATH 402                    14




                                        34
                          III                     MATH 403                    15
                          III                      EDSE 483                   24
                          IV                       EDSE 416            Clinical Practice


Social Studies Grades 8-12

                        Level                  Course Information   # of Field Hrs Required


                             I                     EDF 207                    10
                             I                     EDF 211                    8
                             I                     EDSP 230                   10
                             II                    EDF 311                    12
                          III                      EDSE 312                   14
                          III                       HIS 451                   15
                          III                      HIS 499D                   15
                          III                      EDSE 483                   24
                          IV                       EDSE 416            Clinical Practice


 Agricultural Education Grade 5-12

                        Level                  Course Information   # of Field Hrs Required


                             I                     CTE 207                    16
                             I                     EDF 211                    8
                             I                     EDSP 230                   10
                             II                    CTE 388                    20
                             II                    CTE 392                    20
                          III                      CTE 470                    10
                          IV                       CTE 478             Clinical Practice




Business and Marketing Education Grades 5-12

                        Level                  Course Information   # of Field Hrs Required


                             I                     EDF 207                    10
                             I                     EDF 211                    8
                             I                     EDSP 230                   10
                             II                    EDF 311                    12
                             II                   EDMG 306                    8
                          III                      EDSE 483                   24
                          III                      BIS 499C                   65
                          IV                       EDSE 416            Clinical Practice




                                                   35
Industrial Technology Education Grade 5-12
                         Level                      Course Information                 # of Field Hrs Required


                            I                            CTE 207                                  16
                            I                           EDSP 230                                  10
                           II                            EDF 311                                  12
                           II                           EDEM 330                                  15
                           II                            CTE 388                                  20
                           II                            CTE 392                                  20
                           III                           CTE 470                                  10
                           III                           IET 496                                  20
                           IV                            CTE 478                           Clinical Practice



Grades P-12 Certification Areas (Dual placement required during Clinical Practice)
   Art Education
                          Level                    Course Information                  # of Field Hrs Required


                            I                            EDF 207                                  10
                            I                            EDF 211                                  8
                            I                           EDSP 230                                  10
                           II                            EDF 311                                  12
                           III                          EDSE 312                                  14
                           III                           ART 300                                  18
                           III                           ART 321                                  18
                           III                           ART 301                                  20
                           III                          EDSE 483                                  24
                           IV                           EDSE 416                           Clinical Practice



Area of Studies in Health and Physical Education P-12 Teaching
                         Level                     Course Information                # of Field Hrs Required

                                I                        EDF 207                                  10

                                I                        EDF 211                                  8

                                II         EDF 311 or EDEE 305 or EDMG 306                   12 or 8 or 8

                                II                      PHED 212                                  10

                            III                         EDSE 312                                  14

                            III                          HPE 300                                  12

                            III                          HPE 302                                  12

                            III                          HPE 303                                  12

                            III                          HPE 304                                  12




                                                        36
                          III       PHED 475                    24

                          III       EDSE 483                    24

                          IV        EDSE 416             Clinical Practice


 Health Education Major P-12

                       Level    Course Information    # of Field Hrs Required


                         I           EDF 207                    10
                         I           EDF 211                    8
                         I          EDSP 230                    10
                         II          EDF 311                    12
                        III         EDSE 312                    14
                        III          HPE 302                    12
                        III          HPE 304                    12
                        III         EDSE 483                    24
                        IV          EDSE 416             Clinical Practice


French Education

                       Level    Course Information   # of Field Hrs Required


                         I          EDF 207                    10
                         I          EDF 211                    8
                         I          EDSP 230                   10
                         II         EDF 311                    12
                        III         EDSE 312                   14
                        III         EDSE 483                   24
                        III         FRN 405                    30
                        IV          EDSE 416            Clinical Practice


Music Education

                      Level     Course Information   # of Field Hrs Required
                        I           EDF 207                     10
                        I           EDF 211                      8
                        II          EDF 311                     12
                        II         MUSE 207                     12
                       III         MUSE 325                  18 to 12
                       III         MUSE 375                  16 to 12
                       III         MUSE 376                  16 to 12
                       IV          EDSE 416              Clinical Practice




                                    37
Physical Education P-12

                                  Level              Course Information            # of Field Hrs
                                                                                     Required
                                    I                     EDF 207                        10
                                    I                     EDF 211                          8
                                   II        EDF 311or EDEE 305 or EDMG 306              12 or 8
                                                                                          or 8
                                   II                    PHED 212                          10
                                   III                   EDSE 312                          14
                                   III                   HPE 300                           12
                                   III                   HPE 303                           12
                                   III                   PHED 475                          24
                                   III                   EDSE 483                          24
                                   IV                    EDSE 416                 Clinical Practice


Spanish Education

                          Level           Course Information              # of Field Hrs Required

                            I                  EDF 207                              10

                            I                  EDF 211                              8

                            I                 EDSP 230                              10

                            II                 EDF 311                              12

                           III                EDSE 312                              14

                           III                EDSE 483                              24

                           III                SPA 405                               30

                           IV                 EDSE 416                       Clinical Practice


 Theatre Education

                          Level           Course Information              # of Field Hrs Required
                            I                 EDF 207                               10
                            I                 EDF 211                                8
                            I                 EDSP 230                              10
                            II                EDF 311                               12
                            II                THEA 375                              20
                           III                EDSE 312                              14
                           III                THEA 311                              28
                           III                CMSP 495                              24
                           III                EDSE 483                              24
                           IV                 EDSE 416                       Clinical Practice




                                             38
Learning and Behavior Disorders

                      Level                    Course Information              # of Field Hrs Required

                         I                          EDF 207                               10

                         I                          EDF 211                               8

                         I                          EDSP 230                              10

                         I                          ART 121                               4

                         I                          MUSE 221                              3

                        II                          EDEE 305 or                            8
                                                    EDMG 306                               8
                        II                          EDEL 302                              10

                        II                          EDEM 330                              15

                        II                          EDSP 350                              10

                        II                          EDSP 320                              2

                        II                          EDSP 360                              10

                        II                          EDSP 363                              2

                        II                          EDSP 372                              20

                        II                          HLTH 301                              6

                        II                          PHED 311                              6

                        II                         EDEE 327 or                             2
                                                   EDMG 347                                3
                        III                        EDSP 356                               20

                        III                        EDSP 365                               10

                        III                        EDSP 367                               10

                        III                        EDEE 321 or                            10
                                                   EDMG 341                               10
                        III                        EDEE 322 or                             7
                                                   EDMG 342                                7
                        III                        EDEE 323 or                            16
                                                   EDMG 343                               10
                        III                        EDEE 331 or                            20
                                                   EDMG 332                               20

                        III                        EDUC 482                               10
                        III                        EDSP 353                               10

                        III                        EDSP 355                               10

                        III                        EDSP 359                               30

                        III                        EDSP 357                               10

                        IV                         EDSP 435                        Clinical Practice


    Field Experience requirements vary according to certification level being pursued.




                                                    39
Moderate and Severe Disabilities

                       Level         Course Information   # of Field Hrs Required

                          I              EDF 207                    10

                          I              EDF 211                    8

                          I              EDSP 230                   10

                         II        EDEE 305 or EDMG 306              8
                                                                     8
                         II              EDEL 302                   10

                         II             EDEM 330                    15

                         II              EDSP 350                   10

                         II              EDSP 320                   2

                         II              EDSP 372                   20

                         II              HLTH 301                   6

                         II              PHED 311                   6

                         II        EDEE 327 or EDMG 347             2
                                                                    3
                         II              EDSP 363                   2

                         III             EDSP 365                   10

                         III             EDSP 367                   10

                         III       EDEE 321 or EDMG 341             10
                                                                    10
                         III       EDEE 322 or EDMG 342              7
                                                                     7
                         III       EDEE 323 or EDMG 343             16
                                                                    10
                         III       EDEE 331 or EDMG 332             20
                                                                    20
                         III             SCI 490                     5

                         III            EDUC 482                    10

                         III             EDSP 371                   10

                         III             EDSP 359                   30

                         III        EDSP 373, 374, 375              60

                         IV              EDSP 437            Clinical Practice




                                         40
Application for Clinical Practice
Application for the professional semester must be submitted electronically through the COE on-
line assessment system, TK20. Directions for completing the on-line application may be found on
the Educational Service Unit web page in individual student TK20 accounts on the home page.
Application for clinical practice must be made at the beginning of the semester PRIOR to clinical
semester. (September for the Spring Semester and January for the Fall Semester).
Eligibility requirements for admission to the clinical practice include the following:

1. Admission to the Teacher Education Program is required
2. Grade point average of 2.50 on a 4.0 scale on all course work completed (includes transfer
     credit)
3. Course work completed at Morehead State University must reflect an overall 2.5 GPA
4. Grade point average of 2.50 on a 4.0 scale in area of concentration, major(s), and academic
   components
5. Completion of prerequisite courses. **See List below**
6. A minimum average grade of 2.5 on professional education courses is required.
7. **Completion of prerequisite courses. **See list below
8. A minimum grade of “C” is required in each course requiring field experience hours and
     all TEP restricted courses (those requiring TEP admission as a prerequisite) with an
     overall grade point average of 2.5 on a 4.0 scale in the area of concentration, major(s)
     and academic components.
9. A minimum of 90 semester hours must have been completed.
10. Applicant must have a bona fide major for teacher certification. (See Curriculum Standards
     ST-2).
11. Must complete a minimum of seventy-five percent of the course requirements in area or
     teaching component(s) as required by program. (To include all methods courses).
12. One semester (12 hours minimum) in residence at Morehead State University.
13. A current physical examination must be attached to the Clinical Practice Application in Tk20
     prior to commencing the professional semester (As per EPSB policy, a TB Skin test is
     required)
14. Students must score 13 or above as an average on two dispositions (Tk20) prior to clinical
     practice.
15. As soon as a clinical practice candidate is notified by the ESU of their school placement, they
     are to contact the principal or central office personnel officer to secure information related to
     that district’s protocol for completing a criminal background check. Criminal background
     checks are required, as per EPSB state policy.
16. Students must request a copy of PRAXIS test scores to be sent to Morehead State University
     when registering for each test. All test scores must be on file prior to commencing the clinical
     semester.
17. Scores for all required PRAXIS tests must be on file in the MSU Testing Center prior to
     commencing the clinical semester. If a student is unable to obtain a passing scores (s), a
     Praxis Re-Take Plan, designed by the candidate and assigned advisor/university supervisor,
     must be submitted to the ESU Director or Coordinator, prior to commencing clinical practice.
     Signatures of the candidate and the advisor/university supervisor are required. Re-Take Plan
     forms may be found by accessing “Forms” at (www.moreheadstate.edu/esu.)
18. A minimum average grade of 2.5 on professional education courses is required.
19. A minimum grade of “C” is required in each course requiring field experience hours
     and all TEP restricted courses (those requiring TEP admission as a prerequisite) with
     an overall grade point average of 2.5 on a 4.0 scale in the area of concentration,
     major(s) and academic components.
20. A minimum of 90 semester hours must have been completed.
21. Applicant must have a bona fide major for teacher certification. (See Curriculum Standards
     ST-2).
22. Must complete a minimum of seventy-five percent of the course requirements in area or
     teaching component(s) as required by program. (To include all methods courses).



                                               41
23. One semester (12 hours minimum) in residence at Morehead State University.
24. A current physical examination must be on file in the Educational Service Unit prior to
    commencing the professional semester.
25. Students must score 13 or above as an average on two dispositions prior to clinical practice.
26. Students will contact the school district after having received the clinical placement for the
    criminal background check. Criminal background checks are required for individuals working
    with the school districts. Criminal background checks can be obtained prior to placement by
    contacting Administrative Offices of the Court (502)573-2350.
27. Some district policy requires drug testing. If a Clinical Practice Student is placed in a district
    where this is a requirement, the student must followed procedures and have the test
    completed.
28. Students must request a copy of PRAXIS test scores to be sent to Morehead State University
    when registering for each test. All test scores must be on file prior to commencing the clinical
    semester.


The following Program of Study options include prerequisite courses
specific to each program:

Secondary Certification Programs:
EDF 207, 211, 311, EDSE 312, EDSP 230,
EDSE 483 and required methods or field experience
courses.

BIOL – BIOL 402, 403
CHEM – SCI 402, 403
ESS – SCI 402, 403
ENG – ENG 382, 500
MATH – MATH 402, 403
PHYS – SCI 402, 403
HIS – HIS 451, 499d

5-12 Certification Programs:
AGR – CTE 207, EDF 211, EDSP 230, CTE 388, 392,
470, 478

IET – CTE 207,388, 392, 470, 478, EDF 311, EDEM 330,
EDSP 230, IET 496, 499C

BITE – EDF 207, 211, 311, EDMG 306, EDSE 416, 483,
EDSP 230, BIS 499c

P-12 Certification Programs:
HPE – EDF 207, 211, 311 or EDMG 306, EDSE 312, 483,
HLTH 360, 475, 418, HPE 300, 301, 302, 303, 304, PHED 212, 213
214, 215, 216, 217, 218, 315, 475

HE – EDF 207, 211, 311 or EDMG 306, EDSE 312, 483,
HPE 301, HLTH 418, 475, 518

PE – EDF 207, 211, 311 or EDMG 306, EDSE 312, 483,
PHED 212, 213,214, 215, 216, 217, 218, 315, 475,



                                               42
HPE 300 (PHED only), 301, 303 (PHED only)

BME – EDF 207, 211, 311, MUSC 271, MUSE 207, 215, 325, MUSH 267 EDSE 312, 483
and
Voice – MUSG 123, 124, 223, 224, MUSG 211 or 213; 212 or 214; 217 or 226; 240, 241, MUSC
471, MUSE 375, 416
Or
Brass/Woodwinds – MUSG 123, 124, 211, 212, 213, 214, 217, 223, 224, 226, 239, MUSC 472,
MUSE 376
Or
Percussion – MUSG 123, 124, 211, 212, 213, 214, 223, 224, 226, 239, MUSC 472, MUSE 376
Or
Orchestral Strings – MUSG 123, 124, 211, 213, 214, 217, 223, 224, 226, 239, MUSC 472,
MUSE 376

ART – ART 301, EDF 207, 311, EDSE 312, 483,
EDSP 230, and required methods or field
experience courses.

LBD and MSD – P-5 or 5-9 education requirements plus
EDSP 230, 350, 356, 365, 367, 372 and
and
LBD- EDSP 360, 353, 355, 356, 357, 359
Or
MSD- EDSP 363, 370, 371, 373, 374, 375

LBD OR MSD and Middle Grades (5-9):
Middle Grades education requirements plus EDSP 230, 350, 356, 365, 367, 372,
and
LBD - EDSP 360, 353, 355, 356, 357, 359
or
MSD - EDSP 363, 370, 371, 373, 374, 375


FRN- EDF 207, 211, 311, EDSE 312, 483, EDSP 230,
FRN 405

SPA- EDF 207, 211, 311, EDSE 312, 483, EDSP 230, SPA 405

THEA – CMSP 495

Interdisciplinary Early Childhood:
(For candidates admitted prior to fall 2010) EDF 207, EDEE 305, 327, HS 253, EDSP 230,
350, 363, 365, 370, 371, IECE 301, 345, 360, 361, 411
(For candidates admitted Fall 2010 and following) EDF 207, EDEE 305, 327; EDEC 253, 254,
255; EDSP 230,320,350, 363, 370, 371; IECE 301, 311; 345, 360, 361, 416, 418

P-5 Certification Program:
EDF 207, 211, EDEL 302, EDEE 305, 321, 322, 323, 331,
EDEM 330, EDSP 230, EDUC 482, PHED 311, HLTH 301,
SCI 490




                                            43
Middle Grades Certification Program:
EDF 207, 211, EDEL 302, EDMG 330,
EDMG 306, 332, 347, EDSP 230,
EDUC 482; 2 courses corresponding to academic
Components (EDMG 341, 342, 343, SCI 402)

29. A minimum average grade of 2.5 on professional education courses is required.
30. A minimum grade of “C” is required in each course requiring field experience hours
    and all TEP restricted courses (those requiring TEP admission as a prerequisite) with
    an overall grade point average of 2.5 on a 4.0 scale in the area of concentration,
    major(s) and academic components.
31. A minimum of 90 semester hours must have been completed.
32. Applicant must have a bona fide major for teacher certification. (See Curriculum Standards
    ST-2).
33. Must complete a minimum of seventy-five percent of the course requirements in area or
    teaching component(s) as required by program. (To include all methods courses).
34. One semester (12 hours minimum) in residence at Morehead State University.
35. A current physical examination must be on file in the Educational Service Unit prior to
    commencing the professional semester.
36. Students must score 13 or above as an average on two dispositions prior to clinical practice.
37. Students will contact the school district after having received the clinical placement for the
    criminal background check. Criminal background checks are required for individuals working
    with the school districts. Criminal background checks can be obtained prior to placement by
    contacting Administrative Offices of the Court (502)573-2350.
38. Some district policy requires drug testing. If a Clinical Practice Student is placed in a district
    where this is a requirement, the student must followed procedures and have the test
    completed.
39. Students must request a copy of PRAXIS test scores to be sent to Morehead State University
    when registering for each test. All test scores must be on file prior to commencing the clinical
    semester.


Clinical Semester

P-5
EDEE                      423                       Clinical Practicum (12 hrs)
EDEM                      499C                      Seminar – Capstone (3 hrs)

LBD P-12
EDEM                      499C                      Seminar – Capstone (3 hrs)
EDSP                      435                       Clinical (LBD) Practicum (12 hrs)

MSD P-12
EDEM                      499C                      Seminar – Capstone (3 hrs)
EDSP                      437                       Clinical (MSD) Practicum (12 hrs)
LBD P-12 and P-5

EDEE                      423                       Clinical Practicum (6 hrs)
EDEM                      499C                      Seminar – Capstone (3 hrs)
EDSP                      435                       Clinical (LBD) Practicum (6 hrs)


MSD P-12 and P-5



                                               44
EDEE                    423                   Supervised Clinical Practicum (6 hrs)
EDEM                    499C                  Seminar – Capstone (3 hrs)
EDSP                    437                   Supervised Clinical (MSD) Practicum (6hrs)

Middle School 5-9

EDEM                    499C                  Seminar – Capstone (3 hrs)
EDMG                    446                   Clinical Practice (12 hrs)


LBD P-12 and 5-9

EDEM                    499C                  Seminar – Capstone (3 hrs)
EDMG                    446                   Supervised Clinical (6 hrs)
EDSP                    435                   Supervised Clinical (LBD) Practicum (6 hrs)


MSD P-12 and 5-9

EDEM                    499C                  Seminar – Capstone (3 hrs)
EDMG                    446                   Clinical Practice (6 hrs)
EDSP                    437                   Supervised Clinical (MSD) Practice (6 hrs)


Interdisciplinary Early Childhood Development (Birth to Primary)

IECE                    425                   Clinical Practice (12hrs)

Secondary Education

EDSE                    416                   Supervised Clinical Practice (12 hrs)

Technology Education (5-12)

IET                     478                   Supervised Clinical Practicum in Industrial
                                              Education- Orientation and
                                              Exploration Levels (12 hrs)

Business and Marketing Education

EDSE                    416                   Supervised Clinical Practice (12 hrs)

Agricultural Education (5-12)

CTE                     478                   Clinical Practicum in Agriculture (12 hrs)


Health Education P-12

EDSE                    416                   Supervised Clinical Practicum (12 hrs)
HPE                     499C                  Senior Seminar in Health/Physical Education

Physical Education P-12



                                         45
EDSE                   416              Supervised Clinical Practicum (12 hrs)
HPE                    499C             Senior Seminar in Health/Physical Ed


Health & Physical Education P-12

EDSE                   416              Supervised Clinical Practicum (12 hrs)
HPE                    499C             Teacher in Today’s Schools-Capstone (3 hrs)

Art Education P-12

EDSE                   416              Supervised Clinical Practicum (12 hrs)

Music Education P-12

EDSE                   416              Supervised Clinical Practicum (12 hrs)

Spanish Education P-12

EDSE                   416              Supervised Clinical Practicum (12 hrs)

French Education P-12

EDSE                   416              Supervised Clinical Practicum (12 hrs)

Theatre Education P-12

EDSE                    416             Supervised Clinical Practicum (12 hrs)




                                   46
Clinical Practice G
C                          s
                  Guidelines and Policies
The following policy stateme
              p                          actors that inf
                           ents outline fa                                      elated to clinic
                                                       fluence decision making re              cal
 ractice placem
pr            ments:

               SU           and
    1. The ES Director a the Educa                      s               r
                                           ation Services Coordinator engage in a collaborative     e
              ach
       approa as placem                   ns
                            ment decision are made. Recommend           dations from school princip  pals
       and un              ervisors weigh heavily in th decision making. And, p
              niversity supe              h            he                                           of
                                                                                       preferences o the
       clinical practice can                            20             n               so
                            ndidates, listed on the Tk-2 application form, are als given due
       consid deration, howeever, candida               med
                                          ates are inform that prefe                   not
                                                                        erences are n guarantee as  ed,
              a
       there are many vari                 ust
                             iables that mu be taken i  into considera                              rvisor
                                                                        ation, i.e., university super
       worklo               y,
              oads, diversity school perf formance, ava                ooperating tea
                                                        ailability of co                            pecific
                                                                                       achers in a sp
              cation area, co
       certific                                         ity,
                             ooperating teacher eligibili

                         permitted to independent contact school admin
        Students are not p                      tly                  nistrators or
        make arrangemen for a placement assignment.
                        nts

    2. Conten certification areas dictat whether as
             nt             n             te           ssignments will be made
       with tw cooperatin teachers, o per 8-wee placement, or with
             wo            ng            one           ek
       one coooperating tea acher for a 6-week. The f  following prov vides
             ines related to specific con
       guideli               o                         evel placemen
                                          ntent/grade le              nt
             ements:
       require
    3.
            Candidates completing a Secondary Clinical Pract
                           s                                           tice
                           e              d
                Experience are assigned to teach in t   their area of
                concentration for 16-wee  eks, with one cooperating teacher.
            Candidates certified in P
                           s             P-12 (Art, Heaalth, French, S               sic,
                                                                      Spanish, Mus Physical
                Education, & Theater) or 5-12 (Agricu                 ess             ng,
                                                       ulture, Busine & Marketin Family an        nd
                Consumer Sciences, & T    Technology E                 e
                                                       Education) are scheduled d    dual placements,
                when possi   ible.
            Candidates completing t Middle Sc
                           s              the          chool 5-9 Cer                 gram are
                                                                      rtification Prog
                                          with
                scheduled placements w two cooperating teachers, one in ea academic  ach          c
                component area, for 16-
                            t             -weeks.
            Primary-5 t    teacher educa ation candidates are sched  duled in dual placements, w  with
                two cooper                rs,
                           rating teacher one in prim  mary and one in the intermediate level. Each
                placement is for 8-weeks.
            Special Edu     ucation practiicums, EDSP 435 (LBD) and EDSP 437 (MSD) are
                                                      P                              7
                             for         ek
                scheduled f a 6-8 wee period, dep      pending on sc                 s
                                                                      chool district’s calendar, whhich
                           nction with eith the EDEE 423 Supervision of Stude Teaching (6
                is in conjun              her          E                             ent
                            or            6
                credit hrs) o EDMG 446 Supervision of Student T      Teaching (6 cr  redit hrs).
            Classrooms identified as collaborative teaching cla
                             s            s             e                            ow
                                                                      assrooms allo for a full 14  4-16
                week exper   rience in one classroom.
            Six-week or summer pra       acticums are s               r             g
                                                        scheduled for the Learning Behavior
                Disorder ED              d
                            DSP 435 and Moderate Se                    ity
                                                       evere Disabili (MSD) EDSP 437. Sch         hool
                based prog grams are a re              or
                                          equirement fo special edu   ucation placem ments. IECE
                                          ed
                candidates are schedule dual placem     ments when p   possible.


    4. Petitions to carry a course concu              e             ctice are limite Only one (3)
                                        urrent with the clinical prac              ed.
       hour course is allow
             c                         waiver request must be filed in the Educa
                           wed; and, a w              t              d                          ce
                                                                                   ational Servic
             801           all)        ce             cal            e.
       Unit (8 Ginger Ha in advanc of the clinic experience An overall 3.2 GPA is
              ed
       require and circum               st             d
                           mstances mus be identified that necess   sitate an overload. The
                           ent
       overload is continge upon approval of the D   Director of the Educational Service Unit.
                                                                    e




                                                 47
5. Clinical practice candidates unable to fulfill clinical practice obligations must officially
   withdraw their application in the Educational Service Unit and then withdraw from courses
   in which they are enrolled in Office of the Registrar.

6.   Candidates desiring additional certification will be required to complete a practicum in the
     specific area for which additional certification is sought.

7. Candidates are required to complete a criminal background check. As soon as
   placement information is received, candidates are directed to contact the personnel
   director at the district school board office and secure information regarding background
   check procedures. It is imperative that candidates follow through with making the contact
   and following the identified procedure, as they will not be permitted to enter the assigned
   classroom and begin the clinical practice experience until the report is filed in the
   school/district in which the placement has been confirmed. If a dual placement
   necessitates a candidate be placed in two districts, most often the district where the first
   8-week placement is completed, will willingly provide the background to the district/school
   where the second 8-week placement is scheduled to occur.

8.   The clinical practice semester represents a total commitment to teaching. Part-time
     employment must be adjusted so that the candidate may devote his/her full attention and
     energy to the clinical practice. The university strongly supports a policy of NO outside
     employment during the clinical practice semester.

9.   All required Praxis exams must have been taken and scores on file at MSU in order for a
     candidate to begin the clinical practice experience in the assigned classroom. A
     candidate with ETS scoring results that indicate a less than a passing score is required to
     schedule a time to meet with their academic advisor to analyze scoring results and
     develop an action plan focused on Praxis preparation steps that will be addressed, prior
     to the next scheduled Praxis testing session. The plan must contain signatures from the
     candidate and the advisor and be submitted to the Education Service Coordinator in the
     Educational Service Unit Office. The Praxis Re-Take form can be located in the
     Appendix, (p 126).




                                           48
         GATE III:

Clinical Practice Experience




            49
Gate III: Clinical Practice Experience
Duties of the Clinical Practice Candidate
Documentation: The MSU College of Education Clinical Practice Application must be
completed in TK20, by the designated deadline, the semester prior to the clinical
semester.

Liabilities and Responsibilities: Clinical practice candidates hold the same legal
responsibilities for the welfare of pupils under their direction, as do teachers employed
by the school system. The clinical practice candidate is liable for actions while
participating in school activities and may be tried in a court of law for mistakes,
erroneous judgment or harmful acts. Negligence involving the welfare of pupils is the
most frequent basis for litigation, although these instances are rare. The clinical practice
candidate should develop an awareness of potentially unsafe conditions or practices.
On the basis of this legal vulnerability, it is strongly recommended that professional
liability insurance be obtained, coverage prior to entering the CP classroom(s). Liability
insurance may be obtained from the Kentucky Education Association (KEA) Student
Program, Kentucky Association of Professional Educators (KAPE), or other private
agencies.

Orientation Seminars: The two-day, required, orientation seminars are intentionally
scheduled prior to the start of the semester to provide professional development
opportunities that assist candidates in the transition of moving from the student role to
that of a teacher. Additional seminar dates are scheduled throughout the semester with
topics that include, but are not limited to the following: certification, career placement
planning and information, Kentucky Beginning Teacher Internship Program, liability
insurance through KEA-SP, school law and ethics, model lessons, assessment,
technology, Teacher Performance Assessment (TPA), differentiation, diversity, DOK,
questioning skills, and more.


Keys to a Successful Beginning

The following list includes school and individual classroom information, including
policies, and procedures that probably will be accessible in the district’s faculty
handbook; however, as you enter the school on the first day, you will learn a great deal
from the administrators and your cooperating teacher, as you engage in conversations
and/or an orientation session:

      Academic Expectations/Core Content/Program of Studies
      Attendance procedures
      Assessment plans
      Availability of teacher resources
      Bell schedule
      Children with special needs in the classes you will be teaching
      Class party policies and procedures
      Class schedule



                                          50
   Comprehensive School Improvement Plan (CSIP)
   Cooperating teacher contact information (in case you need to notify of an
    absence)
   Curriculum calendar map
   Detention policies and procedures
   Discipline and behavior management policies and procedures
   Dismissal procedures
   District curriculum guidelines
   District School Improvement Plan (DSIP)
   Dress code for students and staff
   Emergency safety codes and procedures
   Facility floor plan
   Faculty attendance policy (MSU policy only excuses 2 absences)
   Faculty committees
   Faculty handbook
   Field trip approval procedures
   Homework policy
   Hours school building is open
   Identification badge
   KY school testing results (new scores are received in the fall)
   Lesson plan format (to be used, except when being observed by the university
    supervisor and/or cooperating teacher and for all TPA lessons taught
   Library use policy
   Lunch procedures
   Parent Conference procedures
   Professional organizations
   School calendar of events (PTA, PTO, SBDM meetings, School Board meetings,
    extra- curricular activities, etc.)
   School staff members
   School contact information
   School website
   Sign-in policy (procedures and protocol for clinical practice candidates)
   Student folder access procedures
   Standards and Indicators for School Improvement (SISI)
   Substitute teacher procedures (As per state law, a clinical practice candidate
    may not serve as a substitute during the clinical practice experience; however, it
    is good to know procedures, so you can assist a substitute if the cooperating
    teacher is absent.
   Support staff (take time to introduce yourself and build positive relationships with
    the cafeteria staff, office staff, and maintenance staff, as they are a part of the
    school team)
   Student names (learn them as quickly as possible)
   Teacher duties and responsibilities (cooperating teacher will provide this
    information)
   Teachers’ manuals and materials
   Technology availability, use, and policies




                                       51
Conferences: The purpose of conference sessions is to provide a time for the clinical
practice candidate and the cooperating teacher to discuss specific issues relating to
effective teaching practices. It is also an ideal time to establish a critical friend
relationship, as the cooperating teacher(s) are encouraged to constructively critique the
clinical practice candidate's classroom performance. As a result, the clinical practice
candidate will be provided clear expectations for improvement plans; and, if followed
through, profession growth will be successfully attained. The Kentucky Teacher
Standards Mentoring Inventory will be used to guide conference discussions focused on
mastery of the Kentucky Teacher Standards.

Inventory Check and Time Card: The College of Education Kentucky Teacher
Standards Mentoring Inventory, Pathway to Proficiency identifies ways mentors and
teacher candidates can work together to address the KY Teacher Standards, while
actively involved in a “real life” classroom learning environment. The tool will be
distributed to candidates at the first scheduled seminar. Accountability for maintaining
the check list and posting hours in the time log at the end of each week is an important
responsibility of the clinical practice candidate.

As the time card serves as the official record of classroom attendance, for verification
purposes, signatures of the candidate’s mentor(s), and the candidate are required prior
to submitting the document to the Education Services Coordinator at the last seminar.


Observations: In addition to conferences with the cooperating teacher, observations of
classes being taught by other experienced teachers will aid the clinical practice
candidate in extending knowledge related to content and best practice methods and
strategies. Observations prior to and during the first few days of the clinical practice are
essential to the clinical practice experience. The university supervisors (P-5, 5-9 and
Special Education) may use a portion of required seminar time for directed observations
in the assigned classrooms. Focused observation during this early period will provide
the clinical practice candidate with an orientation of the culture and climate of the
classroom and school learning environment. Periodic observations throughout the entire
clinical practice semester will enhance the clinical practice experience and provide
extended opportunities for guidance in attaining higher levels of professional growth.
“Look For” suggestions may include, but are not limited to the following:
   1. Individual characteristic behaviors of each child
   2. Behavior of each class as a whole
   3. Temperament or mood of each class
   4. Teacher's use of audio-visual aids/technology
   5. Bulletin board displays
   6. Motivational discipline techniques used by the teacher
   7. Teaching methodology
   8. Evidence of instructional planning and use of instructional technology
   9. Learning styles of students
  10. Questioning, assessment, and evaluation techniques
  11. Communication skills
  12. Development of a positive classroom climate
  13. Classroom management techniques
  14. Professional attitudes
  15. Grammar/speech
  16. Enthusiasm of students and the instructor


                                          52
Participation: An expectation of clinical practice candidates is participation in extra-
curricular activities, outside the regular classroom hours and environment. This phase of
the clinical semester usually begins following the period of initial observations of the
class/classes to be taught. Participating in activities out of the classroom setting affords
a clinical practice candidate opportunities to be a positive role model, establish rapport
with the students, become familiar with individual interests, practice teaching skills and
work with students, both individually, and in both small and large group settings.
Becoming a part of the “teaching and learning team” is another valuable learning
experience, as candidates will gain knowledge from other teachers willing to share
teaching and learning experiences and content expertise. Your professional reputation
is important and demonstrating that you are a dependable person is a great way to
begin. The aforementioned activities are building blocks, as well as the ones listed
below:

Participation activities include, but are not limited to:
   1. Collecting, organizing, and filing teaching materials
   2. Constructing assessment instruments aligned with objectives
   3. Guiding student activities, scoring/grading and analyzing results of student work
        products
   4. Assisting in supervising study halls, hallways, playgrounds, and library activities.
   5. Assisting with bus duty, early duty, or late duty
   6. Supervising field trips, parties, or class programs
   7. Assisting special needs students
   8. Judging science fair projects or attending a school drama or music production
   9. Attending P.T.A./P.T.O. meetings, parent-teacher conferences, faculty meetings,
        in- services meetings, and professional development, site-based council
        meetings, and school board meetings
   10. Reading or telling stories
   11. Preparing bulletin board displays
   12. Attending and assisting with club meetings and other extracurricular activities
   13. Checking out library materials for classroom use
   14. Participating in Professional Development Workshops

Teaching: When the cooperating teacher believes the clinical practice candidate has
made sufficient professional growth through observation experiences and participation in
class activities, the candidate will be permitted to teach under the cooperating teacher's
guidance. The clinical practice candidate’s demonstration of proficiency in working with
small group situations will help determine when he or she will begin engaging in whole-
class instruction. The cooperating teacher will collaborate with the clinical practice
candidate in the beginning. The candidates will begin teaching as confidence and
independent teaching skills are successfully demonstrated. The university supervisor
and the cooperating teacher are encouraged to differentiate clinical practice experiences
so that the semester’s activities provides for an individual candidate’s needs. Lesson
plans are to be prepared and reviewed prior to teaching. During the 14-16 weeks, the
candidate should progress to a full week of solo teaching and then gradually decrease
the teaching schedule.

University supervisors will share expectations with candidates regarding observation
visits and the observation evaluation form, Record of Performance, the KY Teacher
Standards Mentoring Inventory and Time log, required seminars, and processes to be


                                          53
followed, if a candidate is absent. Students are encouraged to take full advantage of
having two mentors who are quality resources. Candidates should not be afraid to ask
questions.


Documentation and Evaluation Forms: (Forms may be found in the Appendix)
    Teacher Performance Assessment
    Lesson Plan Format
    Clinical Practice Time Card
    Teacher Education Candidate Withdraw/Failure Form
    Summative Evaluation
    Teacher Education Candidate Tort Liability Form
    Teacher Education Candidate Record of Performance
    KY Teacher Standards Mentoring Inventory (not in Appendix)




                                       54
Duties of the Cooperating Teacher
Classroom supervision is an integral part of the preparation of competent teachers.
Cooperating teachers are selected based on the following criteria:
1. Teachers should have (effective July 1, 2006): a valid Kentucky teaching certificate for
   each grade and subject taught; attained Rank II certification; at least three years of
   teaching experience on a Professional Certificate; and taught in the present school
   system at least one (1) year immediately prior to being assigned a student teacher.
      a)To be eligible to serve as a cooperating teacher one must have a Rank II or
      completed 15 graduate hours of approved credit toward a Rank II, within a five year
      period.
      b)Teachers assigned to a teaching position on the basis of a probationary or an
      emergency certificate, issued by the Education Professional Standards Board
      under KAR Title 16, shall not be eligible for serving as a cooperating teacher.
2. The cooperating teacher should demonstrate knowledge of best practice teaching and
   learning strategies and current research. They should also demonstrate a willingness
   to participate in the continuous improvement of the clinical practice candidate through
   effective mentoring.
3. The cooperating teacher must be recommended by the local school administration
   and by the University.
4. While not required, cooperating teachers who have been trained in the Kentucky
   Teacher Internship program are preferred.

A basic question discussed by all supervisors and clinical practice candidates concerns
the legality of the candidate and their relationship and responsibility to the school where
they are assigned. Opinions of the Attorney General and subsequent appraisal by the
office should clarify this question.

Benefits for the cooperating teacher in the past have been very limited in view of the
contribution made in preparing teachers. The 2000 Kentucky General Assembly
allocated funding for the compensation of cooperating teachers. The regulation requires
the institution of higher education where the teacher education candidate is training to
report the cooperating teacher and teacher education candidate to the Education
Professional Standards Board.        The public school district that employs the
cooperating teacher will facilitate processing and distribution of stipends. The
amount is determined by the Education Professional Standards Board at the end of the
school year.

Senate Bill 77 provides a cooperating teacher mentoring a clinical practice candidate the
opportunity to take a maximum of six (6) credit hours per term at a public postsecondary
institution using a tuition waiver. The teachers identified in this legislation may exercise
the tuition free course option only if there is available space within a given course offering
and the tuition-free courses may be used to partially satisfy requirements for an
advanced degree. A tuition waiver is issued to the cooperating teacher upon request at
the end of the clinical practice semester. Applications for tuition waivers may be obtained
on-line in TK20.

Collaboration between the Cooperating Teacher and the University: Cooperating
teachers enter into a special working relationship with the university in preparing future
teachers. Suggestions from cooperating teachers are given careful consideration in the
process of continuous evaluation of the clinical practice program.

Collaboration between the Cooperating Teacher and the University Supervisor: A
team approach should be used to assist the clinical practice candidate during the
practicum period. The university supervisor will observe the clinical practice candidate’s



                                               55
teaching practices and classroom management techniques. Continuous evaluation of
Kentucky Teacher Standards will result in evidence as documented in the Teacher
Performance Assessment, the candidate’s professional dispositions, and in the Kentucky
Teacher Standards Mentoring Inventory. The final evaluation will be determined based on
evidence collected during the clinical semester and agreed upon by both the cooperating
teacher and the university supervisor. The ultimate responsibility for the final evaluation
lies with the university supervisor.

Preparing the Clinical Practice Candidate:          Success in guiding the teaching
experience of a clinical practice candidate depends upon careful pre-planning on behalf
of the cooperating teacher. Thoughtful consideration should be given to addressing the
following:

1. Review what has been taught prior to the clinical practice candidate's arrival
2. Review the subject matter to be taught in the assigned grade or area
3. Prepare materials to give to the clinical practice candidate on his/her first day

These may include:
    a)School Policy Handbook
    b)Class schedules
    c) Technology Resources/Policies
    d)Textbooks

4.        Prepare students classroom for the arrival of the clinical practice candidate

As a cooperating teacher you should provide a welcoming environment for the clinical
practice candidate and in doing so, familiarize them with your school, the classroom and
community. Suggestions include:

          a) Arrange a tour of the school facilities.
          b) Arrange a tour of the community, if the candidate is not familiar with the district.
          c) Acquaint the clinical practice candidate with your classes, subjects, policy and
             procedures.
          d) Provide the clinical practice candidate a school schedule, student handbook,
             faculty handbook, and a copy of the school/district aligned curriculum document

Orientation for Cooperating Teachers: An orientation for cooperating teachers will be
scheduled by the University Supervisor to explain program changes, innovations and
state department requirements. These conferencing sessions serve as an on-going in-
service program for cooperating teachers conducted by the Director or on site by the
MSU University Supervisor.

The First Week of the Clinical Practice: Getting off to a good start is crucial. The first
few weeks of the Clinical Practice should be a continuation of the initial visit scaffolding
learning activities focused on standards mastery. It is during this time that the clinical
practice candidate will make the adjustment that is necessary for a meaningful clinical
practice experience. Cooperating teachers may find the following list of details useful in
providing a comprehensive orientation to the school:

1.        School
     a)    School Facilities
     b)    School Mission Statement and Policies
     c)    Custodial Personnel
     d)    Personal Data Forms
     e)    Discipline Policies and Procedures




                                                     56
2.        Students
     a)   Individual Needs (IEP)
     b)   Behavior Patterns
     c)   Group Interactions
     d)   Peer Group Interests
     e)   Extracurricular Emphasis
3.        Records
     a)   Attendance Patterns
     b)   Guidance Records
     c)   Conference Reports
     d)   Letters to Parents
     e)   Communicating Assessment Results
     f)   Achievement Profiles
4.        Clerical Duties
     a)   Collecting Money
     b)   Recording Grades
     c)    Checking Attendance
5.        Limited Teaching Duties (first week)
     a)   Clinical practice candidates should not be required to teach subjects
           unrelated to their fields
     b)   Clinical practice candidates should be given options of activities to be
           taught

Conferences: The primary purpose of daily conferences is to provide direction, offer
suggestions, and make recommendations, while serving as mentor to the clinical practice
candidate. New techniques and means of presenting materials should be discussed
during conference periods. The clinical practice candidate may need encouragement
and reassurance to build confidence. Use of the Kentucky Teacher Standards Mentoring
Inventory is recommended as a tool to guide conferencing.

Participation: The clinical practice candidate should become actively involved in
classroom activities from the first day. The majority of the participation should be
completed during the early stages of the Clinical Practice in order to help the candidate
gain self-confidence and become actively involved in working with individuals and small
groups. Refer to the section on participation under the “Duties of the Teacher Education
Candidate.”

Observation: Observing is an effective method of learning. Therefore, the cooperating
teacher should provide the candidate with observation periods in a variety of teaching
situations. This may be accomplished by providing observation periods in other
classrooms or in special classes. Additional information concerning observations may be
found in the clinical practice candidate section of this handbook.

Organizing and Planning for Instruction: There is no substitute for good planning. The
clinical practice candidate shall write daily lesson plans to include appropriate content,
teaching strategies and assessments that include formative and summative evaluations
of learning. The lesson plan model for the clinical semester is aligned with Kentucky
Teacher Internship Program design.

Induction into Teaching: The induction into the Clinical Practice experience should be
gradual. It should follow a sequential pattern of orientation, observation, teaching of
several classes, participation in small group activities, progress toward the responsibility
for a full day schedule and a week of solo teaching. Cooperating Teachers are required
to complete four (4) evaluations/formal observations. The university supervisor and the




                                                    57
cooperating teacher are encouraged to differentiate clinical practice experiences so that
the semester’s activities provide for an individual candidate’s needs.

Documentation and Evaluation: It is understood that acceptance of a clinical practice
candidate constitutes a responsibility on the part of the cooperating teacher to complete
the documentation noted below in the MSU database,TK20.

               Cooperating Teacher Contract/Payroll Forms
               Teacher Education Candidate Record of Performance
               Disposition Evaluation
               Cooperating Teacher

The cooperating teacher must document four (4) formal evaluations for a 16-week
placement. The cooperating teacher must document two (2) formal evaluations for
an 8-week placement/s. In addition, the cooperating teacher is responsible for
documenting time on the Clinical Practice Timecard that is included in the KY Teacher
Standards Mentoring Inventory (not in TK20). A copy of the time card is available in the
appendix.

Evaluation of the Clinical Practice: Collaboration between the cooperating teacher
and university supervisor is critical in assigning letter grades. Ultimate responsibility for
the assignment of grades is the responsibility of the University Supervisor. Review
of the TPA, professional disposition, and observations will be considered in the
evaluation process (see syllabus for grading guidelines).

Assignment of Letter Grades: The following general guidelines may be used in
distinguishing among levels of performance during the Clinical Practice.

1. A grade of A means that the clinical practice candidate has demonstrated
outstanding performance.     The candidate demonstrates competency in Kentucky
Teacher Standards and is creative, responsible, and highly capable of self-direction and
practices effective classroom management skills. The candidate is a self-starter,
organized and effectively implements lessons that are accomplished and/or above a
satisfactory level. As addressed in the Kentucky Teacher Standards, the candidate
should demonstrate a satisfactory level of achievement and professional behavior should
be observed at all times.

2. A grade of B means that the clinical practice candidate is noticeably above average
in ability to teach and demonstrates effective classroom management. This candidate
can plan and implement effective teaching practices and has grown consistently with
regard to self-direction and responsibility. The candidate demonstrates a level of
satisfactory achievement as shown by the indicators addressed in the Kentucky Teacher
Standards and demonstrates professional behavior.

3. A grade of C means the clinical practice candidate can teach in an acceptable
fashion. This candidate is an average candidate, who may need more supervision. The
candidate’s professional insights will need to be fully developed. Additional teaching and
experience will be needed before the candidate may be considered a fully prepared
teacher. The candidate is recommended for a teaching position and prospective
employers may assume that this teacher will need supervisory assistance and growth in
the area of professional disposition. The candidate demonstrates a level of satisfactory
progress in meeting Kentucky Teacher Standards.

4. A grade of D means that the clinical practice candidate has demonstrated
unacceptable lesson preparation and limited classroom management skills. The
candidate demonstrates a need to develop creativity and self-direction. There is a need


                                               58
to develop effective teaching skills before being placed in a classroom situation and
improvement in demonstrating a professional disposition related to the teaching career.
The teacher education candidate will not be eligible for certification.

5. A grade of I means the clinical practice candidate did not complete the required work.
 A student has until mid-term of the next clinical practice semester to fulfill course
requirements and receive a grade.




                                             59
     Duties of the Director, Educational Service Unit

     The Director of the Educational Service Unit is the coordinator of all clinical experiences
     in the teacher education programs at Morehead State University. In fulfilling this
     responsibility:

1.   The Director is responsible for the coordination of the clinical experiences component of
     the undergraduate program and the following responsibilities are to be met:

        Reports to the Dean of the College of Education as a liaison between Morehead
         State University and regional districts
        Screens, processes and assigns placements in clinical practice program
        Receives and processes recommendations related to the placement of clinical
         practice candidates, observers, and interns; consults with university supervisors on
         matters of placement; works with appropriate personnel in contracted schools.
        Coordinates the Clinical Practice program for all areas of preparation in accordance
         with policies established by the Education Professional Standards Board, Kentucky
         Department of Education, Kentucky State Board for Vocational Education, and
         Morehead State University’s Teacher Education Council
        Maintains all records and contracts relative to the Clinical Practice semester
        Interprets and monitors existing policies related to the Clinical Practice as directed by
         the University Teacher Education Committee
        Assists departments in the evaluation of the clinical semester
        Supervises financial transactions involving the professional programs to include
         university and Education Professional Standards honorarium to cooperating teachers
         as well as fee waivers
        Provides liaison and public relations contacts with the teachers and administrators of
         the cooperating schools
        Provides leadership and support for the initiation and development of program
         changes in the clinical semester.

2. Recommends appropriate research and experimental activities related to the growth and
   development of teacher education

3.   Assists in the orientation, staff development and formal evaluation of personnel
     scheduled to supervise during the clinical semester

4. In terms of line relationships, the Director reports directly to the Dean of the College of
   Education on matters relating to the clinical practice experience




                                                    60
Duties of the University Supervisor

The university supervisor works with the clinical practice candidate during the clinical
semester. Duties and responsibilities of University Supervisors include the following:

   1.   Schedule class meetings, if involved in a program with a 3 hours seminar-
        capstone course to enrich effective teaching practices and allow opportunities for
        reflection.

   2.   Exemplify the best in teaching techniques, planning, classroom organization,
        ability to recognize individual differences, democratic classroom control, and
        opportunities for students to develop self-direction.

   3.   Visit and observe the clinical practice candidate a minimum of four (4) on-site
        visits for the purpose of assessment using the Clinical Practice Candidate Record
        of Performance.

   4.   Conduct an orientation and summative conference with the clinical practice
        candidate and cooperating teacher. Two (2) on-site visits required (summative
        conference can be completed during fourth on-site visit).

   5.   Conduct regular conferences with the clinical practice candidate and cooperating
        teacher to discuss observations, classroom management, effective teaching
        practices, and TPA entries. Use of Blackboard sites, including Wimba, is
        encouraged.

   6.   Collaborate with each cooperating teacher on the final evaluation of clinical
        practice candidate performance and to assign an appropriate grade.

   7.   Serve as an ambassador for the University and as a liaison between the district
        and the Educational Service Unit/CoE/University.

   8.   Ensure the following documents are completed:


               Clinical Practice Candidate Record of Performance – 4 per student (Tk20)
               Clinical Practice Time Card
               Disposition Evaluation (Tk20)
               KY Teacher Standards Mentoring Inventory
               Professional Disposition Evaluation (in Tk20)
               Teacher Performance Assessment Rubric (in Tk20)
               Summative Evaluation (in Tk20)

   9. Participates in Teacher Performance Assessment scoring training and
      Scoring event.

   10. Enters mid-term and final grades in Datatel.

   11. Attend seminars along with CP Candidates.

   12. Attend supervisor’s meetings to collaborate in the design and development of
       future clinical practice seminars, based on candidate needs.




                                                       61
     Duties of the School Principal

     The principal of the school designated as a Clinical Practice Center may accept or delegate
     the following responsibilities:

1.   Recommends highly qualified faculty members to serve as cooperating teachers.

2.   Ensures that all cooperating teachers meet minimum academic and professional
     requirements.
          Teachers should have (effective July 1, 2006): a valid Kentucky teaching
             certificate for each grade and subject taught; attained Rank II certification; at least
             three years of teaching experience on a Professional Certificate; and taught in the
             present school system at least one (1) year immediately prior to being assigned a
             student teacher.
          If a cooperating teacher has not attained Rank II certification, the teacher shall
             have attained a minimum of 15 hours of approved credit toward a Rank II within a
             minimum period of five (5) years.
          Teachers assigned to a teaching position on the basis of a probationary or
             emergency certificate issued by the Education Professional Standards Board under
             KAR Title 16 shall not be eligible for serving as a cooperating teacher.
          The cooperating teacher should demonstrate knowledge of best practices, current
             research, and a willingness to participate in the continuous improvement of the
             clinical practice candidate through effective mentoring.
          The cooperating teacher must be recommended by the local school administration
             and by the University.
             While not required, cooperating teachers who have been trained in the Kentucky
             Teacher Internship Program are preferred.

3.   Works with university personnel in assigning clinical practice candidates and coordinates
     the work of the clinical practice candidate, the cooperating teacher and university
     supervisor.

4.   Knows the clinical practice candidates assigned to his/her school and keeps on file a record
     of the clinical practice candidate's schedule.

5.   Provides a clinical practice candidate induction through conferences and materials, and
     reviews of facilities, personnel policies and orientation to the school community.
          Participates in conference discussions regarding school policies, including
             personnel policies.
          Shares school resource materials
          Provides a tour of the facilities
          Orients candidates to the school & extended learning community

6.   Keeps the university informed of personnel changes within the school system that might
     affect the Clinical Practice placements.




                                                            62
    Duties of the Superintendent
The superintendent or a designated representative has the following responsibilities:


    1. Creates awareness in the schools and the community of the role of the public school in
       the education of clinical practice candidates.

    2. Develops in the minds of students, teachers, and patrons of the schools, a sympathetic
       understanding of the problems faced by clinical practice candidates and their need for
       guidance and assistance.

    3. Works cooperatively with university administrators in arriving at a contractual
       arrangement.




                                                           63
     Attorney General’s Statement

     Classroom Responsibility

     The following statement issued in 1963 by the Attorney General of the
     Commonwealth of Kentucky is quoted below to clarify classroom authority and
     responsibility of the teacher education candidate:

     KRS Chapters 157 and 161 require the employment of competent certified teachers,
     but there is no express or implied exclusion of an assistant or student teacher. The
     student teacher cannot be employed by the local board of education, can receive no
     compensation from said board or exercise any authority in the management or
     control of the class. While a student teacher is working with the class, the regularly
     employed certified teacher must remainin a supervisory capacity to see that the
     recitations are heard and instructions given according to her own judgment and
     discretion. There can be no delegation of this authority and responsibility.

     The student teacher may be devoted in her pursuit of the art of teaching, but she is
     not a teacher within the meaning of the law, which has undertaken to insure that
     school children shall be taught only by those who have met, not by those seeking to
     attain a certain standard of proficiency.

     Therefore it is the opinion of this office that a student teacher may not legally take
     charge of a classroom in the absence of the regular teacher.

     A January 1975 opinion of the Attorney General not only reaffirms this opinion but
     also further states that student teacher is not authorized to teach except under the
     supervision of a certified teacher.

     In response to the Attorney General's statement, the following policy statements
     will guide college supervisors and student teachers.

1.   A student teacher has no legal authority as a certified teacher either in or out
     of the classroom.

2.   A student teacher may not be used in a substitute role for any certified teacher.

3.   A student teacher may not legally assume responsibility for any activities (such
     as field trips, debate contests, etc.) that occur away from the cooperating
     school.




                                                       64
General Policies

Absences: Only 2 excused absences are permitted. Clinical practice candidates are
expected to be punctual and in attendance for the entire day, each day, during the
placement, that the school is in session. All meetings, conferences and class activities are
to be attended.

Co-curricular Activities: Clinical practice candidates are expected to assist the
cooperating teacher in co-curricular school activities.

Applying for a Teaching Certificate: Application forms for certification are distributed by
the Teacher Certification Officer. The application will be completed and returned to the
Certification Officer during the last seminar prior to graduation/program completion.

Clinical Practice Center Policies: Students enrolled in the clinical semester must abide
by the policies of the school system to which they are assigned. It is the responsibility of
the student to obtain school policies from the principal and cooperating teacher.

Criminal Background Check: KRS 160.380 School employees – Restrictions on
appointment of relatives, violent offenders, and persons convicted of sex crimes – National
and state criminal history background checks on applicants.

Initiated January 1, 1999 - A superintendent shall require a national and state criminal
background check on all new certified hires in the school district and clinical practice
candidates assigned within the district. Excluded are certified individuals who were
employed in another certified position in a Kentucky school district within six (6) months of
the date of hire and who had previously submitted to a national and state criminal
background check for the previous employment. Clinical practice candidates are
responsible for completing the background check and filing this information with the school
district where the candidate has been assigned.

Grades: Clinical practice candidates must attain a letter grade of C or above in each
course of the Clinical Practice semester and clinical practicum in order to be recommended
for teacher..

Grade Appeal: Clinical practice candidates may appeal their grade by following the
procedures set forth in the Teacher Education Council Regulations.

Health Examinations: The State of Kentucky requires a medical examination, tuberculin
skin test, and immunization record for each clinical practice candidate. This record must be
filed in the Educational Service Unit prior to registering for the clinical semester. Forms for
these examinations are included in this packet. The University Health Clinic or a personal
physician may perform the examination. Candidates are to advise the Director of medical
conditions that may affect their teaching (Americans with Disabilities Act 1990). Physical or
medical limitations identified on the physical examination are subject to a request for
additional information to clarify disabilities or limitations to facilitate a suitable placement.
Health examinations are good for one year. Medical Examination forms are an eligibility
requirement (TK-20)..

Job Interviews: Clinical practice candidates must make arrangements, well in advance,
with the university supervisor, cooperating teacher and principal in order to be absent from
the clinical practice for job interviews. If at all possible, the teacher education candidate
should attempt to limit interviews to a time outside the regular school day.




                                                         65
Legal Action: Candidates charged with violations of criminal law may be suspended from
the Teacher Education Program and/or the Clinical Practice until the case is settled. In all
cases, it is the candidate’s responsibility to report such charges to the Director.



Length of the Practicum: The candidate is expected to teach on a full day basis for the
assigned semester. The clinical practice may be extended on an individual basis upon the
recommendation of the university supervisor and the approval of the Director.

Non-Teaching Days: Days observed in the public schools as non-teaching days during the
fall and spring semesters are also observed by the teacher education candidate. Holidays
identified on the University’s fall/spring schedule are not to be observed by the teacher
education candidate unless these specific dates are observed as non-teaching days in the
school where the teacher education candidate is assigned.
              a. The University recognizes the need for clinical practice candidates to
                  spend as much time as possible in their teaching assignments. It is hoped
                  that clinical practice candidates, cooperating teacher, and university
                  supervisors might mutually resolve various situations.
              b. All professional days, in-service days, and snow days should be observed
                  as a school day by the teacher education candidate

Orientation: Clinical practice candidates are required to attend the Clinical Practice
Orientation and Seminar I and II, prior to the beginning of each semester.

Placements: Placements for the clinical practice are the responsibility of the Director of
the Educational Service Unit and the Educational Services Coordinator. Candidates are
not permitted to make contact with public school officials for clinical practice
placement.

Pregnancy: School districts within the geographic area where Morehead State University
places clinical practice candidates have conclusive statements of policy regarding maternity
leave and its relationship to teaching positions in those systems. MSU respects these
policies concerning maternity leave and recognizes the school district's prerogative in
establishing such regulations. The University abides by these regulations and will place
students in accordance with them.

Requests: Information and requests relative to clinical practice assignments must be
made BY THE STUDENT to the Director/Coordinator.

Schedules: Class schedules for clinical practice candidates are official university
schedules and shall not be altered during the clinical practice semester without prior
approval by the Director.

Seminars: The first two seminars are scheduled prior to the beginning of MSU’s first day
of fall and spring classes, as well as the opening days in the districts. Scheduling seminars
early provides students the opportunity to meet and greet university supervisors and
participate in professional development opportunities intentionally designed to relieve
anxiousness and better prepare them for entry into the district classrooms. Clinical practice
candidates are scheduled to return to the campus for additional seminars throughout the
semester, some are scheduled on Saturdays so candidates will not have to miss days in
their assigned classrooms with their students. The seminars provide the opportunity for the
clinical practice candidates to analyze various classroom activities, to evaluate effective
teaching practices, discuss TPA development and share learning gained from classroom
experiences. Candidates are required to attend all scheduled seminars; the Director
must be notified in writing prior to the seminar if a candidate, for any reason, cannot attend.
Students are responsible for all information provided at seminars and may be asked to




                                                       66
complete make-up assignments, even if an absence is excused. Attendance at seminars
and completion of assignments must be documented before a passing grade will be issued.

Student Load: The course schedule for the clinical semester represents a full academic
workload. A candidate shall be permitted to schedule an additional three (3) semester

hours providing it is the last required course, the student has a 3.2 overall GPA and has the
approval of the ESU Director.

Substitute Teaching: Clinical practice candidates placed in centers are not, by law, to be
assigned to substitute teach. (Attorney General's Ruling. OAG 75- 70.)

Clinical Practice Candidate Rights: Clinical practice candidates with grievances may
document them using procedures outlined in the Morehead State University catalog and
regulations of the Teacher Education.

Testing: Clinical practice candidates are required to take the PRAXIS Specialty Area and
Principles of Learning and Teaching (PLT) Examination as specified by the State
Department of Education and the Kentucky Educational Professional Standards Board. The
student must bear the expense for these examination(s). PRAXIS scores are required prior
to commencing the Clinical Practice. Copies of PRAXIS Score Reports must be submitted
to the Educational Service Unit in 801 Ginger Hall. Students whose scores are below
passing need to access a PRAXIS Re-Take Preparation Plan
(www.moreheadstate.edu/esu) to take to their advisors for assistance in completion. The
completed form must be signed by the advisor and returned to the Educational Service Unit
prior to commencing the Clinical Practice experience.

Transportation of Pupils: Transportation of pupils to school events, field trips, or other
activities shall not be provided in the automobile belonging to or driven by a clinical practice
candidate.

Vacations: Interns, practicum students, and teacher education candidates will follow the
schedule of the school district while off campus.

Non-Academic Responsibility: Clinical practice candidates are expected to represent
Morehead State University in a positive manner while completing the clinical practice
semester. Students are expected to demonstrate professional behavior by acting
responsibly and with integrity and character. Students must demonstrate behavior and
attitudes in accordance with the Code of Ethics.
Clinical practice candidates must demonstrate appropriate personal conduct consistent with
professional behavior. Being punctual and in attendance each day, accepting constructive
criticism, demonstrating appropriate behavior when dealing with conflict, and developing
appropriate relationships with students, parents, faculty, or supervisors are all examples of
professional behavior expected of students. Appropriate personal dress, language, and
written communications also represent professional conduct in the clinical practice
placement and clinical practice seminars. During the clinical practice placement, students
should limit personal phone calls during the school day and refrain from using cell phones
during instructional time.

Clinical practice candidates must demonstrate respect for all students, parents, colleagues,
supervisors, and faculty. Students must value differences as well as similarities in others.
Professional respect includes exhibiting positive attitudes towards persons with
exceptionalities and cultural diversities and being able to work cooperatively with others.




                                                        67
                             Morehead State University
                               College of Education

                                           Clinical Practice
                                         Critical Performance



Teacher Performance Assessment (TPA):
                      Performance Tasks
                      Teaching Process Expectations
                      Scoring Rubrics
                      Instructional Sequence/Lesson Plan Format




A library of TPA-TWS resources can be found at
http://fp.uni.edu/itq
The Renaissance group manual for mentoring students to develop a TPA/TWS can be downloaded at:
http://fp.uni.edu/itq/PDF_files/mentoring_manual_june_2004.pdf




These tasks and scoring rubric are based on the work done by
The Renaissance Partnership for Improving Teacher Quality Project,
(http://fp.uni.edu/itq) a Title II federally funded project with offices at Western Kentucky University. (June
2008) Director: Roger Pankratz

Revised: July, 2010




                                                        68
Overview of Teacher Performance Assessment (TPA)
The Vision: Successful teacher candidates support learning by designing a Teacher
Performance Assessment that employs a range of strategies and builds on each
student's strengths, needs, and prior experiences. Through this performance
assessment, teacher candidates provide credible evidence of their ability to facilitate
learning by meeting the following TPA expectations:
    The teacher uses information about the teaching/learning context and student
        individual differences to set learning objectives, plan instruction and design
        authentic purposeful assessments.
    The teacher selects significant, challenging, varied, and measurable learning
        objectives.
    The teacher uses multiple assessment modes (formative and/or summative) and
        instructional approaches aligned with learning objectives to assess student
        learning before, during, and after instruction.
    The teacher designs instruction for specific learning objectives, student
        characteristics and needs, and learning contexts.
    The teacher uses regular and systematic evaluations of student learning to make
        instructional decisions.
    The teacher uses assessment data to profile student learning and communicate
        information about student progress and achievement.
    The teacher reflects on his or her instruction and student learning in order to
        improve teaching practice and raise levels of student achievement.
    The teacher presents information in a professional manner which is marked by
        use of Standard English, concise clear writing, absence of surface error (s), and
        the systematic presentation of all information needed to understand the subject at
        hand.
TPA Section Assignments: The TPA contains teaching processes identified by
research and best practice as fundamental to improving student learning. Each process
is followed by a TPA Expectation and a Task. A. Included with each section assignment
is a rubric. Rubric evaluation of the TPA section assignments targets performance
expectations and defines various levels of performance. The Tasks provide explicit
directions; and if addressed appropriately, will afford the candidate a high level of
mastery, when each TPA section assignment is completed.
Expectations include teaching a well-developed instructional sequence (3-5 lessons). The
scaffolding of section assignments is intentionally designed so that candidates will
experience and internalize a backwards design approach to lesson development; the
following steps are aligned with the backwards design approach:
        Candidate will identify and describe contextual factors related to the teaching
         and learning context. Factors are to be specifically focused on the learning
         environment, which includes the individual students in the classroom where the
         candidate is placed.
        Candidate will identify learning objectives, based on state or district content
         standards. As KY continues to address meeting national standards and raising
         levels of student achievement, the following information is important to know:
              2010-2011 KY state tests will be aligned with Kentucky Core Content
              2011-2012 KY state tests will be aligned with the new KY Core
                 Standards
        Candidate will create an assessment plan that is designed to measure student
         performance before (pre-assessment), during (formative assessment) and after
         (summative-assessment). This design of the plan should provide students with
         learning experiences focused on high levels of mastery, as per the summative
         assessment rubric criteria the candidate designs to measure student
         achievement.




                                                    69
         Candidate will analyze student learning and then reflect upon and evaluate
          teaching, as related to student learning.


TPA Development Process Guidelines:
               University Supervisors will provide a timeline for submission of each
                section assignment.
               Candidates will follow the university supervisor’s instructions and submit
                each section assignment for review and feedback, as per the schedule
                provided by the university supervisor. The schedule may vary from one
                candidate to another, as individualization and differentiation may come
                into play due to exceptionalities. That is to be determined by the
                university supervisor.
               Candidates will move to the next section assignment, only when the
                university supervisor directs them to do so. One assignment builds on
                the other and this ensures that the scaffolding design is addressed
                appropriately.
               Candidates with dual placements are to complete the TPA by the end of
                the 1st 8 weeks of the clinical practice experience, Scheduled timelines
                must be followed. Due dates may only be extended, in cases of
                exceptionality. Permission for an extension must be received from the
                university supervisor with the approval of the Educational Service
                Director.
               Candidates with 16-week placements may be guided to address an
                entirely different timeline schedule.


TPA Format (Candidate Instructions):
   Ownership. Complete a cover page that includes (a) your name, (b) date
      submitted, (c) grade level taught, (d) subject taught, (d) your university, (e)
      course number and title. (TPA page 1)
   Certification. The certification page attests that the entire document is your
      original work. (A copy of a certification page is found at the conclusion of this
      document.) (TPA page 2).
   Table of Contents. Provide a Table of Contents that lists the sections and
      attachments in your TPA document with page numbers. (TPA page 3)
   Charts, Graphs and Attachments. Charts, graphs and assessment instruments
      are required as part of the TPA document. Other attachments, such as student
      work may be included. However, you should be very selective and make sure
      attachments provide clear, concise evidence of performance related to TPA
      expectations and students' learning progress.
   Narrative Length. There is some flexibility of length across components, but the
      total length of your written narrative (excluding charts, graphs, attachments and
      references) should not exceed 11-13 (plus any additional charts, etc.) word
      processed pages, double-spaced in 12-point font, with 1-inch margins. The
      narrative should be very specific and address factors that impact the students
      learning (quality and not quantity) with the complete TPA not exceeding 50-60
      typed pages.

         References and Credits (not included in total page length). If you refer to
          another person's ideas or material within the narrative, it is imperative that
          you cite these under “References and Credits”, as directed, at the end of
          each section assignment. You may use any standard form for references;
          however, the American Psychological Association (APA) style is a recommended
          format (explained in the manual entitled "Publication Manual of the American
          Psychological Association").



                                                     70
   Instructional Sequence/Lesson Plans. The plans (3-5) for the instructional
    activities analyzed in the TPA should be attached in an appendix and follow the
    lesson plan format included in the candidate packet provided at seminar II.
   Anonymity. In order to ensure the anonymity of district classroom students, do
    not include any student names or identification in any part of the narrative (TPA).




                                                 71
       Teaching Processes Assessed by the Teacher Performance Assessment


       Teaching Processes, Kentucky Teacher & IECE Standards, TPA Expectations, and Indicators

Contextual Factors

TPA Expectation
The candidate identifies information about the teaching and learning context as well as
student individual characteristics and can articulate how these factors will impact the
teaching and learning process.

Kentucky Teacher Standards
Standard 2: The Teacher Designs and Plans Instruction
Standard 3: The Teacher Creates and Maintains Learning Climate
Standard 4: The Teacher Implements and Manages Instruction
Standard 8: The Teacher Collaborates with Colleagues, Parents, and Others

Interdisciplinary Early Childhood Education (IECE) Standards
Standard 1: The Teacher Designs and Plans Instruction
Standard 2: The Teacher Creates and Maintains Learning Climate
Standard 3: The Teacher Implements Instruction
Standard 6: The Teacher Collaborates with Colleagues/Families/Others
Standard 8: The Teacher Supports Families

Learning Objectives

TPA Expectation
The candidate establishes significant, challenging, varied, and appropriate learning objectives
aligned with content area standards.

Kentucky Teacher Standards
Standard 2: The Teacher Designs and Plans Instruction
Standard 3: The Teacher Creates and Maintains Learning Climate

Interdisciplinary Early Childhood Education (IECE) Standards
Standard 1: The Teacher Designs and Plans Instruction
Standard 2: The Teacher Creates and Maintains Learning Climate

 Assessment Plan

 TPA Expectation
he candidate uses a variety of assessments aligned with learning objectives to assess student
rning before (pre-assessment), during (formative), and after (summative) instruction.

Kentucky Teacher Standards
Standard 2: The Teacher Designs and Plans Instruction
Standard 3: The Teacher Creates and Maintains Learning Climate
Standard 4: The Teacher Implements and Manages Instruction
Standard 5: The Teacher Assesses and Communicates Learning Results

Interdisciplinary Early Childhood Education (IECE) Standards
Standard 1: The Teacher Designs and Plans Instruction


                                                        72
Standard 2: The Teacher Creates and Maintains Learning Climate
Standard 3: The Teacher Implements and Manages Instruction
Standard 4: The Teacher Assesses and Communicates Learning Results




Design for Instruction

TPA Expectation
The candidate designs instruction for specific learning objectives based on student
characteristics and needs, learning contexts, and best teaching practices.

Kentucky Teacher Standards:
Standard 1: The Teacher Demonstrates Applied Content Knowledge
Standard 2: The Teacher Designs and Plans Instruction
Standard 3: The Teacher Creates and Maintains Learning Climate
Standard 4: The Teacher Implements and Manages Instruction
Standard 5: The Teacher Assesses and Communicates Learning Results
Standard 6: The Teacher Demonstrates the Implementation of Technology
Standard 8: The Teacher Collaborates with Colleagues, Parents, and Others

Interdisciplinary Early Childhood Education (IECE) Standards
Standard 1: The Teacher Designs and Plans Instruction
Standard 2: The Teacher Creates and Maintains Learning Climate
Standard 3: The Teacher Implements and Manages Instruction
Standard 4: The Teacher Assesses and Communicates Learning Results
Standard 6: The Teacher Collaborates with Colleagues/Families/Others
Standard 8: The Teacher Supports Families
Standard 9: The Teacher Demonstrates Implementation of Technology

Instructional Decision-Making

TPA Expectation
The candidate continually monitors and uses on-going analysis of student learning to make
instructional decisions.

Kentucky Teacher Standards
Standard 1: The Teacher Demonstrates Applied Content Knowledge
Standard 2: The Teacher Designs and Plans Instruction
Standard 3: The Teacher Creates and Maintains Learning Climate
Standard 8: The Teacher Collaborates with Colleagues, Parents, and Others

Interdisciplinary Early Childhood Education (IECE) Standards
Standard 1: The Teacher Designs and Plans Instruction
Standard 2: The Teacher Creates and Maintains Learning Climate
Standard 6: The Teacher Collaborates with Colleagues/Families/Others
Standard 8: The Teacher Supports Families




                                                     73
Analysis of Student Learning

TPA Expectation
The candidate uses assessment data to profile and document students’ learning during the instructional
sequence.

Kentucky Teacher Standards
Standard 5: The Teacher Assesses and Communicates Learning Results
Standard 7: The Teacher Reflects On and Evaluates Teaching and Learning
Standard 8: The Teacher Collaborates with Colleagues, Parents, and Others

Interdisciplinary Early Childhood Education (IECE) Standards
Standard 4: The Teacher Implements and Manages Instruction
Standard 5: The Teacher Assesses and Communicates Learning Results
Standard 6: The Teacher Demonstrates the Implementation of Technology
Standard 8: The Teacher Collaborates with Colleagues, Parents, and Others


Self-Evaluation and Reflection

TPA Expectation
The candidate analyzes the relationship between his or her instruction, assessment data, and other
factors in order to improve teaching practice.

Kentucky Teacher Standards
Standard 7: The Teacher Reflects On and evaluates Teaching and Learning
Standard 9: The Teacher Evaluates Teaching and Implements Professional Development

Interdisciplinary Early Childhood Education (IECE) Standards
Standard 5: The Teacher Assesses and Communicates Learning Results
Standard 7: The Teacher Engages in Professional Development

Presentation

TPA Expectation
The candidate’s TPA is presented with accuracy, clarity and professionalism.

Professional Code of Ethics for Kentucky School Certified Personnel
16KAR1:200
KRS 161.028, KRS 161.030




                                                       74
      Contextual Factors: TPA Section I

      TPA Expectation
      The candidate identifies information about the teaching and learning context
      as well as student individual characteristics and can articulate how these
      factors will impact the teaching and learning process.

Kentucky Teacher Standards                                IECE Teacher Standards
Standard 2: Designs and Plans Instruction                 Standard 1: Designs and Plans Instruction
Standard 3: Creates and Maintains Learning Climate        Standard 2: Creates and Maintains Learning Climate
Standard 4: Implements and Manages Instruction            Standard 3: Implements Instruction
Standard 8: Collaborates with Colleagues/Parents/Others   Standard 6: Collaborates with Colleagues/Families/Others
                                                          Standard 8: Supports Families

      Task
      Complete the contextual factors data chart to identify contextual factors, as
      they are relevant to the class for which you are developing the TPA. In
      doing so, you will address the following:
         1) Contextual factors that impact the teaching and learning process
         2) Specific types of strategies and techniques used to address these
             unique characteristics and needs.

      Include
          Credits and References


      *Contextual Factors Data Chart follows…




                                                          75
Contextual Factors Data
Complete the tables below with the requested information. Be sure to indicate the source
of your information for all items.

District, School, & Classroom Contextual Factors
District &             1. List economic characteristics of the school district
Community              2. List the population and diversity information for the school district
Factors
School Factors         1. List economic characteristics of your school
                       2. List the population and diversity information for the school
                       3. Describe the parent involvement in the school
Classroom              1. Describe the assistance you have in the classroom (i.e assistants,
Factors                   volunteers, resource teachers, etc.)
                       2. Describe the classroom resources available to you (i.e. equipment,
                          technology, supplies, etc.)
                       3. Describe the physical learning environment of the classroom (i.e.
                          how are desks arranged, how easily can technology and supplies be
                          accessed, how is the classroom setup to engage students, etc.)

Student Contextual Factors
Grade level(s) in the class:    Student ages in the class:        Number of Students in the
                                                                  Class:
# Students with IEP:             # of GSSP Students:              # of LEP Students:
Characteristics      1. Describe any language, cultural, socioeconomic, and/or
of Students              developmental differences of the students in the classroom.
                     2. Describe any special needs of the students in your classroom.
                     3. Describe any positive characteristics of students that impact
                         classroom learning (i.e. interests, talents, motivation, etc.)
Student Varied       Describe the different learning preferences of the students in the
Approaches to        classroom.
    Learning
Student Skills       1. Estimate the achievement levels of the students in the classroom
and Prior                (i.e. approximately how many students are above, on, or below
Learning                 grade level?)
                     2. Describe the prior instruction students have received regarding the
                         TPA topic.

Implications of Contextual Factors
Implications for      1. Select and describe two ways that the contextual factors listed
Assessment &             above will impact the assessment of students.
Instruction           2. Select and describe two ways that the contextual factors listed
                         above will impact the planning and instruction of the instructional
                         sequence.

References
References            List the sources for the above information in an appropriate
                      reference format.
                      Ex:




                                                 76
Contextual Factors Rubric

TPA Section I: The candidate identifies information about the learning and teaching context and
student individual characteristics and can articulate how these factors will impact the teaching and
learning process.
                               1                            2                             3
    Indicator                                                                                           Score
                            Not Met                   Partially Met                     Met
Knowledge of     Candidate displays           Candidate displays some      Candidate displays a
Community,       minimal, irrelevant, or      knowledge of the             comprehensive
School and       biased knowledge of the      characteristics of the       understanding of the
Classroom        characteristics of the       community, school, and       characteristics of the
Factors          community, school, and       classroom that may affect community, school, and
KTS 2.2, 4.2     classroom.                   learning.                    classroom that may affect
                                                                           learning.
Knowledge of     Candidate displays           Candidate displays           Candidate displays
Characteristics minimal, stereotypical, or    general knowledge of         general & specific
of Students      irrelevant knowledge of      student differences (e.g.,   understanding of student
KTS 3.5, 4.2,    student differences (e.g.,   development, interests,      differences (e.g.,
4.4              development, interests,      culture,                     development, interests,
                 culture,                     abilities/disabilities).     culture,
                 abilities/disabilities).                                  abilities/disabilities) that
                                                                           may affect learning.
Knowledge of     Candidate displays           Candidate displays           Candidate displays
Students’        minimal, stereotypical, or   general knowledge about      general & specific
Varied           irrelevant knowledge         the different ways           understanding of the
Approaches to about the different ways        students learn (e.g.,        different ways students
Learning         students learn (e.g.,        learning styles, learning    learn (e.g., learning
KTS 3.3, 4.2,    learning styles, learning    modalities).                 styles, learning
8.1              modalities).                                              modalities) that may affect
                                                                           learning.
Knowledge of     Candidate displays little or Candidate displays           Candidate displays
students’ skills irrelevant knowledge of      general knowledge of         general & specific
and prior        students’ skills and prior   students’ skills and prior   understanding of
learning         learning.                    learning that may affect     students’ skills and prior
KTS 3.2, 3.3,                                 learning.                    learning that may affect
3.4, 3.5, 4.2,                                                             learning.
4.4, 8.1, 8.2,
8.3
Implications     Candidate does not           Candidate provides           Candidate provides
for              provide implications for     general implications for     specific implications for
Instructional    instruction and              instruction and              instruction and
Planning and     assessment based on          assessment based on          assessment based on
Assessment       student individual           student individual           student individual
                 differences and              differences and              differences and
                 community, school, and       community, school, and       community, school, and
                 classroom characteristics classroom characteristics. classroom characteristics.
                 OR characteristics OR
                 provides inappropriate
                 implications.
                                                           Contextual Factors Mean Score
                                                                          




                                                       77
Learning Objectives: TPA Section II


TPA Expectation
The candidate establishes significant, challenging, varied, and appropriate learning
objectives aligned with content area standards.

Teacher Standards
Standard 2: The Teacher Designs and Plans Instruction
Standard 3: The Teacher Creates and Maintains Learning Climate

Task
Provide and justify the learning objectives for the instructional sequence.

The Objectives must:
    Define what students are expected to know and be able to do at the end of the
     instructional sequence (Be sure that objectives focus on the “big picture” outcome,
     not activities in which students will be participating during the lesson).
    Reflect the key concepts and skills of the discipline.
    Be challenging, varied, and relevant to the content and learners.
    Align with content area standards (Identify the source of your standards).


Include:
    A chart with the objective(s), standard(s), Depths of Knowledge (DOK), and
      Bloom’s Taxonomy levels.
    A discussion of why the identified learning objectives are appropriate in terms of
      the contextual factors and pre-requisite knowledge, skills, and other unique needs
      of the student(s).
    Credits and References




                                              78
Learning Objectives Rubric

TPA Section II: The candidate establishes significant, challenging, varied and appropriate learning
objectives aligned with content area standards.
                                 1                          2                            3
    Indicator                                                                                         Score
                             Not Met                  Partially Met                    Met
Significance,      Objectives reflect only    Objectives reflect several Objectives reflect several
Challenge, and     one type or level of       types or levels of learning types or levels of learning
Variety            learning.                  but lack significance or    and are significant and
KTS 2.4, 2.5, 3.1                             challenge.                  challenging.
Clarity and        Objectives are not stated Some of the objectives       Most of the objectives are
Focus on           clearly and are activities are clearly stated as       clearly stated as learning
Learning           rather than learning       learning outcomes.          outcomes.
Outcomes           outcomes.
KTS 3.1
Appropriateness Objectives are not            Some objectives are         Most objectives are
for Students       appropriate for the        appropriate for the         appropriate for the
KTS 2.2, 2.5, 3.1  development; pre-          development; pre-           development; pre-
                   requisite knowledge,       requisite knowledge,        requisite knowledge,
                   skills, experiences; or    skills, experiences; and    skills, experiences; and
                   other student needs.       other student needs.        other student needs.
Alignments with Objectives are not            Some objectives are         Most of the objectives are
Content Area       aligned with national,     aligned with national,      explicitly aligned with
Standards          state or local standards.  state or local standards.   national, state or local
KTS 2.1, 2.4                                                              standards.
                                                         Learning Objectives Mean Score




                                                    79
Assessment Plan: TPA Section III

TPA Expectation
The candidate uses a variety of assessments aligned with learning objectives to assess student
learning before (pre-assessment), during (formative), and after (summative) instruction.

Teacher Standards
Standard 2: The Teacher Designs and Plans Instruction
Standard 3: The Teacher Creates and Maintains Learning Climate
Standard 4: The Teacher Implements and Manages Instruction
Standard 5: The Teacher Assesses and Communicates Learning Results

Task
Design an assessment plan to monitor student progress toward learning objectives. Use a variety
of assessment modes and strategies to evaluate student learning before (pre-assessment), during
(formative), and after (summative) instruction. At least one assessment instrument must include
numerical data in order to easily compare pre- and summative assessment data.

The Assessment Plan Must:
      Directly align assessments with learning objectives
      Assess student knowledge and learning before, during, and after instruction
      Include a pre-assessment that must be completed and analyzed prior to beginning
       instruction
      Include multiple types of assessments
      Clearly and appropriately measure student learning towards learning objectives
      Measure student learning focused on learning objectives throughout the instructional
       sequence
      Include adaptations that are appropriate to meet the needs and exceptionalities of
       individual students (refer to BRIGHT IDEAS – www.moreheadstate.edu/esu)
      Describe how student performance will be scored and evaluated. Include the criteria
       used to determine whether or not learning objectives are met
      Include at least one original assessment instrument designed by the candidate

Include:
      An assessment plan, in table format, that shows (1) alignment of the assessment with
         the learning objectives (2) multiple assessments and assessment modes (3) Depth of
         Knowledge (DOK) level and (4) a brief overview of the assessment task and 5)
         accommodations.
      A description of assessment activities that:
             1. Explains how the assessments will be used to determine student progress
             2. Justifies why the format used for assessment is the best choice
             3. Describes how the assessment was customized to meet students’ needs
             4. Explains how the contextual factors have helped shape assessment activities
         An explanation of how formative assessment activities will be used to determine student
          progress during the instructional sequence and why collecting this evidence is critical
          related to the instructional design, delivery of the sequence and the
          evaluation/assessment process.




                                                   80
     Copies of your assessments, including directions provided to students and instruments used to score
      and evaluate student performance (e.g., rubrics, checklists, rating scales, answer keys, etc.).
     Credits and References


Assessment Plan Rubric

TPA Section III: The candidate uses a variety of assessments aligned with objectives to assess
student learning before (pre-assessment), during (formative), and after (summative) instruction.
                             1                            2                           3
  Indicator                                                                                          Score
                          Not Met                  Partially Met                     Met
Alignment      Content and methods of      Although all objectives are Each of the objectives is
with           assessment lack             assessed in some way, the assessed throughout the
Learning       congruence with objectives content and methods used assessment plan;
Objectives     or lack cognitive           are not completely           assessments are
KTS 2.2,       complexity.                 congruent or have minimal congruent with the
2.3, 2.4, 4.2,                             cognitive complexity.        objectives in content and
5.1                                                                     cognitive complexity.
Clarity of     The assessments contain     Assessment criteria have     Assessment criteria are
Criteria and   no clear criteria for       been developed, but they     clear and are explicitly
Standards      measuring student           are not clear or are not     linked to the objectives.
for            performance relative to the explicitly linked to the
Performance learning goals.                objectives.
KTS 2.3, 3.1
Multiple       The assessment plan         The assessment plan          The assessment plan
Formats and includes only one              includes multiple formats    includes multiple
Methods of     assessment format and       but all are either           assessment formats
Assessment does not assess students        pencil/paper based (i.e.,    (including, but not limited
(e.g., pre-,   before, during, and after   they are not performance     to, performance
formative, & instruction.                  assessments) and/or do       assessments, lab reports,
summative).                                not require the integration  research projects, etc.)
KTS 4.2, 6.4                               of knowledge, skills and     and assesses student
                                           reasoning ability.           performance throughout
                                                                        the instructional sequence.
Technical      Assessments are not valid; Assessments appear to         Assessments are valid;
Soundness      scoring procedures are      have some validity. Some scoring procedures are
KTS 2.2,       absent or inaccurate; items scoring procedures are       explained; most items or
5.2, 5.3       or prompts are poorly       explained; some items or     prompts are clearly written;
               written; directions and     prompts are clearly written; directions and procedures
               procedures are unclear to   some directions and          are clear to students.
               students.                   procedures are clear to
                                           students.
Adaptations Candidate does not adapt       Candidate makes              Candidate makes
Based on       assessments to meet the     adaptations to               adaptations to
Individual     individual needs of         assessments that are         assessments that are
Needs and      students or these           appropriate to meet the      appropriate to meet the
Contextual     assessments are             individual needs of some     individual needs of most
Factors        inappropriate.              students.                    students.
KTS 2.2,
2.3, 2.4, 3.3
                                                          Assessment Plan Mean Score




                                                     81
Design for Instruction: TPA Section IV

TPA Expectation
The candidate designs instruction for specific learning objectives based on student
characteristics and needs, learning contexts, and best teaching practices.

Kentucky Teacher Standards:
Standard 1: The Teacher Demonstrates Applied Content Knowledge
Standard 2: The Teacher Designs and Plans Instruction
Standard 3: The Teacher Creates and Maintains Learning Climate
Standard 4: The Teacher Implements and Manages Instruction
Standard 5: The Teacher Assesses and Communicates Learning Results
Standard 6: The Teacher Demonstrates the Implementation of Technology
Standard 8: The Teacher Collaborates with Colleagues, Parents, and Others

Task
Develop a 3-5 day lesson sequence designed to guide and assist students in achieving the
learning objectives. The lesson sequence is to be based on student characteristics and needs,
learning contexts, and best teaching practices.

The Design for Instruction must:
    Use pre-assessment data and analysis, student needs, and the contextual factors to
      shape the design of the instructional sequence, the teaching to be used, and the
      strategies and activities that will be used.
    Reflect a variety of instructional strategies, techniques, and activities
    Be appropriate for the content area
    Include appropriate use of available resources

Include:
     An overview of the pre-assessment data in a table, graphic organizer, narrative, or some
       other form
     A summary of pre-assessment results that describe students’ prior knowledge related to
       the objectives
     A table that provides an overview of the instructional sequence focused on identified
       objectives, topics being discussed, and activities. Every activity must be shown to relate
       to one or more of the objectives, and every objective must have a related activity.
     A detailed description of two or more selected activities that:
       Describes the activities (clearly and concisely)
       Shows a variety of instructional strategies and techniques/approaches are being used
       Explains why these activities are developmentally appropriate for the content area, and
        the identified needs of the learners, the contextual factors, and the learning objectives
       Explains how the pre-assessment data influenced the design of the activities
       Discuss how the assessment plan will be implemented during and after the activities
     A description of how technology will be used in planning and instructional delivery
     A description of how students will use technology during their learning activities. (Note: If
       for some reason, student use of technology is not included during the instructional
       sequence, a clear rationale should be provided for its omission.)
     Credits and References




                                                       82
Design for Instruction Rubric

TPA Section IV: The candidate designs instruction for specific learning objectives, student
characteristics and needs, learning contexts, and best teaching practices.
                                   1                             2                            3
     Indicator                                                                                               Score
                               Not Met                     Partially Met                     Met
Alignment with      Few lessons are explicitly     Most lessons are explicitly All lessons are explicitly
Learning            linked to objectives. Few      linked to objectives. Most    linked to objectives. All
Objectives          learning activities,           learning activities,          learning activities,
                    assignments and                assignments and               assignments and
                    resources are aligned with resources are aligned with resources are aligned
KTS 1.3, 2.4, 4.1   objectives. Not all            objectives. Most              with objectives. All
                    objectives are included in     objectives are included in    objectives are included
                    the design.                    the design.                   in the design.
Accurate            Candidate’s use of content Candidate’s use of content Candidate’s use of
Representation of appears to contain               appears to be mostly          content appears to be
Content             numerous inaccuracies.         accurate. Shows some          accurate. Focus of the
                    Content seems to be            awareness of the big ideas content is congruent
                    viewed more as isolated        or structure of the           with the big ideas of
KTS 1.1, 1.2, 1.4   skills and facts rather than discipline.                     structure of the
                    as part of a larger                                          discipline.
                    conceptual structure.
Lesson and Unit     The lessons within the unit The lessons within the unit All lessons within the
Structure (KTIP     are not logically organized. have some logical               unit are logically
Lesson Plan         (e.g., sequenced).             organization and appear to organized and appear to
Format)                                            be somewhat useful in         be useful in moving
KTS 1.1, 1.2, 2.5,                                 moving students toward        students toward
4.5                                                achieving the objectives.     achieving the objectives.
Use of a Variety    Little variety of instruction, Some variety in               Significant variety
of Instruction,     activities, assignments,       instruction, activities,      across instruction,
Activities,         and resources. Heavy           assignments, or resources activities, assignments,
Assignments and reliance on textbook or            but with limited              and/or resources. This
Resources           single resource (e.g., work contribution to learning.        variety makes a clear
KTS 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, sheets).                                                      contribution to learning.
1.4, 3.3
Use of Contextual Instruction has not been         Some instruction has been Most instruction has
Information and     designed with reference to designed with reference to been designed with
Data to Select      contextual factors and pre- contextual factors and pre- reference to contextual
Appropriate and     assessment data.               assessment data. Some         factors and pre-
Relevant            Activities and assignments activities and assignments assessment data. Most
Activities,         do not appear purposeful,      appear purposeful,            activities and
Assignments and productive, and                    productive, and               assignments are
Resources           appropriate for each           appropriate for each          purposeful, productive,
KTS 1.3, 2.2, 4.2, student.                        student.                      and appropriate for each
4.3, 4.4, 8.2, 8.3                                                               student.
Use of              Technology is                  Candidate uses                Candidate integrates
Technology          inappropriately used OR        technology but it does not    appropriate technology
                    candidate does not use         make a significant            that makes a significant
                    technology, and no (or         contribution to teaching      contribution to teaching
                    inappropriate) rationale is    and learning, OR              and learning, OR
                    provided.                      candidate provides limited candidate provides a
KTS 6.1, 6.2, 6.3,                                 rationale for not using       strong rationale for not
6.5                                                technology.                   using technology.
                                                             Design for Instruction Mean Score
 




                                                          83
Instructional Decision-Making: TPA Section V

TPA Expectation
The candidate continually monitors and uses on-going analysis of student learning to make
instructional decisions.

Kentucky Teacher Standards
Standard 1: The Teacher Demonstrates Applied Content Knowledge
Standard 2: The Teacher Designs and Plans Instruction
Standard 3: The Teacher Creates and Maintains Learning Climate
Standard 8: The Teacher Collaborates with Colleagues, Parents, and Others

Task
Describe at least one instance during the instructional sequence when a student’s response to
the instruction prompted altering a teaching technique, strategy, or the sequence of events from
what was originally planned.

The Instructional Decision-Making Must:
    Be focused on changes to the instructional plan that were determined because of
       student performance during the learning activities
    Be focused on changes to instruction after the pre-assessment, design for instruction,
       and original lesson plan sequence were completed

Include:
     A description of the student actions that prompted a modification to the original design
     A description of the actions taken when modification/adaptation was identified
     A discussion of why the modification was made and selected as the best choice for
       improving student learning
     A discussion of the effectiveness and impact of the modification
     Credits and References




                                                     84
Instructional Decision-Making Rubric

TPA Section V: The candidate continually monitors and uses on-going analysis of student learning to
make instructional decisions.
                             1                           2                            3
   Indicator                                                                                         Score
                         Not Met                   Partially Met                     Met
Sound          Many instructional          Instructional decisions are  Most instructional
Professional decisions are                 mostly appropriate, but      decisions are
Practice       inappropriate and not       some decisions are not       pedagogically sound (i.e.,
               pedagogically sound (i.e., pedagogically sound (i.e.,    they are likely to lead to
               they are likely to lead to  they are likely to lead to   student learning).
KTS 1.2,       student learning).          student learning).
1.3, 3.2, 3.3
Modifications Candidate treats class as Some modifications of the       Appropriate modifications
Based on       “one plan fits all” with no instructional plan are made of the instructional plan are
Analysis of    modifications.              to address individual        made to address individual
Student                                    student needs, but these     student needs. These
Learning                                   are not based on the         modifications are informed
                                           analysis of student          by the analysis of student
                                           learning, best practice or   learning/performance, best
KTS 1.5, 2.2,                              contextual factors.          practice, or contextual
2.3, 3.1                                                                factors. Included
                                                                        explanation of why the
                                                                        modifications would
                                                                        improve student progress.
Congruence     Modifications in            Modifications in instruction Modifications in instruction
Between        instruction lack            are somewhat congruent       are congruent with
Modifications congruence with              with objectives.             objectives.
and Learning objectives.
Goals


KTS 3.3, 8.3
                                                Instructional Decision-Making Mean Score




                                                   85
Analysis of Student Learning: TPA Section VI

TPA Expectation
The candidate uses assessment data to profile and document students’ learning during the
instructional sequence.

Kentucky Teacher Standards
Standard 5: The Teacher Assesses and Communicates Learning Results
Standard 7: The Teacher Reflects On and Evaluates Teaching and Learning
Standard 8: The Teacher Collaborates with Colleagues, Parents, and Others

Task
Analyze assessment data to determine students’ progress related to the learning objectives.

The Analysis of Student Learning Must:
    Compare pre-assessment and summative assessment data for learning objectives
    Provide documentation that clearly explains whether or not student progress toward
      mastery of the identified learning objectives occurred

Include:
     An analysis of the entire class’s progress toward learning objectives by:
           1. Creating a table that shows the pre-assessment and summative assessment data
               for every student, as well as the class average of these assessments
           2. Creating a graphic summary that compares the pre-assessment data with the
               summative assessment data
           3. Discussing what the data shows about student learning related to the learning
               objectives
     An analysis that compares the assessment data for subgroups of students for ONE of
       the learning objectives by:
           1. Selecting a group characteristic to divide the class into two subgroups (i.e.,
               performance level, age, gender, reading level)
           2. Discussing why it is important to compare student results based on the
               characteristic chosen
           3. Creating a graphic summary that compares the pre-assessment and summative
               assessment for the subgroups for one of the learning objectives
           4. Discussing what the data shows about students’ learning related to the learning
               objective and the subgroups chosen
     An analysis that compares the assessment data for two students by:
           1. Selecting two students who demonstrated different levels of performance during
               the instructional sequence
           2. Summarizing the differences in the pre-assessment, formative assessment, and
               summative assessment data for the two selected students
           3. Including appropriate examples of the two students’ work
           4. Discussing the similarities and differences between the students work (e.g.
               assessment results, work product comparison, and mastery of learning objectives)
     Credits and References




                                                86
Analysis of Student Learning Rubric

TPA Section VI: The candidate uses assessment data to profile student learning during
the instructional sequence.
                            1                     2                    3
  Indicator                                                                        Score
                         Not Met           Partially Met             Met
Clarity and     Presentation is not    Presentation is      Presentation is easy
Accuracy of     clear and accurate; it understandable and   to understand and
Presentation does not accurately       contains few errors. contains no errors of
                reflect the data.                           representation.

KTS 7.2
Alignment      Analysis of student       Analysis of student        Analysis is fully
With           learning is not aligned   learning is partially      aligned with objectives
Objectives     with objectives.          aligned with objectives    and provides a
                                         and/or fails to provide    comprehensive profile
                                         a comprehensive            of student learning for
KTS 5.4                                  profile of student         the whole class,
                                         learning relative to the   subgroups, and two
                                         objectives for the         individuals.
                                         whole class,
                                         subgroups, and two
                                         individuals.
Interpretation Interpretation is         Interpretation is          Interpretation is
of Data        inaccurate and            technically accurate,      meaningful and
               conclusions are           but conclusions are        appropriate
               missing or                missing or not fully       conclusions are drawn
KTS 5.4, 7.1, unsupported by data.       supported by data.         from the data.
8.1
Evidence of    Analysis of student       Analysis of student    Analysis of student
Impact on      learning fails to         learning includes      learning includes
Student        include evidence of       incomplete evidence    evidence of the impact
Learning       impact on student         of the impact on       on student learning in
               learning in terms of      student learning in    terms of number of
               numbers of students       terms of numbers of    students who
KTS 5.5, 7.1, who achieved and           students who           achieved and made
8.4            made progress toward      achieved and made      progress toward each
               objectives.               progress toward        objective.
                                         objectives.
                                           Analysis of Student Learning Mean Score




                                                87
Self-Evaluation and Reflection: TPA Section VII

TPA Expectation
The candidate analyzes the relationship between his or her instruction, assessment data, and
other factors in order to improve teaching practice.

Kentucky Teacher Standards
Standard 7: The Teacher Reflects On and evaluates Teaching and Learning
Standard 9: The Teacher Evaluates Teaching and Implements Professional Development

Task
Evaluate “teacher” performance, giving consideration to the lesson design, delivery of the
sequence, and student achievement results. Design a professional development action plan that
is focused on improving practice and professional growth in areas identified as needing
improvement.

The Reflection and Self-Evaluation must:
    Consider all factors relating to teaching the instructional sequence
    Focus on ideas for the future that will increase student achievement

Include:
     Identification of the learning objective with the highest student achievement.
       Include the following:
           1. Based primarily on the analysis of student learning, identify the learning objective
               with the highest student achievement rating
           2. Include at least two reasons for the success
           3. Identify “teacher” improvements to be addressed when/if the lesson sequence is
               taught again, in order for students to achieve higher levels of success and mastery
               of the learning objectives
           4. Consider the impact the contextual factors, objectives, instruction, assessments
               and/or other conditions had on the instructional sequence and final results
     Identification of the learning objective with the lowest student achievement. Include
       the following:
           1. Based primarily on the analysis of student learning, identify the learning objective
               with the lowest student achievement.
           2. Discuss at least two reasons for this lower achievement
           3. Identify what could be done differently or better in the future to improve students’
               performance
           4. In the discussion, consider how the objectives, instruction, assessments,
               contextual factors, and/or other conditions may have hindered student
               achievement
     Discussion of identified professional growth needs
           1. Identify two areas in which professional development is necessary to improve
               teaching skills and abilities
           2. Describe how professional growth in the two identified areas will improve teaching
               and enhance student learning results in your classroom
           3. Discuss professional development activities in which you will engage to assist in
               reaching higher levels of professional growth
     Credits and Reference




                                                88
Reflection and Self-Evaluation Rubric

TPA Section VII: The candidate analyzes the relationship between his or her instruction, assessment
data, and other factors in order to improve teaching practice.
                              1                           2                           3
   Indicator                                                                                        Score
                          Not Met                  Partially Met                     Met
Interpretation No evidence or reasons      Provides evidence but no     Uses evidence to support
of Student      provided to support        (or simplistic, superficial) conclusions drawn in
Learning        conclusions drawn in       reasons or hypotheses to     “Analysis of Student
                “Analysis of Student       support conclusions drawn Learning” section.
                Learning” section.         in “Analysis of Student      Explores multiple
KTS 7.1, 7.2                               Learning” section.           hypotheses for why some
                                                                        students did not meet
                                                                        objectives.
Insights on     Provides no rationale for  Identifies successful and    Identifies successful and
Effective       why some activities or     unsuccessful activities or   unsuccessful activities and
Instruction     assessments were more      assessments and              assessments and provides
and             successful than others.    superficially explores       plausible reasons (based
Assessment                                 reasons for their success    on theory or research) for
                                           or lack thereof (no use of   their success or lack
                                           theory or research).         thereof.
KTS 7.1, 7.2
Alignment       Does not connect           Connects learning goals,     Logically connects learning
Among           learning goals,            instruction, and             goals, instruction, and
Goals,          instruction, and           assessment results in the    assessment results in the
Instruction     assessment results in the discussion of student         discussion of student
and             discussion of student      learning and effective       learning and effective
Assessment      learning and effective     instruction, but             instruction.
                instruction and/or the     misunderstandings or
KTS 7.3         connections are irrelevant conceptual gaps are
                or inaccurate.             present.
Implications    Provides no ides or        Provides ideas for           Provides ideas for
for Future      inappropriate ideas for    redesigning learning goals, redesigning objectives,
Teaching        redesigning objectives,    instruction, and             instruction and assessment
                instruction, and           assessment but offers no     and explains why these
                assessment.                rationale for why these      modifications would
KTS 9.1, 9.3,                              changes would improve        improve student learning.
9.4                                        student learning.
Implications    Provides no professional   Presents professional        Presents a small number of
for             learning goals or goals    learning goals that are not  professional learning goals
Professional that are not related to the strongly related to the        that clearly emerge from
Development insights and experiences insights and experiences           the insights and
                described in this section. described in this section    experiences described in
                                           and/or provides a vague      this section. Describes
KTS 7.3, 9.2                               plan for meeting the goals. specific steps to meet
                                                                        these goals.
                                                 Reflection and Self-Evaluation Mean Score




                                                    89
Presentation: TPA Section VIII

TPA Expectation
The candidate’s TPA is presented with accuracy, clarity and professionalism.

Professional Code of Ethics for Kentucky School Certified Personnel
16KAR1:200
KRS 161.028, KRS 161.030

Format and organization, formal writing and citations are related to the entire TPA.



Presentation

TPA Section VIII: The candidate presents their TPA with accuracy, clarity, and
professionalism.
                           1                            2                             3
                        Not Met                   Partially Met                      Met
                                                                                                      Score
Format and     The TPA product quality     The TPA product format       The TPA product format
Organization   is unacceptable due to      and organization is          and organization is clear
               format or organization      somewhat easy to             and easy to navigate,
               issues that make the        navigate, read and           read, and understand.
               document difficult to       understand. Some             Any problems or
               navigate, read, and         problems or irregularities   irregularities in
               understand.                 in organization and          organization and
                                           formatting detract from      formatting do not detract
                                           the overall quality of the   from the overall quality of
                                           document.                    the document.

Writing        The writing is largely      The writing is largely       The writing is always
               informal and there are      formal and professional.     formal and professional.
               many errors in spelling,    There are some errors in     There are almost no
               punctuation, and            spelling, punctuation and    errors in spelling,
               grammar. The writing        grammar. The writing         punctuation, and
               and grammar does not        and grammar represents       grammar. The writing
               represent minimal           at least minimal teacher     and grammar is
               teacher competency.         competency.                  representative of a highly
                                                                        competent educator.

References     Materials, works, ideas,                            There is no evidence of
               and identities of others                            plagiarism. Materials,
               are not consistently                                works, and ideas that are
               treated in a professional                           not developed by the
               manner.                                             candidate are
                                                                   appropriately credited to
                                                                   original authors. Student
                                                                   identities are protected at
                                                                   all times.
                                             Presentation Mean Score




                                                     90
                                     Certification of Originality

I certify that all work submitted in this document is my own work. I have completed all of the

assignments on my own without assistance from others except as indicated by appropriate

citation. I have read and understand the university policy on plagiarism and academic

dishonesty. I further understand that official sanctions will be imposed if there is any evidence of

academic dishonesty in this work.




                         Signature                                                Date




                                                       91
                                                      TPA Rubric

   Contextual                           1                                 2                                   3
                                                                                                                                 Score
    Factors                        Not Met                          Partially Met                            Met
Knowledge of          Candidate displays minimal,         Candidate displays some            Candidate displays a
Community,            irrelevant, or biased               knowledge of the                   comprehensive understanding
School and            knowledge of the                    characteristics of the             of the characteristics of the
Classroom             characteristics of the              community, school, and             community, school, and
Factors               community, school, and              classroom that may affect          classroom that may affect
KTS 2.2, 4.2          classroom.                          learning.                          learning.
Knowledge of          Candidate displays minimal,         Candidate displays general         Candidate displays general &
Characteristics of    stereotypical, or irrelevant        knowledge of student               specific understanding of
Students              knowledge of student                differences (e.g., learning        student differences (e.g.,
KTS 3.5, 4.2, 4.4     differences (e.g., development,     styles, learning modalities).      development, interests,
                      interests, culture,                                                    culture, abilities/disabilities)
                      abilities/disabilities).                                               that may affect learning.
Knowledge of          Candidate displays minimal,         Candidate displays general         Candidate displays general &
Students’ Varied      stereotypical, or irrelevant        knowledge about the different      specific understanding of the
Approaches to         knowledge about the different       ways students learn (e.g.,         different ways students learn
Learning              ways students learn (e.g.,          learning styles, learning          (e.g., learning styles, learning
KTS 3.3, 4.2, 8.1     learning styles, learning           modalities).                       modalities) that may affect
                      modalities).                                                           learning.
Implications for      Candidate displays little or        Candidate displays general         Candidate displays general &
Instructional         irrelevant knowledge of             knowledge of students’ skills      specific understanding of
Planning and          student’ skills and prior           and prior learning that may        student’s skills and prior
Assessment            learning.                           affect learning.                   learning that may affect
KTS 3.2, 3.3, 3.4,                                                                           learning.
3.5, 4.2, 4.4, 8.1,
8.2, 8.3
Implications for      Candidate does not provide          Candidate provides general         Candidate provides specific
Instructional         implications for instruction and    implications for instruction and   implications for instruction and
Planning and          assessment based on student         assessment based on student        assessment based on student
Assessment            individual differences and          individual differences and         individual differences and
                      community, school, and              community, school, and             community, school, and
                      classroom characteristics OR        classroom characteristics.         classroom characteristics.
                      characteristics OR provides
                      inappropriate implications.
                                                                          Contextual Factors Mean Score
     Learning                          1                                  2                               3
                                                                                                                                 Score
    Objectives                      Not Met                        Partially Met                         Met
Significance,         Objectives reflect only one type    Objectives reflect several      Objectives reflect several
Challenge, and        or level of learning.               types or levels of learning but types or levels of learning and
Variety                                                   lack significance or challenge. are significant and challenging.
KTS 2.4, 2.5, 3.1
Clarity and Focus     Objectives are not stated           Some of the objectives are         Most of the objectives are
on Learning           clearly and are activities rather   clearly stated as learning         clearly stated as learning
Outcomes              than learning outcomes.             outcomes.                          outcomes.
KTS 3.1
Appropriateness       Objectives are not appropriate      Some objectives are                Most objectives are
for Students          for the development; pre-           appropriate for the                appropriate for the
KTS 2.2, 2.5, 3.1     requisite knowledge, skills,        development; pre-requisite         development; pre-requisite
                      experiences; or other student       knowledge, skills, experiences;    knowledge, skills, experiences;
                      needs.                              and other student needs.           and other student needs.
Alignments with       Objectives are not aligned with     Some objectives are aligned        Most of the objectives are
Content Area          national, state or local            with national, state or local      explicitly aligned with national,
Standards             standards.                          standards.                         state or local standards.
KTS 2.1, 2.4
                                                                        Learning Objectives Mean Score
   Assessment                        1                                  2                               3
                                                                                                                                 Score
       Plan                       Not Met                         Partially Met                       Met
Alignment with        Content and methods of              Some of the objectives are     Each of the objectives is
Learning              assessment lack congruence          assessed throughout the        assessed throughout the
Objectives            with objectives or lack             assessment plan, but many      assessment plan;



                                                                      92
KTS 2.2, 2.3, 2.4,    cognitive complexity.             are not congruent with               assessments are congruent
4.2, 5.1                                                objectives in content and            with the objectives in content
                                                        cognitive complexity.                and cognitive complexity.
Clarity of Criteria   The assessments contain no        Assessment criteria have been        Assessment criteria are clear
and Standards for     clear criteria for measuring      developed, but they are not          and are explicitly linked to the
Performance           student performance relative      clear or are not explicitly linked   objectives.
KTS 2.3, 3.1          to the learning goals.            to the objectives.
Multiple Formats      The assessment plan includes      The assessment plan includes         The assessment plan includes
and Methods of        only one assessment format        multiple formats but all are         multiple assessment formats
Assessment (e.g.,     and does not assess students      either pencil/paper based (i.e.,     (including, but not limited to,
pre-, formative, &    before, during, and after         they are not performance             performance assessments, lab
summative).           instruction.                      assessments) and/or do not           reports, research projects,
KTS 4.2, 6.4                                            require the integration of           etc.) and assesses student
                                                        knowledge, skills and                performance throughout the
                                                        reasoning ability.                   instructional sequence.
Technical             Assessments are not valid;        Assessments appear to have           Assessments are valid;
Soundness             scoring procedures are absent     some validity. Some scoring          scoring procedures are
KTS 2.2, 5.2, 5.3     or inaccurate; items or           procedures are explained;            explained; most items or
                      prompts are poorly written;       some items or prompts are            prompts are clearly written;
                      directions and procedures are     clearly written; some directions     directions and procedures are
                      unclear to students.              and procedures are clear to          clear to students.
                                                        students.
Adaptations           Candidate does not adapt          Candidate makes adaptations          Candidate makes adaptations
Based on              assessments to meet the           to assessments that are              to assessments that are
Individual Needs      individual needs of students or   appropriate to meet the              appropriate to meet the
and Contextual        these assessments are             individual needs of some             individual needs of most
Factors               inappropriate.                    students.                            students.
KTS 2.2, 2.3, 2.4,
3.3
                                                                           Assessment Plan Mean Score
    Design for                         1                                 2                                3
                                                                                                                                 Score
    Instruction                    Not Met                        Partially Met                         Met
Alignment with        Few lessons are explicitly        Most lessons are explicitly      All lessons are explicitly linked
Learning              linked to objectives. Few         linked to objectives. Most       to objectives. All learning
Objectives            learning activities,              learning activities,             activities, assignments and
                      assignments and resources         assignments and resources        resources are aligned with
                      are aligned with objectives.      are aligned with objectives.     objectives. All objectives are
KTS 1.3, 2.4, 4.1     Not all objectives are included   Most objectives are included in included in the design.
                      in the design.                    the design.
Accurate              Candidate’s use of content        Candidate’s use of content       Candidate’s use of content
Representation of     appears to contain numerous       appears to be mostly accurate. appears to be accurate.
Content               inaccuracies. Content seems       Shows some awareness of the Focus of the content is
                      to be viewed more as isolated     big ideas or structure of the    congruent with the big ideas of
                      skills and facts rather than as   discipline.                      structure of the discipline.
KTS 1.1, 1.2, 1.4     part of a larger conceptual
                      structure.
Lesson and Unit       The lessons within the unit are   The lessons within the unit          All lessons within the unit are
Structure (KTIP       not logically organized. (e.g.,   have some logical organization       logically organized and appear
Lesson Plan           sequenced).                       and appear to be somewhat            to be useful in moving
Format)                                                 useful in moving students            students toward achieving the
KTS 1.1, 1.2, 2.5,                                      toward achieving the                 objectives.
4.5                                                     objectives.
Use of a Variety of   Little variety of instruction,    Some variety in instruction,         Significant variety across
Instruction,          activities, assignments, and      activities, assignments, or          instruction, activities,
Activities,           resources. Heavy reliance on      resources but with limited           assignments, and/or
Assignments and       textbook or single resource       contribution to learning.            resources. This variety makes
Resources             (e.g., work sheets).                                                   a clear contribution to learning.
KTS 1.1, 1.2, 1.3,
1.4, 3.3
Use of Contextual     Instruction has not been          Some instruction has been            Most instruction has been
Information and       designed with reference to        designed with reference to           designed with reference to



                                                                    93
Data to Select       contextual factors and pre-       contextual factors and pre-         contextual factors and pre-
Appropriate and      assessment data. Activities       assessment data. Some               assessment data. Most
Relevant             and assignments do not            activities and assignments          activities and assignments are
Activities,          appear purposeful, productive,    appear purposeful, productive,      purposeful, productive, and
Assignments and      and appropriate for each          and appropriate for each            appropriate for each student.
Resources            student.                          student.
KTS 1.3, 2.2, 4.2,
4.3, 4.4, 8.2, 8.3
Use of               Technology is inappropriately     Candidate uses technology but       Candidate integrates
Technology           used OR candidate does not        it does not make a significant      appropriate technology that
                     use technology, and no (or        contribution to teaching and        makes a significant
                     inappropriate) rationale is       learning, OR candidate              contribution to teaching and
                     provided.                         provides limited rationale for      learning, OR candidate
                                                       not using technology.               provides a strong rationale for
KTS 6.1, 6.2, 6.3,                                                                         not using technology.
6.5
                                                                       Design for Instruction Mean Score
  Instructional-                      1                                 2                                  3
                                                                                                                              Score
Decision Making                   Not Met                        Partially Met                           Met
Sound                Many instructional decisions      Instructional decisions are        Most instructional decisions
Professional         are inappropriate and not         mostly appropriate, but some       are pedagogically sound (i.e.,
Practice             pedagogically sound (i.e., they   decisions are not                  they are likely to lead to
                     are likely to lead to student     pedagogically sound (i.e., they student learning).
                     learning).                        are likely to lead to student
KTS 1.2, 1.3,                                          learning).
3.2, 3.3
Modifications        Candidate treats class as “one    Some modifications of the           Appropriate modifications of
Based on Analysis    plan fits all” with no            instructional plan are made to      the instructional plan are made
of Student           modifications.                    address individual student          to address individual student
Learning                                               needs, but these are not            needs. These modifications
                                                       based on the analysis of            are informed by the analysis of
                                                       student learning, best practice     student learning/performance,
KTS 1.5, 2.2, 2.3,                                     or contextual factors.              best practice, or contextual
3.1                                                                                        factors. Included explanation
                                                                                           of why the modifications would
                                                                                           improve student progress.
Congruence           Modifications in instruction      Modifications in instruction are    Modifications in instruction are
Between              lack congruence with              somewhat congruent with             congruent with objectives.
Modifications and    objectives.                       objectives.
Learning Goals


KTS 3.3, 8.3
                                                                 Instructional Decision-Making Mean Score

   Analysis of                      1                                 2                                   3
                                                                                                                              Score
Student Learning                 Not Met                        Partially Met                            Met

Clarity and          Presentation is not clear and     Presentation is                     Presentation is easy to
Accuracy of          accurate; it does not             understandable and contains         understand and contains no
Presentation         accurately reflect the data.      few errors.                         errors of representation.


KTS 7.2
Alignment With       Analysis of student learning is   Analysis of student learning is     Analysis is fully aligned with
Objectives           not aligned with objectives.      partially aligned with objectives   objectives and provides a
                                                       and/or fails to provide a           comprehensive profile of
                                                       comprehensive profile of            student learning for the whole
KTS 5.4                                                student learning relative to the    class, subgroups, and two
                                                       objectives for the whole class,     individuals.
                                                       subgroups, and two
                                                       individuals.



                                                                   94
Interpretation of     Interpretation is inaccurate and    Interpretation is technically      Interpretation is meaningful
Data                  conclusions are missing or          accurate, but conclusions are      and appropriate conclusions
                      unsupported by data.                missing or not fully supported     are drawn from the data.
                                                          by data.
KTS 5.4, 7.1, 8.1
Evidence of           Analysis of student learning        Analysis of student learning     Analysis of student learning
Impact on Student     fails to include evidence of        includes incomplete evidence     includes evidence of the
Learning              impact on student learning in       of the impact on student         impact on student learning in
                      terms of numbers of students        learning in terms of numbers     terms of number of students
                      who achieved and made               of students who achieved and     who achieved and made
KTS 5.5, 7.1, 8.4     progress toward objectives.         made progress toward             progress toward each
                                                          objectives.                      objective.
                                                                      Analysis of Student Learning Mean Score
  Reflection and                     1                                    2                               3
                                                                                                                            Score
 Self-Evaluation                 Not Met                            Partially Met                        Met
Interpretation of     No evidence or reasons              Provides evidence but no (or     Uses evidence to support
Student Learning      provided to support                 simplistic, superficial) reasons conclusions drawn in “Analysis
                      conclusions drawn in “Analysis      or hypotheses to support         of Student Learning” section.
                      of Student Learning” section.       conclusions drawn in “Analysis Explores multiple hypotheses
KTS 7.1, 7.2                                              of Student Learning” section.    for why some students did not
                                                                                           meet objectives.
Insights on           Provides no rationale for why       Identifies successful and        Identifies successful and
Effective             some activities or                  unsuccessful activities or       unsuccessful activities and
Instruction and       assessments were more               assessments and superficially    assessments and provides
Assessment            successful than others.             explores reasons for their       plausible reasons (based on
                                                          success or lack thereof (no      theory or research) for their
                                                          use of theory or research).      success or lack thereof.
KTS 7.1, 7.2
Alignment Among       Does not connect learning        Connects learning goals,         Logically connects learning
Goals, Instruction    goals, instruction, and          instruction, and assessment      goals, instruction, and
and Assessment        assessment results in the        results in the discussion of     assessment results in the
                      discussion of student learning   student learning and effective   discussion of student learning
KTS 7.3               and effective instruction and/or instruction, but                 and effective instruction.
                      the connections are irrelevant   misunderstandings or
                      or inaccurate.                   conceptual gaps are present.
Implications for      Provides no ides or              Provides ideas for redesigning   Provides ideas for redesigning
Future Teaching       inappropriate ideas for          learning goals, instruction, and objectives, instruction and
                      redesigning objectives,          assessment but offers no         assessment and explains why
                      instruction, and assessment.     rationale for why these          these modifications would
KTS 9.1, 9.3, 9.4                                      changes would improve            improve student learning.
                                                       student learning.
Implications for    Provides no professional           Presents professional learning   Presents a small number of
Professional        learning goals or goals that are goals that are not strongly        professional learning goals
Development         not related to the insights and    related to the insights and      that clearly emerge from the
                    experiences described in this      experiences described in this    insights and experiences
                    section.                           section and/or provides a        described in this section.
KTS 7.3, 9.2                                           vague plan for meeting the       Describes specific steps to
                                                       goals.                           meet these goals.
                                                                  Reflection and Self-Evaluation Mean Score
                                  1                                    2                                  3
  Presentation                                                                                                              Score
                              Not Met                           Partially Met                            Met
Format and        The TPA product quality is        The TPA product format and          The TPA product format and
Organization      unacceptable due to format or     organization is somewhat easy       organization is clear and easy
                  organization issues that make     to navigate, read and               to navigate, read, and
                  the document difficult to         understand. Some problems or        understand. Any problems or
                  navigate, read, and               irregularities in organization and  irregularities in organization
                  understand.                       formatting detract from the         and formatting do not detract
                                                    overall quality of the document.    from the overall quality of the
                                                                                        document.

Writing              The writing is largely informal     The writing is largely formal and   The writing is always formal



                                                                      95
             and there are many errors in   professional. There are some      and professional. There are
             spelling, punctuation, and     errors in spelling, punctuation   almost no errors in spelling,
             grammar. The writing and       and grammar. The writing and      punctuation, and grammar.
             grammar does not represent     grammar represents at least       The writing and grammar is
             minimal teacher competency.    minimal teacher competency.       representative of a highly
                                                                              competent educator.

References   Materials, works, ideas, and                                     There is no evidence of
             identities of others are not                                     plagiarism. Materials, works,
             consistently treated in a                                        and ideas that are not
             professional manner.                                             developed by the candidate are
                                                                              appropriately credited to
                                                                              original authors. Student
                                                                              identities are protected at all
                                                                              times.
                                               Presentation Mean Score




                                                         96
    GATE IV:

Program Completion




       97
GATE IV: PROGRAM COMPLETION

Initial Kentucky teacher certification requires the completion of at least a bachelor’s degree and a
certifiable teaching area and/or major in Interdisciplinary Early Childhood Education, birth to
primary; Elementary Education, grades P-5; Middle Grades Education, grades 5-9; Elementary
and Middle Grades may be combined with certification for special education (MSD and LBD),
grades P-12; English, Mathematics, Social Studies, Biological Science, Chemistry, Earth and
Space Science or Physics for grades 8-12; Agriculture, Business and Marketing Education, or
Technology Education in grades 5-12; Art, Spanish, French, Health, Physical Education, Music or
Theater Education, grades P-12. Program completion is assessed by the Registrar’s Office and
documented by official transcripts. Program completion candidates should file for degree
completion in the Registrar’s Office early in their completion semester (check with Registrar for
deadline).

Using official transcripts, checksheets, and PRAXIS test scores, the Undergraduate Certification
Officer tracks completion of teacher certification requirements and recommends eligible applicants
for initial Kentucky certification. Candidates must complete the application for Kentucky Teacher
Certification (TC1 Form) as indicated below.

APPLYING FOR TEACHER CERTIFICATION
Morehead State University Teacher Education students completing our approved programs and
successfully completing all required PRAXIS tests are eligible to apply for a Kentucky Statement of
Eligibility. The Statement of Eligibility is required prior to employment in a school and participation
in the Kentucky Teacher Internship Program.

Kentucky State Regulations require that candidates for certification complete requirements in
effect at the time of program completion and application for certification. Advisors will be kept up
to date with changes in State policies effecting University regulations. However, it is the student’s
responsibility to stay abreast of current requirements. Presently program requirements include
successful completion of the PRAXIS Specialty Area Test(s) and the appropriate Principles of
Learning and Teaching Test. A list of the required tests and their passing scores may be found at
the KDE website, www.kyepsb.net. Registration information for PRAXIS tests, test preparation
materials and fee structures may be secured from the MSU Testing Center, 501 Ginger Hall and at
the Testing Service web site, www.ETS.org.

COMPLETE AN APPLICATION FOR KENTUCKY TEACHER CERTIFICATION (FORM
TC1)
TC1 Forms and directions for their completion will be distributed by e-mail to clinical practice
students during the last month of their placements. The forms may also be downloaded from the
Education Professional Standards web site, www.kyepsb.net.

The completed form may be mailed or hand delivered to the following address:
Certification Officer
801 Ginger Hall
Morehead State University
Morehead, KY 40351

The application should be submitted during the clinical practice semester. The Certification Officer
will review the application for accuracy and completeness, verify PRAXIS scores and complete the
University Recommendation section of the TC1 form when appropriate. If the applicant does not
complete his/her program at the end of the clinical practice semester and/or pass all required
PRAXIS tests, the application will be kept on file until the applicant notifies the Certification Officer
of his/her program and/or testing requirement completion.



                                                          98
PRAXIS SCORE REPORTS
Before a recommendation for certification can be forwarded by the MSU Certification Officer to the
Education Professional Standards Board all required PRAXIS tests must:
     Be on file in the MSU Testing Center in 501 Ginger Hall
     Be included on a candidate’s MSU academic records

CHECKSHEETS/TRANSCRIPTS
Individuals applying for certification upon completion of a Bachelor’s Degree program DO NOT
NEED to submit copies of their checksheets. MSU transcripts reflecting degrees conferred and/or
current grades must be attached to all applications. APPLICATIONS CAN NOT BE SENT
FORWARD UNTIL TRANSCRIPTS WITH DEGREES AND/OR GRADES POSTED ARE
AVAILABLE FROM THE REGISTRAR. The Certification Officer will obtain MSU transcripts when
they become available from the Registrar.

Graduate students completing certification only programs DO NEED to submit copies of their
official checksheets with all course substitutions indicated and copies of approved Course
Substitutions Forms attached. Official transcripts for ALL NON-MSU Bachelor’s Degrees must be
sent from the granting institution to the MSU Certification Officer for inclusion with the application
when it is mailed to the EPSB.

CERTIFICATION IN OTHER STATES
Kentucky does have reciprocity with most states, but a teaching certificate or license is valid only
in the state for which it is issued. Certification and testing requirements are never static. States
change regulations constantly. To apply in another state, contact the state’s certification/licensure
office as the first step. All state departments of education have web sites with information
regarding applying for certification/licensure. To access information for applying in the state of, for
example, Indiana, do an on-line search for “Indiana Teacher Certification” and access that site.
The sites will provide applications and instructions that you may download for completion.

Please contact the Certification Officer in Ginger Hall 801 for assistance in completing any
paperwork required by other states.




                                                         99
Kentucky Teacher Internship Program

        First year teachers will receive supervision, assistance, and assessment through the
Kentucky Teacher Internship Program (KTIP) as described in KRS 161.030 and 16 KAR 7:010.
The main goal of KTIP is to increase the likelihood that new teachers will experience success
during their first year in the classroom. To accomplish this goal each new teacher is assigned a
three-person committee consisting of the school principal, a resource teacher, and a teacher
educator appointed by the regional university. First year teachers in Kentucky must successfully
complete the Internship Program to obtain certification and continue teaching beyond the
internship year.




                                                     100
Local, State, and National Regulations




                  101
Clarification of Attorney General’s Opinion
          This is in response to your letter of January 11 concerning OAG 63-269 generally and the
following statement therein specifically, to wit: “While the student teacher is working with the class, the
regularly employed certified teacher must remain in a supervisory capacity…” You inquire if the quoted
statement should be interpreted to mean that the certified teacher must be physically present in the
classroom while a student teacher is instructing the children.

         This is to advise it is not necessary for the regularly employed teacher to be physically present in
the classroom. However, she should be close by so that she can supervise the work of the student teacher.
This supervision could take place with the regular teacher outside the classroom by the use of various
techniques. In some schools, where facilities are available, the regular teacher could supervise the student
teacher by looking through a one-way glass partition. The regular teacher could monitor the class via the
public communication system. These are only two examples of numerous ways in which the student
teacher could acquire the much-needed opportunity to be alone with the class and yet remain under the
supervision of the regular teacher.

         We hope that the foregoing statements have clarified rather than confuses. If additional
information is needed, please advise.


                                                                        Sincerely Yours,
                                                                        Ray Corns, Director
                                                                        Division of Legal Services




To further clarify the status of a student teacher in a public school, the 1972 session of the General
Assembly of the Commonwealth of Kentucky enacted the following legislation:

                                              Kentucky Revised Statutes – 161.042 (3)

“A student teacher who is jointly assigned under agreement by a teacher education institution and a local
board of education shall have the same legal status and protection as a certified teacher employed within
the school district but shall be subject to the direction and supervision of the professional administrative
and teaching staff of the school district.”




                                                          102
Further Clarification by Attorney General to KRS 161.042
You have requested an opinion of this office on two questions, which we will answer seriatim:

     (1) Whether KRS 161.042 (3) when it states that student teachers “shall have the same legal status
and protection as a certified teacher employed within the school district…” means that said teacher would
be subject to tort liability.

A student teacher may be held liable for his negligent acts or omissions the same as a regular teacher
except that a student’s actions would have to be judged in the light of the fact that he is acting under the
direction and supervision of a teacher. In OAG 74-883, copy enclosed, we pointed out the standard by
which a teacher’s actions are to be evaluated in regard to negligence is the same as for any other person,
to wit: what a reasonable person would do under the circumstances.

       (2) Whether a student teacher can perform the services of a student teacher in the
       absence of a regular classroom teacher.

One answer is negative. KRS 161.042 reads as follows:

“A student teacher who is jointly assigned under agreement by a teacher education institution and a local
board of education shall have the same legal status and protection as a certified teacher employed within
the school district and shall be subject to the direction and supervision of the professional administration
and teaching staff of the school district.”

Since the foregoing statute provides that a student teacher shall be subject to the direction and supervision
of the teaching staff of the school district, we believe the legislative intent is that a regular teacher must be
present in the classroom when a student teacher is teaching. We believe that a student teacher is not
qualified or authorized to serve as a substitute teacher. A student teacher does not have a regular or an
emergency certificate from the State Department of Education and is therefore not authorized to teach
except under the supervision of a certified teacher.
                                                                  Yours very truly,
                                                                  Ed W. Hancock, Attorney General
                                                                  By: Carl Miller, Assistant Attorney General




                                                           103
Curriculum
Goals
       The General Assembly created a system of public education that will assist students in acquiring basic skills,
        communication skills, understanding of governmental processes, knowledge to make economic, social and
        political choices, and other skills necessary to compete favorably with students in other states. (Section 2)

       The Council on School Performance Standards framed goals for the schools in measurable terms, which
        define the outcomes expected of students. (Section 3)

       The State Board for Elementary and Secondary Education (later known as the Kentucky Board of Education)
        disseminated to local schools a model curriculum framework to assist the schools as they develop their
        curriculum. (Section 3)

   Assessment: Rewards and Sanctions

       The State Board developed a statewide assessment program, including performance-based student testing,
        to measure the success of each school. An interim-testing program administered to a sample of students
        during the 1991-92 school year provided baseline data for determining school success during the subsequent
        school year. (Section 4)

       The original assessment and accountability system, known as the Kentucky Instructional Results Information
        System (KIRIS), was in place until 1998. That year, the Kentucky General Assembly mandated that the
        system be revamped, and a new system – the Commonwealth Accountability Testing System (CATS) was
        implemented in 1999.

       CATS was designed to meet the same needs as KIRIS. The primary changes were to the accountability
        process.

       Under CATS, successful schools receive recognition from the state; unsuccessful schools are required to
        develop plans for improvement. If a school is particularly unsuccessful, it may receive direct assistance from
        the state level. Students at consistently low-performing schools may transfer to more successful schools;
        highly skilled educators are assigned to assist schools needing improvements. (Sections 5,6)

       The Commonwealth School Improvement Fund provides grants to schools in educationally deficient districts
        to help pursue new and innovative strategies to raise the schools' performance. (Section 7)

       The Kentucky Board of Education established standards for assessing the performance of school districts. If
        a school district consistently fails to meet its improvement goals, the superintendent and board members may
        be removed and replaced by new members appointed by the board to serve until the district's performance
        improves. (Section 10)


   Professional Development

       There are increased efforts to provide professional development opportunities for teachers and other certified
        employees.(Section12)

   School-based Decision Making

       Each school must have a council composed of parents, teachers, and an administrator, to adopt policies
        relating to instructional materials, personnel, curriculum, extracurricular programs, and other aspects of
        school management. With approval, schools may implement different models for school-based decision-
        making, or may qualify for an exemption. (Section 14)




                                                             104
Preschool Programs

   Preschool education programs are provided for four-year olds who are determined to be at risk of educational
    failure and for as many other four-year-olds as possible. (Section 16)

   Any handicapped child who is three or four years of age or may become five after October I is eligible for free
    and appropriate preschool education and related services. (Section 17)


Family Resource Centers and Youth Services Center

   Family resource centers and youth services centers have been established to provide services to students
    and families in areas where at least 20 percent of the students qualify for free school meals. The family
    resource centers are in or near elementary schools and the youth services centers are in or near schools
    serving students 12 years of age or older. (Section 18)

Technology in Education

   There is greater emphasis on the use of technology in public education. Each year, the Kentucky Department
    of Education updates the Master Plan for Technology, which sets the course for future purchasing, developing
    and using technology in public education. A program assists teachers and students in purchasing and using
    personal computers. (sections 19-23)

Primary School Reform

   The primary school program replaces that part of elementary school from the beginning of school to the
    beginning of fourth grade; successful completion of the program will be required before a student is allowed to
    enter fourth grade. (Section 25)

   Kindergarten is provided at least one-half day, five days a week, for a full year for each kindergarten pupil.
    (Section 94)


Continuing Education for Students

   Schools provide continuing education, including extended days, extended weeks, or extended years for
    students who need additional time for instruction. Local school districts receive state grants for continuing
    education. (Section 27)

Age for Compulsory School Attendance

   The Commissioner of Education has made recommendations to the General Assembly regarding raising the
    age for compulsory school attendance from 16 to 18. Several bills have been introduced by lawmakers, but
    none has passed as of the 2008 session. (Section 29)


Governance

State Board for Elementary and Secondary Education

   This new board, renamed as the Kentucky Board of Education, consists of 11 members appointed by the
    Governor, confirmed by House and Senate, and the president of the Council on Postsecondary Education as
    an ex-officio member. Membership includes representation from each of the seven Supreme Court districts
    and four at large members. (Section 35)

   The Board is responsible for adopting policies by which the Department of Education is to be governed.
    (Section 35)

   The Board is responsible for hiring the Commissioner of Education. (Section 36)

                                                         105
    Commissioner of Education

   A temporary Education Management Selection Commission was created to conduct a national search for the
    first Commissioner of Education. The commission consisted of persons appointed by the Governor and the
    legislative leaders. Its decision was required to be unanimous. (Section 36)

   The first Commissioner of Education assumed duties as the chief state school officer on January 1, 1991.
    (Section 39)

   The Commissioner of Education is the executive officer of the State Board for Elementary and Secondary
    Education, implementing educational policies and directing all persons employed in the Department of
    Education. (Section 41)

Department of Education

   The Department of Education provides services including assistance with curriculum design, school
    administration and finance, monitoring the management of school districts, and research and planning.
    (Section 43)

   Regional service centers were established in 1992 with a primary focus on professional development of
    school district employees. Those centers were not funded by the General Assembly beginning in 2003, and
    the centers were disbanded. (Section 44)

   The Department established a Principals' Assessment Center to administer the process that a principal
    completes to be qualified for initial or continued employment as a principal. (Section 45)

   The Department established a Superintendents' Training Program and Assessment Center to provide a
    training process in certain subjects that a superintendent must successfully complete to be qualified for initial
    or continued employment. (Section 46)

State Board for Adult and Technical Education

   The State Board for Adult, Vocational Education, and Vocational Rehabilitation retained its composition and
    was transferred under its new name to the new Workforce Development Cabinet. (House Bill 814)

Certification Authority

  The Education Professional Standards Board establishes requirements for obtaining and maintaining a
   teaching certificate, evaluates college and school district programs for preparing school personnel, and issues
   and revokes teaching certificates (Sections 56-57). The Board also implements an alternative certification
   program, administers the principal testing and internship program, and administers the adjunct instructor
   certificate program. (Sections 58-61)
Local Boards of Education

   School board members in county school districts continue to be elected from divisions, and in independent
    school districts the members of the school board continue to be elected from the entire district. (Section 69)

   A person elected to a local board must have at least a high school education or GED certificate. (Section 71)

   Except in certain limited circumstances, a person is ineligible for election to local board if he has a relative
    employed by the school district. (Section 71)

   Board members are prohibited from attempting to influence the hiring of any school employee, except the
    superintendent and the school board attorney. (Section 71)

   The local superintendent is appointed by the local board after the board receives the recommendations of a
    screening committee consisting of two teachers, one board member, one principal, and one parent. The local
    board is not bound by the committee's recommendation. (Sections 75-76)

                                                          106
   Campaign contributions to local board candidates' races are limited to $100 from an individual and $200 from
    a PAC. (Section 73)

   Candidates for local school board are prohibited from soliciting or accepting any money or services from any
    employee of the school district. (Section 79)


Local Superintendent

   The superintendent is responsible for all personnel actions, including hiring, transfer, dismissal, suspension,
    promotion, and demotion, and for reporting the actions to the local board. (Section 90)

   Only the local board, upon approval of the Commissioner of Education may terminate the local
    superintendent’s employment contract. (Section 75)

   Except in certain limited circumstances, the superintendent is prohibited from hiring his/her relatives and
    board members' relatives to work for the local district. Also, vacancies in the local districts must be reported
    to the Department of Education and, unless a waiver is obtained under certain conditions, they must be
    posted in the board office for 30 days prior to filling the position. (Section 78)


School Employees

   Except in certain limited circumstances, relatives of a principal cannot be employed in the principal's school.
    (Section 78)

   School district employees are prohibited from activity in school board campaigns. (Section 79)

   All classified school employees must have a high school degree, GED certificate, or show progress toward
    obtaining a GED. (Section 54)

   The law requiring that certain procedures be followed in demoting administrative personnel is amended to
    exclude principals from its coverage. (Sections 80 & 283)

   The procedure for terminating a teacher's contract for cause follows. The superintendent notifies the local
    board of the dismissal with cause. If the dismissal is appealed, the Commissioner of Education will appoint a
    three-member tribunal, including one teacher, one administrator, and a lay person, to hear and decide the
    appeal. All three members of the tribunal must reside outside the county. The decision of the tribunal may
    be appealed on the record to the circuit court. (Section 85)

Education Accountability Office

   The Office of Education Accountability was established under the Legislative Research Commission (LRC) as
    an independent arm of the legislature. The purpose of the office is to monitor the education system and
    implementation of the Education Reform Act; review the state's system of school finance; verify accuracy of
    school district and state performance; investigate unresolved allegations of wrongdoing at the state, regional
    or district level; and, report to the LRC. (Section 92)




Finance
State Support The Support Education Excellence in Kentucky (SEEK) fund was established.

1. A guaranteed amount of money per pupil is provided throughout Kentucky (Sections 94, 95, 96).
2. Calculation of SEEK funding is based on the previous year's average daily attendance. (Section 97)
3. The SEEK program was fully implemented with the 1994-95 school year. (Section 97)
4. State Funding will be determined by the state legislature for each biennium.
                                                          107
   Adjustments to SEEK include the costs of the following.

1. Educating at-risk children as identified by participation in the free lunch program. (Section 97)
2. Educating exceptional children. (Section 97), and
3. Transportation costs in the district. (Sections 97, 98)

   The adequacy of funding is reviewed by the Office of Education Accountability of the Legislative Research
    Commission. (Section 92)
   Funds are provided for preschool education. (Section 17)
   Funds are provided for students who need additional time to achieve educational goals.(Section 27)
   Grants are available for assisting in the establishment of family resource centers and youth services centers
    in eligible districts. (Section 18)
   The Commonwealth School Improvement Fund assists schools in educationally deficient districts to improve
    instruction or management. (Section 7)
   Funds are provided for technology throughout the school system. (Sections 21, 22)

   Funds are provided for professional development programs. (Section 13)

   Funds are provided for the Principals' Assessment Center (Section 45)

   Funds are provided for the Superintendents' Training Program and Assessment Center. (Section 46)


   Funds are provided for the Kentucky Highly Skilled Educators' Program. (Section 6)

   An integrated technology based communications system for conducting annual fiscal, management and
    compliance audits is required. (Section 102)

Local Support

   A minimum level is required. (Section 105)

1. The local equivalent rate will be 30 cents per $100 assessed valuation of property and motor vehicles in the
   district. (Section 105)
2. The local support minimum may be reached through levies on property and through other levies permitted for
   general school purposes. (Section 105)
3. Utilities subject to taxation by school districts include cable television. (Section 11 5)
4. If a board fails to comply with providing the minimum local support, its members are subject to removal from
   office. (Section 105)

   Additional revenue may be provided by school board action. (Section 107)

1. An increase up to 15 percent of those revenues guaranteed by the SEEK program is permitted.
2. The state will equalize the increase at 150 percent of the statewide average per pupil equalized assessment.

   Additional revenue may be provided by the vote of the people. (Section 107)

1. The local school board may increase its funds up to an additional 30 percent, subject to the vote of the people.
2. The state will not equalize this increase.

   All real property be assessed at 100 percent of fair cash value. (Section 104)

   No school district is required to levy an equivalent tax rate lower than the rate levied during the 1989-90
    school year. (Section 107)




                                                          108
Teachers

   No teacher will be paid below the minimum statewide salary schedule adopted in the state budget (Section
    94)

   The Kentucky Professional Compensation Plan was developed in the 1990-92 Biennium and implemented in
    Fiscal Year 1992-93. (Section 99)

   Except in those schools that have implemented school-based decision making, the maximum class sizes for
    academic courses: Primary grades, 24; Grades 4, 28; Grades 5 and 6, 29; Grades 7 through 12, 31;
    exceptions must be approved by the chief state school officer. (Section 97)

   Teachers in schools which do not have school-based decision making will have a maximum load of 150 pupil
    hours per day (Section 97)

   No ungraded students are to be placed in a combined class with graded students. (Section 97)

   There can be no more than two consecutive grade levels combined in any class in grades four through six.
    (Section 97)

   Professional development programs for certified personnel are required. (Section 13)

   The Kentucky Board of Education established a program to assist teachers in obtaining computers for their
    personal use. The program includes training provided by the vendor. (Section 23)

Capital Outlay
 The capital outlay allotment is on a per pupil basis. (Section 106)

   The Department of Education designates each school facility as a permanent center, a functional center, or a
    transitional center. The transitional centers eligible for new construction, additions or major renovation.
    (Section 106)




                                                         109
             Kentucky's Learning Goals and Academic Expectations

Goal 1:         Students are able to use basic communication and mathematics skills for purposes and
                situations they will encounter throughout their lives.
1.1             Students use reference tools such as dictionaries, almanacs, encyclopedias, and computer reference
                programs and research tools such as interviews and surveys to find the information they need to
                meet specific demands, explore interests, or solve problems.
1.2             Students make sense of the variety of materials they read.
1.3             Students make sense of the various things they observe.
1.4             Students make sense of the various messages to which they listen.
1.5-1.9         Students use mathematical ideas and procedures communicate, reason, and solve problems.
1.10            Students organize information through development and use of classification rules and systems.
1.11            Students write using appropriate forms, conventions, and styles to communicate ideas and
                information to different audiences for different purposes.
1.12            Students speak using appropriate forms, conventions, and styles to communicate ideas and
                information to different audiences for different purposes.
1.13            Students make sense of and communicate ideas with the visual arts.
1.14            Students make sense of and communicate ideas with music.
1.15            Students make sense of and communicate ideas with movement.
1.16            Students use computers and other kinds of technology to collect, organize, and communicate
                information and ideas.

Goal 2:         Students shall develop their abilities to apply core concepts and principles from mathematics,
                the sciences, the arts, the humanities, social studies, practical living studies, and vocational
                studies to what they will encounter throughout their lives.

Science
2.1             Students understand scientific ways of thinking and working and use those methods to solve real-life
                problems.
2.2             Students identify, analyze, and use patterns such as cycles and trends to understand past and
                present events and predict possible future events.
2.3             Students identify and analyze systems and the ways their components work together or affect each
                other.
2.4             Students use the concept of scale and scientific models to explain the organization and functioning of
                living and nonliving things and predict other characteristics that might be observed.
2.5             Students understand that tinder certain conditions nature tends to remain the same and move toward
                a balance.
2.6             Students understand how living and nonliving things change over time and the factors that influence
                the changes.
Mathematics
2.7         Students understand number concepts and use numbers appropriately and accurately.
2.8         Students understand various mathematical procedures and use them appropriately and accurately.
2.9         Students understand space and dimensionality concepts and use them appropriately and accurately.
2.10        Students understand measurement concepts and use measurements appropriately and accurately.
2.11        Students understand mathematical change concepts and use them appropriately and accurately.
2.12        Students understand mathematical structure concepts including the properties and logic of various
            mathematical systems.
2.13        Students understand and appropriately use statistics and probability.

Social Studies
2.14           Students understand the democratic principles of justice, equality, responsibility, and freedom and
               apply them to real life situations.
2.15           Students can accurately describe various forms of government and analyze issues that relate to the
               tights and responsibilities of citizens in a democracy.
2.16           Students observe, analyze, and interpret human behaviors, social groupings, and institutions to better
               understand people and the relationships among individuals and among groups.

                                                             110
2.17            Students interact effectively and work cooperatively with the many ethnic and cultural groups of our
                nation and world.
2.18            Students understand economic principles and are able to make economic decisions that have
                consequences in daily life.
2.19            Students recognize and understand the relationship between people and geography and apply their
                knowledge to real life situations.
2.20            Students understand, analyze, and interpret historical events, conditions, trends, and issues to
                develop historical perspective.
2.21            (incorporated into 2.16)
Arts and Humanities
2.22            Students create works of art and make presentations to convey a point of view.
2.23            Students analyze their own and others' artistic products and performances using accept
2.24            Students have knowledge of major works of art, music, and literature and appreciate creativity and
                the contributions of the arts and humanities.
2.25            In the products they make and the performances they present, students show that they understand
                how time, place, and society influence the arts and humanities such as languages, literature and
                history.
2.26            Through the arts and humanities, students recognize that although people are different, they share
                some common experiences and attitudes.
2.27            Students recognize and understand the similarities and differences among languages.
2.28            Students understand and communicate in a second language.
Practical Living
2.29            Students demonstrate skills that promote individual well-being and healthy family relationships.
2.30            Students evaluate consumer products and services and make effective consumer decisions.
2.31            Students demonstrate the knowledge and skills they need to remain physically healthy and to accept
                responsibility for their own physical well-being.
2.32            Students demonstrate strategies for becoming and remaining mentally and emotionally healthy.
2.33            Students demonstrate the skills to evaluate and use services and resources available in their
                community.
2.34            Students perform physical movement skills effectively in a variety of settings.
2.35            Students demonstrate knowledge and skills that promote physical activity and involvement in physical
                activity throughout their lives.

Vocational Studies
2.36          Students use strategies for choosing and preparing for a career.
2.37          Students demonstrate skills and work habits that lead to success in future schooling and work.
2.38          Students demonstrate skills such as interviewing, writing resumes, and completing applications that
              are needed to be accepted into college or other post secondary training or to get a job.

Goal 3:        Students shall develop their abilities to become self-sufficient individuals.

Goal 4:        Students shall develop their abilities to become responsible members of a family, work group,
               or community, including demonstrating effectiveness in community service.

Note:          Goals 3 & 4 are included in Kentucky statute as learning goals, but they are not included in the state's
               academic assessment program.

Goal 5:        Students shall develop their abilities to think and solve problems in school situations and in a
               variety of situations they will encounter in life.
5.1            Students use critical thinking skills such as analyzing, prioritizing, categorizing, evaluating, and
               comparing to solve a variety of problems in real-life situations.
5.2            Students use creative thinking skills to develop or invent novel, constructive ideas or products.
5.3            Students organize information to develop or change their understanding or a concept.
5.4            Students use decision-making process to make informed decisions among options.
5.5            Students use problem-solving processes to develop solutions to relatively complex problems.

Goal 6:        Students shall develop their abilities to connect and integrate experiences and new
               knowledge from all subject matter fields with what they have previously learned and build on
               past learning experiences to acquire new information through various media sources.
                                                           111
6.1                Students connect knowledge and experiences from different subject areas.
6.2                Students use what they already know to acquire new knowledge, develop new ideas, or interpret new
                   experiences.

6.3                Students expand their understanding of existing knowledge by making connections with new
                   knowledge, ideas, and experiences.


Provisions for National Enforcement Constitution, National Education Association

ARTICLE VII, Section 2, a. The review Board shall have original jurisdiction in the following cases:

      1.   Impeachment of an officer who is a member of the Executive Committee;

      2. Alleged violations of the CODE OF ETHICS OF THE EDUCATION               PROFESSION.

ARTICLE VII, Section 2, b. The Review Board shall have the following powers subject to the conditions as herein
outlines:

      1. To impeach an officer. The officer shall have the right to appeal to the Board of Directors;

      2. To censure, suspend, or expel a member for violation of THE CODE OF ETHICS OF THE EDUCATION
           PROFESSION. The member shall have the right to appeal to the Executive Committee on procedural
           grounds only.
      3. To vacate censure, lift suspension, or reinstate a member.

ARTICLE VII, Section 4. The Review Board shall establish its rules of procedure with the approval of the Board of
Directors. Due process must be guaranteed in all its proceedings.



Adherence to the Code

Constitution, National Education Association

ARTICLE II, Section 2,b. Members engaged in teaching or in other education work shall adhere to THE CODE OF
ETHICS OF THE EDUCATION PROFESSION…

ARTICLE II, Section 6. Executive officers of the Association may be impeached for violation of THE CODE OF
ETHICS OF THE EDUCATION PROFESSION…

ARTICLE VI, Section 4. Officers of the Association may be impeached for violation of THE CODE OF ETHICS OF
THE EDUCATION PROFESSION…

ARTICLE VII, Section 5, a. Members of the Review Board may be impeached (by the Executive Committee) for
violation of THE CODE OF ETHICS OF THE EDUCATION PROFESSION…


Provisions of the Education Reform Act House Bill 940
On appeal, the Kentucky Supreme Court issued an opinion in June 1989, which held the system of common schools
in Kentucky unconstitutional. The Court said the essential and minimal characteristics of an efficient system of
common schools may be summarized as follows:

      1. Its establishment, maintenance, and funding are the sole responsibility of the General Assembly.

      2. It is free to all.

      3. It is available to all Kentucky children,
                                                                 112
 4. It is substantially uniform throughout the state.

 5. It provides equal educational opportunities to all Kentucky children.

 6. It is monitored by the General Assembly to assure that there is no waste, no duplication, no mismanagement,
    and no political influence.

 7. Schools are operated under the premise that an adequate education is a constitutional right.

 8. Sufficient funding provides each child an adequate education.

 9. An adequate education' is defined as one which develops the following seven
    capacities:

a) Communication skills necessary to function in a complex and changing civilization.

b) Knowledge to make economic, social, and political choices.

c) Understanding of governmental processes as they affect the community, state and nation.

d) Sufficient self-knowledge and knowledge of one's mental and physical wellness.

e) Sufficient grounding in the arts to enable each student to appreciate his or her cultural and historical heritage.

f)   Sufficient preparation to choose and pursue one's life's work intelligently.

g) Skills enabling students to compete favorably with students in other states.




                                                            113
Appendix ........................................................................................................... 114
Resume Example ............................................................................................... 115
Philosophy of Education Example …………………………………………………116
Disposition Evaluation Process Instructions ....... …………………………………117
Dress Code Example                .................................................................................... 120
TEP Hearing Procedures ……………………………………………………………121
Waiver Form for Restricted TEP Courses …………………………………………122
Record of Performance Evaluation Form. …………………………………………123
Clinical Practice Time Card …………………………………………………………124
Tort Liability Form .............................................................................................. 125
Praxis Re-Testing Preparation Plan ................................................................... 126
Medical History Form ......................................................................................... 127
Lesson Plan Format ........................................................................................... 129
Clinical Practice Withdrawal/Failure Form ...………………………………………132
Clinical Practice Terminology . ………………………………………………………133
Glossary ............................................................................................................. 134




                                                                                           114
                                                                4289 Skaggs Road     Phone 555-626-1212
                                                                Morehead, KY 40351   Fax 555-626-1213
                                                                                     E-mail
                                                                                     johnksmith@yahoo.com




      John K. Smith
Objective           To gain admission to the Teacher Education Program at Morehead
                    State University.


Education           2000 - present        Morehead State University
                    Pursuing a degree in Elementary Education
                  Anticipated graduation date: May 2004
                  Current GPA: 3.550

                    1998-2000             Ashland Community College


Awards received     Deans List: Morehead State University

                    Fall 2001 & Spring 2002


Work experience     2002-present            Rowan County Board of Education
                    Substitute Teacher
                   ubstitute teacher for elementary and middle grades as needed.


Extracurricular     2001-present    Student Government Association
activities
                    Morehead State University.
                    2002-present   Student Activities Council
                    Morehead State University


Professional        2001-present     Kappa Delta Pi
memberships




                                                      115
This is a Philosophy of Education Statement produced by a student in EDF 207. It would score a 9 on the Philosophy of Education
Statement TEP rubric. It uses professional language, includes references to specific philosophies and theories, addresses the conflicts
between these philosophies and theories and is free of surface errors. The Philosophy of Education Statement should be double-spaced.

PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION
Education has a two-fold purpose: to cultivate the intellect of an individual sufficiently to be a productive, contributive member of
our global society, and to expose the individual to the limitless possibilities afforded him/her by that education. Knowledge is
empowering, whether it is to satisfy an immediate need or a future concern. I believe, as did Dewey, that every facet of the
knowledge we acquire during our lifetime is useful for future problem solving, and will shape our process of decision-making.

Education should be for everyone, according to his or her self-defined capabilities and goals. Plato first established educational
opportunity for selected women in the fourth and fifth centuries B.C., but it was not until the Renaissance and Reformation eras that
education began to break gender-prescribed roles. Minority education has had a lengthier battle and is still evolving. Schooling for
the mentally or physically challenged is not individualized to their needs and must often be won through hard-fought battles
between the parent and the school board.

For education to be carried out effectively it must be based on a child’s emotional and cognitive readiness. Quintilian knew this and
Piaget expounded upon this theory. Like Erasmus and Comenius, I believe the child must have a secure and unhurried learning
environment. As Locke proposed, the curriculum should allow time for play and recreation because this is the young child’s reality.

The curriculum in most American schools is not carried out effectively. Many schools still use the drill and memorization methods
employed by ancient civilizations. These methods do not stimulate the intellect, nor do they promote independent thought. The
teacher simply passes on his/her knowledge of a subject for the student to learn by rote.

I have incorporated various components of the philosophies/theories we have studied into my own philosophy of education. I
admire Progressivism the most because it stimulates autonomous thought and recognizes that competition should take second place
to collaborative learning. The Critical Theorist’s propensity for not passing value judgment on student answers is vital for self-
esteem development. Because not everyone learns in the same way, the Constructivist theory of learning a subject several different
ways is invaluable. Above all, teaming should take place at the child’s level of readiness.

From preschool to age six, the child learns most effectively by doing. Montessori was a proponent of this idea through use of
didactic material. A century before her, Pestalozzi expounded the object lesson. At this stage of development, the child should
master basic skills through employment of these methods with the teacher serving as a warm facilitator.

At ages seven through ten, children should master basic reading, writing, arithmetic, computer and social studies skills. Neo-
essentialists recognize the importance of their mastery and I believe they are vital to prepare the child for more abstract learning in
secondary school. This is the stage where some children begin to get left behind because of their failure to utilize the basics. This
deficit will follow them throughout their educational careers, guaranteeing failure before attainment of goals.

Progressivism’s inquiry-led approach best suits the eleven to fifteen-year-old mind. At these ages, children want to be their own
boss and create their own reality. This drive for self-defined knowledge can best be met through use of Dewey’s scientific
experimentation, which lets the individual determine for themselves what is or isn’t true. Also, because the opinion of peer groups
is important at this age, learning should take place collaboratively, with the teacher acting as an informed guide.

After completing the above stages, the pupil should have an adequate knowledge base to make informed choices and process
abstract thought. From ages sixteen to eighteen the student should be allowed to determine their future educational destiny. If
further study of educational subjects is desired, it should take place through Socratic Dialogue and Critical Theory. If the student
plans to enter the work force directly after secondary school, the two years prior to graduation should be spent in apprenticeship of a
desired skill. In Illich’s Deschooling Society, he proposed that most genuine knowledge is acquired outside of school, a notion that
has some merit.

In summation, I believe that education should be available for everyone and individualized to his or her needs and ability. It should
go through constant evolution, focusing on what is important to the individual, but taking in consideration societal issues.
Education is what you make of it, no more, and no less.




                                                                   116
                                                  Dispositions Evaluation Process

     At the April, 2006 Teacher Education Council meeting, the following revised professional disposition assessment
    instrument and process were approved. The instrument must be used for all disposition assessments completed
    beginning fall, 2006. Please note that disposition assessments completed prior to fall, 2006 using the earlier
    instrument are still valid for meeting the disposition assessment requirement.

    General:

    All faculty and field/clinical experience teachers are responsible for ensuring that students/candidates demonstrate the
    dispositions expected of teachers.

    All faculty have the option of processing a student/candidate Professional Disposition Assessment form when a candidate
    demonstrates a behavior that is of concern.

    All faculty members may include disposition assessment as a course objective and assessment component.

    All students/candidates are expected to have disposition evaluations throughout the program, including: pre-TEP candidacy,
    pre-clinical practice, and during clinical practice...

    Specific Requirements:

1. The faculty members in each program area are responsible for determining the specific content area Pre-TEP Candidacy
   and Pre-Clinical practice courses in which Professional Dispositions Assessment and reporting will occur. All candidates will
   have an assessment during the clinical semester.

2. Faculty members who teach one of the selected disposition evaluation courses are responsible for:

   Including disposition evaluation as a course outcome and evaluation component (syllabus)

   Completing an on-line Professional Disposition Assessment Form for each student through TK20 (Directions for on-line
    completion of the Disposition Assessment Form may be found on the following page.

   Faculty who ask public school classroom teachers to complete Disposition Assessments for their students should distribute
    copies of the Disposition Assessment Form for each student to those teachers. Please send the completed forms to the
    Education Service Unit where whey will be entered on TK20.

3. Advisors will receive notification when an advisee is assessed as not demonstrating expected behavior in all categories and
   they are to work with their advisees/candidates to develop a written remediation plan for improving the expected behaviors
   and meet with the advisee to discuss progress toward fulfilling the goals stated in the plan.

4. Candidates will not be eligible for clinical practice when there are continued dispositional concerns prior to placement.




                                                                  117
Faculty Directions for Completion of Disposition Assessment of TEP Candidates

   1. Log onto TK20
   2. From the dark blue tabs beneath the MSU banner at the top of the page, select
       “Courses”.
   3. From the list in the light blue Reports section on the left side of the screen, select
       “Assessment Tools”.
   4. From the list, check the box to select “Disposition Assessment (Professional Dispositions
       of Candidate Coursework)”.
   5. Scroll to the bottom of the page and click the button “Make Available to Me”.
   6. From the list in the light blue Coursework section on the left side of the screen, select
       “Observations”.
   7. From the Coursework section, beneath Observations, select “Assess”.
   8. Under General Information, to the right of Please Select Your Assessment Template,
       select “Dispositions Assessment (Professional Dispositions of Candidate Coursework)”
       from the drop down menu.
   9. Under Select Course, click the small white circle to the left of the course in which the
       student(s) is/are enrolled. If you do not have any courses listed, click “Select more
       courses”. Complete the search form, place a check next to the correct course, and select
       “Add”. Then click the small white circle to the left of the course.
   10. Click on “Next”.
   11. Under Student, in the grey box, select “add new”.
   12. Complete form as indicated.
   13. Under General Information, type in candidate’s last name.
   14. No response is required for “Total Weight” or “Include in Grade?”.
   15. Assess the student.
   16. Select your status as an evaluator.
   17. Enter the date of your assessment.
   18. Under Grade, to the right of Record Name, type in: Student’s
       Last Name, Student’s First Name (Please use names as they appear on university
       records).
   19. To the right of Grade, type in: N/A.
   20. No entry is required for “Rubrics Total” or “Score”.
   21. Select “Submit”.
   22. If you are creating a Disposition for one student only, click save at the bottom of the list
       of students and logout.
   23. To create a Disposition for another student, click “add new”.
   24. Repeat steps 12 through 16 until all students have been assessed.
   25. Click “Save”.
   26. Under the TK20 logo in the upper right hand corner, click “Logout”.




                                                118
                                                 Evaluator/Instructor
                                        Professional Dispositions Assessment
Candidate Name: _________________________________________                  Candidate ID: _________________

Advisor’s Name _______________________________________                     Course Prefix and Number: _______

Course Name:

The following dispositions are believed to be essential attributes for effective teaching. All students applying to the Teacher
Education Program and candidates who have been admitted to this program will be evaluated by faculty and field teachers
regarding the demonstration of these behaviors.

Place a checkmark in the column below that best describes the student’s/candidate’s behavior. When a student/candidate
does not consistently demonstrate one or more of these behaviors, by the end of a course or field experience, an explanation
is to be included in the comments section. The comments section may also be used to describe behavioral concerns that are
not identified on the list below. Place a checkmark in the “Not Selected Column” when you have chosen not to evaluate a
disposition.

                                                                  Consistently            Not Consistently       Not
The Candidate:                                                    Demonstrated            Demonstrated           Selected

 1.   Fulfills the attendance and punctuality requirements.   ____________           ____________            _______
 2.   Demonstrates sensitivity to all students.                   ____________           ____________            _______
 3.   Fulfills responsibilities.                                  ____________           ____________            _______
 4.   Identifies and solves problems independently.              ____________            ____________            _______
 5.   Cooperates, works well with others.                        ____________            ____________            _______
 6.   Solicits suggestions and feedback from others.             ____________            ____________            _______
 7.   Maintains confidentiality.                                 ____________            ____________            _______
 8.   Engages in self-reflection.                                ____________            ____________            _______
 9.   Exhibits adaptability and resilience.                      ____________           ____________            _______
10.   Demonstrates professional dress and demeanor               ____________            ____________            _______


Comments:
                                                                                                     ___________________




Signature of Reviewer (faculty member or field supervisor):__________________________ Date _________________

Signature of Candidate: _____________________________________________ Date _________________




                                                               119
The following dress code policy is a sample of one school district’s policy. Clinical Practice Candidates are
encouraged to secure a copy of the dress code for the school in which they are placed. School dress code policies
apply both to field experience and clinical practice students.

Sample Faculty/Staff Dress Code Policy

      Faculty and Staff will dress and act professionally and be an example for the students you are teaching and/or
       servicing. People should be able to tell you from your students by your appearance and behavior.

      Any attire that brings undo attention to the wearer is considered inappropriate. This includes but is not limited to
       (mesh shirts, see-through clothing, spaghetti straps, tube tops, halter tops, tank tops, over-sized sleeveless shirts,
       mid-drift tops, undergarments or cleavage showing).

      Any clothing or accessories with language, statements, pictures, or graphics which are obscene, inappropriate,
       racially or ethnically offensive, or pertain to drugs, alcohol, tobacco, or sex are not permitted.

      Sandals are permitted. Flip flops are not.

      Athletic suits can be worn ONLY on Friday. Physical Education Teachers may wear athletic suits throughout the
       week. Pants made out of sweat shirt material are not permitted. Shirts/sweatshirts with logos are permitted
       throughout the week.

      Jeans of any color can be worn only on Fridays.

      Waistband of clothing must be worn above the hips.

      Knee length walking shorts or Capri pants are permitted.

      Tight fitting clothing is not permitted and appropriate undergarments must be worn.

      Scrubs are permitted for nursing staff, custodians and cooks only.

      If in doubt about attire, do not wear it.

      Principals will be allowed to make exceptions for special events.

      Any person who violates this dress code policy will be sent home for the day.




                                                              120
                                TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM HEARING PROCEDURES

        When the Dean of the College of Education (“Dean”) acts to enforce any policy of the Teacher Education Council and
a teacher education student (“student”) appeals that action to the Teacher Education Council, the following hearing and due
process rights shall apply.

Within the following sixty days, a hearing date and time shall be set by the Teacher Education Council, or its representative, to
hear the appeal by the teacher education student. The student shall be given notice of the date and time at least ten days
prior to the hearing. The hearing shall be held by mid-term of the regular semester (fall/spring) following the filing of the
appeal. For appeals filed prior to the adoption of these procedures, the hearing shall be held by mid-term of the regular
semester (fall/spring) following the adoption. For extenuating circumstances, the student or College representative may
request a postponement of the hearing. The chair of the Council, or his designee, shall rule on the postponement request.

The student and the College representative presenting the charges shall be informed of these hearing procedures.

Upon request, the student may be permitted to review the evidence and obtain a copy of each document.

All hearings will be closed to the public. All discussion in the hearing shall be kept confidential.

The student and the College representative may each be accompanied by one advisor selected from the student body,
faculty, or staff. The advisor serves only in a support role and may not participate in the direct examination, cross-
examination, and arguments.

The student and the College representative will each be given the opportunity to hear the evidence presented and to cross-
examine witnesses who testify.

The student and College representative may present witnesses who will testify under oath, and make arguments.
Reasonable limits may be placed by the chairperson on the direct examination, cross-examination, and argument.

The student may remain silent which fact will not be considered as adverse against the student.

At the conclusion of the presentation of all evidence, the Teacher Education Council will move into executive session for
deliberation.

The Council shall consider whether there is substantial evidence that the student has committed the violation as accused and
shall determine whether the sanction issued by the Dean is appropriate. Decisions of the Council shall be by majority vote of
those present and voting. If the Council determines the sanction appropriate, it shall affirm the decision of the Dean. If the
Council determines that the evidence does not support the action of the Dean, it shall recommend to the Dean an appropriate
sanction, if any.

The burden of proof shall be upon the student to prove by a preponderance of the evidence that the decision of the Dean was
erroneous.

Except for deliberations in executive session, the proceedings at the hearing shall be tape recorded. The student, upon
request, may receive a copy of the record upon payment of a reasonable cost.

The decision of the Council shall be in writing and forwarded to the student and the Dean.




                                                                121
                                                 2009-2010
            PETITION FOR WAIVER TO ENROLL IN RESTRICTED TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM COURSES
Petitioner’s Name___________________________________________________________                              SS #_____________________________

Student ID #_________________                                        E-Mail Address_________________________________________________________________

I have met the following TEP eligibility requirements and request that I be granted a waiver to take a maximum of two restricted courses (maximum of six credit hours)
during the ____________________ term.

AN UP-TO-DATE PROGRAM EVALUATION/CHECKSHEET (ALL STUDENTS) AND TRANSCRIPTS (GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY) MUST
ACCOMPANY THIS PETITION.

A BRIEF EXPLANATION OF THE CIRCUMSTANCES LEADING TO THE NEED FOR A WAIVER MUST BE ATTACHED TO THIS FORM.

GPA & Course Requirements:
Admission to Morehead State University and completion of a minimum of *thirty (30) semester hours for P-5, 5-9 or Special Education and *45 hours for secondary, 5-12
and P-12 certification programs. The hours completed must include:

 **ENG 100_____          **ENG 200_____          **CMSP 108_____             **EDF 207_____           **EDF 211_____

Total Hours Completed to Date_____                  TEP GPA_____

*Minimum overall GPA of 2.5 on ALL course work completed at MSU and other accredited and approved institutions is required; **Minimum grade of “C” is required

Testing Requirement: One of the following testing requirement options must be met:
Plan 1
21 ACT Composite with a minimum of 10 on each of the sub-test

Plan 2**
18, 19 or 20 ACT Composite with a minimum of 10 on each of the sub-tests AND the Pre-Professional Skills Test (PPST) with minimum scores of 173 for Reading, 172 for
Writing*** and 173 for Math

Plan 3
750 on the Graduate Record Exam (GRE)

Plan 4
990 on the SAT

Plan 5
18, 19 or 20 ACT Composite with a minimum of 10 on each of the sub-tests AND passing scores on the PRAXIS Content Area Test(s) required for the candidate’s area of
certification
*All test scores must be on file at MSU and reflected on the candidate’s academic records on Datatel; **Plan 2 is not be available for candidates seeking admission to the
P-5, P-5/LBD and P-5/MSD programs; ***Candidates obtaining grades of “B” or better (or “CLEP”) in ENG 100 and ENG 200 are exempt from the PPST Writing Test.

Writing Requirement:
Passing score (172) on the PPST Writing test OR grades of “B” or better (or CLEP) in both ENG 100 and ENG 200

If my petition is approved, I request that I be allowed to register myself for the following course(s):

1.____________________________________                           2.___________________________________
I have met all the prerequisites for the above courses as they are listed in the MSU Undergraduate Catalog. In order to register for subsequent restricted courses, I
must be admitted to the Teacher Education Program. I also understand that this petition will be invalid without the signature of my advisor and/or if any of the
information supplied above is found to be inaccurate.

____________________________________________                         ___________________________________
          Petitioner’s Signature                                                  Date

As the above student’s advisor, I have verified the information he/she has provided and support his/her petition for this waiver.

_____________________________________________                        _____________________________________
          Advisor’s Signature                                                      Date

ACTION TAKEN ON THE ABOVE PETITION:
▫ Approved
▫ Denied because____________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________
          TEP Admissions Coordinator                                Date
          801 Ginger Hall

A Disposition Evaluation Form will be completed for all candidates applying for a waiver.
                                                                                                                    (Form Updated Fall, 2009Sue Vencill, TEP Coordinator)


                                                                                       122
Clinical Practice Candidate Record of Performance
Clinical Practice Candidate _________________________________________________Core Subject Area _______________________Ages/Grade______________

Date _______________________Time of Observation _______/________ School ___________________________________                                 # of IEP Students          _________
                                                                                                                                            # of GSSP Students         _________
Total # in class _________                                                                                                                  # of LEP Students          _________

RATING:           N/A=NOT APPLICABLE                ND = NOT DEMONSTRATED                   PD = PARTIALLY DEMONSTRATED                                D= DEMONSTRATED

Rating                 Standard I: The Teacher Demonstrates Applied                                                                          Comments:
                       Content Knowledge
N/A   ND   PD   D      A. Demonstrates/communicates accurate knowledge of content/processes
N/A   ND   PD   D      B. Demonstrates multi teaching strategies from various perspectives
N/A   ND   PD   D      C. Connects knowledge to real-life situations
N/A   ND   PD   D      D. Models correct oral/written language
N/A   ND   PD   D      E. Guides students to understand content from various perspectives
                                                                                                                                             Comments:
Rating                 Standard II: The Teacher Designs and Plans Instruction
N/A ND     PD   D      A. Focuses objectives to program of studies/core content
N/A ND     PD   D      B. Proposes appropriate learning experiences based on contextual data
N/A ND     PD   D      C. Plans assessments to guide instruction and measure learning objectives
N/A ND     PD   D      D. Makes appropriate modifications and accommodations
N/A ND     PD   D      E. Follows prescribed lesson plan design

Rating                 Standard III: The Teacher Creates & Maintains Learning
                       Environment                                                                                                           Comments:
N/A   ND   PD   D      A. Uses effective classroom management techniques
N/A   ND   PD   D      B. Expresses high expectations for all students
N/A   ND   PD   D      C. Motivates student learning
N/A   ND   PD   D      D. Communicates enthusiasm for learning
N/A   ND   PD   D      E. Encourages independent thinking and investigation
N/A   ND   PD   D      F. Sets clear behavior expectations
N/A   ND   PD   D      G. Minimizes disruptions and delays
N/A   ND   PD   D      H. Uses praise effectively
N/A   ND   PD   D      I. Addresses misbehavior in an appropriate and timely manner

Rating                 Standard IV: The Teacher Implements/Manages Instruction                                                               Comments:
N/A ND     PD   D      A. Begins instruction promptly
N/A ND     PD   D      B. Opens and closes lesson with meaningful activity/review
N/A ND     PD   D      C. Links learning to prior knowledge
N/A ND     PD   D      D. Uses appropriate/multiple teaching strategies
N/A ND     PD   D      E. Provides for skill/concept practice
N/A ND     PD   D      F. Keeps lesson moving at good pace – makes efficient use of time
N/A ND     PD   D      G. Monitors room, circulates to assist student
N/A ND     PD   D      H. Makes provisions to address diversity in learning levels/styles
N/A ND     PD   D      I. Actively engages students
N/A ND     PD   D      J. Provides student feedback
N/A ND     PD   D      K. Engages students in higher-order/critical thinking
                                                                                                                                             Comments:
Rating                 Standard V: The Teacher Assesses & Communicates
                       Learning Results
N/A   ND   PD   D      A. Analyzes prior assessment
N/A   ND   PD   D      B. Assesses student performance based on established criteria/rubric
N/A   ND   PD   D      C. Promotes student self-assessment
N/A   ND   PD   D      D. Uses multiple assessments that address diversity
N/A   ND   PD   D      E. Aligns assessment with key program of studies/core content/objectives
N/A   ND   PD   D      F. Includes formative/summative assessment                                     ________________________________________________________

Rating                 Standard VI: The Teacher Demonstrates Implementation                                                                  Comments:
                       of Technology
N/A   ND   PD   D      A. Selects appropriate/available technology to plan/implement instruction
N/A   ND   PD   D      B. Integrates student use of technology
N/A   ND   PD   D      C. Employs a variety of media applications/adaptive technologies
N/A   ND   PD   D      D. Includes media/technology that enhances learning

 Rating                Standard X: Provides Leadership Within School/Community/Profession                            Comments:
N/A ND PD D            A. The teacher demonstrates leadership qualities                   ________________________________________________________




_________________________________________________________

                Clinical Practice Candidate
                                                                                   123
_________________________________________________________
                 Observer’s Name
                                                                                            Morehead State University is an affirmative action, equal opportunity, educational institution
                 TICE TIM CARD
    CLINICAL PRACTI     ME   D
       ESTER: _______
    SEME                         ________
                    ______________                      EAR: _________
                                                       YE                         ________
                                                                     ______________

    NAM ___________
      ME:         _____________            ______________
                              ______________            ______________           ______________
                                                                     _____________            ____
          Last                                First                                           ddle
                                                                                            Mid

    CERT          AREA: _______
       TIFICATION A                        _____________
                              ______________                        _____K-12: ____
                                                       ______________                         ___________
                                                                                  _____________

    PLAC                      __________ CO
                TES: __________
       CEMENT DAT                         OOPERATING TEACHER: __
                                                   G           _____________
                                                                           ______________
                                                                                        __________

    Unive              or
        ersity Superviso Visitations
    C=Coonference                 C           C           C           C          C         C          C
    O=Obbservation                O           O           O           O          O         O          O

                         this card: Pleas keep an accur record of th time spent eac week in the v
    Direct
         tions for using t               se             rate          he             ch          various activities described below Report time in the
                                                                                                                  s               w.
         us                              lf
    variou categories to the nearest hal hour. This r   record should b initialed each week. The ti
                                                                      be             h            ime distribution should be eval                ally in
                                                                                                                                  luated periodica
         rences with the c
    confer                              cher and universi supervisor.
                         cooperating teac               ity

                         mentation for ce
    The time card is docum                               must        d                                               sity
                                        ertification and m be returned to the Educational Services Unit by the Univers Supervisor.

       e          nts:
    Time Requiremen                         16 Weeks              14 Wee
                                                                       eks                    12 Weeks                       8 Weeks                   weeks
                                                                                                                                                      6w
        mum Teaching T
    Minim              Time                 180 hrs               157 hrs                      135 hrs                       90 hrs                     67 hrs
        mum Number of Conferences
    Minim              f                    48 hrs                42 hrs                       36 hrs                        24 hrs                     18 hrs
        mum Number of Observations
    Minim              f                    54 hrs                47 hrs                       40 hrs                        27 hrs                     20 hrs
        mum participatio
    Minim              on                   40 hrs                35 hrs                       30 hrs                        20 hrs                     15 hrs

    Note t               ks             inimum requirem
          that the 12 week pertains to mi              ments. Teacher Education Cand
                                                                     r                            head State Unive
                                                                                   didates at Moreh                               ed
                                                                                                                  ersity will excee the minimum hours
         red
    requir by the Kentu  ucky State Depaartment of Educa
                                                       ation. The teach education ca
                                                                      her                                         d                ed
                                                                                   andidate’s time card is recorded and documente by the coope erating
         er.
    teache

          o                he              tice           at                r
    Due to the nature of th Clinical Pract experience a MSU, the four categories are e                       lows:
                                                                                             explained as foll
   Confe                                  n
         erence: Record the time spent in cooperating tea  acher/teacher ed                 ate
                                                                           ducation candida conference.
   Obser                 d
         rvation: Record the time the tea                 candidate observ the classroom teacher.
                                          acher education c                ves              m
        cipation: Reco the time th teacher educ
    Partic                ord             he                               e
                                                          cation candidate is involved in counseling, i
                                                                                             n               individual assist            isitations, assem
                                                                                                                             tance, home vi               mblies,
         curricular activiti grading coop
    extrac                 ies,                           r’s
                                           perating teacher papers, homer                  d
                                                                            room duties and case studies.
   Actua Teaching: Re
         al               ecord the time th teacher educat
                                          he               tion candidate is in charge of cla or a segment of the class and has prepared a lesson plan.
                                                                           s                ass                             d


                                                                                                                                            CT
    Week                  1      2      3      4      5       6      7      8     9      10     11       12   13    14     15     16      I
                                                                                                                                          Initial



       ference
    Confe



       ervations
    Obse



    Partic
         cipation



        al
    Actua
        hing
    Teach

    Days




                                                                                124
   nical Prac
Clin                rt        y
            ctice Tor Liability Form




    ve         rmed of the advisability of obtaining tort liabilit for covera during th Clinical P
I hav been infor                                   g             ty         age       he                      ester
                                                                                                  Practice seme
    have been pr
and h                     ormation from the Educa
               rovided info            m           ational Servic Unit abou how to ob
                                                                  ce        ut                    ge.
                                                                                      btain coverag

  me:      __________
Nam ________        ___________
                              __________
                                       ___________        ___________
                                                 __________         ________

                on        n           ort                   for         cal      r.
It is my intentio to obtain adequate to liability insurance fo the clinic semester

Ye
  es                  No

    rance Compa _______
Insur         any:             ___________
                      __________                  ___________
                                         __________         ____

   aive                    p
I wa the opportunity to purchase in
                                  nsurance and understan that the U
                                             d         nd                                coverage an
                                                                  University provides no c         nd
                 lely
that I will be sol liable.

Ye
  es                  No


    ature ______
Signa                   ___________
               __________                  _______ Dat ________
                                  __________         te       __________




                                                        125
                                                   PRAXIS RE‐TESTING PREPARATION PLAN 
                                                                         
                           A separate plan must be completed for each test in which you have been unsuccessful 
                                                                         
Student Teacher’s Name:  ________________________________________________________________________ 
 
Student Teaching Term:  ________________________________________________________________________ 
 
Certification Being Sought ________________________________________________________________________ 
 
Advisor:                    ________________________________________________________________________ 
 
Test #                      _______   Test Score  ______________________________ Test Date  _______________ 
 
Please download and print a copy of the TAG (Test at a Glance) for this test from the ETS web page, www.ets.org. 
 
Using the information from your PRAXIS Score Report, please complete the table below 
 
Test        Category Name          Points     Average            Points I Scored        Topics covered in            Course related 
Category                           Earned  Performance           Below the Middle       Category                     to topic content 
                                              Range (APR)        Score of the APR 
 
I                                                                                                                     
II                                                                                                                    
III                                                                                                                   
IV                                                                                                                    
V                                                                                                                     
VI                                                                                                                    
VII                                                                                                                   
VIII                                                                                                                  
 
Using the TAG for your test, for each category in which you scored lower than the middle score of the APR, review the “Topics Covered” 
section for that category in the TAG for the test.  For each topic in the category, write in the course(s)  you have taken in which the topic 
was covered.  This will help you determine what textbooks you may need to obtain for additional study and the faculty you might go to 
for assistance/advice regarding strategies for preparing to retake the test.   
 
I have met with my advisor and we have reviewed the above table and the attached TAG.  Together,  we developed the plan below for 
me to prepare to re‐take this PRAXIS test on the following date  ____________________.   
 
Preparation Plan: 
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 
 
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 
 
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 
 
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 
 
__________________________________________ 
 
I understand that while I may complete my program at M.S.U. without passing the required PRAXIS tests, the Kentucky Education 
Professional Standards Board requires that I pass them prior to applying for my teaching certificate.  My plan is designed to prepare me 
to be successful when I re‐take this required test and enable me to apply for my certification in a timely manner. 
 
Student Teacher’s Signature/Date  _______________________________________________________________________________ 
 
Advisor’s Signature/Date _______________________________________________________________________________________ 
                                                                    126
                                                                                                                     per

Clinical Practice Candidate Medical History and Medical Examination Form




TO THE STUDENT: For admission to the Clinical Practice at Morehead State University, it is required that this report be on file in the
Educational Services Unit prior to entering the clinical semester. Your family physician or any physician of your choice may perform the
examination. A limited number of physicals may be done by the staff of the Caudill Health Clinic at a student rate of $30.00. Physicals
will be done BY APPOINTMENT only. The date and time will depend on patient flow. If you desire to have your physical at the Caudill
Health Clinic, please call 783-2055 and ask for an appointment.

_____________________________________________________________________________________________
Last Name                                  First                         Middle/Other

Home Address:_________________________________________________________________________________
                      Street                City                 State                 Zip

Home Telephone: (_____)_____________ Age: ______________ Date of Birth: ____________________________



Student Medical History
Check each box below yes or no and indicate year for each yes response.
Have you had the following?


YES                 NO                                                                           YEAR
                                         Asthma
                                         Tuberculosis
                                         Mental Health Care
                                         Epilepsy
                                         Convulsions Seizures
                                         Severe Headaches
                                         Diabetes
                                         Measles
                                         Mumps
                                         Chicken Pox
                                         Heart Murmur
                                         Heart Disease
                                         Rheumatic Fever
                                         High Blood Pressure
                                         Hay Fever


Please note any other past medical problems: ________________________________________________________
I verify that the above medical information is correct to the best of my knowledge.


Signature: ______________________________________________________________ Date: _________________




                                                                127
Licensed Medical Practitioner: Please complete the following Medical Examination. This examination is at the student’s expense.


Additional History and Medical Examination

Height: _________ Ft. __________ In. Weight: _________ lbs. Blood Pressure: __________ Pulse: _________

Vision: Right 20/ ___________ Left 20/ ___________ Corrected to: Right 20/ ___________ Left 20/ __________

Physician’s Comments on Medical History: ________________________________________________________


Illnesses, injuries, or hospitalization not already noted: ______________________________________________


Surgical (Major Operations): ____________________________________________________________________


Is patient allergic to any medications? _____________No _____________Yes
If yes, indicate medications _______________________________________________________________

Is patient currently taking any medication(s)? _________No ________Yes If yes, list name of drug(s), dosage, strength and
frequency. __________________________________________________________________________


Note any pertinent physical abnormalities: ________________________________________________________

Has patient lived in a household with anyone who has had tuberculosis? __________No __________ Yes
If yes, explain: _________________________________________________________________________________

Has patient been immunized against polio? ______No ______Yes           If yes, indicate year: __________________

T.B. Skin Test: Date Applied ______________________________ Date Read _____________________________
Pos. ____________________________________________Neg. _________________________________________
Read By:______________________________________________________________________________________

(Required annually by school employees)


Certification of Medical Examination

This is to certify that I have examined ________________________________________________ and find him/her free of any
communicable disease(s) and also any physical limitations that might interfere with performing his/her duties as a teacher.

Date of Examination: _____________________

Signature of Licensed Medical Practitioner: ____________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________________
City                               State                         Zip

Physical or medical limitations identified on the physical examination are subject to a request for additional
information to clarify disabilities or limitations to facilitate a suitable placement.




                                                                 128
LESSON PLAN FORMAT

Name:

                           Date:                          Age/Grade Level:

# of Students:            # of IEP Students:              # of GSSP Students:                # of LEP Students:

Subject:                                                                            Major Content:

                                                     Lesson Length:

Start Time: _________ End Time: ___________


PREPARATION – Prior to Teaching

Context – Place this lesson in a context:
A. Explain how this lesson relates to the unit of study or your broad goals for teaching about the topic.
B. Describe the students’ prior knowledge or the focus of the previous lesson.
C. Describe generally any critical student characteristics or attributes that will affect student learning.

Objectives – State what students will be able to do as a result of this lesson. Objectives must be
student-centered, outcome-based, unambiguous, and observable/measurable.
        EXAMPLE:
        A.  Objective 1: The students will use text clues for understanding.

Connections – Site the specific Learning Goals and Academic Expectation, Core Content Goal, or
Program Goal with which your objectives connect. Use no more than two or three connections. Then
explain in a sentence how this is accomplished in your lesson.
        EXAMPLE:
        A.  KY Learning Goals and Academic Expectations 1.2: Students make sense of the variety of materials they read. This
               will be accomplished as students complete a Cloze Procedure.
        B.     Core Content RD-04-1.1): Students will apply word recognition strategies (e.g., phonetic principles, context clues,
               structural analysis) to determine pronunciations or meanings of words in passages. DOK 2 This will be accomplished
               as students make sense of their reading through text clues.

Assessment Plan – In tabular format organize how objectives will be assessed. Include copies of
assessment instruments and rubrics (if applicable to the lesson plan).
EXAMPLE:
     Learner              Type of             Description of             Depth of                Adaptations and/or
                                                                        Knowledge
 Objective Number       Assessment            Assessment                  Level                   Accommodations
                                        Discussion
Objective 1          Formative          (Narrative Notes &
                                        Observation Checklist)              2        None
                                                                                     2 IEP students will be paired with stronger
Objective 1          Summative          Cloze Worksheet                     2        readers.
                                                                                     Visually impaired student will have larger
                                        (Rubric)                                     type font.
Objective 2          Pre-Assessment     Brainstorming Activity
                                        (Observation Checklist)             1        None




                                                                  129
Resources, Media, and Technology
A. List the specific materials and equipment needed for the lesson. Attach copies of
   printed materials to be used with the students.
B. List technology resources for the lesson, including hardware, software, and Internet
   URLs, and be sure to cite the sources used to develop this lesson.

Procedures – Describe the strategies and activities you will use to involve students and
accomplish your objectives, including how you will trigger prior knowledge and how you
will adapt strategies to meet individual student needs and the diversity in your
classroom. Be sure to make the connection between objectives, instruction, and
assessment.
A. Opening:
       1. Stimulate recall of prior learning. Use questions that promote higher order
            thinking. Include content information from previous lessons.
       2. Motivation: Describe what will be done to gain the students’ attention and
            interest in the lesson. Make connections to real-life situation; integrate the
            cultural attributes and interests of the    students.
       EXAMPLE:
            Teacher asks students if they remember the story of “Goldilocks and the Three Bears.” What was
            their favorite part of the story? What do they remember about the story? After brainstorming
            and discussing “pieces” of the story’s content, students complete the following steps:

B.   Strategies and Activities:
       1. Describe the teaching strategies that will be used to actively engage the
           students.
       2. Detail the learning activities the students will perform to achieve the lesson
           objectives. Explain how you will introduce and then reinforce concepts
           related to the lesson objectives. Appropriate        activities should be
           selected to address multiple levels of achievement, learning styles, and
           multiple intelligences, as well as to connect to real-life situations. List
           procedures specific to the activities. Attach printed materials that will be
           used by the students.
       3. Describe the modifications made to the lesson tasks to meet individual
           student needs.
       4. Describe how formative assessment will be conducted during the lesson.
       5. If "observation" is your assessment of choice, you must describe what you
           are assessing and include an observation checklist detailing what
           observable behaviors you will be assessing.
       EXAMPLE:
           1.   Students view a sample cloze passage from “Goldilocks and the Three Bears” on the
                  overhead. (See attached).
            2.   As a group, students fill in the missing words on the overhead.
            3.   Students discuss their strategies for figuring out the missing words.
            4.   Students listen as teacher reads I Can Hear the Sun.
            5.   Students discuss the story responding to some of the following questions:
                 a.     ...
                 b.     etc.
            6.   Students complete a modified cloze procedure worksheet on I Can Hear the Sun.
            Modifications: Two students have difficulty reading. I will pair them with better readers. One
            student is visually impaired. I will make sure that her reading material has an enlarged font.




                                                             130
           Summative Assessment: Worksheets will be the summative assessment tool. Completed worksheets will be
           assessed for the plausibility of answers, which will indicate an understanding of the book and the cloze procedure. See
           the attached answer key for possible responses and rubric for scoring.



INSTRUCTIONAL IMPACT/ANALYSIS OF TEACHING AND LEARNING – Prepared after the lesson.

1.    Analyze student assessment(s) and discuss the accomplishments of your students and the growth
      in learning that was achieved.
2.    Describe modifications you made during implementation of the lesson and how you think the
      modifications affected learning results.
3.    Describe how you will give instructional feedback to the students.


INSTRUCTIONAL REFINEMENT – Prepared after the lesson

Reflect on your teaching and student learning to identify future actions to improve both student and
teacher performance. (i.e. Changes you will make before you teach it again and plans for students who
did not make satisfactory progress).




                                                            131
Clin        ctice Can
   nical Prac               Withdrawa
                    ndidate W                e
                                    al/Failure Form

   dent: ______
Stud          ___________
                        __________
                                 ________ So
                                           ocial Securit Number: _
                                                       ty                 ________
                                                                 __________


   versity Supe
Univ                      ___________
              ervisor: ____                  ___                _____ Year: _______
                                    __________ Semester: ________




   sons for with
Reas                      lure:
               hdrawal/fail




   ommendatio made to candidate (c
Reco        ons                  counseling, career goal change, oth courses, etc.)
                                                       l           her




   ommendatio regardin future Cli
Reco        ons      ng                     ice      nt
                                inical Practi placemen




   nature: ____
Sign          ___________
                        ___________
                                 ___________
                                           ___________        Date: ______
                                                    _________ D          ________




                                                  132
Clinical Practice Terminology

The Educational Service Unit, College of Education, and Morehead State University endorse the following
terminology.

Clinical Practice Candidate:
A qualified student who has an opportunity to observe and teach with a cooperating teacher. The clinical practice
candidate gradually assumes increased classroom responsibility with a group of learners for the duration of the
Clinical Practice.

Clinical Practice Center:
A school or school system with which the college or university has agreed to establish a comprehensive Clinical
Practice program.

Cooperating School:
A school that is not controlled or supported by the university, but does provide facilities for Clinical Practice
experiences in a teacher education program and has a contract with Morehead State University.

Cooperating Teacher:
A certified classroom teacher who teaches children or adolescents, and also supervises teacher education candidates
during the Clinical Practice semester. Requirements to serve as a cooperating teacher, as designated by the
institution, must be verified. Requirements can be found under Duties of Cooperating Teacher. (p.57)

Director, Educational Service Unit:
The college representative who coordinates the Clinical Practice program for all areas of teacher preparation. The
Director acts as a liaison officer between the university and school districts.

Professional Development School:
This term refers to schools within the service region where pre-service teachers and/or teacher education candidates
are engaged in field experiences. A partnership contract is made between the district and Morehead State University.

Resident Center:
A Clinical Practice Center in which the teacher education candidate lives in residence and participates in the
community as a part of the Clinical Practice.

TK20:
A database allowing the College of Education to track individual student progress and program improvement.

Teacher Performance Assessment:
A new Teacher Performance Assessment (TPA) with an emphasis on student success will replace the KTIP portfolio.
The key to student success is using data for continuous improvement. The TPA is designed to put structures and
processes in place to measure teacher effectiveness via classroom instruction and the learning gains of students.

University Supervisor:
The college representative who is responsible for serving as a mentor for a clinical practice candidate or a group of
clinical practice candidates.




                                                                 133
Glossary

Assessment – Using various methods to obtain information about student learning that can be used to guide a
variety of decisions and actions.

Anecdotal Record – A written record kept in a positive tone of a child’s progress based on milestones particular to
that child’s social, emotional, physical, and cognitive development. Recording happens throughout the day while
actual learning occurs. Recordings are made when appropriate and are not forced. This method is informal and
encourages the use of a note pad, sticky notes, and a checklist with space for notes, etc. Continuous comments are
recorded about what a child can do and his/her achievements as opposed to what he/she cannot do.

Authentic Assessment – A broad evaluation procedure that includes a student’s performance or demonstration of
complex cognitive behaviors. Assessment occurs in the context of normal classroom involvement and reflects the
actual learning experience (i.e. portfolios, journals, observations, taped readings, videotaping, conferencing, etc.) The
products or performances, which are assessed, are like products and performances that occur in the “real world.”

Basal Textbook – A book that offers a basis for instruction for a course or grade level that is organized to provide
appropriate progression of information on a subject being studied.

Baseline Date – Information collected to comprise a reference set for comparison of a second set of data collected at
a later time; used to interpret changes over time usually after some condition has been changed for research
purposes that sets the standard for any research that follows in the same project.

Beliefs – A core group or set of guiding principles that serves as a basis for decision-making.

Best Practices – Current, national consensus recommendations that consistently offer the full benefit of the latest
knowledge, technology, and procedures impacting teaching and learning.

Benchmark – A term used interchangeably with “exemplar.” A benchmark is an example of student work that
illustrates the qualities of a specific score on a rubric or scoring guide.

Civic organizations – Clubs, fraternal or other community groups that have a knowledge, awareness and experience
to make a contribution to the larger community.

Classroom Writing/Working Folder – A collection of student writing in different stages of development from more
than one content area.

Co-curricular Activities – Clubs, athletic teams, intramurals or other school based organizations or activities that
provide opportunities for students to participate in the school community.

Collaboration - A systematic process by which people work together, interdependently, to analyze and impact professional
practice in order to improve individual and collective results.

Common Items – Items on the assessment taken by all students and on which individual student scores are based.

Computer Assisted Instruction –Instruction within a classroom used to enhance the acquisition of knowledge
through the use of interactive computer programs that allow students to work at their own pace.

Consolidated Plan – A school improvement plan organized around priority needs that include financial resources,
professional development, equity, and technology to improve the academic environment.

Cooperative Learning - A teaching strategy that groups students in structured learning groups requiring that they
work together to solve problems by using skills and content. The teacher acts as a facilitator of learning.

Critical Attributes – Those descriptors that define necessary components of the primary program. They are:
developmentally appropriate skillfully about causal explanation, prediction, generalization, reasoning by analogy,
conditional reasoning, and the reliability of sources of information and then applying them in evaluative ways.

Criteria – A standard on which a judgment or decision may be based.


                                                              134
Curriculum – An organized plan of instruction that engages students in learning the standards that have been
identified at the state and local level.

Curriculum Alignment – A curriculum in which what is taught, how it is taught, and how it is assessed is intentionally
based on, but not limited to the Kentucky Program of Studies, and the Kentucky Core Content for Assessment. The
sequence of learning in an aligned curriculum is articulated and constantly discussed, monitored and revised.

Curriculum Framework – Transformations: Kentucky’s Curriculum Framework, Volumes I & II provide direction in the
development of local curriculum and should serve as a major basis for staff development and the development of
instructional units and performance assessments.

Demonstrators – Expansions of the Academic Expectations that further define what students should be able to do as
found in Transformations.

Developmentally Appropriate – The use of content, instruction, and assessment that meets the student’s ability to
reason, interpret, focus, communicate, and interact, both socially and academically.

Developmental Appropriateness* - This concept of developmental appropriateness has two dimensions:
    Age appropriateness – Human development research indicates that there are universal, predictable
       milestones of growth and change that occur in children during the first nine years of life. These predictable
       changes occur in all domains of development – physical, emotional, social, cognitive, and aesthetic.
       Knowledge of typical development of children within the age span served by the program provides a
       framework from which teachers prepare the learning environment and plan appropriate experiences.

       Individual appropriateness – Each child is a unique person with an individual pattern and timing of growth,
        as well as individual personality, learning style and family background. Both the curriculum and adults’
        interactions with children should be responsive to individual differences. Learning in your children is the result
        of interaction between the child’s thought and experiences with materials, ideas, and people. When these
        experiences match the child’s developing abilities, while also challenging the child’s interest and
        understanding, learning will take place.

Differentiation – A philosophy, which involves students giving multiple options for taking in information, making sense
of ideas, and expressing what they learn. It provides different avenues to acquire content, process or make sense of
ideas, and develop products.

Diverse/ Diversity – The inclusion of differences based on race, gender, disability, age, national origin, color,
economic status, religion, geographic regions and other characteristics. Achieving diversity requires respect of
differences, valuing differences, supporting, encouraging and promoting differences, and affirmation initiatives, such
as recruitment, placement, and retention.

Educational Equity Plan – A plan, which addresses equity within the school environment.

Educational Technology – A variety of equipment used to teach pupils, including computers, telecommunication,
cable television, interactive video, film, lower-power television, satellite communications, and microwave
communications. In the future, special rate funding will provide such equipment.

Empowerment – The process of providing stakeholders with the opportunities to make decisions through a
consensus building process.

Equity – A condition that occurs when a community believes in and provides access, opportunity, and fairness to all
learners as demonstrated by the absence of any form of discrimination.

External Criteria – The list of requirements for judging work (i.e. rubric, scoring guide.)

Family Literacy Initiative – A national and state movement involving at-risk children and their families, with sufficient
intensity and duration, to make sustained changes in their lives through the educational process.

Family Resource and Youth Services Centers – Centers established to provide programs and make referrals to
service agencies to assist students and families in need.



                                                                135
Flexible Grouping – A strategy that allows students to work in differently mixed groups depending on the goal of the
learning task at hand.

Focus Groups - Ad hoc committees or groups formed to meet a specific purpose or need. They are together long
enough to formulate a solution or suggest a strategy.

Formative Assessment - An assessment for learning used to advance and not merely monitor each student’s learning
(Stiggins, 2001).

Heterogeneous Grouping – The grouping of students in classrooms on the basis of mixed abilities.

Holistic Scoring – A scoring process used to evaluate a student’s overall performance or product. One set of criteria
is used to assess the quality or overall effectiveness of student work. The criteria are written to include all the
expectations or standards, which are targeted.

Homogeneous Grouping – The grouping of students, based on their similarities, i.e., chronological age, reading
ability, and test scores.

Inclusion - It is both a philosophy and a practice where all students are considered and treated as members of the
school community.

Integrated/Interdisciplinary Curriculum – A curriculum, which purposefully links disciplines to each other.

Instructional Practices – Methodology used by teachers to engage students in the learning process.

Integration of Technology – Incorporating the use of computers or other technical equipment into the curriculum.

Learning Environment – Any setting or location inside or outside the school used to enhance the instruction of
students.

Learning Objectives/Outcomes - Learning objectives, sometimes referred to as outcomes, are statements that specify
what learners will know and/or be able to do as a result of experiencing the teaching of the series of lessons developed for
inclusion in the TPA. Learning objectives/outcomes are usually expressed as knowledge, skills, or attitudes.

Local Task Group – Similar to a Focus Group in structure and function.
Manipulative – Concrete or hands-on instructional materials and games used in the classroom in introduce and
reinforce skills.

Mentoring – Providing support for activities in a learning process by a person who usually has more experience or
expertise.

Mission - A statement of purpose to define the goals and direction; a guide for decisions and a set of criteria by which
to measure the school’s progress toward it’s defined purposes. It emphasizes the conditions that must be present in
schools where all children succeed.

Modality – The sensory styles through which people receive information.

Model Site – A primary program in completion; one that includes all of the Critical Attributes as outlined by the
Kentucky Department of Education.

Modeling – A teaching strategy in which the teacher demonstrates to student’s how to do a task, with the expectation
that the student will copy the model. Modeling often involves talking about how to work through a task or “thinking
aloud”.

Multicultural Education – (1) Interdisciplinary, cross-curricular education that prepares students to live, learn, and
work together to achieve common goals in a culturally diverse world. It does this by (a) enabling all students to be
aware of and affirmed in their own cultural roots; (b) allowing all students to understand and accept cultural diversity;
(c) fostering appreciation, respect, and understanding for persons of different cultural backgrounds; and (d) preparing
students to live fruitful lives in an increasingly global society with decreasing borders

Multi-Age – Grouping students of various ages together.
                                                              136
Non-Academic Data – Formally referenced as non-cognitive indicators of a school’s progress (retention rate, dropout
rate, attendance and school to work transition) included in the calculation of the school’s Academic Index.

On-Demand Writing Prompts – Also known as “writing prompt,” “prompt,” “Timed writing,” or “directed writing.”
Interchangeable terms refer to timed structured writing assessments that require extended writing, including essays,
letter, compositions, etc.

Open-Response Items – Questions that require students to combine content knowledge and application of process
skills in order to communicate as answer.

Outcome – Successful demonstration of learning that occurs at the culminating point of a set of learning experiences.

Partnership – Involvement of parents and/or family members and students themselves in a variety of home and
school based partner ship activities.

Peer Collaboration – Students working together in a group to solve a problem.

Peer and Cross-Age Tutoring – Support in the learning environment provided by same or different aged students.

Performance Assessment - See Authentic Assessment.

Portfolio - A purposeful or systematic collection of selected student work and student self-assessments developed
over time, gathered to demonstrate and evaluate progress and achievement in learning.

Process – The steps a student takes in reaching the final performance or product.

Professional Development – An intentional, ongoing, systematic process.          It is embedded in the process of
developing and evaluating curricula and student assessment.

Reflective Thinking – A process that provides a structured opportunity for students to consider what has taken place
and the feelings that have been stimulated through an experience.

Reliability – The accuracy and repeatability of a measurement.

Reliable – The consistency of assessment results from an instrument over time or over a number of trials.

Response to Intervention (RTI) - Response to Intervention (RTI) is a multi-tiered approach to help struggling learners.
Students' progress is closely monitored at each stage of intervention to determine the need for further research-based
instruction and/or intervention in general education, in special education, or both.


Rubric/Scoring Guide – A set of scoring guidelines to be used in evaluating a student’s work.

School Based Decision-Making – A council is typically composed of two parents, three teachers, and an
administrator. Councils adopt policies relating to instructional materials, personnel, curriculum, extracurricular
programs, and other aspects of school management. Exceptions are: successful schools that request a waiver,
districts that have only one school, district-wide operated schools, such as vocational and alternative, and special
education school.

Scrimmage – Practice tests that schools administer to improve student performance on the Commonwealth
Accountability Testing System.

Self-Assessment – A student’s evaluation of his/her own work.

Service Learning - A teaching methodology that allows students to learn and apply academic, social and personal
skills to improve the community, continue individual growth and become better citizens.

Stakeholder – Any person or group of people associated with the school community that has an interest in the
success of the school and its programs.


                                                             137
Standard(s) – Content: A description of what students need to know and be able to do.
     Performance: A description of how well students need to perform on
                   various skills and knowledge to be considered proficient.

Strategies – Plans and methods used by both teachers and students to approach a task.
Technology – Includes, but is not limited to, computers, telecommunication, cable television, interactive video, film,
television, satellite communication, and microwave communication that are in supplement instruction.

Summative Assessment - An assessment of learning (Stiggins, 2002) designed to provide a final measure to determine if
learning goals have been met (Ainsworth & Viegut, 2006).


Thematic Approach to Curriculum – An approach based on organizers that motivate students to investigate
interesting ideas from multiple perspectives. The central theme becomes the catalyst for developing the concepts,
generalizations, skills, attitudes, etc. Themes should encourage integration or correlation of various content areas.
The rationale is grounded in a philosophy that students learn most efficiently when subjects are perceived as worthy
of their time and attention and when they are activity engaged in inquiry. These themes may be broad-based or
narrow in scope; may be used for one class, designated classes, or the whole school; and may last for a few weeks
up to several months.

Thematic Units – Units of study built around a particular theme or topic that are examined across some or all of the
content areas.

Title 1 – Federal law and dollars for special help for disadvantaged children, from the federal law improving America’s
Schools Act.

TK20 - A database providing the ability to track individual student progress and program improvement.
http://moreheadstate.tk20.com

Teacher Performance Assessment -. The Teacher Performance Assessment (TPA) is the critical performance for
the undergraduate teacher education program clinical practice experience. The TPA is designed with structures and
processes in place to measure teacher effectiveness, via classroom instruction, as well as the learning gains of
students. As the sequence of 3-5 lessons is developed, students completing the section assignments will be exposed
to “backward design,” which includes both formative and summative assessments. Data analysis from the
assessments can, and should, drive decision making related to curriculum, instruction and assessment.

Tracking – Grouping students based on their abilities.

Validity – A measurement’s ability to actually measure what it purports to measure.

Values – A core belief structure.

Vision – A future oriented aspiration for the teaching and learning environment of the school.

Welcoming School Environment – An atmosphere/climate created within the school where everyone associated
with the educational system is treated in a warm and inviting manner.

Writing Assessment Portfolio - A selection of a student’s work, no longer required as a part of state assessment,
that represents his/her best efforts including evidence that the student has evaluated the quality of his/her own work
and growth as a writer. The student, in conferences with teachers, chooses the entries for this portfolio from the
writing folder, which should contain several drafts of the required pieces. Ideally, the writings will grow naturally out of
instruction rather than being created solely for the portfolio.




                                                                138
References & Credits
Ainsworth, L., & Viegut, D. (2006). Common formative assessments: An essential part of the integrated whole. Thousand
Oaks, CA: Corwin.

Stiggins, R. (2001). Student involved classroom assessment (3rd ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice-Hall.




                                                            139

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:1
posted:1/7/2013
language:English
pages:139