Docstoc

Literacy for Life - Saskatoon Public Schools

Document Sample
Literacy for Life - Saskatoon Public Schools Powered By Docstoc
					Literacy for Life
     2009-2010 Progress Update




         A Report from Administration
                                                                                                          Literacy for Life:  
                                                                                                2009‐2010 Progress Update 
                                                                                                                                             
                                                                                                                                              
Table of Contents 
 
 
                                                                                                                                      1
Introduction .........................................................................................................................   
 
                                             .
Chapter 1:  2009‐2010 Overview  ........................................................................................              1
 
Chapter 2:  Working with Others ........................................................................................              2
        Partnerships ...........................................................................................................      2
        Literacy for Life Conference ...................................................................................              2
        Saskatchewan Children’s Festival ...........................................................................                  3
        Saskatoon Public Library ........................................................................................             3
        READ Saskatoon .....................................................................................................          3
        Saskatoon Literacy Coalition ..................................................................................               3
        Okicīyapi Partnership .............................................................................................           4
                                       .
        External Consultants  ..............................................................................................          4
        Contributions to the Broader Educational Community .........................................                                  5
 
Chapter 3: Monitoring Our Progress ...................................................................................                6
        Read to Succeed .....................................................................................................         6
        Kindergarten ...........................................................................................................      7
        Grades 1 and 2  .......................................................................................................       9
        Grades 3‐5 ............................................................................................................  1  1
        Grades 6‐8 ............................................................................................................  3  1
                     .                                                                                                              1
        Just Read  ..............................................................................................................  4 
        Build a culture of readers .....................................................................................  5         1
        Engage communities ............................................................................................  5          1
        Increase volume of student reading.....................................................................  6                  1
        Use data to track progress ...................................................................................  6           1
        Confirmation of rubric data ..................................................................................  7           1
 
                                                                                     .
Chapter 4:  Continued Progress and Overall Sustainability  ..............................................  7                        1
                                                          .
        Short‐Term Goals for 2010‐2011  .........................................................................  7                1
        Long‐Term Plans for Sustainability of Literacy for Life .........................................  9                        1
   
                                                                                                                                    2
Appendix 1 .........................................................................................................................  1 
                                                                                                                                    2
Appendix 2 .........................................................................................................................  2 
 
 
                                                                                   Literacy for Life:  
                                                                         2009‐2010 Progress Update 
                                                                                                                 
                                                                                                                  
Introduction: 
 
Early  Learning  and  Literacy  is  one  of  two  learning  priorities  established  by  the  Board  of 
Education for Saskatoon Public Schools.  A large component of this learning priority is known as 
Literacy  for  Life  and  at  the  close  of  the  2009‐2010  school  year,  Saskatoon  Public  Schools  will 
realize a six  year focus on developing our students’ literacy outcomes.  It is rare that a school 
division  is  able  to  maintain  a  singular  learning  priority  for  as  long  as  Saskatoon  Public  Schools 
has held onto the goal of having all students, K‐12, reading at or above grade level.  We believe 
that  this  sustained  priority  has  done  much  to  enhance  the  culture  of  learning  in  our  school 
division – for students, their families and our staff.  
 
Literacy  for  Life  provides  a  strong  focus  for 
Saskatoon Public Schools as we work within the 
Ministry       of      Education’s           Continuous 
Improvement  Framework.    We  believe  that  the 
Board’s  priority  helps  us  to  fulfill  the  mandates 
of  “higher  literacy  and  achievement”  and 
“equitable  opportunities  and  outcomes  for  all” 
as  we  strive  for  improved  student  learning 
outcomes  in  a  variety  of  forms  of  literacy.    To 
that  end,  we  regularly  monitor  and  report  on 
our  students’  progress  through  regular  updates 
at  public  Board  meetings,  through  school  level 
strategic planning processes, and through an annual statement of progress.  This annual report 
for the 2009‐2010 school year concludes with both short term and long‐term considerations for 
continued progress and overall sustainability of this K‐12 literacy learning priority. 
 
 
Chapter 1: 2009‐2010 Overview 
 
   Teachers  in  Kindergarten  to  Grade  8  continued  to  use  professional  inquiry  cycles  to  help 
    them  more  fully  understand  and  integrate  professional  inquiry  into  their  professional 
    schema  (http://olc.spsd.sk.ca/de/pd/epic/index.htm)  and  their  professional  learning  plans 
    (PLPs).  
   As  a  part  of  the  Learning  Alliance  with  Regina  Public  Schools,  Pre‐Kindergarten  teachers 
    from Regina and Saskatoon visited each other’s classrooms with the intended outcomes of 
    learning about each other’s learning environments and reporting processes.  
   Literature  reviews  related  to  determining  successful  strategies  for  EAL  students  led  to  the 
    decision  to  encourage  schools  to  include  these  students  in  Read  to  Succeed  classes  once 
    they had established a base level of oral English.  Recommendations were embedded into 
    the  2009  Review  of  Read  to  Succeed  document  and  were  shared  with  school‐based 
    administrators. 
   The Fountas & Pinnell Assessment System was implemented in all elementary schools. 
   Little  Red  River  School  staff  purchased  professional  development  support  from  Saskatoon 
    Public  Schools  as  a  means  of  beginning  their  journey  to  increase  students’  learning 
    outcomes in literacy. 


                                                                                                               1 
                                                                                 Literacy for Life:  
                                                                       2009‐2010 Progress Update 
                                                                                                               
                                                                                                                
   In  alignment  with  Literacy  for  Life,  our  Community  Schools  established  Data  Teams  as  a 
    means  of  focusing  on  evidence  of  improved  student  learning  outcomes  in  reading  and 
    writing in grades K‐3.  The school year culminated with a celebratory “Learning Café” open 
    to  all  community  school  professional  staff.    Discussions  focused  on  evidence  of  improved 
    learning outcomes, and examined Leadership, Quality Teaching and Learning, and Necessary 
    Support Systems. 
   Curriculum  Renewal  in  Grades  6‐9,  through  several  subject  areas,  was  blended  into  all 
    Literacy for Life professional development sessions. 
   Inquiry learning and teaching efforts were a focus for several groups of teachers this year.  
    This  model  of  instruction  is  also  being  used  as  a  structure  for  professional  learning  in 
    Saskatoon  Public  Schools.    Inquiry  learning  involves  uncovering  the  learners’  curiousities 
    while building their capacities to seek out, research and/or practice what they are learning. 
   Assessment  for  Learning,  technology,  cultural  responsiveness,  and  First  Nations,  Inuit  and 
    Métis  Content,  Perspectives  and  Ways  of  Knowing  were  modeled  and  infused  into  all 
    Literacy for Life professional development efforts. 
   The Board for Saskatoon Public Schools announced the addition of two schools that will be 
    offering Full‐Day, Literacy‐Enhanced Kindergarten (FDK) in 2010‐2011; both Cree and English 
    programs at Confederation Park Community School and an English FDK program at Queen 
    Elizabeth School – the home of our future Early Learning Care Centre in partnership with the 
    Open Door Society and the Ministry of Education. 
   During  2009‐2010,  Saskatoon  Public  Schools  became  a  partner  member  of  the  Canadian 
    Critical  Thinking  Consortium.  Through  the  consortium’s  leader,  Mr.  Roland  Case,  Teacher 
    Librarians,  K‐12,  focused  their  Literacy  for  Life  and  Collegiate  Renewal  learning  by 
    examining  inquiry  learning,  resource‐based  learning,  critical  and  creative  thinking,  and 
    appropriate technology tools. 
 
 
Chapter 2: Working with Others 
 
Partnerships 
Since the onset of Literacy for  Life, we have been fortunate  to  have a wide  variety of literacy 
partners in our community.   
 
Literacy for Life Conference 
In  May  2010,  close  to  5,000  student  delegates  attended  the  fifth  year  of  the  Literacy  for  Life 
conference  on  the  University  of  Saskatchewan  campus.  Support  for  this  successful  conference 
has  been  garnered  from  schools,  post  secondary  institutions,  businesses,  corporations,  the 
Saskatoon  Tribal  Council  and  the  provincial  government.   Each  year,  more  than  35  business 
partners  have  been  involved  and  over  80  small  businesses  have  donated  items  to  be  used  for 
fund  raising  purposes.    The  conference  has  involved  approximately  40  local,  national  and 
international presenters and about 100 volunteers each year.  The conference involves student 
sessions  with  numerous  well‐known  authors  and  illustrators,  a  banquet,  and  a  business 
luncheon.  This year’s speaker at the banquet was the Right Honorable Adrienne Clarkson, while 
the business luncheon’s speaker was Mr. Gary Merasty.  Both were very well received and left 
their audiences with much to consider about the needs of our youth, the importance of multiple 
literacies, and the future of our society. 


                                                                                                             2 
                                                                                 Literacy for Life:  
                                                                       2009‐2010 Progress Update 
                                                                                                              
                                                                                                               
Saskatchewan Children’s Festival 
Through  our  partnership  with  the  Saskatchewan 
Children’s Festival, live theatre shows with applications to 
literacy  are  carefully  selected  and  sponsored  by 
Saskatoon Public Schools. Performances supported at the 
2010  Festival  include:  The  Man  Who  Planted  Trees,  and 
two  productions  that  also  focused  on  cultural 
responsiveness;  Khac  Chi  Bamboo  Music  and  La  Diva 
Extraordinaire.    This  year,  forty‐two  of  our  forty‐five 
elementary  schools  participated  in  this  literacy‐based, 
fun‐filled community event. 
 
Saskatoon Public Library 
According  to  personnel  at  Saskatoon  Public  Libraries 
(SPL),  the  staff  at  their  newest  branch  on  20th  Street  is 
“run  off  their  feet”  with  patrons  of  all  ages.    SPL  has 
commented  that  they  believe  this  is  due,  in  part,  to  the 
strong literacy relationship Saskatoon Public Schools built with them over the past three years 
through  provincial  granting  initiatives,  as  well  as  through  the  culture  of  readers  we  are 
developing  in  our  community  schools.  This  year,  Saskatoon  Public  Schools  joined  Saskatoon 
Public  Libraries  at  a  Saskatchewan  Public  Libraries  Forum  to  examine  our  common  goal  of 
creating a culture of readers through life‐long learning. 
 
READ Saskatoon  
READ  Saskatoon  is  a  not‐for‐profit  organization  focused  on  the  development  of  a  culture  of 
readers, along with reading skill development for children and adults.  Saskatoon Public Schools 
and  READ  Saskatoon  have  partnered  in  many  ways  over  the  past  few  years.  Recent  examples 
include, the Alphabet Soup program for parents and Pre‐Kindergarten programs.  Participation 
in Alphabet Soup is now a required aspect of our three‐way nutrition funding partnership with 
CHEP  (Child  Hunger  in  Education  Program),  READ  Saskatoon,  and  Saskatoon  Public  Schools’ 
PreKindergarten programs. Volunteers from READ Saskatoon annually give many hours to Book 
and Breakfast Clubs in our schools which strongly supports our Just Read initiative. 
 
Saskatoon Literacy Coalition 
Saskatoon Public Schools is a proud member of the Saskatoon Literacy Coalition.  As members of 
the  coalition,  we  are  strong  supporters  of  International  Literacy  Day  held  annually  at  SIAST 
Campus. Each year on September 8th, students and staff in our schools STOP, DROP AND READ 
to  celebrate  literacy  and  this  past  fall,  we  registered  15,441  readers  on  International  Literacy 
Day.    This  past  September,  our  Director  and  one  of  our  Literacy  Teachers,  Mary  Bishop  ‐  a 
nationally recognized children’s author ‐ spoke to the students and staff assembled on the SIAST 
campus. 
 
 
 
 
 


                                                                                                            3 
                                                                                 Literacy for Life:  
                                                                       2009‐2010 Progress Update 
                                                                                                              
                                                                                                               
Okicīyapi Partnership 
Saskatoon Public Schools is proud of its partnership with the Saskatoon Tribal Council and the 
Central  Urban  Métis  Federation  Incorporated.    This  award  winning  partnership,  known  as  the 
Okicīyapi  Partnership,  has  brought  a  particular  richness  to  our  professional  development 
sessions  because  of  the  involvement  of  teachers  from  a  variety  of  Saskatoon  Tribal  Council 
schools.    This  partnership  has  enhanced  our  ability  to  be  culturally  responsive  through  the 
selection of materials used throughout our Literacy for Life learning priority. In April, members 
of our Literacy for Life Team and our First Nations, Inuit and Métis Education Unit joined with 
teachers from the Saskatoon Tribal Council to share some of the highlights and successes of our 
partnership at the annual AWASIS conference. 
 
External Consultants 
External consultants bring a fresh perspective to our work. They provide objective feedback by 
serving  as  “critical  friends”  and  by  sharing  their  expertise  in  a  variety  of  areas  and  through 
current research. 
 
During 2009‐2010, we were fortunate to learn from a variety of external consultants: 
o Mrs. Debbie Miller engaged our trustees, teachers and school‐based administrators through 
    both  theoretical  and  practical  examples  of  enhancing  students’  reading  comprehension 
    strategies  in  Kindergarten  to  Grade  5.    Debbie’s  published  works  include:    Teaching  with 
    Intention: Defining Beliefs, Aligning Practice, and Taking Action, Reading with Meaning, and 
    two video series Happy Reading! and The Joy of Conferring. 
     
o Dr.  Roland  Case,  founder  of  the  Canadian  Critical  Thinking  Consortium,  and  professor  of 
    curriculum and social studies at Simon Fraser University. With the consortium, Dr. Case has 
    worked  with  15,000  classroom  teachers  to  embed  critical  thinking  into  their  practice.  His 
    several hundred academic and professional presentations have been delivered to audiences 
    across Canada and the United States and in England, Israel, Russia and India. In addition to 
    his  work  in  critical  thinking,  Dr.  Case  has  authored  or  edited  books  on  judicial  reasoning, 
    law‐related education, social studies teaching and program evaluation. 
     
o Mrs.  Karen  Hume  is  a  well‐known  Canadian  teacher,  administrator,  author,  speaker,  and 
    workshop  leader.  Karen's  publications  revolve  around  a  differentiated  instruction 
    framework.    Her  specific  areas  of  interest  within  this  framework  include  effective  and 
    responsive  instruction  and  assessment;  engaging  learners;  developing  effective  learning 
    communities  for  students  and  adults;  literacy  education;  evidence‐informed  decision 
    making;  and  change  processes  for  adult  learners.    Central  Office  personnel  worked  with 
    Karen in the fall and have relied quite heavily on many of her publications across the year.  
     
o Dr. Doug Reeves is the founder of The Leadership and Learning Center.  He has worked with 
    education,  business,  nonprofit,  and  government  organizations  throughout  the  world.   The 
    author  of  more  than  20  books  and  many  articles  on  leadership  and  organizational 
    effectiveness,  he  has  twice  been  named  to  the  Harvard  University  Distinguished  Authors 
    Series.   Several  of  his  publications  have  spurred  the  thinking  and  actions  of  central  office 
    and school‐based personnel during 2009‐2010.  Although we did not work with Dr. Reeves 
    directly in Saskatoon, his work with “raising the bar” for vulnerable children, along with his 
    focus on school‐based data teams, has been critical to the work we are currently conducting 


                                                                                                            4 
                                                                                Literacy for Life:  
                                                                      2009‐2010 Progress Update 
                                                                                                             
                                                                                                              
    in our community schools.  A small team of leaders will be working with Dr. Reeves at a Data 
    Team Summit at the end of June. 
 
o   Dr. Douglas Willms is the Director of the Canadian Research Institute for Social Policy at the 
    University  of  New  Brunswick  (UNB).  He  has  published  over  two  hundred  research  articles 
    and  monographs  pertaining  to  youth  literacy,  children’s  health,  the  accountability  of 
    schooling  systems,  and  the  assessment  of  national  reforms.  He  is  the  editor  of  Vulnerable 
    Children: Findings from Canada’s National Longitudinal Study of Children and Youth, and the 
    author of Student engagement at school: A sense of belonging and participation. Dr. Willms 
    played  a  lead  role  in  developing  the  questionnaires  for  Canada’s  National  Longitudinal 
    Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY) and the OECD’s Programme for International Student 
    Assessment  (PISA).  Recently,  Dr.  Willms  and  his  colleagues  designed  the  Early  Years 
    Evaluation (EYE), an instrument for the direct assessment of children’s developmental skills 
    at ages 3 to 6. 
 
Contributions to the Broader Educational Community 
Having  a  learning  priority  calls  upon  us  to  share  our  learning  with  the  broader  education 
community.  What follows are the contributions made during 2009‐2010: 
  A  number  of  Literacy  Teachers  presented  at  the  Saskatchewan  Reading  Association 
   Conference.  Since that time, we have had numerous requests made to our literacy team to 
   share  their  expertise  in  a  variety  of  school  divisions  both  inside  and  outside  of 
   Saskatchewan. 
  We  hosted  Horizon  Public  School  Division  as  a  part  of  the  information‐gathering  phase  of 
   their strategic plan.  We are hopeful we will be able to collaborate with this school division 
   in  the  future  as  we  continue  to  explore  best  means  for  enhancing  classroom  practice  and 
   assessment methods related to student literacy outcomes. 
  We  have  been  contacted  by  the  Battleford  Tribal  Council  and  are  in  the  midst  of 
   determining how we might be able to support this school division with their literacy learning 
   in the future. 
  Saskatoon  Public  Schools  and  its  progress  in  Literacy  for  Life 
   was  featured  in  Dr.  Bruce  Joyce  and  Dr.  Emily  Calhoun’s  most 
   recent  publication  entitled  Models  of  Professional 
   Development: A Celebration of Educators (February 2010). 
  Through  Dr.  Doug  Willms,  Saskatoon  Public  Schools  partnered 
   with  The  Canadian  Research  Institute  for  Social  Policy  (CRISP) 
   to  host  a  conference  focusing  on  the  assessment  of  children's 
   development at ages 3 to 6 years. 
  During  2009‐2010  two  of  our  literacy  teachers  served  as  the 
   President and Vice President of the Saskatoon Reading Council.  
   Their  expertise  and  influence  were  evident  as  they  worked  as 
   key  organizers  for  the  upcoming  2010‐11  provincial  reading 
   conference.    At  this  conference,  Gerald  Duffy,  an 
   internationally known researcher, will serve as a keynote speaker.  Through the same two 
   literacy  teachers,  we  were  able  to  secure  Dr.  Duffy as  an  external  support  for  Literacy  for 
   Life in 2010‐2011.  



                                                                                                           5 
                                                                                             Literacy for Life:  
                                                                                   2009‐2010 Progress Update 
                                                                                                                                 
                                                                                                                                  
      Ministry  consultants,  Dean  Elliott  and  Brent  Toles,  attended  Literacy  for  Life  professional 
       development  sessions  in order  to  guide  their  own  thinking  about  curriculum  development 
       and renewal across Saskatchewan. 
      Saskatoon Public Schools’ teachers worked with, and shared instructional knowledge with, 
       169  elementary  and  secondary  teacher  interns  from  the  University  of  Saskatchewan, 
       University of Regina and the University of Lethbridge.  We are already well into the process 
       of placing next year’s interns and know we will realize a similar cohort in 2011‐2012.   
 
 
Chapter 3: Monitoring Our Progress 
 
Educational research (Davies, Stiggins, Wilms, McTighe, Wiggins, and others) consistently shows 
that  data  collected  from  a  broad  range  of  assessments,  when  used  appropriately,  improves 
student  and/or  organizational  learning.  As  a  part  of  our  learning  through  the  Literacy  for  Life 
learning  priority,  Saskatoon  Public  Schools  continues  to  learn  about,  and  become  stronger  at, 
understanding  and  using  assessment  for  and  of  learning  practices  through  the  triangulated 
collection  of  products,  conversations  and  observations.    Over  the  last  number  of  years, 
Saskatoon Public Schools has broadened and strengthened its repertoire of measurement tools 
at all grade levels (See Appendix 2). 
 
Read to Succeed 
Read  to  Succeed  is  aimed  at  helping  students  in  Grades  3‐12  who  struggle  with  reading.    This 
intensive  program  is  designed  to  help  students  develop  reading  skills  and,  at  the  same  time, 
experience success as readers – often for the first time.  Students in the program receive reading 
and  writing  instruction  for  90  minutes  per  day  outside  of  their  regularly  scheduled  English 
language arts programs. 
 
Evidence  of  Learning  in  Read  to  Succeed: 
Grades 3‐8 
With  the  voluntary  implementation  of  the 
Fountas  &  Pinnell  Assessment  System  (F&P) 
in  2008‐2009,  we  were  able  to  administer 
both  it  and  the  Gray  Oral  Reading  Test 
(GORT)  to  our  Read  to  Succeed  students. 
During 2009‐2010, only the F&P was used as 
a pre and post assessment tool in all Read to 
Succeed classrooms.  The 2009‐2010 analysis 
and  reporting  out  of  the  F&P  results  will  be 
presented  to  Trustees  in  the  fall  of  2010‐
2011. 
 

    My  students  are  excited  about  the  ‘student  driven’  projects  they  have  taken  part  in  this  year.  With  the 
    incorporation of Reggio and inquiry, the students are making wonderful connections to their learning. 

 



                                                                                                                            6 
                                                                               Literacy for Life:  
                                                                     2009‐2010 Progress Update 
                                                                                                            
                                                                                                             
Evidence of Learning in Read to Succeed: Grades 9‐12 
Read  to  Succeed  in  Grades  9‐12  is  largely  integrated  within  Saskatoon  Public  Schools’  other 
learning priority, Collegiate Renewal.  It was therefore determined in 2008‐2009 that this aspect 
of  Literacy  for  Life  would  be  monitored  and  reported  on  through  the  Collegiate  Renewal 
learning priority.  
 
Kindergarten 
During 2009‐2010, Saskatoon Public Schools offered Full Day, Literacy Enhanced Kindergarten in 
ten  elementary  schools.    In  response  to  families’  needs,  the  remaining  schools  offered  a 
combination  of  half‐day  programs  and  full‐day,  alternate  day  programs.    In  all  Kindergarten 
programs,  Literacy  for  Life  provides  literacy  enhanced  learning,  and  our  students’  learning 
outcomes indicate this focus is helping them to achieve at strong levels.  Much of this focus has 
grown out of our understandings of the Picture Word Inductive Model (PWIM) and from recent 
research conducted in the early years. 
 
Evidence of Student Learning 
Alphabet letters are the building blocks of all aspects of literacy. Alphabet Recognition continues 
to  be  collected  and  reported  centrally  on  a  regular  basis  by  classroom  teachers.  While  it  is 
important for children to learn both lower‐ and upper‐case letters, the ability to recognize lower 
case letters is a particularly difficult skill for children to master. Therefore, this skill is highlighted 
here  as  an  important  determiner  both  of  alphabet  recognition  skill  development  and  of 
emergent literacy skills in general. 
 
Kindergarten students have experienced substantial growth in terms of their ability to recognize 
lower case letters (see Table 1). In September 2009, 30% of Kindergarten students were able to 
recognize 20‐26 lower case letters, and 43% knew 10 or fewer letters.  However, by June 2010, 
90% of the students knew 20‐26 lower case letters; while only 2% knew 10 or fewer lower case 
letters.  
 
Table 1 

Kindergarten Alphabet Statistics ‐ Longitudinal (2006‐07 to 2009‐2010) 

Number of Letters         Month           06‐07             07‐08             08‐09             09‐10 

                       September           28%               24%               27%               30% 
20‐26 
                       June                83%               91%               87%               90% 

                       September           46%               45%               45%               43% 
10 or fewer 
                       June                 7%                3%               4%                2% 

 
Kindergarten students continue to be very successful in adding words to their sight vocabularies 
(see Table 2). During this year’s September PWIM cycle, Kindergarten students, as a group, were 
able  to  recognize  about  13%  of  the  total  number  of  words  generated  at  the  beginning  of  the 
cycle, and they knew about 46% of those words at the end of the cycle. At the beginning of the 
next to last cycle of the year, students knew about 40% of the words generated while at the end 


                                                                                                          7 
                                                                                Literacy for Life:  
                                                                      2009‐2010 Progress Update 
                                                                                                                
                                                                                                                 
of the cycle, they knew 72%  of those words. These results reflect the notion that students are 
adding word identification strategies to their “reading tool kit” from the beginning of the year to 
the end.  
 
Table 2 

Kindergarten Vocabulary Statistics – Comparison of 2006‐07, 2007‐08, 2008‐09 & 2009‐10 

                                       September                                      June 
Assessment cycle 
                          06‐07     07‐08     08‐09     09‐10      06‐07     07‐08      08‐09       09‐10 

First assessment           15%       14%       14%       13%        34%       36%        33%           40% 

Last assessment            49%       40%       38%       46%        63%       75%        68%           72% 

 
Twice  during  the  2009‐10  school  year,  all  Kindergarten  teachers  conducted  the  Early  Years 
Evaluation (EYE). The EYE is a teacher‐completed assessment that we have been using as a pre‐
and post‐test to measure student growth. We have found the EYE to be particularly helpful in 
monitoring  the  extent  to  which  there  are  learning  and  developmental  differences  between 
students  enrolled  in  the  Full‐day,  Everyday,  Literacy‐Enhanced  Kindergarten  (FDK)  program 
compared to those who are enrolled in half‐day Kindergarten programs (HDK). 
 
Based  on  findings  from  the  EYE,  we  can  say  there  is  strong  evidence  to  suggest  that  students 
who are enrolled in the FDK program experience greater growth during their Kindergarten year 
and are more likely to be well‐prepared for Grade 1 as compared to their HDK peers.  The EYE 
domains assessed include: cognitive development, awareness of self and environment, physical 
development,  language,  and  social  skills  and  approaches  to  learning.  The  findings  from  this 
year’s EYE assessment indicate that: 
   Students in FDK showed more growth in two domains: i) awareness of self and environment, 
    and ii) cognitive development. 
   Growth  in  the  remaining  domains  ‐  language  development,  and  two  aspects  of  physical 
    development were relatively consistent between both groups. 
   Dr. Doug Willms constructed a “vulnerability score” for each child from the dataset. A child 
    was considered ‘vulnerable” if he or she had a low learning score in either the fall or spring 
    EYE assessment. Our findings are as follows: 
       Overall, there was a reduction in vulnerability across both HDK and FDK. 
       Children in FDK were more likely to make a “successful transition” as compared to their 
        counterparts in HDK (2.2 times more likely). 
       In terms of the move from “vulnerability” to being “no longer vulnerable”, about 18% of 
        Kindergarten  children  who  were  considered  “vulnerable”  in  October  made  the 
        successful  transition  to  being  no  longer  vulnerable  in  May  (about  10%  were  still 
        vulnerable  in  May  –  a  figure  which  is  consistent  with  typical  percentages  of  children 
        considered to have special needs). 
                                    




                                                                                                              8 
                                                                                      Literacy for Life:  
                                                                            2009‐2010 Progress Update 
                                                                                                                       
                                                                                                                        
            
                    September 2009                                                     June 2010 
 
                                                      
                                                      
                                                       
                                                       
                                                       
                                                        
                                                        
                                                         
                                                         
                                                          
                                                          
                                                          
                                                           
                                                           
                                                           
                                                           
                                                           
                                                           
                                                           
 
 
Grades 1 and 2 
Grades  1  and  2  teachers  spent  this  school  year  studying  literacy  instruction  in  reading  and 
writing.  Inquiry learning in the classroom was a major focus this year and through the support 
of  Debbie  Miller,  our  teachers  examined  classroom  learning  environments,  explicit  reading 
strategies, and students’ self‐selection of reading materials. 
 
Evidence of Learning 
Between 2004‐2008, significant improvements, on average, were noted in our Grade 1 students’ 
reading  comprehension  achievements.    On  average,  at  this  grade  level,  we  appeared  to  have 
met our goal of having students reading at or above grade level.  In 2008‐2009, we introduced 
the  Fountas  and  Pinnell  Assessment  System  in  a  number  of  our  Grade  1  classrooms.    As 
indicated  to  the  Board  that  year,  the  decision  was  made  not  to  assess  our  Grade  1  students 
using the GORT (Grey Oral Reading Test), but rather, to focus our energies and resources on the 
implementation of the Fountas & Pinnell system.  Implementation of this tool is underway and 
will be used to report our progress at the end of 2010‐2011.   
 
                                        


    I feel my students are more engaged with the PWIM model this year. It has taken me some time to put everything 
    together, as I become a better teacher...they are learning more.




                                                                                                                  9 
                                                                                          Literacy for Life:  
                                                                                2009‐2010 Progress Update 
                                                                                                                            
                                                                                                                             
Table 3 
    Longitudinal Analysis of Reading Comprehension Results for Grade 1 

                                      03‐04        04‐05          05‐06            06‐07            07‐08       08‐10 
                                                                                                                 See 
    May assessment = 1.9 GLE           1.6          2.2            2.3              2.0              2.0 
                                                                                                                above 
    norm for this month               GORT         GORT           GORT             GORT             GORT 
                                                                                                                 text 
 
Grade  1  students  made  very  good  progress  related  to  alphabet  acquisition  (see  Table  4).  This 
year’s data show that 84% of Grade 1 students knew 20‐26 lower case letters at the beginning of 
the 2009‐10 school year. By the end of the year, nearly all students had achieved the ultimate 
goal of recognizing all of their lower case letters. 
 
            Table 4 
             Grade 1 Alphabet Statistics – Longitudinal (2006‐07 to 2009‐10) 

             Number of letters            Month        06‐07        07‐08               08‐09         09‐10 

                                     September         85%             80%              82%           84 % 
              20‐26 
                                           June        98%             99%              99%           97% 

                                     September          4%               6%              6%            5% 
             10 or fewer 
                                           June         0%               0%              0%            1% 
 
Grade 1 students also continue to be successful in adding new words to their sight vocabularies 
(see Table 5). On average, students recognized 41% of the words at the start of the first PWIM 
cycle of the 2009‐2010 school year and were able to recognize 70% of the words by the end of 
the  cycle.  In  comparison,  Grade  1  students  began  the  next  to  last  PWIM  cycle  of  the  year 
knowing 69% of their vocabulary words and, by the end of that cycle, knew 87% of the words.  
These results are very similar to those noted over the past few years and indicate our Grade 1 
students  have  grown  significantly  in  their  ability  to  recognize  vocabulary  using  multiple 
strategies.  They have become good “word detectives”. 
 
Table 5 
Grade 1 Vocabulary Statistics – Comparison of 2006‐07, 2007‐08, 2008‐09 & 2009‐10 

                                          September                                              June 

Assessment Cycle            06‐07         07‐08    08‐09        09‐10          06‐07       07‐08       08‐09     09‐10 

First assessment            46%           47%      44%          41%            73%          70%          73%      69% 

Last assessment             76%           75%      76%          70%            87%          89%          91%      87% 

 
                                       




                                                                                                                         10 
                                                                               Literacy for Life:  
                                                                     2009‐2010 Progress Update 
                                                                                                            
                                                                                                             
Through  sampling  our  Grade  2  students,  we  assessed  them  in  March,  using  the  F&P,  to 
determine  their  reading  accuracy  and  comprehension  development  levels.    Below  is  the 
frequency  distribution  of  the  Instructional  Level  F&P  scores  for  our  Grade  2  students. 
Observations made through these results include: 
 Approximately 160 Grade 2 students were assessed by external assessors.  
 The  Fountas  and  Pinnell  Assessment  System  identifies  gradients  that  correspond  to  grade 
    levels.  It is expected that students in Grade 2 will score in the range of gradients H – M (See 
    Appendix 1).   In Saskatoon Public Schools, we expect Grade 2 students assessed in March to 
    achieve at gradient K or higher. 
 The  majority  of  our  sampled  Grade  2  students  performed  in  the  middle  and  upper  end  of 
    the expected range.  About 65% of the students achieved at gradient K or higher.  
 It  is  worthy  of  note  that  the  gradient  range  from  P‐W  falls  in  the  Grades  4‐5  reading 
    accuracy and comprehension levels. 
 Using  school  specific  data,  along  with  AfL  data,  it  will  be  important  in  2010‐2011  that  we 
    identify  those  students  not  achieving  at  acceptable  levels  and  work  to  improve  their 
    learning outcomes. 
     
Figure 1 
 
                             Grade 2 Fountas & Pinnell Results ‐
                                     Instructional Level
                0.16
 
                0.11
 
                0.06
 
                0.01
 
                        A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U W
               ‐0.04
 
 
Grades 3‐5 
 
                                                       Professional  development  sessions  for  these 
                                                       teachers  focused  on  implementing  renewed 
                                                       curricula through inquiry‐based approaches to 
                                                       teaching  and  learning,  along  with  approaches 
                                                       to hands on learning in Science.  The Ministry 
                                                       provided  draft  copies  of  the renewed  science 
                                                       curriculum  to  enable  teachers  to  explore 
                                                       renewed  science  topics  through  inquiry  kits 
                                                       developed  by  the  literacy  team.   Teachers 
                                                       were  guided  to  develop  their  own  capacities 
                                                       toward getting to the heart of what matters in 
                                                       content,  and  establishing  big  ideas  and 



                                                                                                         11 
                                                                               Literacy for Life:  
                                                                     2009‐2010 Progress Update 
                                                                                                            
                                                                                                             
essential understandings.   Assessment for Learning principles were used to triangulate evidence 
of  student  learning  using  conversations,  observations  and  products  as  an  approach  to  unit 
development.   
 
Evidence of Learning 
We  assessed  a  sample  of  our  Grade  3  students  in  March,  using  the  Fountas  and  Pinnell 
Assessment  System,  to  determine  their  average  developmental  levels  in  reading  accuracy  and 
comprehension.  Below is the frequency distribution of the Instructional Level scores for Grade 
3 students.  Observations from this assessment include: 
 Approximately 160 Grade 3 students were assessed by external assessors. 
 The Fountas and Pinnell Assessment System identifies gradients that roughly correspond to 
     grade levels.  It is expected that students in Grade 3 will score in the range of gradients, L‐P 
     (see  Appendix  1).      In  Saskatoon  Public  Schools,  we  expect  Grade  3  students  assessed  in 
     March to achieve at gradient O or higher.  
 The  majority  of  our  sampled  Grade  3  students  performed  in  the  middle  and  upper  end  of 
     the expected range. About 60% of our students achieved at gradient O or higher. 
 Using  school  specific  data,  along  with  AfL  data,  it  will  be  important  in  2010‐2011  that  we 
     identify  those  students  who  are  not  achieving  at  acceptable  levels  and  work  to  improve 
     their learning outcomes. 
 
Figure 2 
     
                         Grade 3 Fountas & Pinnell Results ‐
                                   Instructional Level
 
             0.15
 
               0.1
 
             0.05
 
                 0
                     A D E H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X
 
 
We look to the provincial Assessment for Learning results as another piece of evidence of our 
progress.  Overall, Grade 4 students achieved remarkably well in all five reading outcome areas 
included in the provincial assessment (see Figure 3).  Our students’ performance was similar to 
provincial results.  Our students’ performance also improved substantially over the 2007 results 
in all five areas.  
 
                                    




                                                                                                         12 
                                                                                         Literacy for Life:  
                                                                               2009‐2010 Progress Update 
                                                                                                                            
                                                                                                                             
Figure 3 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Grades 6‐8 
In 2009‐2010, the focus for professional learning at Grades 6‐8 was Curriculum Renewal through 
Literacy for Life. Outcomes for this work included: 
   Transitioning toward curriculum renewal,  
   Aligning with the goals of Saskatoon Public Schools’ learning priorities,  
   Examining the role of technology in effective instruction, 
   Developing cross cultural competencies, 
   Exploring inquiry as a philosophical approach to teaching and learning, and 
   Strengthening our use of formative assessment.  
The  vehicle  used  to  actualize  these  outcomes  was  a  focus  on  non‐fiction  writing  across  all 
subject areas.  
 
Evidence of Learning 
We  look  to  the  provincial  Assessment  for  Learning  results  as  one  piece  of  evidence  of  our 
students’ progress.  Grade 7 students achieved remarkably well in all five reading outcome areas 
included in the provincial assessment (see Figure 4).  Our students’ performance was similar to 
provincial  results  ‐  with  the  exception  of  “reader  response”  in  which  case  our  students 
performed  meaningfully  higher  as  compared  to  their  provincial  peers.  Our  students’ 
performance also improved over the 2007 results in all five areas. The improvement in each of 
these areas was similar to provincial improvements. 
 
 
 
                                          

    I have intentionally moved to releasing responsibility to my students. We have been able to focus on inquiry and do 
    more exploring and discovering to go deeper in our learning. 




                                                                                                                     13 
                                                                             Literacy for Life:  
                                                                   2009‐2010 Progress Update 
                                                                                                        
                                                                                                         
Figure 4 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Just Read  
Just Read is a targeted initiative aimed at increasing the amount of reading our students enjoy 
outside  of  school  time.  It  is  designed  to  link  our  schools  and  our  community  together  in 
powerful ways as we encourage our students to read more fiction and non‐fiction material, and 
to develop the culture, habit and joy of reading.  
 
Research indicates that regular reading improves 
a person’s learning and literacy skills. We want all 
of  our  young  people  to  view  reading  as  an 
enjoyable and worthwhile option.  
 
Principals, staffs, and School Community Councils 
incorporate  Just  Read  in  their  schools’  strategic 
plans. Each school identifies goals and strategies 
to  achieve  the  Just  Read  goals  that  are 
meaningful  to  their  school  communities  and 
make  plans  to  celebrate  their  successes.    As 
schools  implement  their  Just  Read  plans, 
evidence is collected over time to document progress.  Principals, in consultation with teachers, 
students, and parents, collate their data to include the Just Read results in their schools’ annual 
reports. 
 
 
 


                                                                                                     14 
                                                                              Literacy for Life:  
                                                                    2009‐2010 Progress Update 
                                                                                                          
                                                                                                           
Specific Division‐wide efforts within Just Read during 2009‐2010 include: 
   The development of the Olympic Reading Challenge; Reading for Gold and bookmarks, 
   Design and distribution of new Just Read posters, 
   Partnership with the Saskatchewan Children’s Festival, and 
   The creation of newsletter inserts to support parents through school newsletters. 
 
As  evidence  of  progress  through  a  Division  perspective,  we  annually  collect  each  school’s 
assessment evidence through an online measurement tool. The graphs below provide a sense of 
progress  schools  have  made  as  they  work  toward  the  goals  of  Just  Read.  The  results  are 
reported  here  according  to  categories  represented  by  colour  (green  –  for  very  good  progress, 
yellow – for average progress, and red – an area of challenge).  The graphs are also accompanied 
by representative quotes submitted by principals. 
                                                                                                 Figure 5 
Build a culture of readers 
“We  have  made  effective  use  of  our  grant 
from  [book  retailer]  to  build  a  culture  of 
readers …  we had class and family trips to 
[book  retailer],  enhancement  of  classroom 
libraries with student input, as well as book 
giveaways  on  a  weekly  basis.  Students  and 
staff  shared  books  at  assemblies  almost 
every  week,  and  many  classes  have  made 
trips  to  the  public  library  a  regular  part  of 
their reading program.” 
 
“Our  students  [and  staff]  have  moved 
beyond  ‘book  byte’  reporting  into  being 
more  reflective  of  their  reading  and  the 
impact on the rest of their learning.” 
 
Engage communities                                                                               Figure 6 
“Parents  were  much  more  involved  in 
student  literacy  this  year...  many  parents 
visited the public library with our classes.” 
 
“Some  of  our  Grade  11  English  Language 
Arts  classes  have  gone  to  elementary 
schools  in  our  area  to  read  and  work  with 
students in their Language Arts classes.” 
 
“We  have  a  group  of  seniors  in  our 
community who come weekly to our school 
and read with our students (some of whom 
might  have  less  support  for  individual 
reading at home).” 
 



                                                                                                       15 
                                                                Literacy for Life:  
                                                      2009‐2010 Progress Update 
                                                                                               
                                                                                                
Increase volume of student reading 
“The  staff  re‐worked  student  reading 
surveys to gather more specific information                                       Figure 7
about  student  reading  behaviour  at  home 
and  attitudes  toward  reading.  Specific 
information  about  book  preferences  was 
also  collected.  Staff  then  worked  with 
students  to  bring  appropriate  and 
interesting  reading  materials  into  the  class 
to support struggling readers.” 
 
“Our  Teacher  Librarian  reports  we  are 
increasing our circulation in the library.  Our 
boys  are  reading  more  graphic  novels  and 
magazines.  We have a strong core group of 
readers  and  we  continue  to  encourage  our 
struggling readers.” 
 
Use data to track progress                                                             Figure 8
“All  staff  created  data  grids  that  pulled 
together  multiple  sources  of  relevant 
information to gain a clearer understanding 
of the literacy progress of their students.” 
 
“Our  school  collected  and  studied  product, 
observational,  and  conversational  evidence 
to describe the kind and amount of reading 
done  by  students  this  year.  We  also 
compared  LRC  circulation  rates  from  this 
school  year  to  last,  and  we  noted  how 
increased  classroom  libraries  affected 
reading rates and circulation rates.” 
 
                                                                                   Figure 9 
“The  teachers  use  this  same  'traffic  light' 
icon  to  track  their  students.  The  principal 
and  literacy  committee  reviews  this  (SIC) 
data and an intervention plan is put in place 
[where  needed].  The  students  are  made 
aware of their standings and place a greater 
effort  to  improve  their  reading.  In  some 
cases  this  information  is  shared  with 
parents  and  this  also  has  a  positive  impact 
on children's reading.” 
 
                                      




                                                                                            16 
                                                                             Literacy for Life:  
                                                                   2009‐2010 Progress Update 
                                                                                                           
                                                                                                            
Confirmation of rubric data 
If  we  triangulate  our  Just  Read  rubric 
information  with  data  collected  from  other                                              Figure 10 
sources,  we  have  confirmation  of  the  data 
collected from our principals.  For example: 
   Through  data  collected  via  our  Board’s 
    parent  survey,  we  have  seen  a  steady 
    increase  in  the  percentage  of  parents 
    who  strongly  agree  that  their  child  is 
    developing  or  has  developed  a 
    satisfactory level of reading (Figure 9). 
   According to data collected through our 
    student  perception  survey  (WDYDIST) 
    the  amount  of  time  students  spend 
    reading  books  for  fun  has  remained 
    relatively  consistent  for  the  past  two 
    years.    Figure  10  indicates  that,  on 
    average,  our  students  report  that  they 
    read  for  fun  for  56  minutes  per 
    weekday.    The  Canadian  norm  for  this 
    survey item is 42 minutes per day.  This 
    equates  to  our  students  reading  14 
    minutes per day more, or about an hour 
    per  week  more,  than  the  Canadian 
    norm. 
 
 
Chapter 4: Continued Progress and Overall Sustainability 
 
As we look to the future of Literacy for Life, it is important to attend to both short and long term 
goals for student and staff learning, while considering the provincial and national context, and 
the Ministry of Education’s Continuous Improvement Framework. Further, it is our intention to 
embed the appropriate use of instructional technology, First Nations, Inuit and Métis Content, 
Perspectives  and  Ways  of  Knowing,  and  powerful  strategies  to  support  our  new  Canadian 
students  throughout  the  initiative.    Through  continuous  examinations  of  our  evidence  of 
progress, we have identified the following targets: 
 
Short‐Term Goals for 2010‐2011: 
Leadership  building  for  sustainability,  partnership  work,  sharing  with  the  larger  educational 
community, strengthening our understandings of our students’ achievements, staying abreast of 
educational research, implementing curriculum renewal and working with external consultants 
will continue in 2010‐2011. It is also our intent to continue to provide professional development 
and data analysis opportunities which are focused on the achievements of our students: 
 
    Read to Succeed: The focus for professional development will be to continue to support the 
     components of the Read to Succeed model, to engage struggling readers through an inquiry 


                                                                                                     17 
                                                                                      Literacy for Life:  
                                                                            2009‐2010 Progress Update 
                                                                                                                    
                                                                                                                     
        stance  in  our  Read  to  Succeed  classrooms,  and  to  more  effectively  weave  assessment  for 
        learning  practices  into  instruction.      Our  goal  for  student  learning  continues  to  be  that  of 
        having these students reading at grade level. 
     
       Kindergarten  to  Grade  2:  Teachers  will  integrate  their  learning  within  Literacy  for  Life 
        through  a  transition  to  renewed  provincial  curricula.    Using  the  PWIM  as  the  common 
        language  and  model  of  instruction,  and  adding  Inquiry  as  a  key  approach  to  teaching  and 
        learning,  they  will  continue  to  develop  their  instructional  repertoires  to  positively  impact 
        student learning outcomes.  Our goal for students is to see them reading at or above grade 
        level in a culture and community of readers. 
     
       Grades 3‐5: Teachers will continue to explore various models of Inquiry as they consolidate 
        their learning within the framework of the renewed provincial curricula. A sustained focus 
        will  be  the  development  of  the  following  competencies  for  twenty‐first  century  learning: 
        conceptual  understanding,  critical  thinking,  creative  thinking,  collaboration  and 
        communication.  The enhancement of these competencies in our students will help them to 
        achieve the goal of reading at or above grade level. 
         
       Grades 6‐8: Teachers will focus on implementing the renewed provincial curricula as a key 
        resource, while teaching subject area content through the receptive and expressive strands 
        of  literacy.    Literacy,  Inquiry,  deepening  our  students’  implementation  of  assessment  for 
        learning practices, and effectively employing powerful instructional models will continue to 
        be  a  focus.    Reading  at  or  above  grade  level  continues  to  be  the  goal  for  our  students  in 
        Grades 6‐8. 
     
       School‐based Administrators:  All school‐based administrators will have the opportunity to 
        enhance  their  skills  in  determining  and  collecting  strong  evidence  of  progress,  as  well  to 
        develop  cognitive  coaching  skills  to  support  the  learning  of  their  staff  members.    Their 
        learning  in  these  areas  will  be  integrated  with  the  work  of  our  Leadership  Professional 
        Development Advisory Committee.  Our goal for school‐based administrators is to increase 
        their  efficacy  toward  sustaining  high  levels  of  learning  outcomes  for  both  teachers  and 
        students. 
 
       New Teachers: Each year we provide professional development support to a keen group of 
        teachers who are new to the PWIM, Read to Succeed, or who are new to Saskatoon Public 
        Schools.    This  practice  will  continue  in  2010‐2011  as  a  part  of  our  sustained  efforts  to 
        increase student learning outcomes in reading. 
         
       Community Schools:  Through school‐based data teams, community schools will implement 
        laser‐focused  targets  for  literacy  improvement  and  will  work  diligently  toward  that  target.  
        This  will  be  done  through  a  combination  of  Literacy  for  Life  professional  development 
        sessions  and  school‐based  efforts.    We  believe  that  all  students  are  capable  of  achieving 
        high  level  learning  outcomes  and,  therefore,  hold  true  to  the  goal  of  having  all  students 
        reading at or above grade level in our community schools. 
             
             
             


                                                                                                                18 
                                                                                   Literacy for Life:  
                                                                         2009‐2010 Progress Update 
                                                                                                                  
                                                                                                                   
     Measurements of Progress:   
      As we embark on our seventh year of Literacy for Life, evidence‐based decision making has 
      become a cornerstone to the learning culture in Saskatoon Public Schools. We will continue 
      to monitor our progress through collection, analysis and interpretation of the following: 
          Provincial Assessment for Learning  (AFL) 
          Canadian Achievement Test (CAT‐4) 
          Fountas and Pinnell Benchmark Assessment  
          Alphabet  Recognition Data (Kindergarten and Grade One) 
          Vocabulary Recognition Data (Kindergarten and Grade One) 
          Writing samples 
          Early Years Evaluation (We will begin using the Evaluator Direct Assessment version of 
           this tool in 2010‐2011) 
          What Did You Do In School Today? (WDYDIST) 
          Early Development Instrument (EDI) 
          Student, Teacher, Administrator Feedback 
          Conversations  and  Observations  with  staff,  students,  families  and  the  broader 
           community 
          Just Read Survey 
          Educational research and the wisdom of external consultants 
It  is  our  responsibility  as  a  school  division  to  interrogate  available  data  to  find  those  students 
who are not reading at or above grade level and ensure we have the necessary supports in place 
to  allow  them  to  achieve  their  potentials  in  multiple  literacies.    All  of  our  results  indicate  we 
have made  much progress toward our overall goal, but that we have continued work to  do in 
this area. 
These short‐term goals will guide the work of all professional staff, but most specifically will be 
used  as  clear  destinations  for  central  office  staff  as  they  seek  to  improve  students’  learning 
outcomes in literacy.  We believe the Response to Intervention model, a three‐tiered model of 
supports, may be useful in this work. 
 
Long‐Term Plans for the Sustainability of Literacy for Life 
Since the onset of Literacy for Life, Saskatoon Public Schools has adhered tightly to the overall 
goal  of  having  all  students,  K‐12,  reading  at  or  above  grade  level.    We  have  monitored  our 
progress  toward  that  goal  through  the  products,  conversations,  and  observations  of  our 
students and staff, and we have consulted with our communities.  We have celebrated along the 
way, and we have reported our progress regularly to our Board, and to the Ministry of Education 
in fulfillment of the Continuous Improvement Framework. 
 
Literacy for Life has also helped us, as an organization, to learn much about large‐scale school 
improvement  efforts  and  organizational  change.    We  have  learned  that  in  order  to  support 
large‐scale change and achieve full implementation of the change effort, we need to be mindful 
of: 
    Believing that all students and staff are capable of learning at high levels,  
    Focusing  on  the  technical  core  (the  classroom)  through  structures,  curriculum,  instruction 
     and assessment, 
    Creating and sustaining a culture of high expectations and accountability, 
    Maintaining a focus on our goal, as well as on our beliefs and commitments, 


                                                                                                              19 
                                                                             Literacy for Life:  
                                                                   2009‐2010 Progress Update 
                                                                                                        
                                                                                                         
   Focusing on the importance of effective school‐ and system‐based leadership, 
   Providing strong support systems such as professional development, engagement of parents 
    and partners, appropriate resources and informed leadership, 
   Using data and research to guide and inform decision‐making, and 
   Celebrating and communicating within and beyond Saskatoon Public Schools. 
 
We  have  much  to  celebrate.    Literacy  for  Life  is  helping  us  to  improve  students’  learning 
outcomes in literacy and causing Saskatoon Public Schools to embrace a culture of professional 
learning, all the while developing a keen sense of large‐scale improvement and change efforts.  
Through this learning priority, our students are growing stronger, our people are feeling more 
efficacious, our organization has a sense of pride in its growing accomplishments, and our larger 
community is expressing support for our work.  We are continuing to become a stronger school 
division, proud of its people, its partners, and most importantly, its students’ achievements! 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                                    




                                                                                                     20 
                                                               Literacy for Life:  
                                                     2009‐2010 Progress Update 
                                                                                         
                                                                                          
 Appendix 1 
 
Fountas & Pinnell Levels and Approximate Corresponding Grade Levels 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 




                                                                                      21 
                            Literacy for Life: 
    Appendix 2 
                  2009‐2010 Progress Update 



 
 
 
 
 
 
 




                                                  22 

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:0
posted:1/7/2013
language:English
pages:24