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House+on+Mango+Street+Journal

VIEWS: 4 PAGES: 86

  • pg 1
									     House on Mango
      Street Journal
          Name:
    _______________
           ___

      Table of Contents:
      Activity:   Page Numbers:

1
Instructions for Journal                     4
Unit Calendar                              5–7
Annotating Directions                     8 – 13
Section 1 Pre-Reading and                14 – 16
Questions
Elements of Style Notes                  17 – 18
Hairs Vignette Prompt                      19
Vignette Project Explanation               20
Vignette Rubric                          21 – 23
Vignette Graphic Organizers (1 – 4)      24 – 27
Vignette Peer Edit (1 – 4)               28 – 43
Section 2 Pre-Reading and                44 – 47
Questions
Table of Contents Activity                 48
Section 3 Pre-Reading and                49 – 53
Questions
Houses in the Book Activity              54 – 56
Section 4 Pre-Reading and                57 – 60
Questions
Section 5 Pre-Reading and                61 – 64
Questions
Geraldo No Last Name Activity            65 – 67
Section 6 Pre-Reading and                68 – 71
Questions
Double Entry Journal Explanation         72 – 76
              Activity:               Page Numbers:
Section 7 Pre-Reading and                77 – 80
Questions
Open Mind Activity                         81
Section 8 Pre-Reading and                82 – 84
Questions
Letter Home Activity                       85
Interpretive Essay Outline               86 – 88
Parent Reflection                        89 - 90
2
Instructions for the Journal:
Pre-Reading:      For the next few weeks we will be reading, studying and analyzing Sandra
Cisneros’ short novel, The House on Mango Street. The novel is made up of 44 short
character sketches, or stories, called vignettes. Esperanza, a Mexican-American young
woman who just moved with her family to Mango Street, narrates them. Since the stories
don’t really follow each other chronologically, we are going to read the novel in the
thematic sections outlined for you below. We will be addressing different subjects and
literary devices for each set of stories. Before we discuss each section you will do a pre-
reading assignment. Pre-readings should be about 1 page.

Questions: You will answer the questions the night after we finish the daily reading. They
will be due the next day in class, which means that you will turn it in the day after the
reading occurs.

Worksheets: We will complete the worksheets for the most part in class. Your job is to
complete them and turn them in when instructed. When worksheets and questions are
graded and handed back, they should be returned to your binder!




3
Calendar: The calendar for the whole unit is attached. This means that you should not
have any excuses as to what we did in class on a day you were absent because you have the
calendar to check. Please make sure you keep track of what we are doing each day and
your assignments. Remember: No late work is accepted after 1 week!




          House on Mango Street Unit
                  Calendar
        Date:                      Class                            Homework:
                                Assignments:
                               Elements of Style Notes            “Hairs” Vignette due
Monday, 10/17                  Share Pre-Reading Question #1     tomorrow.
                              answers and discuss.                 Pre-Reading #2 due
                               Read pgs. 3 – 11 and annotate.    tomorrow.
                               Work on “Hairs” Vignette.          Questions Section #1 due
                                                                  tomorrow.

                               Share vignettes in small groups    Questions Section #2 due
Tuesday, 10/18                and peer edit.                      Thursday.
                               Share pre-reading question #2
                              and discuss.
                               Read pgs. 12 – 20 and annotate.



4
                   Read pgs. 21 – 25 and annotate.    Pre-Reading #3 due
Wednesday,         Table of Contents activity.       tomorrow.
10/19              Work on Table of Contents          Table of Contents Project
                  Project.                            due Friday, 10/14
                                                       Questions Section #2 due
                                                      tomorrow.

                   Share pre-reading question #3      Pre-reading #4 due
Thursday, 10/20   and discuss.                        Monday.
                   Read pgs. 26 – 38.                 Table of Contents Project
                   Work on Houses Chart              due tomorrow.
                  worksheet.                           Questions Section #3 due
                                                      tomorrow.

                   Share Table of Contents            Pre-reading #4 due
Friday, 10/21     Projects.                           Monday, 10/17
                   Begin working on 2nd vignette.     Vignette #2 due Tuesday,
                                                      10/18

                   Share Pre-Reading Question #4      Vignette #2 due
Monday, 10/24     and discuss.                        tomorrow.
                   Read pgs. 39 – 55.                 Pre-reading #5 due
                   Continue to fill out Houses       tomorrow.
                  Chart.                               Questions Section #4 due
                   Work on vignette #2               tomorrow.

                   Collect vignette #2                Questions Section #5 due
Tuesday, 10/25     Share Pre-Reading #5 and          tomorrow.
                  discuss.                             Pre-Reading #6 due
                   Read pgs. 56 – 73.                tomorrow.
                   Geraldo No Last Name Activity.

                   Share Pre-Reading #6 and           Questions Section #6 due
Wednesday,        discuss.                            tomorrow.
10/26              Explain Double Entry Journal       Pre-Reading #7 due
                  and complete as we go through –     tomorrow
                  due at the end of the unit.          Vignette #3 due Friday.
                   Read pgs. 74 – 87.
                   Work on vignette #3.

                   Share Pre-Reading #7 and           Questions Section #7 due
Thursday, 10/27   discuss.                            tomorrow.

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                 Read pgs. 88 – 102.                  Pre-Reading #8 due
                 Complete Open Mind Diagram.         tomorrow
                                                       Vignette #3 due
                                                      tomorrow.

                 Collect/Share Vignette.              Letter Home due Monday.
Friday, 10/28    Share Pre-Reading #8 and
                discuss.
                 Read pgs. 103 – 110.
                 Complete Letter Home Activity.

                 Collect/share Letter Home            Interpretive Essay due
Monday, 10/31   Activity.                             tomorrow.
                 Explain Interpretive Essay.          Annotations due Friday.
                 Work on Interpretive Essay.



                 Collect interpretive essay.          Vignette #4 due in Final
Tuesday, 11/1    Work on Vignette #4                 Project.
                 Explain vignette final project.      Vignette Final Project due
                 Work on vignette final project.     Thursday.
                                                       Annotations due Friday.

                 Continue working on vignette         Vignette Final Project due
Wednesday,      final project.                        Monday.
11/2                                                   Annotations due Friday.

                 Present vignette projects.           Parent Reflection form
Monday, 11/7     Explain Parent Reflections.         due Monday.
                 Pick one vignette and illustrate.    Annotations due
                                                      tomorrow.
                                                       Print out extra copy of
                                                      your favorite vignette!

                 Work on illustrating favorite        Illustrated Vignette due
Tuesday, 11/8   vignette for class project.           Monday.
                 Cover = Extra Credit!                Parent Reflection due
                                                      Monday.




6
Annotating The House on Mango Street


"Every text is a lazy machine asking the reader to do some of its work."

--Umberto Eco




Annotating chapters

At least 5 annotations per chapter




Total of 20 points possible for each chapter:

20: thoughtful and thorough annotation, including comments in margins and

     occasional vocabulary words with definitions

15: thoughtful annotation but lacking depth or detail

10: annotation present; lacks purpose or function

0:   missing annotation or not student’s own work

7
What is the purpose of annotation?

• Encourages active reading and critical thinking.

• Provides a useful overview to consult before discussions or writing assignments.

• Guides the development of research questions and leads to easy citations for research
papers.




Ideas for annotating literature

• Use a pen or pencil so you can make circles, brackets, and notes. Use a highlighter to
mark the passages that you would like to annotate.

• Look for patterns and label them (motifs, diction, symbols, images, behavior, whatever).

• Mark passages that seem to jump out at you, because they suggest an important

idea or theme—or for any other reason (an interesting figure of speech or image, an
intriguing sentence pattern, a striking example of foreshadowing, a key moment in the plot,
a bit of dialogue that reveals character, clues about the setting, etc.).

• Mark things that puzzle, intrigue, please or displease you. Ask questions, make
comments—talk back to the text.

• At the ends of chapters or sections, write a bulleted list of key plot events. This not only
forces you to think about what happened, see it whole, and identify patterns—but you
create a convenient record of the whole work.

• Circle/underline and comment on character development and the use of setting to
progress the plot.

• Circle words you want to learn or words that jump out at you for some reason. If you
don’t want to stop reading, guess, then look the word up and jot down a relevant meaning



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later. You need not write out a full dictionary definition; it is often helpful to put the
relevant meaning in your own words.



Most days, we will be focusing on the theme that is highlighted in your journal for each
section. Please take note of these themes as we read the novel together in class and
annotate those. In addition, here are some topics that could be used to help you annotate
The House on Mango Street:

       Coming of age
       Poverty
       Writing and storytelling
       Emigration
       Home ownership
       Violence toward women
       Family life
       Goal setting and preparing for the future
       Friendship
       Fate and luck
       Marriage


Tips for Annotating (taken from Harvard College Library):




1. Previewing: Look “around” the text before you start reading.

You’ve probably engaged in one version of previewing in the past, when you’ve tried to
determine how long an assigned reading is (and how much time and energy, as a result, it
will demand from you). But you can learn a great deal more about the organization and
purpose of a text by taking note of features other than its length. Previewing enables you
to develop a set of expectations about the scope and aim of the text. These very
preliminary impressions offer you a way to focus your reading. For instance:

       What does the presence of headnotes, an abstract, or other prefatory material tell
        you?
       Is the author known to you, and if so, how does his (or her) reputation or
        credentials influence your perception of what you are about to read? If unknown,



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         has an editor helped to situate the writer (by supplying brief biographical
         information, an assessment of the author’s work, concerns, and importance)?
        How does the disposition or layout of a text prepare you for reading? Is the
         material broken into parts--subtopics, sections, or the like? Are there long and
         unbroken blocks of text or smaller paragraphs or “chunks” and what does this
         suggest? How might the layout guide your reading?
        Does the text seem to be arranged according to certain conventions of discourse?
         Newspaper articles, for instance, have characteristics that you will recognize;
         textbooks and scholarly essays are organized quite differently from them, and
         from one another. Texts demand different things of you as you read, so whenever
         you can, register the type of information you’re presented with.




2. Annotating: “Dialogue” with yourself, the author, and the issues
and ideas at stake.

From start to finish, make your reading of any text thinking-intensive.

        Mark up the margins of your text with WORDS: ideas that occur to you, notes
         about things that seem important to you, reminders of how issues in a text may
         connect with class discussion or course themes. This kind of interaction keeps you
         conscious of the REASON you are reading and the PURPOSES your instructor has
         in mind. Later in the term, when you are reviewing for a test or project, your
         marginalia will be useful memory triggers.
        Develop your own symbol system: asterisk a key idea, for example, or use an
         exclamation point for the surprising, absurd, bizarre . . .. Like your marginalia, your
         hieroglyphs can help you reconstruct the important observations that you made at
         an earlier time. And they will be indispensable when you return to a text later in the
         term, in search of a passage, an idea for a topic, or while preparing for an exam or
         project.




        Get in the habit of hearing yourself ask questions—“what does this mean?” “why is
         he or she drawing that conclusion?” “why is the class reading this text?” etc. Write
         the questions down (in your margins, at the beginning or end of the reading, in a
         notebook, or elsewhere). They are reminders of the unfinished business you still

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         have with a text: something to ask during class discussion, or to come to terms with
         on your own, once you’ve had a chance to digest the material further, or have done
         further reading.




3. Outline, summarize, analyze: take the information apart, look at
its parts, and then try to put it back together again in language
that is meaningful to you. (many skills listed here are for non-
fiction)

The best way to determine that you’ve really gotten the point is to be able to state it in
your own words. Outlining the argument of a text is a version of annotating, and can be
done quite informally in the margins of the text, unless you prefer the more formal Roman
numeral model. Outlining enables you to see the skeleton of an argument: the thesis, the
first point and evidence (and so on), through the conclusion. With weighty or difficult
readings, that skeleton may not be obvious until you go looking for it. Summarizing
accomplishes something similar, but in sentence and paragraph form, and with the
connections between ideas made explicit. Analyzing adds an evaluative component to the
summarizing process—it requires you not just to restate main ideas, but also to test the
logic, credibility, and emotional impact of an argument. In analyzing a text, you reflect
upon and weigh in on how effectively or how sloppily its argument has been made.
Questions to ask:

        What is the writer asserting is true or valid (that is, what is he or she trying to
         convince me of)? What am I being asked to believe or accept?
        Why should I accept the writer’s claim(s) as true or valid? Or, conversely, why
         should I reject the writer’s claim(s)?
        What reasons or evidence does the author supply me, and how effective is the
         evidence?
        What is fact? And what is opinion?
        Is there anywhere that the reasoning breaks down? Are there things that do not
         make sense?




4. Look for repetitions and patterns:



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These are often indications of what an author considers crucial and what he expects you
to glean from his argument. The way language is chosen or used can also alert you to
ideological positions, hidden agendas or biases. Be watching for:

        Recurring images
        Repeated words, phrases, types of examples, or illustrations
        Consistent ways of characterizing people, events, or issues




5. Contextualize: After you’ve finished reading, put the reading in
perspective.

        When was it written or where was it published? Do these factors change or
         otherwise affect how you view a piece?
        Also view it through the lens of your own experience. Your understanding of the
         words on the page and their significance is always shaped by what you have come to
         know and value from living in a particular time and place.




6. Compare and Contrast: Fit this text into an ongoing dialogue

        At what point in the term does this reading come? Why that point, do you imagine?
        How does it contribute to the main concepts and themes of the course?
        How does it compare (or contrast) to the ideas presented by texts that come
         before it? Does it continue a trend, shift direction, or expand the focus of previous
         readings?
        How has your thinking been altered by this reading or how has it affected your
         response to the issues and themes of the course?




The following is a guide only. In no way should you feel limited to annotate
for ONLY the answers to the below. (from the Lewisville High School English
department)

        The mood of this story is set when the author describes the town of Maycomb.
         Consider what this description does for the mood/tone of the story. How does it
         impact the reader’s perception of the town and its characters?

12
        Some critics have said that Atticus is the children’s “point of reference” in this
         novel.
         Decide what you think Atticus’ function is in this novel and consider noting specific
         passages that prove this idea.
        Although Scout is the narrator in this story, the center of focus is frequently her
         brother Jem. Determine whether or not this is a classic “coming of age” novel by
         considering how Jem is at the novel’s beginning, what incidents he becomes involved
         in that change him, and how he has changed by the novel’s end.
        Identify the main plot in this story indicating what initiates it, where it concludes,
         and where it touches on the two subplots. Indicate what the two subplots are and
         when and how all three plots come together.




Use the following website for extra help. Do not copy or use this in place of your own
annotation. Your annotation should be original.

http://www.lausd.k12.ca.us/Belmont_HS/tkm/



         Section One: Self Definition and
                      Identity
         “The House on Mango Street” to “My
                      Name”
Pre-Reading Question: What is the personal significance of your given name (first,
middle and last)? Does your name mean different things to you, your family, and
your friends? What are your nicknames? What do your nicknames mean to you and
those who call you those names?

______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________

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______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________




                          Story Questions
1. "The House on Mango Street"
In describing her house, or where she lives, what does Esperanza convey about her
self-identity? How is the description of her house different from other
information about her and her family’s identity, such as a name, an occupation, or a
physical description?

______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________

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2. "Hairs"
What binds the family together in The House on Mango Street?

______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________




3. "My Name"
What does Esperanza find shameful or burdensome about her name? Why might
Cisneros have chosen this name for her protagonist?

______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________




15
      Elements of Style Class
              Notes
Style - ________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________

     Example - _________________________________________________



Metaphor - _____________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________

     Example - _________________________________________________



Simile - ________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________

     Example - _________________________________________________
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Personification - ________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________

     Example - _________________________________________________



Alliteration - ____________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________

     Example - _________________________________________________




Repetition - ____________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________

     Example - _________________________________________________

Sensory Details - ________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________

     Example - _________________________________________________




17
                         “Hairs” Vignette
Writing Situation: In the vignette “Hairs,” Sandra Cisneros reveals a lot about the narrator’s
family, especially her mother, through a discussion of one physical trait: hair. Her first paragraph
describes the hair of the narrator’s father and the hair of her siblings, using those descriptions to
give the reader insight into each of their personalities. Cisneros also reveals the narrator’s feelings
towards her mother in the passage, using a variety of stylistic devices to achieve this effect. Think
about the people in your own family, the characteristics you share with them and those which make
them (and you) distinctive. Decide which physical trait you would like to write about. Is the trait
one you share with your family or yours alone? How might you present your piece Cisneros did with
metaphors, similes, personification, alliteration, repetition and sensory details?

Writing Directions: Using “Hairs” as a model, write a vignette about your own life that discusses
an important physical trait and how it reveals something about the person who possesses it and your
relationship to him/her. You may choose to discuss a trait that all of you share, or one that makes
a particular family member—or you—stand out from the others because it is different. You must
incorporate at least four stylistic devices in your vignette.

Example: (Written by Mrs. Lemke)

                                                     Toes

         Everyone in my family has different toes. My mom, she was born with syndactylism. That means
she has webbed feet. But not the weird kind like a duck where her whole foot is stuck together and she looks
like a duck, just the two toes next to her big one. Mom calls it having “twin toes”. When I was little she told
me the story of when she was born and how my Nony got scared and thought that my mom was sick until
she looked and my Poppy’s toes. Her toes are like little sausages, bandaged permanently together. Mom says


18
it what makes us unique because she was the only one out of the five children in her family to inherit that
trait.
         My dad was born normal, so sometimes I think he feels left out. He passed that down to my sister
when she was born. I’ve always thought that she was jealous. My brother was born with one foot webbed
and one foot normal. My family took bets on whether he would have twin toes or not. I guess God likes
things to be balanced.
         I used to think that my toes weren’t as unique as my mom’s because they were fully bandaged
together by my skin. My mom told me I had tall toes, and that the only reason her skin reached the top was
because she had short, stubby toes. I wished for stubby sausage toes. I would sit on my mom’s bed and she
would paint my toenails for me, making sure to paint my twin toes a different color to make them stand out.
You are the best kind of special, she would say. The best kind.




                        Vignette Project
Personal Vignette Writing Project (100 points)

Each class, you will have time to create your own vignettes about your neighborhood and
life in the model of Cisneros’s work. Brainstorm a list of topic ideas for vignettes about
your life. Include personal experiences and people. This should cover experiences in a
brief amount of time (about a year).

• You will have four chapters (nine chapters if you are in honors – due November 11th)

• You must have: My Name for one of the nine.

• Use a healthy dose of figurative language. The more metaphors, similes, images, etc., the
better.

• Include a colorful cover and a table of contents

• Show off a creative layout. Use one page per chapter, like HOMS does

• Title your work. The House on ______ Street could work.

• This should be writing you are proud of and invested in!




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Name _____________________

Vignette Project Rubric
Staple this rubric to the back of your project.                 DUE:   Friday, October 28th (Regular)

                                                                       Friday, November 11th (Honors)



Before you turn in your project, complete the steps in the checklist below:



o Formatting:
            o   12 pt. font and 1.5 spacing
            o   each vignette has a title         ___________ (5)



o Clear and vivid language is used, rather than vague and meaningless words    ___________ (10)



o Highlight and label the following:
            o   anaphora (2)                             ___________ (10)
            o   epistrophe (2)                           ___________ (10)
            o   assonance (2)                            ___________ (10)
            o   consonance (2)                           ___________ (10)
            o   simile, metaphor,
                and/or personification (5)               ___________ (25)




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o Make sure you have included the following
            o    dialogue in two different vignettes                            ___________ (5)
            o    vivid imagery in at least two vignettes                 ___________ (10)
            o    a character sketch                                             ___________ (5)
            o    at least three vignettes are written in present tense          ___________ (5)




o Look for and correct the following types of errors: -2 apiece
           o contractions missing apostrophes
           o capitalization
           o punctuation
           o homonym errors (Spell check won’t catch these: their/they’re/there, your/you’re,
                its/it’s, where/wear/were)




                                                           Total for Test Grade 1 ___________




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Sentence Variety and Diction


Sentence Pattern 1             _____________ (20)

Sentence Pattern 2              _____________ (20)

Sentence Pattern 3              _____________ (20)

Sentence Pattern 4             _____________ (20)

Sentence Pattern 5              _____________ (20)

Specific Diction: Avoid vague words like “things” or “something.” Instead, tell me what those “things”
are. Limit your use of pronouns, especially “it.” Use vibrant adjectives and strong verbs (ex: walk 
amble, saunter, stroll, race, march, stride, pace, stagger).



                1       2       3       4       5       6       7       8       9       10




Voice: Help your unique personality shine through by experimenting with figurative language. Avoid
clichéd statements, such as “I wouldn’t change it for the world.”



                1       2       3       4       5       6       7       8       9       10




                                                Total for Test Grade 2 ___________




22
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24
 Vignette Peer Evaluation #1
Author: ______________________   Peer Reviewer: ________________________



25
Directions: Answer these questions carefully and completely about your partner’s essay.
Your goal here is to be helpful so be honest about the strengths and weaknesses of the
vignettes. You are not doing anybody any favors by telling them their writing is perfect as
it is—there’s always something that can be improved upon. Feel free to make notes on
their papers as well.



1. What part of the vignettes are the most memorable or attention grabbing? Why are
   these parts successful in getting and keeping your attention?




2. What specific memory is the author writing about? What exactly happens? In what
   paragraph(s) do you learn this information?




3. Do the vignettes have an interesting beginning and a clear conclusion? Why/why not?




26
4. List three examples of sensory details, simile/metaphor/personification, etc. that you
   see in these vignettes:


                    1.




                    2.




                    3.




5. Where should the author add more sensory details, etc. to the vignettes? Any
   suggestions of what senses/images to use?




6. Does the author use dialogue in his/her essay? Should s/he use more? If so, where?




27
7. Does the author reflect on why this event is significant or meaningful and how it has
   shaped his/her sense of self? What does s/he say?




8. Do the vigneetes flow well from one part to the next? Is it well organized? Are there
   any words misspelled or any grammatical errors that you noticed? (List below and
   circle/correct on draft).




9. Any other questions or comments you have for the author? What do you want to know
   more about?




28
 Vignette Peer Evaluation #2
Author: ______________________   Peer Reviewer: ________________________




29
Directions: Answer these questions carefully and completely about your partner’s essay.
Your goal here is to be helpful so be honest about the strengths and weaknesses of the
vignettes. You are not doing anybody any favors by telling them their writing is perfect as
it is—there’s always something that can be improved upon. Feel free to make notes on
their papers as well.



10. What part of the vignettes are the most memorable or attention grabbing? Why are
    these parts successful in getting and keeping your attention?




11. What specific memory is the author writing about? What exactly happens? In what
    paragraph(s) do you learn this information?




12. Do the vignettes have an interesting beginning and a clear conclusion? Why/why not?




30
13. List three examples of sensory details, simile/metaphor/personification, etc. that you
    see in these vignettes:


                     1.




                     2.




                     3.




14. Where should the author add more sensory details, etc. to the vignettes? Any
    suggestions of what senses/images to use?




15. Does the author use dialogue in his/her essay? Should s/he use more? If so, where?




31
16. Does the author reflect on why this event is significant or meaningful and how it has
    shaped his/her sense of self? What does s/he say?




17. Do the vigneetes flow well from one part to the next? Is it well organized? Are there
    any words misspelled or any grammatical errors that you noticed? (List below and
    circle/correct on draft).




18. Any other questions or comments you have for the author? What do you want to know
    more about?




32
  Vignette Peer Evaluation #3
Author: ______________________            Peer Reviewer: ________________________



Directions: Answer these questions carefully and completely about your partner’s essay.
Your goal here is to be helpful so be honest about the strengths and weaknesses of the
vignettes. You are not doing anybody any favors by telling them their writing is perfect as


33
it is—there’s always something that can be improved upon. Feel free to make notes on
their papers as well.



19. What part of the vignettes are the most memorable or attention grabbing? Why are
    these parts successful in getting and keeping your attention?




20. What specific memory is the author writing about? What exactly happens? In what
    paragraph(s) do you learn this information?




21. Do the vignettes have an interesting beginning and a clear conclusion? Why/why not?




34
22. List three examples of sensory details, simile/metaphor/personification, etc. that you
    see in these vignettes:


                     1.




                     2.




                     3.




23. Where should the author add more sensory details, etc. to the vignettes? Any
    suggestions of what senses/images to use?




24. Does the author use dialogue in his/her essay? Should s/he use more? If so, where?




35
25. Does the author reflect on why this event is significant or meaningful and how it has
    shaped his/her sense of self? What does s/he say?




26. Do the vigneetes flow well from one part to the next? Is it well organized? Are there
    any words misspelled or any grammatical errors that you noticed? (List below and
    circle/correct on draft).




27. Any other questions or comments you have for the author? What do you want to know
    more about?




36
  Vignette Peer Evaluation #4
Author: ______________________            Peer Reviewer: ________________________



Directions: Answer these questions carefully and completely about your partner’s essay.
Your goal here is to be helpful so be honest about the strengths and weaknesses of the
vignettes. You are not doing anybody any favors by telling them their writing is perfect as
it is—there’s always something that can be improved upon. Feel free to make notes on
their papers as well.



37
28. What part of the vignettes are the most memorable or attention grabbing? Why are
    these parts successful in getting and keeping your attention?




29. What specific memory is the author writing about? What exactly happens? In what
    paragraph(s) do you learn this information?




30. Do the vignettes have an interesting beginning and a clear conclusion? Why/why not?




31. List three examples of sensory details, simile/metaphor/personification, etc. that you
    see in these vignettes:


38
                     1.




                     2.




                     3.




32. Where should the author add more sensory details, etc. to the vignettes? Any
    suggestions of what senses/images to use?




33. Does the author use dialogue in his/her essay? Should s/he use more? If so, where?




34. Does the author reflect on why this event is significant or meaningful and how it has
    shaped his/her sense of self? What does s/he say?


39
35. Do the vigneetes flow well from one part to the next? Is it well organized? Are there
    any words misspelled or any grammatical errors that you noticed? (List below and
    circle/correct on draft).




36. Any other questions or comments you have for the author? What do you want to know
    more about?




40
 Section Two: Friendship, Neighborhood, and
                                      Home
     “Cathy Queen of Cats” to “Louie, His Cousin and His Other
                              Cousin”

Pre-Reading Question: Is living in a house your family owns different from living in
a house or apartment your family rents? How? Are renters, owners and homeless
people all considered equal citizens in America? Why or why not?

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41
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                         Story Questions
4. "Cathy Queen of Cats"
Why is Cathy’s family about to move, and what does this mean to Esperanza?

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42
5. "Our Good Day"
At this stage of her life, what are Esperanza’s friendships based on, and what do
her friends mean to her? Does she fit in with an older or younger crowd, and how
does she feel about her place in the social hierarchy?

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6. "Laughter"
What common traits does Esperanza share with Nenny, and how does she
distinguish herself from Nenny?

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7. "Gil’s Furniture Bought & Sold"
What makes Esperanza want the music box, and why is she ashamed of wanting it?
How does her reaction to the box differ from Nenny’s reaction, and what does this



43
difference tell the reader about the difference between the two girls? As in
"Hairs" and "Laughter," how does Esperanza separate herself from her family?

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8. "Meme Ortiz"
How do the residents of Mango Street interact with one another?

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9. "Louie, His Cousin & His Other Cousin"
How do Esperanza’s vivid similes such as those in this story (“the nose of that
yellow Cadillac was all pleated like an alligator’s” [p. 25]) or those in "Laughter"
("ice cream bells’ giggle" or laughter "like a pile of dishes breaking" [p. 17]) set the
tone throughout the novel? As Esperanza matures, does her use of simile change?

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44
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                  Table of Contents Activity
Using Cisneros as a model, brainstorm a list of 10 ACTUAL significant events from your
life which helped shape their sense of identity (the more interesting and concrete the
memory, the better!) and title them accordingly. Once your rough draft has been approved
(rough draft should be written below) the rough draft of your "Chapter Titles" has been
approved, you create a personal table of contents for their own lives. You must come up
with a title for your table of contents. The final draft should be artistically/creatively
displayed and illustrated.

Title of Table of Contents: ____________________________________________

Chapter 1:

Chapter 2:

Chapter 3:

Chapter 4:



45
Chapter 5:

Chapter 6:

Chapter 7:

Chapter 8:

Chapter 9:

Chapter 10:




     Section Three: Freedom and Entrapment
                        “Martin” to “And Some More”
Pre-reading #3 question: In what areas of your life are you most free to do what you
like? In what areas of your life do you have the least freedom? Consider the roles gender,
race, religion, education, class, age, and upbringing play in limiting an individual’s personal
freedom.
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46
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                          Story Questions
10. "Marin"
Does Marin dream of sex, romance or love, or all three? What are her goals? How
does Esperanza position herself vis-á-vis Marin, and what is her opinion of Marin?
Can she identify with Marin, and how might Marin be or not be a role model for
Esperanza?

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47
11. "Those Who Don’t"
How does Esperanza’s view of herself compare to her perception of how others
view her?

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What is the picture of the neighborhood that Esperanza paints for the reader?
Does this picture change the reader’s perception of the neighborhood from this
point on in the book?

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12. "There Was an Old Woman..."
Like "Rafaela Who Drinks Coconut & Papaya Juice on Tuesdays," the title of this
story is long and filled with detail. What do these and other titles in the book
convey about the people and the life surrounding Esperanza? What kind of tone do
these longer titles set for the story? What do they suggest about Esperanza’s
character? How are children regarded in Esperanza’s community?

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48
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13. "Alicia Who Sees Mice"
How has Esperanza’s relationships with Alicia changed since "Cathy Queen of
Cats"? How does Esperanza’s portrait of Alicia compare to her portrait of Marin?
What do these portraits indicate about the differences between the two girls, and
about Esperanza herself?

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14. "Darius & the Clouds"
How does Esperanza keep her dreams alive? Does she hold any religious beliefs?

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49
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15. "And Some More"
What is the importance of names? How does Esperanza portray names in this story
in comparison to her own name in "My Name"? How has her narrative voice changed
from that earlier story?

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50
Houses in the Book
Worksheet
Directions: As you read the story and come across each house or apartment listed below,
fill in the details about the place and the people who live there in the middle column.
Write a significant quotation about the place (or what happens there) in the right-hand
column.

The Houses          Details from the story               Significant Quotations




Esperanza’s
house on Mango
Street

(p. 3-4, 109-110)




Cathy’s house
(p.12-13), the

51
one that Meme
Ortiz moves
into after
Cathy’s family
moves out

(p.21-22)




Louie’s house
where he lives
with his family
and his cousin
Marin (p.23-27)




Earl’s place

(p.70-71)




52
The Monkey
Garden

(p.94-98)




Sally’s new
house after she
gets married

(p.101-102)




Esperanza’s
dream house in
the future

(p.108)




53
        Section Four: Growth and Maturity
           “The Family of Little Feet” to “The First Job”
Pre-reading #4 question: How is growing into a teenage body (physically, mentally and
emotionally) like moving into a new house/apartment? Compare the experiences of moving
into a new house/apartment to the experiences of being a teenager.
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54
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                          Story Questions
17. "A Rice Sandwich"
What kind of person is Esperanza? What does the reader learn from this story
about her strengths and weaknesses?

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18. "Chanclas"
What stage in Esperanza’s life does this story capture, and how is this stage
portrayed? How has Esperanza’s voice changed from the previous stories "And
Some More" and "The Family of Little Feet," and in what ways is her voice still the
same?

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55
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19. "Hips"
How does Esperanza distinguish herself from Nenny in this story? Does this
distinction echo the one in "Gil’s Furniture Bought and Sold"? How does Esperanza
distinguish herself from the other girls she plays with, and has her relationship
with them changed since the earlier stories such as "And Some More" or "Our
Good Day"?

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20. "The First Job"
What range of emotions does Esperanza experience in this story, and how does
Cisneros convey these emotions to the reader without naming them? How does
Esperanza express her emotions in this story differently than those she
experienced in "A Rice Sandwich" or "Chanclas" and, if so, why?

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56
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Section Five: Gender Roles and Expectations
       “Papa Who Wakes Up Tired in the Dark” to “Sire”
Pre-reading #5 question: Should parents/guardians raise their teenage girls in the same
way that they raise their teenage boys? Why or why not? What rules should be the same
for girls and boys? What should be different? Do you have brothers, sisters, cousins, etc.
who are treated differently from you because of gender? Explain.

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57
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                         Story Questions
21. "Papa Who Wakes Up Tired in the Dark"
What is Esperanza’s relationship with her father? How does this story develop
Esperanza’s character?

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22. "Born Bad"
What clues does this story provide about the roles of women and men in
Esperanza’s community? How does this story, like "Papa Who Wakes Up Tired in
the Dark," evidence Esperanza’s character development?

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58
23. "Elenita, Cards, Palm, Water"
Does the superstition expressed in this story conflict or coexist with any religious
beliefs Esperanza may hold? With what tone does Esperanza describe her visit to
Elenita?

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24. "Geraldo No Last Name"
What is the significance of this being the last story in the book in which Marin is
mentioned?

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25. "Edna’s Ruthie"
What does Esperanza learn from Ruthie’s experience that helps her formulate
goals?



59
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26. "The Earl of Tennessee"
What does Esperanza learn from Earl that might help her formulate goals?

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27. "Sire"
How has Esperanza’s awareness of her own sexuality evolved from "Hips" to this
story? How have her imagination and her desires moved away from her negative
sexual experience in "My First Job"?

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60
       ______________________________________________________________
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               Geraldo No Last Name Chart
                Before Reading                           After Reading
What I Need to Know What I still Need to   What I Know Now       What I Still Need to
After Previewing       Know                                      Know




       61
(Note: This is an excerpt from the original article; the last few paragraphs have been
omitted).


                       THE 9⁄11 DISAPPEAREDS
        When 21-year-old Fernando Jimenez Molina failed to return from his job delivering
pizzas two blocks from the collapsed twin towers on September 11, his roommates, also
undocumented immigrants, made the grim decision to warn his mother, Nora Elsa Molina, in
Mexico. Then they headed for Asociacion Tepeyac, a Mexican community organization that
emerged as the city's alternative emergency system for the immigrant workers, families
and binational communities whose lives and livelihoods lay buried beneath the smoldering
rubble.

       While these September 11 victims slipped through the cracks in federal relief
systems, Tepeyac shifted into crisis mode as soon as the first workers covered with soot
and ash stumbled into its office. Arnulfo Chino Rojas “appeared like a ghost, stricken with
sadness and pain, frightened and white with dust,” said a staff member. Arnulfo squeezed
time from his long hours as a waiter at The World Trade Center to teach Mexican dance
classes for the association. He and the other dazed workers who converged on the center
soon joined Tepeyac's director, Joel Magallon, a Jesuit priest, in cobbling up an emergency
response system.

        “Undocumented immigrants are the invisible workers and victims of the disaster,”
says Brother Joel. Tepeyac, a network of forty Mexican organizations in the city and
upstate New York, has firsthand knowledge of sixty-three desaparecidos, sixty-five small
business closings and 3,095 lost jobs, roughly half of which were held by undocumented
workers in and around the trade center. The disappeared came from Mexico and several
other countries. Many immigrants worked seventy- and eighty-hour weeks at subminimum
wages or off the books for cash in restaurants, cafes, bakeries, hotels, for custodial
companies, cleaning shoes, selling flowers and newspapers, and ascending the twin towers
to deliver coffee, newspapers, flowers and gifts.

       Brother Joel insists, “The only way we can know for sure who is missing is for the
employers to cooperate. They are the ones who have lists of who was working for them,
documented or undocumented. But the employers are afraid that they will be penalized.
We want the INS to waive employer sanctions so companies can come forward.” Frantic
family members and co-workers flooded Tepeyac with local and international calls. As word


62
of the group's good zeeds spread, AFL-CIO unions, churches, community organizations,
businesses and individuals donated $35,000, which Tepeyac quickly dispensed to victims
and their families. The organization is now working with the Red Cross and Safe Horizon to
obtain further relief and has dispatched volunteers as far as Guatemala and El Salvador to
test relatives with DNA kits so that the remains of loved ones can be identified. “Jane”
who asked that her real name be withheld, turned to Tepeyac after two lengthy visits to
the Family Assistance Center on Pier 94 left her empty-handed because she could not
produce a pay stub. She worked as a nanny to a 4-year-old before her employers
disappeared on September 11. A member of Freedom and Unity among Pilipina Workers,
Jane groaned, “What domestic worker do you know gets a pay stub?” Thanks to Tepeyac's
intervention, Jane finally received a $50 grocery voucher and the promise of Red Cross
vouchers of $300 for rent and $250 for emergency cash for one month. Joining the tens
of thousands of immigrants who have lost their jobs in recent weeks, Jane wonders how
she will support herself, her husband and two children back home once the emergency
funds run out. Like all undocumented workers, she is not eligible for FEMA assistance or
unemployment benefits.

       Immigrant communities, hard-hit by recession and lacking the cushion of a safety
net, are also gripped with fear as the Bush Administration recasts immigration policy
within the framework of national security and the war on terrorism. Before September 11,
patient community education, organizing, coalition-building and lobbying for humane
immigration policies had begun to bear fruit, especially with the AFL-CIO's shift last year
toward opposing employer sanctions and calling for unconditional amnesty for
undocumented workers. After Mexican President Vicente Fox's visit Cere this past
summer, George W. Bush and Congressional leaders had begun to discuss a limited program
of “phased legalization”—although this was coupled with an exploitative guest-worker
program without a guarantee of permanent residency—while Congressman Luis Gutierrez
had crafted progressive legalization legislation. Now the amnesty debate is on hold in
Washington, and community groups are steeling themselves for reversals on hard-fought
battles against Border Patrol violence, INS raids and detentions and racial profiling.
Catherine Tactaquin, director of the National Network for Immigrant and Refugee Rights,
says, “We're hit with a revival of historic patterns of fear, hatred, of fingering
immigrants as threats to national security.”

~~~~~~~~

By Miriam Ching Louie, Miriam Ching Louie is the author of Sweatshop Warriors:

Immigrant Women Workers Take on the Global Factory (South End).

Copyright of Nation is the property of Nation Company, Inc. and its content may not be
copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's


63
express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for
individual use.

Source: Nation, 12/3/2001, Vol. 273 Issue 18, p7, 2p.



                    Section Six: Fitting In
             “Four Skinny Trees” to “Bums in the Attic”
Pre-reading #6 question: Describe a situation where you once felt really out of
place or uncomfortable. Why did you feel this way? What does the word "outcast"
mean? What kinds of attributes make people into outcasts? Why must society have
outcasts?

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64
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                         Story Questions
28. "Four Skinny Trees"
What do the trees symbolize? What does Esperanza impose of her own character
on the trees, and what does she take from the trees? How do the trees compare to
the clouds in "Darius & the Clouds"?

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29. "No Speak English"
What does Esperanza tell us about her community’s attitude towards non-Mexican
Americans? What about the image that the non-Latinos have of the Latinos? How
do these views help or hinder Esperanza in the formulation of her own personal
identity?

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65
30. "Rafaela Who Drinks Coconut..."
What conflicting needs or desires of Esperanza’s does her description of Rafaela’s
situation convey?

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32. "Sally"
Compare the portrait of Sally to that of Marin in "Marin." How is Esperanza’s
relationship with Sally different?

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33. "Minerva Writes Poems"
With what tone is Esperanza’s plaintive "There is nothing I can do" conveyed? [p.
85]

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66
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34. "Bums in the Attic"
Why does Esperanza wish to house “bums” in her attic?

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67
                      Double Entry Journal
                       Overview/Example
Overview: A DEJ is a way to closely read passages from a text, to discover what individual
words and sentences reveal about characters, conflicts, themes, etc. In the future, you will
be selecting your own “strong lines” and meaningful passages to comment on, but for this
first effort three have been chosen for you. Each passage shows something about
Esperanza, her relationship to someone else in the neighborhood, and/or her opinion about a
particular social issue.

Directions: As you read each passage, you have five tasks: First, identify who is speaking
or narrating. Second, explain what the context or situation is—that is, who is involved,
where s/he is, at what time, and what is going on, etc., Third, explain what the quotation
means and how it is significant to the novel. (In other words, why is this quote
important?) Keep in mind that quotations rarely tell you why they are important, so you must
use the clues given to you and really dig beneath the surface, kind of like “Author and Me”
questions. Fourth, note any stylistic devices (similes, metaphors, personification, symbols,
alliteration, etc.), and finally, what connections do you see between this excerpt and other
vignettes in the novel? (Ideas of waiting, feeling trapped, making friends, etc.) Before you
begin, compare the “weak” and “strong” examples of how to do a DEJ. I know it sounds like a
lot, but you are capable.




68
Example:

Quotation:                                Response:

Sample:                                   Speaker: Esperanza is narrating

from “Marin”                              Situation: (weak) Esperanza watches Marin late at night

                                          Situation: (strong) Esperanza has been watching Marin in the
                                          evenings. Her observations help her to get to know Marin and to
Marin, under the streetlight, dancing
by herself, is singing the same song      interpret what her actions might mean. Esperanza has a sense that
somewhere. I know. Is waiting for a       Marin is waiting for change to happen to her.
car to stop, a star to fall, someone to
change her life (27).                     Significance: (weak) This means that Marin wants her life to change

                                          Significance: (strong) Esperanza understands that Marin thinks that
                                          her life will change when someone comes into her life. That someone
                                          will be a man. Marin knows she can use her physical attractiveness to
                                          get out of Mango Street, a place she doesn’t like. Esperanza appears
                                          to relate to Marin because she says, “I know.” Esperanza also has
                                          dreams of changing her life and getting beyond Mango Street. But
                                          while Marin is stuck, “singing the same song,” I think that Esperanza
                                          would like to make change happen, not just wait for “someone to
                                          change her life.”

                                          Stylistic devices: (weak) Cisneros uses sensory details.

                                          Stylistic devices: (strong) A falling star is something you wish upon.
                                          It symbolizes Marin’s dependency on something outside herself to
                                          bring change. Cisneros also uses alliteration (ex. Same song
                                          somewhere) to establish rhythm.

                                          Connections: Marin is like Sally, Rafaela and Minerva, other women on
                                          Mango Street. All of them seem trapped in relationships and
                                          circumstances that they want out of, but don’t know how to escape.




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Quotation:                               Response:


from “A Rice Sandwich”                   Speaker:



“And then she made me stand up on a
                                         Situation:
box of books and point. That one? she
said, pointing to a row of ugly three-
flats, the ones even the raggedy men
are ashamed to go into. Yes, I nodded
even though I knew that wasn’t my
house and started to cry. I always cry
when nuns yell at me, even if they’re
not yelling” (45).
                                         Significance:




                                         Stylistic devices:




                                         Connections:




from “Born Bad”                          Speaker:



“She listened to every book, every       Situation:
poem I read her. One day I read her
one of my own. I came very close. I
whispered it into the pillow:




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     I want to be

     like the waves on the sea              Significance:

     like the clouds in the wind,

     but I’m me.

     One day I’ll jump

     out of my skin.

     I’ll shake the sky
                                            Stylistic devices:
     like a hundred violins.

That’s nice. That’s very good, she said
in her tired voice. You just remember
to keep writing…It will keep you free,
and I said yes, but at that time I          Connections:
didn’t know what she meant” (60-61).




From “Four Skinny Trees”                    Speaker:



“Let one forget his reason for being,       Situation:
they’d all droop like tulips in a glass,
each one with their arms around the
other. Keep, keep, keep, trees say
while I sleep. They teach.
   When I am too sad and too skinny
to keep keeping, when I am a tiny thing
against so many bricks, then it is I look
at trees. When there is nothing left        Significance:
to look at on this street. Four who
grew despite concrete. Four who
reach and do not forget to reach. Four
whose only reason is to be and be”
(75).


                                            Stylistic devices:




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                      Connections:




     Section Seven: Future Opportunities and
                         Limitations
         “Beautiful and Cruel” to “Linoleum Roses”


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Pre-reading #7 question: What parts of your life would you most like to escape?
Can you escape these elements at some point in your life? If so, how? If not, why
not?

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                          Story Questions
35. "Beautiful & Cruel"
Does Esperanza reconcile the images of herself as "ugly" [p. 88] and "beautiful and
cruel," and what does each self-image imply about her future?



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36. "A Smart Cookie"
What does Esperanza learn from her mother in this story, and how might their
relationship be characterized?

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37. "What Sally Said"
With what tone does Esperanza convey the violence Sally suffers? How does this
tone convey her attitude toward abuse? Has Esperanza’s attitude changed from
the earlier stories? Compare Esperanza’s family’s response toward this abuse with
how the community reacts toward domestic violence and abuse in general.




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38. "The Monkey Garden"
What is the nature of Sally’s and Esperanza’s friendship? Can Esperanza ever
recover what she lost in the monkey garden? What does the monkey garden
symbolize?

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39. "Red Clowns"
What does Esperanza lose in "Red Clowns," and how does it compare to her loss in
"The Monkey Garden"? What clues does Cisneros provide the reader about the
precise nature of the assault on Esperanza?




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40. "Linoleum Roses"
How and why has Esperanza’s tone toward Sally changed?

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                Open Mind Activity
Directions: Put yourself into Esperanza’s place at the end of p. 89. Fill in the open mind
diagram below with objects, images, symbols and quotations from the story to provide a
picture of what might be going through her mind. Be sure that you follow each quote

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with the page number on which it appears. You must include at least 2 quotations in
your open mind.



Extra Credit: On the back of this sheet write a paragraph explaining what you drew and
wrote inside the open mind.




      Section Eight: Finding One’s “Home”
“The Three Sisters” to “Mango Says Goodbye Sometimes”
Pre-reading #8 question: What inspires you most in life? What do you see your future
holding for you? What obstacles might stand in your way? In what ways will you attempt to
overcome them and achieve your future desires?

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41. "The Three Sisters"
In what way do the Sisters provide the decisive turning point for Esperanza? How
does Esperanza’s community fit into her vision of her own future?

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42. "Alicia & I Talking on Edna’s Steps"
What is the significance of the fact that the only lasting friendship Esperanza
seems to have is with Alicia?

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43. "A House of My Own"
How does Esperanza’s dream house in this story and in "Bums in the Attic" differ
from Sally’s dream house in "Linoleum Roses"? How does Cisneros utilize the
recurring image of a house as a metaphor to tie her stories together thematically
and structurally? Is the house a positive or negative image? What does it
alternatively preserve or imprison within its walls, and what does it keep out? How
is Esperanza’s house on Mango Street alike or different from the other houses
portrayed in the stories? [See, e.g., “Meme Ortiz”]

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44. "Mango Says Goodbye Sometimes"
Why must Mango say goodbye to Esperanza, and not vice versa? Why is Mango
Street personified as a "she"? Might Esperanza’s view of her own name have
changed at this point, and, if so, how might she describe it?

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               Letter Home Explanation
At the end of the novel Esperanza says, "One day I’ll pack my bags of books and paper.
One day I will say goodbye to Mango…Friends and neighbors will say, What happened to
that Esperanza…They will not know I have gone away to come back. For the one’s I left
behind" (110). Pretend that you are Esperanza and write a letter to one of the characters
on Mango Street that you "left behind." Discuss some of your memories of Mango Street,
particularly the one’s that had a significant impact on how you view yourself and your
community. Describe what you are doing now, and how your life on Mango Street prepared
you for it. You should also include how you plan to "come back" for the others and how you
intend to help them. (1-2 pages).




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         Interpretive Essay Explanation
Directions: When you must write an essay in a short amount of time, it is often helpful to
make an outline to organize your thoughts and ideas. Once you have chosen the
interpretive claim you want to write about, use your notes and the Power Point
presentations to fill in the following outline.

Introduction:

Point of departure:
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Interpretive claim/thesis: (Underline the specific ideas from your thesis that you will
need to “prove” in the body of your essay)
__________________________________________________________________

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Body:

Evidence: Choose one or more quotations from the novel to support each thing that you
underlined then explain the quotes and how they support your thesis.

Quotation:___________________________________________________________

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Explanation:
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Quotation:___________________________________________________________

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Explanation:
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Quotation:___________________________________________________________

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Explanation:
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Conclusion: (Jot down any concluding remarks to wrap up your essay):




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Parent/Guardian Interview                 Student’s name: _______________

                                                 Date: ________________________

                                                 Period: _____




Dear Parent/Guardian,




As part of their grade for this marking period, I am asking students to share some of
their work with you and to get your responses to the following questions. After looking
over your student’s work, please answer the following questions or allow your student to
interview you and record your answers. These responses give me valuable information to
help improve my teaching of your child. Thank you in advance for taking the time to
respond.




                                                                      Sincerely,

                                                                      Amanda Lemke

                                                                      English Teacher


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     1. Based on the portfolio your student has shared (or other work you’ve seen) what
        are your impressions of the work s/he is doing in English 1 so far?




     2. What, in your opinion, are your student’s strengths, interests and goals?




     3. What does your student do that makes your proud? What are some of your hopes
        and dreams for him/her in the upcoming semester?




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     4. Does your student spend time reading at home? What does s/he like to read?
        Does s/he discuss what is read? With whom?




Thanks again for your time!

Parent’s/Guardian’s
Signature__________________________________________________




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