Peripheral Lateral Meniscus Tear

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					Peripheral Lateral Meniscus
            Tear
        Kristen Knorr
History:
• 18 year old female
    collegiate soccer
    goalie.
•   No previous knee
    injuries.
•   Felt a pop and had
    sudden sharp pain.
•   Pain Scale 9/10.
Assessment:
              •   No discoloration.
              •   No deformity.
              •   Positive swelling.
              •   Pain within the
                  lateral joint line.
Diagnosis:

• This injury was originally thought to be a
  pathology of the meniscus, not an actual
  tear due to the MRI which showed no
  tear.
• After the athlete had a second pop in the
  knee it was decided to have arthroscopic
  surgery and determine the problem.
Diagnosis:
             • The surgery revealed
                 a tear on the
                 periphery of the
                 lateral meniscus.
             •   Because the tear was
                 on the edge of the
                 meniscus it was not
                 visible on the MRI.
Rehabilitation:

• The patient is only 10% weight bearing
  for the first 2 weeks and 50% for the next
  two.
• During this time she will be doing:
• Patellar Mobilizations
• Heel Slides
• Quad sets
Rehabilitation:

• Russian Stim with straight leg raise.
• Straight leg raises: flexion, adduction,
  abduction.
• Theraband: Dorsiflexion.
• Weighted knee flexion and extension.
• Heel Digs
Rehabilitation:

• Flexibility: full ext and flx to 90 degrees.
• Friction massage.
• Ice and NSAID’s.
• Once the athlete is off the crutches:
• Balance pad
• T band kicks
• Stool Scoots
Rehabilitation:

• Leg press
• Cybex
• Calf Raises
• Lateral step ups
• Wall squats
• Full knee flexion
• Jump squats
Rehabilitation:

• Light jogging, straight line
• Figure 8 jogging
• Side Shuffle
• Zig zags
• 4 corner drill
• Agility ladder
• Sprints
Rehabilitation:
• Goalie drills such as diving and quickly jumping
    back up.
•   Diving side to side.
•   Explosive jumps, single and double leg.
Criteria for Return:
• The patient should be able to accomplish
  these tasks with no pain or hesitation
  before returning to play:
• Straight line sprints
• Zig zags
• Side shuffle
• Single and double leg hops
• Figure 8’s
Uniqueness:

• This injury was very unique due to that
  fact that the tear was not visible on the
  MRI.
• This athlete actually did strengthening and
  returned to play before having another
  pop which seemed worse than the first
  episode.

				
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posted:1/4/2013
language:Latin
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