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					  NATIONAL NEWS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY / SOMMAIRE DES NOUVELLES NATIONALES
                                       ADM(PA) / SMA(AP)
                                 May 17 2012 / le 17 mai 2012

MINISTER / LE MINISTRE

Criticism of DND/CF Ombudsman
The office of Canada's military Ombudsman has become dysfunctional, with an employee turnover rate of
50 per cent, complaints about sexist and off-colour jokes, and some investigations into issues affecting
soldiers dragging on for years, say former and current staff. Some have labelled the environment in the
Ottawa office as poisonous and they blame the problems on Pierre Daigle, a former major-general
appointed Ombudsman for the DND and the CF in February 2009. In addition, two former soldiers who
complained to the ombudsman's office in 2006 about mistreatment at the hands of a senior officer have
come forward to allege that Mr. Daigle has dragged his heels on the investigations into their cases. Mr.
Daigle declined to be interviewed by the Citizen. A spokesperson for Mr. Daigle said the ombudsman
does not agree with the concerns of some employees. Coverage noted the confidence Defence Minister
Peter MacKay expressed in Mr. Daigle when he was appointed (D. Pugliese: Ctz A1; No mention of the
Minister: D. Pugliese: EJ A9, VTC A10).

Project Ojibwa
Project Ojibwa is a “go,” a tugboat on its way to fetch the decommissioned Canadian submarine from
Halifax and tow it to Port Burwell. Mr. McKay signed the official agreement transferring the Cold-War-era
sub to the Elgin County Military Museum. The Ojibwa will become a tourist attraction in the Lake Erie port,
joining a select group of Great Lakes centres with museum subs (C. Martin: LFP A8).

Ministres nuisibles
Raymond Giroux, dans Le Soleil, soutient qu’au moins sept ministres du cabinet Harper nuisent par leur
incompétence ou leur façon de diriger leur ministère, et ce, au-delà de toute considération politique.
Selon lui, ceux-ci mériteraient de se voir montrer la porte de leur ministère et un huitième, Christian
Paradis, a perdu tout contrôle sur son avenir. Parmi ces ministres, il mentionne Peter MacKay. Il
souligne que le ministre de la Défense nationale a perdu tout contrôle sur son ministère. Le dossier du F-
35, où il a camouflé les coûts réels du projet, confirme sa capitulation devant notre petit complexe
militaro-industriel (Sol 12).

ASSOCIATE MINISTER / MINISTRE ASSOCIÉ
No related coverage. / Aucune couverture pertinente.

CDS / CEM
No related coverage. / Aucune couverture pertinente.

BUDGET 2012
No related coverage. / Aucune couverture pertinente.

CANADA IN AFGHANISTAN / LE CANADA EN AFGHANISTAN

Link Between IEDs and Brain Disease
Researchers say they have found evidence of a degenerative brain disease in soldiers exposed to blast
injuries caused by IEDs. Thousands of military members in Canada and other countries have been
exposed to the potent blasts from improvised explosive devices, the crude bombs that maimed and killed
dozens of CF in Afghanistan. Col. Rakesh Jetly, a senior Canadian Forces psychiatrist, said the
Canadian Forces has created a special panel on managing brain injuries in the military (A. Auld: HCH B1,
WStar D7, CG A9, VTC B11).

PROCUREMENT / APPROVISIONNEMENT

Investigation of F-35 Information Leak
The government reportedly called in the RCMP to investigate a politically embarrassing story involving
the decision to sole-source the purchase of the F-35 stealth fighter, claiming it was a breach of national
security. Records obtained under the Access to Information Act show investigators had doubts almost
from the outset in July 2010 that any laws were broken in the Globe and Mail story. The story revealed
angst within government about possible alienation from Washington if a competition was held to replace
the air force's CF-18s. In finally shutting down the probe, the Mounties said “since the information was
available on open source, it was decided that no further investigation was needed.” Wesley Wark, an
expert in security and intelligence at the University of Ottawa, said he was concerned by the revelations in
the file. He described the probe as a misuse of not only the RCMP, but of the security legislation (M.
Brewster / J. Bronskill: EJ A14, HCH B1, RDA A7)

OTHERS / AUTRES

Claims of Discrimination at Military Daycare
Some claim the practices of the Kingston Military Family Resource Centre Daycare are discriminatory. A
mother claims the bilingual daycare told her they are holding their remaining spots for French-speaking
children (D. Vandenbrink: KWS 1).

CF Snowbirds Season Opens
Daring manoeuvres in front of a crowd of family and friends in 30C weather kicked off the 2012 show
season of the CF Snowbirds at 15 Wing Moose Jaw. Several new moves have been added to the
repertoire of the group (L. Goudy: RLP A1, SSP A5).

Soldiers Offered Diversion Program
Four members of the RCN will be given the opportunity to avoid having a criminal record for
impersonating police. The Crown has agreed to refer the charge against the sailors to the province's adult
diversion program (S. Bruce: HCH A9).
Section: News
Byline: David Pugliese
Outlet: Ottawa Citizen
Headline: Infighting plagues military watchdog; Staff blame ombudsman for poisonous work
environment; two former soldiers allege delays in investigations
Page: A1 / Front
Date: Thursday 17 May 2012
Source: Ottawa Citizen

The office of Canada's military Ombudsman has become dysfunctional, with an employee
turnover rate of 50 per cent, complaints about sexist and off-colour jokes, and some
investigations into issues affecting soldiers dragging on for years, say former and current staff.
Some have labelled the environment in the Ottawa office as poisonous and they blame the
problems on Pierre Daigle, a former major-general appointed Ombudsman for the Department of
National Defence and the Canadian Forces in February 2009.
Since Daigle's arrival, almost half of his investigators have left, causing a backlog in cases being
investigated, they say. Key staff are among those who have left, including a director general of
operations, two directors of investigations, a general counsel and one director of human
resources. A number of employees in the 55-member office have also taken medical leave for
stress-related reasons.
In addition, two former sol-diers who complained to the ombudsman's office in 2006 about
mistreatment at the hands of a senior officer have come forward to allege that Daigle has dragged
his heels on the investigations into their cases.
Daigle declined to be interviewed by the Citizen. His spokesman, Darren Gibb, said the office
continues to follow its mandate to help Canadian Forces and DND personnel.
Gibb acknowledged there has been a 50-per-cent turnover in staff in the last three years, but he
noted that such workers are in high demand for other ombudsman organizations. In addition,
Daigle also initiated a restructuring of the office. "Change is not always uniformly welcomed,"
Gibb explained. "People will choose to leave an organization at that point."
A number of employees have also raised with the Citizen their concerns about inappropriate
jokes about women and other sexual references made by Daigle last year.
At a staff meeting, Daigle told a joke comparing sperm and lawyers. Employees were upset, with
some viewing the joke as directed at the only lawyer in the room, a woman.
Another joke Daigle told to some employees last year, including women, had to deal with
menstrual cycles.
Daigle's staff say not only were the jokes inappropriate, but it was upsetting that they came from
a person whose office might have to examine complaints about discrimination against women in
the Canadian Forces and at DND.
Gibb said Daigle admits making those jokes in front of his employees and confirms that at the
time some workers raised their concerns about the appropriateness. "I don't believe he intended
to offend anyone and I think it would be safe to say he would be troubled to learn that he has
upset someone with these jokes."
But Gibb said the ombudsman doesn't agree with the concerns of some employees that there are
major problems in the workplace. "I think in the ombudsman's mind he has taken a number of
steps to ensure a healthy work environment over the past few years," Gibb said.
"I'm not sure that it's a poisonous work environment (and) that there's poor morale. I'm happy to
say we're almost fully staffed. I've never met a more passionate group of people committed to the
mandate."
In announcing Daigle's appointment, Defence Minister Peter MacKay expressed his confidence
and support for the former senior officer, stating that "he brings to the position an outstanding
record of professionalism and a proven track record of advocating on behalf of the men and
women in the Canadian Forces."
One employee noted that in the early days of Daigle's tenure, the former general did not appear
to believe the Canadian Forces had any systemic problems and he did not seem to have a clear
understanding of what an ombudsman was to do. That in turn significantly affected reviews and
investigations into systemic issues, such as those examining how injured reservists and soldiers
with post-traumatic stress disorders were treated in the military.
Gibb acknowledged that the ombudsman's office has not done that many reviews into systemic
problems in the Canadian Forces and that "they were not as a high a priority."
But he added that Daigle has been concentrating on dealing with individual complaints, going on
outreach trips to ensure that military members understand the role of the ombudsman, and
restructuring the office.
Gibb noted that sometime in the summer the ombudsman hopes to release two investigations into
systemic issues in the Canadian Forces: a followup review on the issue of operational stress
injuries and another on injured reservists. The office has also launched an investigation into the
challenges military families face.
The ombudsman's office has received a steady flow of individual complaints since it opened in
1998 under André Marin. Such complaints, which now number about 1,500 a year, deal with a
wide variety of problems, but many are concentrated on pay and benefits. Such complaints can
usually be resolved with several phone calls, Gibb noted.
Some of the more complicated cases can take years to deal with, he said.
Two of those involve retired Sgt.-Maj. Mike Spellen and retired Master Cpl. Kevin Clark, who
filed complaints more than five years ago with the ombudsman's office against the senior officer
they worked for at an office dealing with post-traumatic stress and other operational stress
injuries.
The soldiers say Daigle's office has continually stalled in moving their complaints forward and in
both cases watered down the final reports.
The men point out that the senior officer was granted meetings with senior staff in Daigle's
office, while they were denied the same courtesy.
"If I could say something to the ombudsman I'd say, 'Who do you represent here?'," said Clark,
who fought in the former Yugoslavia and was released from the military after being diagnosed
with post-traumatic stress. "I thought that the office was supposed to be a non-biased
organization?"
Clark believes the ombudsman's office is trying to protect a fellow senior officer.
Spellen, who fought in the Medak Pocket battle in the former Yugoslavia in the 1990s, said he is
aware there are other cases filed with the ombudsman's office that are taking years to be
investigated.
Spellen, who also served on the advisory committee for military ombudsmen Marin and Yves
Coté, said he thinks Daigle is a "puppet" who doesn't want to challenge the government or his
former fellow generals.
"If Mr. Marin was in this office my case would have been settled within three to six months,"
said Spellen. "He was thorough. People may not have liked him, but he didn't try to brush
anything under the carpet."
Former staff at the ombudsman's office acknowledge the Spellen and Clark reports have been
continually rewritten and, in the process, changed.
Both reports were sent to DND around seven months ago. Previous ombudsmen gave DND a
time limit to respond to such reports, allowing sometimes up to 90 days.
In this case, Daigle's office put no time limit on a response from the department.
Gibb said he cannot go into the Spellen and Clark cases in detail because of privacy concerns,
but noted the ombudsman was not happy with the reports produced and asked for them to be
rewritten.
"I'm safe in saying that in both cases the complainants were treated unfairly (by DND) and we
have made recommendations," Gibb said. "I believe we have been pushing to get a resolution
from DND. To my knowledge, we don't have that resolution."
Retried brigadier-general Joe Sharpe, who advised previous military ombudsmen Marin and Coté
on post-traumatic stress disorders, said he is aware of the details of both cases and can't
understand why those reports have been delayed for more than five years.
Sharpe said bureaucracies can move slowly and the ombudsman's office is no different. "Slow in
the early days (of the ombudsman's office) would have been six months, maybe a year, which is
getting pretty excessive," he said. "This is not slow. It's glacial."
Sharpe said his former colleagues who are still in the ombudsman's office have informed him
about the ongoing work issues.
He said the situation appears to be "a bit of dysfunctional working environment."
"There doesn't seem to be a lot of co-operation between the working level and the leadership
level in getting things out the front door."
dpugliese@ottawacitizen.com

Back to Top
Section: News
Lead: Project Ojibwa is a "go," a tugboat on its way to fetch the decommissioned Canadian
submarine from Halifax and tow it to Port Burwell.
Headline: Full steam ahead for museum sub HMCS OJIBWA: DEAL SIGNED WEDNESDAY
CLEARS THE WAY TO MOVE THE COLD WAR-ERA VESSEL TO PORT BURWELL
Page: A8
Byline: CHIP MARTIN, THE LONDON FREE PRESS
Outlet: The London Free Press
Illustrations:
 photo by Elgin Military Museum Two submariners look out from high atop HMCS Ojibwa
before it was decommissioned in 1998. The sub, now in Halifax, is expected to arrive at its new
home in Port Burwell on Sept. 8.
Date: Thursday 17 May 2012

Project Ojibwa is a "go," a tugboat on its way to fetch the decommissioned Canadian submarine
from Halifax and tow it to Port Burwell.
Defence Minister Peter McKay signed the official agreement Wednesday in Ottawa, transferring
the Cold-War-era sub to the Elgin County Military Museum.
The Ojibwa will become a tourist attraction in the Lake Erie port, joining a select group of Great
Lakes centres with museum subs.
Ian Raven, curator and executive director of the museum, said he was hugely relieved the deal is
signed.
"Project Ojibwa is going full speed ahead," said Raven, who's worked on the venture for three
years. His reaction, he said, was "relief, with terror."
"Now we actually have to make it happen," he said. "We have a very short window to complete
all the work" for a harbour dredging and the sub's Sept. 8 arrival.
The former HMCS Ojibwa, a diesel-electric Oberonclass sub, British-built in 1965 and
decommissioned in 1998, will be the focal point of a lakefront Canadian naval history museum.
The project's backers have raised $500,000 toward the $6-million project goal, and fundraising
will ramp up.
The federal government came up with $1.9 million to help make the project happen in the name
of economic development.
The tugboat Florence McKeil was sent from Hamilton to fetch the Ojibwa, whose return with its
cargo -- nearly as long as a football field -- aboard a barge can be followed in real time at the
Project Ojibwa web-site, at projectojibwa.ca
The Ojibwa will be mounted on a cradle alongside Otter Creek and open for the 2013 season. A
15,000-sq.-ft museum to be built beside it will open the next year.
Backers expect the attraction to generate 100,000 visitors a year and $14.4 million in economic
benefits to the hard-hit Port Burwell- Bayham area.
"I see this as an economic driver for an area of this country that really needs it," said
Conservative MP Joe Preston of Elgin-Middlesex- London.
Preston credited Raven and volunteer co-ordinator Dan McNeil with the hard work pushing for
the venture.
McNeil, a retired Canadian naval rear admiral, said signing the deal "is truly awesome."
He noted that unlike other places around the Great Lakes that have submarines, "we're putting
the emphasis on the Canadian naval history museum."
Overnight stays for visitors might be offered aboard the Ojibwa in future, he said.
Port Burwell made way for the Ojibwa when Port Stanley turned down the project.
chip.martin@sunmedia.ca twitter.com/ChipatLFPress
---
SUBMARINE MUSEUMS
ONONDAGA
Rimouski, Que.
Commissioned: 1965
Service: Operated mainly in the Atlantic during the Cold War.
Tourist attraction: Since 2009. On a dry land cradle along the St. Lawrence, Canada's first
publicly assessible sub.
USS COD
Cleveland, Ohio
Commissioned: 1943
Service: Operated in the Pacific, Philippines, South China Sea and Australia in the Second World
War; later, a training vessel.
Tourist Attraction: Since 1976 at Cleveland as a memorial.
USS CROAKER
Buffalo, N.Y.
Commissioned: 1944
Service: In the Pacific in the Second World War, post-war duty in the Atlantic and Caribbean.
Tourist attraction: First in Connecticut, but since 1988 at the Buffalo and Erie County Naval and
Military Park.
U-505
Chicago, Ill.
Commissioned: 1941
Service: German U-boat patrolled the North Atlantic, before her capture in June 1944.
Tourist Attraction: Since 1954 at Chicago's Museum of Science and Industry, now in an
underground climate-controlled structure.

Back to Top
Section: Politique
Byline: Raymond Giroux
Outlet: Le Soleil
Headline: Les ministres qui nuisent
Page: 12
Date: Thursday 17 May 2012
Dateline: Ottawa


Stephen Harper nommait son premier Conseil des ministres majoritaire il y aura un an demain. Trente-
sept élus, en plus de la sénatrice Marjory LeBreton, dirigent le pays en sa compagnie depuis ce temps.

Certains d'entre eux comme Jim Flaherty, Jason Kenney ou John Baird jouent vraiment un rôle majeur
dans la gestion des affaires publiques.

D'autres comme Maxime Bernier, Bal Gosal ou Gail Shea inaugurent les chrysanthèmes, selon
l'expression consacrée. Ils servent soit de traducteurs bien payés, soit de potiches destinées à attirer des
segments particuliers d'électeurs.

Une troisième catégorie de ministres, par contre, nuisent vraiment par leur incompétence ou leur façon
de diriger leur ministère, et ce, au-delà de toute considération politique.

Sept d'entre eux, à mon avis, mériteraient de se voir montrer la porte de leur ministère et un huitième,
Christian Paradis, a perdu tout contrôle sur son avenir.

La commissaire à l'éthique, Mary Dawson, l'a déjà blâmé pour son attitude envers l'ancien député Rahim
Jaffer. Mais il n'a violé aucune loi et promis d'en tirer les bonnes leçons.

Mme Dawson étudie cependant deux autres plaintes contre M. Paradis, l'une concernant sa partie de
pêche chez Marcel Aubut et l'autre, son intervention dans le transfert du bureau de l'assurance emploi de
Rimouski à Thetford Mines.

Que M. Paradis perde ces causes, et il devra purger un purgatoire certain sur les banquettes arrière.

Voici mon choix de ministres à déplacer d'urgence ou à tout simplement congédier :

Peter MacKay. Le ministre de la Défense nationale a perdu tout contrôle sur son ministère. Le dossier du
F-35, où il a camouflé les coûts réels du projet, confirme sa capitulation devant notre petit complexe
militaro-industriel. Comme nous ignorons ce qu'il sait et ce qu'il ne sait pas sur les Forces armées, aussi
bien passer au suivant.

Julian Fantino : associé au précédent et responsable des achats, il n'a maintenant plus rien à faire. Le
dossier du F-35 a été transféré à un secrétariat interministériel sous la coupe de Rona Ambrose, et M.
Fantino se contente de rebrasser ses vieilles fiches en attendant les questions de l'opposition.

John Duncan : il n'y a pas de dossier plus critique que celui des Affaires autochtones. M. Duncan n'en
saisit visiblement pas toute la portée et se retrouve constamment à la remorque des événements. Le
milieu politique s'interroge sur son état de santé et, dans son cas, un repos s'impose.

Peter Kent : d'accord, le poste de ministre de l'Environnement sous un gouvernement Harper n'est pas de
tout repos. Mais M. Kent a l'art de jeter de l'huile sur le feu, accusant ses adversaires de tous les mots,
lançant des attaques personnelles à la volée, mais sans jamais répondre aux questions les plus banales.

Tony Clement : sous les apparences d'un bon gars, le président du Conseil du Trésor a élaboré une
stratégie bien huilée pour camoufler l'ampleur réelle des coupes budgétaires en utilisant toutes les ficelles
administratives. La vérité sort toujours, et ce jour venu, son attitude aura éclaboussé tout le
gouvernement.
Vic Toews : le ministre de la Sécurité publique se comporte comme le shérif du village, traitant ses rivaux
de pédophiles un jour, d'amis des criminels le lendemain. Son projet de surveillance d'Internet dépassait
les bornes et a pris le chemin des oubliettes. M. Toews devrait bientôt l'y rejoindre.

Bev Oda : la ministre du Développement international a perdu tout bon sens en louant une limousine à
1000 $ par jour, à Londres, pour une course entre deux hôtels qui coûte 12 $ au commun des mortels.
Prise la main dans le sac, elle a remboursé. Mais trop tard.

Back to Top
Section: InFocus
Byline: Alison Auld
Outlet: The Chronicle-Herald
Headline: Soldiers hurt by blasts prone to brain disease; Study links condition to athletes'
injuries
Page: B1
Date: Thursday 17 May 2012
Source: The Canadian Press

Researchers studying the brains of soldiers exposed to blast injuries have found evidence of a
degenerative disease also detected in athletes who have suffered repeated blows to the head,
raising a worrisome prospect for thousands of combat veterans.
Scientists from the United States and England say brain tissue in four American military
members showed signs of chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or CTE, a progressive disease
normally linked to repetitive concussions.
The condition has been identified in more than a dozen professional football players who have
died after suffering multiple concussions. In some cases, they developed memory loss,
irritability, dementia and suicidal thoughts before they died.
Patric Stanton, a cell biologist at the New York Medical College, said the international team of
scientists found telltale signs of the disease in veterans exposed to even just one blast from an
improvised explosive device, a weapon that became the hallmark of the Afghanistan conflict.
"This is really the first demonstration that their brains look indistinguishable from that you see in
athletes that have had multiple concussions," he said upon the release of the findings Wednesday
in the online journal, Science Translational Medicine.
"It's very worrisome."
The researchers, based largely at Boston University, looked at the brains of four veterans after
they had died, three of whom had been exposed to IEDs.
The fourth had suffered concussions in and outside the military and developed post-traumatic
stress disorder, but didn't have a blast exposure.
He said they all showed signs of CTE and that it may only take one blast exposure to develop
symptoms, rather than multiple hits to the head suffered by some athletes who have the condition
that is characterized by abnormal protein deposits.
"It's as if the blast has concentrated in a second or so repeated concussions - like a whole NFL
career might be concentrated in a few seconds," he said.
The researchers said they found that the blast produces a wind that can reach a velocity of 530
kilometres per hour and moves the person's head back and forth very rapidly, causing the brain to
get compressed several times as it floats in fluid.
They recreated the effect in mice and discovered signs of the disease only two weeks after
exposing them to a single blast.
The blasts can cause traumatic brain injuries, which can lead to symptoms that are thought to be
short-lived, depending on the severity of the blast.
Thousands of military members in Canada and other countries have been exposed to the potent
blasts from IEDs, the crude bombs that maimed and killed dozens of Canadian Forces in
Afghanistan over the course of the 10-year mission.
It's estimated that just over five per cent of personnel deployed to Afghanistan from 2009 to
2011 experienced a mild traumatic brain injury.
Col. Rakesh Jetly, a senior Canadian Forces psychiatrist, said the Canadian Forces has created a
special panel on managing brain injuries in the military.

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Section: News
Byline: Murray Brewster And Jim Bronskill
Outlet: Edmonton Journal
Headline: RCMP investigated leaked F-35 story; Five-month 'national security' probe ordered
by Tories queried from outset
Page: A14
Date: Thursday 17 May 2012
Dateline: OTTAWA
Source: The Canadian Press

The Harper government called in the RCMP to investigate a politically embarrassing story
involving the decision to sole-source the purchase of the F-35 stealth fighter, claiming it was a
breach of national security, The Canadian Press has learned.
The Mounties conducted a fivemonth review into an alleged leak of cabinet documents under the
Security of Information Act, recently used to charge a naval intelligence officer in an apparent
spy case.
Records obtained under the Access to Information Act show investigators had doubts almost
from the outset in July 2010 that any laws were broken in the Globe and Mail story.
The story revealed angst within government about possible alienation from Washington if a
competition was held to replace the air force's CF-18s.
Still, the review pressed ahead and drew in one of the RCMP's four Integrated National Security
Enforcement Teams, whose job is to chase terrorism threats. It was shut down in December 2010
for lack of evidence.
The case file shows the complaint was laid by Wayne Wouters, clerk of the Privy Council, the
country's highest-ranking civil servant and adviser to Prime Minister Stephen Harper, shortly
after the article appeared on June 11, 2010.
The story by reporter Daniel Leblanc ran a month before the Harper government formally
announced it had selected the Lockheed Martin-built F-35 in a glitzy photo op that included a
mock-up of the radar-evading jet.
The first RCMP member to review the allegation on July 8 was mystified as to what the issue
might be.
"By reading the article, it is unclear how the info, interferes with the development of weapons or
jeopardizes the safety of Canada," said the summary file, which rated the preliminary
investigation as a medium priority.
"It is an analytical fact that Canada and the USA are allies in several aspects. International
competition may hinder Can-US relationships if Canada decides to turn down US offer, and the
Globe and Mail article has not shed new lights on these facts or revealed secrets."
Doubts about the substance of the complaint lingered until the file was closed, the records show.
The prime minister's communications director defended the decision to ask for an investigation.
"The RCMP was asked to look into a possible unauthorized disclosure of classified information
as has been done from time to time," said Andrew MacDougall in an email.
A spokesman for the RCMP, Cpl. David Falls, said the force has a mandate to "investigate the
unauthorized disclosure, mishandling or communication of classified information," but declined
to comment on the specifics of the Globe and Mail investigation, referring questions to the Privy
Council Office.
The case file reveals investigators recommended on Sept. 2, 2010, the review be shut down. The
complaint could be "concluded as it does not constitute a breach of secret or protected
documents." Yet it was kept alive by senior officers, who insisted National Defence be
consulted.
The RCMP closed its file in November 2010, but was forced to "reactivate" the case and
"investigate further" because it was noted no one had talked to Wouters.
In finally shutting down the probe, the Mounties said "since the information was available on
open source, it was decided that no further investigation was needed."
Wesley Wark, an expert in security and intelligence at the University of Ottawa, said he was
concerned by the revelations in the file. He described the probe as a misuse of not only the
RCMP, but of the security legislation, one of the most serious laws on the book. "This has the
whiff, well more than a whiff, of a politically inspired move," said Wark.

Back to Top
Section: News
Lead: Ashley Moores wants to give her two young children an early start at learning a second
language.
Headline: Daycare's French-first policy called 'discrimination' CHILDCARE: Mother says
facility's 'bilingual' title is misleading
Page: 1
Byline: DANIELLE VANDENBRINK, THE WHIG-STANDARD
Outlet: The Kingston Whig-Standard
Date: Thursday 17 May 2012

Ashley Moores wants to give her two young children an early start at learning a second
language.
Moores' husband, a soldier at Canadian Forces Base Kingston, grew up in Quebec and is fluent
in both French and English.
Recently, Moores discovered the Kingston Military Family Resource Centre -- located in the
Batoche Community Centre on Lundy's Lane -- offers full-day, bilingual childcare.
Moores, who heard the two-week- old licensed facility was still accepting clients, immediately
contacted the resource centre to inquire about a spot for her twin boys, aged three.
"I found out that they were only keeping spots available for French-speaking children," she said.
Faced with returning to a full-time job and her partner working on base, Moores said she was
looking for a childcare option that was convenient for her young family.
She said she has avoided the base's other childcare facility, Sunshine Playhouse, saying the wait
list tops one year.
But the main motivation, she said, was incorporating a second language into her children's early
childhood education.
"To know both languages is very important," she said. "Day-care is just prepping them for
education.
"Why offer daycare as bilingual and only accept Frenchspeaking children?"
The new facility is also less expensive -- offering its 21 child care spaces for approximately $30
to $40 per day.
Moores calls the KMFRC's French-only policy "favouritism," and said the "bilingual" title is
misleading.
"It's unfair for the families that are being posted in," she said. "It's discrimination. It really is.
"There is no justification for it," Moores said.
Moores said she is surprised these rules have been created by the resource centre, which helped
her through her hus-band's deployment last year.
"They do play a big part in the military spouse's life," she said. "They do a lot for us, but I just
can't get over this."
Iain Harper, executive director of the KMFRC, said CFB Kings - ton has seen an influx in the
number of francophone families stationed there, and the decision to designate the childcare
facility as "francophone-first" was based on space available in the facility.
"It's a space issue," Harper said. "If I had more space, I would help everybody. It's just
unfortunate that I don't."
Harper said a number of childcare spaces are being reserved for French-speaking children in
anticipation of postings to the base in the coming month.
"We considered there needed to be alternate childcare for francophone families," he said. "Yes,
there are spots available, and people are calling daily and we are filling francophone spaces."
Harper said current figures show that of the military population, approximately 30% identify
themselves as francophone.
Recently, the base's only French-language childcare centre moved to the Portsmouth Village
area.
"We needed to provide alternative choices for francophone families," he said.
Because Sunshine Playhouse offers services in English, Harper said there is an alternative for
English-speaking families.
"I have no control over the wait list of Sunshine," he said. "I understand their frustration if
they've been on a (wait) list."
If available spaces are not filled by September, Harper said they would be made available to
English-speaking children.
When asked why the childcare centre was being advertised as "bilingual," including on the
KMFRC's website, Harper admitted the wording may not have clearly described the services the
resource centre provides.
"It may have been forward-looking to use the word bilingual," he said. "If I do get more space, of
course we will look at eventually making it bilingual. Our intent is, over time, that our services
will be completely bilingual.
"Now, we try to balance the (child) care for all."
But Moores said that misses the point.
"When they look at demand for childcare, I don't think it should go on how many francophone
families there are," she said. "It should go on how many families need childcare, regardless of
language."
danielle.
vandenbrink@sunmedia.ca

Back to Top
Section: News
Byline: Lisa Goudy
Outlet: The Leader-Post (Regina)
Headline: Snowbirds open 2012 season with daring manoeuvres
Page: A1 / Front
Date: Thursday 17 May 2012
Dateline: MOOSE JAW
Source: Moose Jaw Times-Herald

Daring manoeuvres in front of a crowd of family and friends in 30C weather kicked off the 2012
show season of the Canadian Forces Snowbirds on Wednesday afternoon at 15 Wing Moose
Jaw.
"It was challenging conditions for us. It was the hottest day that we've flown this year, so that
makes the jet quite a bit underpowered compared to how it normally is," said Capt. Brent Handy,
the No. 9 opposing solo. "It was good training opportunity plus that's actually our first time to fly
over the airfields here in Moose Jaw."
Handy, a first-time pilot with the Snowbirds in 2012, said the training is normally done in
Mossbank and flying in front of family and friends was an "added perceived pressure." The
Snowbirds are in their 42nd season.
Approximately three quarters into the show, Snowbird No. 7 experienced a minor technical
problem and measures were taken to get the plane on the ground before resuming the show.
"Seven hit a bird on the leading edge so we stopped the show and that's what we would normally
do," said Maj. Wayne Mott, the 2012 team lead who flies the No. 1 jet. "It's a dent on the leading
edge. The guys will take it off and put a new part on - you wouldn't even know that it was dented
in that airplane if you didn't hear the noise of the bird hitting it."
Mott said having a jet missing can affect the dynamics of the show, but changes are discussed
over the air to adjust for having a jet missing. He said he believed they put on a good opening
show, even though it was a bit bumpy in the air.
Capt. Padruig MacIntosh, No. 3 inner left wing, added that several new moves have been added
this year, such as the Concord Combo, which he said is a "roll followed by a loop."
"We're pretty excited to get that in the opener this year," said MacIntosh.
The Snowbirds will hold approximately 58 performances in 39 locations across Canada and the
United States. Their next show is in Winnipeg on May 19 and they'll return to Moose Jaw for a
show on July 7. Travel destinations include places as far away as Illinois, Minnesota and Florida.
"I've never been way up north to Whitehorse, Nunavut and all that so I'm pretty pumped for
that," said MacIntosh. "My experience so far has been like a dream."
For Handy, it'll be a new experience travelling across North America during the summer.
"It'll be a summer of highs and lows, travelling to some really neat places and meeting all kinds
of really neat people, but the lows are obviously being away from your family for such a long
time," said Handy.

Back to Top
Section: NovaScotia
Byline: Steve Bruce Court Reporter
Outlet: The Chronicle-Herald
Illustrations:
 Four members of the Royal Canadian Navy talk outside Dartmouth provincial court earlier this
month. The men were in court for their arraignment on charges of impersonating police. From
left are Scott Broderick, Bronson Mahnke, Nicholas Brownhill and John Proctor. (TIM
KROCHAK/ Staff)
Headline: Sailors' case headed to adult diversion program
Page: A9
Date: Thursday 17 May 2012

Four members of the Royal Canadian Navy will be given the opportunity to avoid having a
criminal record for impersonating police.
The Crown has agreed to refer the charge against the sailors to the province's adult diversion
program, a Dartmouth provincial court judge was told Wednesday.
If the young men accept responsibility for their actions and meet the terms of a contract to be
drawn up by a probation officer, the charge will be withdrawn by the prosecution.
The four men were charged after someone in a car pulled in behind a vehicle that was parked on
Bissett Road in Cole Harbour on March 25 at about 1 a.m. and activated blue and red flashing
lights on the dash and a siren.
After the fake police car pulled away without anyone getting out, the people in the other vehicle
called 911.
A few minutes later, RCMP stopped a Dodge Avenger matching the description of the suspicious
car and arrested the four occupants for posing as police.
The accused are Scott Carman Broderick, 21, Nicholas Christopher Brownhill, 22, and John
Arthur Proctor, 20, all of Lady Hammond Road in Halifax, and Bronson Guenther Mahnke, 19,
of Washmill Lake Drive in Halifax.
The men were arraigned two weeks ago and were back before a judge Wednesday.
They assured Judge Pam Williams that they understood how adult diversion works. She ordered
them to return to court Aug. 15 for an update on their progress.
Two uniformed naval officers sat in the gallery and took notes on the proceedings.
Police laid a summary charge, so the maximum penalty is a $5,000 fine or six months in jail. It
also meant the case was eligible for adult diversion, which has been offered provincewide since
1997 to first-time offenders of minor crimes.
(sbruce@herald.ca)
Back to Top
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