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the-heat-is-on

VIEWS: 4 PAGES: 28

									THE HEAT IS ON!

3C Conference
S3P1. STUDENTS WILL INVESTIGATE HOW HEAT
IS PRODUCED AND THE EFFECTS OF HEATING
AND COOLING AND WILL UNDERSTAND A
CHANGE IN TEMPERATURE INDICATES A
CHANGE IN HEAT.

a. Categorize ways to produce heat energy such as
   burning, rubbing (friction) and mixing one thing
   with another.
b. Investigate how insulation affects heating and
   cooling.
c. Investigate the transfer of heat energy from the
   sun to various materials.
d. Use thermometers to measure the changes in
   temperature of water samples (hot, warm, cold)
   over time.
S3P1. STUDENTS WILL INVESTIGATE HOW HEAT
IS PRODUCED AND THE EFFECTS OF HEATING
AND COOLING AND WILL UNDERSTAND A
CHANGE IN TEMPERATURE INDICATES A
CHANGE IN HEAT.

a. Categorize ways to produce heat energy such as
   burning, rubbing (friction) and mixing one thing
   with another.
b. Investigate how insulation affects heating and
   cooling.
c. Investigate the transfer of heat energy from the
   sun to various materials.
d. Use thermometers to measure the changes in
   temperature of water samples (hot, warm, cold)
   over time.
COLD IS THE ABSENCE OF HEAT!
   Heat energy only travels in one direction.

   The Law of Thermodynamics states that all materials
    strive to be the same temperature so warmer objects
    use energy to equalize their temperature. Using this
    energy to heat objects touching or near them, cools the
    warmer object until all are the same temperature.

   So ice does not cool a drink, the drink
    gives up its heat to warm the ice
    and the ice melts.
HEAT ENERGY
   This Handout is Teacher Content.

   The Heat Is On foldable is third grade content.

   Be very careful with Heat Energy concepts.
CLASSIC INVESTIGATION
 Lay out thermometers and let them sit until they have
  reached room temperature.
 Record the temperature.

 Wrap each individual thermometer in a different
  material, such as wool, cotton, plastic, paper, etc.
 Let the thermometers sit untouched for several
  minutes.
 Which thermometer will have the
  highest reading? The lowest?
  Write in your notebook your
  explanation.
 Record the temperatures.

 What did you find out?
PROBES
 What are they?
 Why do we use them?

 When do we use them?

 Remember they are asking for different things
  from different age levels.
 Oh Dear! Heat must be full of misconceptions
  because there are a plethora of probes for heat
  concepts!
 Let’s study them in groups and share our
  thinking about how to use them.
UNCOVERING STUDENT IDEAS IN SCIENCE
BY PAGE KEELEY

   Volume 1
     P. 103 The Mitten Problem
     P. 109 Objects and Temperature


   Volume 2
     P. 47 Turning the Dial
     P. 59 Freezing Ice
     P. 77 Ice-Cold Lemonade
     P. 83 Mixing Water


   Volume 4
       P. 45 Ice Water
FREEZING ICE
    Mia and Devon are having a summer party. They need to
     make two sizes of ice. The large blocks of ice will be put in
     a cooler to keep the cans of soda cold. The small ice cubes
     will keep the sodas in the glasses cold. They wondered
     how the temperature at which ice freezes is affected by
     the size.

A.    Small ice cubes freeze at a lower temperature than
      large blocks of ice.
B.    Small ice cubes freeze at a higher temperature
      than large blocks of ice.
C.    Small ice cubes and large blocks of ice freeze at the
      same temperature.
WHY USE A THERMOMETER?
 Hot      or Cold?
   3 bowls of water

Does it matter
whether we use
Fahrenheit or Celsius?

 Look at the scale.
 Which one is more

precise?

Who needs a couple of
Immersion thermometers?
CATEGORIZE WAYS TO PRODUCE HEAT ENERGY
SUCH AS BURNING, RUBBING (FRICTION) AND
MIXING ONE THING WITH ANOTHER.
 Hot Stuff is an AIMS activity that is in the
  AIMS books in the Media Center.
 It is done by stations.

 Let’s discuss setting up, managing, and
  maintaining stations and safety precautions.
                                                           Safety Note:
                                                            Point out the
                                                               safety
 EQ: How can heat be produced?                             precautions at
                                                            each station
Procedure:                                                    prior to
     Construct rubber band book                             beginning.
          The Heat is On
     Students will rotate through 6 stations
          Exploration 1: hand sanitizer
          Exploration 2: hair dryer & electrical outlet
          Exploration 3: desk lamp & electrical outlet      Materials:
          Exploration 4: candle, match, foil              hand sanitizer,
                                                              hair dryer,
          Exploration 5: block of wood, sandpaper          lamp, candle,
          Exploration 6: wire hanger                      matches, block
                                                             wood, sand
                                                             paper, wire
                                                               hanger
TURNING THE DIAL
    Flora is boiling water on a stove. She turns the temperature
     dial up to high to boil the water. The water is boiling
     vigorously with large bubbles quickly forming and bursting
     at the surface. Flora then turns the dial of the stove down
     to low. The water is boiling gently, with smaller bubbles
     slowly forming and bursting at the surface. Flora wonders if
     the boiling temperature changes when she turns the dial.
     What would you tell Flora?
A.     The boiling temperature is greater when the dial is set at
       high.
B.     The boiling temperature is greater when the dial is set at
       low.
C.     The boiling temperature is the same at both settings.
INVESTIGATE HOW INSULATION AFFECTS
HEATING AND COOLING.

   Cartons ‘N Cotton AIMS Books




   Polar Brrrs AIMS Books




Let’s check our undercover thermometers.
    EQ: How can we slow down the loss of heat?


• Day 1 – Prepare Cartons
    Carton 1 – Outside
     covered with cotton
    Carton 2 – Inside
     covered with cotton
    Carton 3 – Plain carton –
     No cotton
• Day 2 – Test & Record data
  every 6 min.
    EQ: How can we slow down the loss of heat?

• What question were we trying to
  answer?
• How did we make a fair test?

• What happened to the
  temperature of the water in each
  jar?
• Which jar retained the most heat?

• What are sources of hot water in
  our homes? Why is it important to
  insulate these sources?
GRASS AND SOIL AS INSULATION
 THE MITTEN
Sarah’s science class is investigating heat energy. They wonder
  what would happen to the temperature reading on a
  thermometer if they put the thermometer inside a mitten.
Sarah’s group obtained two thermometers and a mitten. They
  put one thermometer inside the mitten and the other
  thermometer on the table next to the mitten. An hour later
  they compared the readings on the two thermometers. The
  temperature inside the room remained the same during their
  experiment.
A. The thermometer inside the mitten will have a lower
    temperature reading then the thermometer on the table.
B. The thermometer inside the mitten will have a higher
    temperature reading than the thermometer on the table.
C. Both thermometers will have the same temperature reading.
OBJECTS AND TEMPERATURE
   Taz and Kyle are comparing the temperature readings of four
    different objects.
           Blocks of wood
           Metal tray
           Wool hat
           Glass plate
 They place the objects on a table in their science classroom and
  leave them overnight. A thermometer is attached to each
  object. The next day they record the temperature of each
  object at the same time.
A. None of the objects will have the same temperature.

B. Two of the objects will have the same temperature.

C. Three of the objects will have the same temperature.

D. All of the objects will have the same temperature.
USE
THERMOMETERS
TO MEASURE THE
CHANGES IN
TEMPERATURE OF
WATER SAMPLES
(HOT, WARM,
COLD) OVER TIME.
MIXING WATER
Melinda filled two glasses of equal size half full with
  water. The water in one glass was 50 degrees Celsius.
  The water in the other glass was 10 degrees Celsius.
  She poured one glass into the other, stirred the liquid,
  and measured the temperature of the full glass of
  water.
What do you think the temperature of the full glass of
  water will be?
A. 20 degrees Celsius

B. 30 degrees Celsius

C. 40 degrees Celsius

D. 50 degrees Celsius

E. 60 degrees Celsius
ICE-COLD LEMONADE
    It was a hot summer day. Mattie poured herself a glass
     of lemonade. The lemonade was warm, so Mattie put
     some ice in the glass. After 10 minutes, Mattie noticed
     that the ice was melting and the lemonade was cold.
     Mattie wondered what made the lemonade get cold.
     She had three different ideas. Which idea do you think
     best explains why the lemonade got cold?

A.    The coldness from the ice mixed into the lemonade.
B.    The heat from the lemonade moved into the ice.
C.    The coldness and the heat moved back and forth until
      the lemonade cooled off.
ICE WATER
    Christine put five ice cubes in a glass. After 20 minutes
     most of the ice had melted to form “ice water.” There
     were still some small pieces of ice floating in the water.
     Christine measured the temperature of the ice water
     then added five more ice cubes to the glass. She
     measured the temperature three minutes later. What
     do you predict happened to the temperature of the
     “ice water” three minutes after she added more ice?

A.    The temperature of the “ice water” increased.
B.    The temperature of the “ice water decreased.
C.    The temperature of the “ice water” stayed the same.
REFLECTIONS

								
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