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					Socializing in the                        21st

       Century




Presented by Heather Huey, NJIT Library, Newark NJ
        Who’s on myspace?
• Is anyone here on myspace or facebook?
MYSPACE- Musicians first.

• Now, filmmakers, authors, librarians
  because they could reach their audiences.

Who do you think these users are?
                                   Teens?
     –55% of online teens have created a
      profile
     –48% of teens visit social networking
      websites daily or more often
     –26% visit once a day
     –22% visit several times a day.
•   Lenhart, Amanda and Mary Madden. “Social Networking Websites and Teens: An Overview.” Pew Internet &
    American Life Project. January 7, 2007. Available May 18, 2007 at
    http://www.pewinternet.org/pdfs/PIP_SNS_Data_Memo_Jan_2007.pdf
            Age Demographics




“More than Half of MySpace Visitors are Now Age 35 or Older,
  as the Site’s Demographic Composition Continues to Shift.” Comscore Press Release.
                        October 5, 2006. Available on May 20, 2007 at
                 http://www.comscore.com/press/release.asp?press=1019
“More than Half of MySpace Visitors are Now Age 35 or Older, as the Site’s Demographic Composition Continues to Shift.” Comscore Press Release.
                     October 5, 2006. Available on May 20, 2007 at http://www.comscore.com/press/release.asp?press=1019
       Who’s on Facebook?
• 85% of college students are on Facebook.
• Librarians, Professors, Staff
Myspace does not have a built in network
           like facebook.




                         View all 3137 Current Students
      What do people do there?
• Create Profiles
  Individual user profiles: can establish for a library and/or
    individual librarians

• Participate in Groups
  Can be started by anyone and for any purpose: pre-
   existing college-specific groups and subgroups

• Share
Myspace: Bulletins & Event Announcements, Blogs
Facebook: Notes, Posted Items, Status Updates, etc
They leave
comments
(known as
wall posts in
facebook)
People make plans, publicly through comments. For example: me
They post bulletins
Post Blogs or Notes
Share Photos
Advertise
 Events
  Just like myspace
 makes this musician
   contactable and
     friendable…
  Myspace can do the
same thing for a library.
NJIT Library’s
Facebook
Profile
NJIT
Library’s
Facebook
Group
Example
of the
News
Feed
On Myspace, one can only use Bulletins, but here on facebook,
they have Notes and Posted Items (for links and photos).
                 Tagging –
unlike folksnomy tagging in facebook refers to photos
 Value of Facebook & Myspace
• Personalize & promote libraries & librarians
• Facilitate & extend opportunities to
  communicate, collaborate, and learn in virtual
  spaces that students utilize for play and school
• Interact with students in their natural
  environment
• Using more human/approachable identities to
  distance learning students. (Charnigo)
    Facebook Librarians are everywhere

• “Walking around my library, I realized many
  students were using Facebook while they
  were researching. Having this group in
  Facebook allows them to get help at their point
  of need in a user interface that they are already
  familiar with.
• In addition, the group message board retains
  questions & answers, allowing students to find
  answers to common questions.” (Landis)
•   Landis, Cliff. “Connecting to Users with Facebook.” Georgia Library Quarterly Winter 2007.
                   Faculty involvement
• “It really helps break down barriers between
  students and faculty.” – University of Iowa
  Senior, Lindsay Schutte

• “Posting a profile on thefacebook.com takes two
  minutes, but it sends a message that you are
  part of the same academic community as the
  students.” Yale Professor of Philosophy, Tony
  Cross (Duboff)
•   Duboff, Josh. “’Poke’ your prof: faculty discovers thefacebook.com. Yale Daily News March 24,
    2005. Available May 10, 2007 at http://www.yaledailynews.com/articles/view/13706?
  An Opportunity for Librarians
• An intriguing opportunity to directly market
  more than 75% of my target audience.
• Potential Target of incoming freshmen &
  graduate students. (Matthews 306)

Matthews, Brian S. (2006). “Do you Facebook? Networking with Students Online.”
   College & Research Libraries News 67(5):306-307.




   My dream for Facebook – More Academic
   Collaboration
         New Roving Librarian?
• “Rather than waiting for students to
  approach us, it is perhaps more beneficial
  to be proactive and approach them. By
  using online social networks, librarians can
  increase campus visibility and update the
  stereotypical image, but most importantly,
  we can let students know what the
  library is really all about.” (Matthews,
  307)
Matthews, Brian S. (2006). “Do you Facebook? Networking with Students Online.”
   College & Research Libraries News 67(5):306-307.
        Building Community
• Using free services such as Myspace &
  Facebook is free yet can greatly increase
  the connections to users of the library.
• These modern methods of community
  building are the ways students today are
  meeting, communicating, and building
  community. (Shier)
  The urls will
 change but the
behavior will stay
   the same.


 These tools may
be temporary fads,
but the underlying
   idea will most
      likely be
permanent--people
  want to connect
  virtually just as
they do physically.
What do you want the Library’s role
             to be?

What role will the library serve in these
 environments might largely depend on
 whether librarians are proactive and
 experimental with this type of technology
 or whether they dismiss it as pure
 recreation. (Charnigo)
    Why librarians should care
• Emerging technologies for
  communications should provoke, at the
  very least, an interest in, and knowledge of
  their presence among library and
  information science professionals.
  (Charnigo).
             Email is a chore
• Some students don’t use email. They
  communicate via IM, text messages, phone, and
  facebook. If the library is where they are at, are
  they more likely to contact us, to think about
  contacting us?

• If they read our myspace bulletin or facebook
  note announcing how to use a database or that
  we have later hours, are they more likely to use
  our services?
            Positive Uses of Social
             Networking. (YASLA)
• Youth participation (have them make your
  myspace page!)
• Can one have an online social network
  without reading & writing?
• Networking with authors
• Educating Parents
    http://teentechweek.wikispaces.com/space/showimage/myspaceforparents_booklet
    .pdf
•   YASLA http://www.leonline.com/yalsa/positive_uses.pdf
More examples of “Reference” on
         Facebook
My favorites 
 How can you use MySpace or Facebook to
      benefit students or patrons?
• You can offer reference services
• Market the library with photos, event announcements,
  myspace bulletins, facebook notes, and flyers (paid
  advertisements targeted at your group's users)
• Use these tools as a venue for instruction (using groups or
  linking to traditional instructional resources).
• Solicit for library suggestions
• Using the information in a student's profile to meet their
  information needs
• Allow a place for users to comment about the library. Allow
  both positive and negative comments.
• Answer Reference Questions publicly.
• Join & Create Educational groups, class groups, for
  presence and to answer questions.
    MySpace & Facebook Links
http://www.myspace.com/askalibrarianfl
http://www.myspace.com/brooklyncollegelibrary
http://www.myspace.com/nfpl
http://www.myspace.com/njitlibrary

Search for us on Facebook as “Robert Van
 Houten.” Search for me as “Heather Huey”
•   Charnigo, L., & Barnett-Ellis, P. (2007, March). Checking Out Facebook.com: The
    Impact of a Digital Trend on Academic Libraries. Information Technology & Libraries,
    26(1), 23-34.
•   Duboff, Josh. “’Poke’ your prof: faculty discovers thefacebook.com. Yale Daily News
    March 24, 2005. Available May 10, 2007 at
    http://www.yaledailynews.com/articles/view/13706?
•   Evans, Beth. (2006). YourSpace or MySpace? NetConnet 10.15.06 Accessible May
    10, 2007 at http://libraryjournal.com/article/CA6375465.html
•   Landis, Cliff. (2007) “Connecting to Users with Facebook.” Georgia Library Quarterly
    43(4), 6.
•   Lenhart, Amanda and Madden, Mary . “Social Networking Websites and Teens: An
    Overview.” Pew Internet & American Life Project. January 7, 2007. Available May 18,
    2007 at http://www.pewinternet.org/pdfs/PIP_SNS_Data_Memo_Jan_2007.pdf
•   Liu, Mingyang. (2005) “Would you ‘friend’ your professors?” The Duke Chronicle
    2.25.05. Accessible May 10, 2007 at http://www.dukechronicle.com/.
•   Matthews, Brian S. (2006). “Do you Facebook? Networking with Students Online.”
    College & Research Libraries News 67(5):306-307.
•   “More than Half of MySpace Visitors are Now Age 35 or Older, as the Site’s
    Demographic Composition Continues to Shift.” Comscore Press Release. October 5,
    2006. Available on May 20, 2007 at
    http://www.comscore.com/press/release.asp?press=1019
•   Shier, Maria Tess. (2005) “The Way Technology Changes How we do what we do.”
    New Directions for Student Services 112: 77-87.
•   Young Adult Library Services Association (YALSA). Social Networking and DOPA.
    LEO: Librarians & Educators Online. Available May 18, 2007 at
    http://www.leonline.com/yalsa/positive_uses.pdf/

				
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posted:1/3/2013
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