Emotional by dffhrtcv3

VIEWS: 1 PAGES: 50

									SLO 3 & 4
Emotional
Development



Kostelnik, 2006, Guiding chidren's
       social development
        Social competence


Depends largely on how well children
express their emotions and understand
the emotions of others.
                                    (Kostelnik Pg. 134)



             Kostelnik, 2006, Guiding chidren's
                    social development
      What are emotions?

the affective (feeling) part of our
consciousness

a state of feeling

a conscious mental reaction

                          http://www.m-w.com/dictionary/
              Kostelnik, 2006, Guiding chidren's
                     social development
What emotion do you see?




       Kostelnik, 2006, Guiding chidren's
              social development
What emotion do you see?




       Kostelnik, 2006, Guiding chidren's
              social development
What emotion do you see?




       Kostelnik, 2006, Guiding chidren's
              social development
What emotion do you see?




       Kostelnik, 2006, Guiding chidren's
              social development
What emotion do you see?




       Kostelnik, 2006, Guiding chidren's
              social development
What emotion do you see?




       Kostelnik, 2006, Guiding chidren's
              social development
What emotion do you see?




       Kostelnik, 2006, Guiding chidren's
              social development
What emotion do you see?




       Kostelnik, 2006, Guiding chidren's
              social development
What emotion do you see?




       Kostelnik, 2006, Guiding chidren's
              social development
What emotion do you see?




       Kostelnik, 2006, Guiding chidren's
              social development
What emotion do you see?




       Kostelnik, 2006, Guiding chidren's
              social development
What emotion do you see?




       Kostelnik, 2006, Guiding chidren's
              social development
Where do emotions come from?


    Internal and external events
  that send signals to the brain and
       central nervous system




           Kostelnik, 2006, Guiding chidren's
                  social development
    Parts to
    emotion




Kostelnik, 2006, Guiding chidren's
       social development
                   Physical

•   Facial expression
•   Posture
•   Voice
•   Body movement
•   Heart rate
•   Sweaty palms
•   Dry throat
                Kostelnik, 2006, Guiding chidren's
                       social development
             Expressive
• Laughing
• Smiling
• Frowning




             Kostelnik, 2006, Guiding chidren's
                    social development
               Cognitive
• Brain interprets what is happening

• A judgment is made – happiness,
  sadness, anger, fear




              Kostelnik, 2006, Guiding chidren's
                     social development
  Choose one of the emotions on
your word search and describe the
     physical, expressive and
  cognitive part of the emotion.



          Kostelnik, 2006, Guiding chidren's
                 social development
      What is important about
             emotions?

• Survival

• Provide information about our well being
 (Table 5-1, pg. 135)
• Serve as a form of communication


                  Kostelnik, 2006, Guiding chidren's
                         social development
             Our role is to
• understand
• be sensitive
• offer support in managing
• provide the words
• help children find opportunities to talk
  about feelings
• express our feelings honestly – model
• help children read cues

              Kostelnik, 2006, Guiding chidren's
                     social development
       We must remember
• Emotions are real

• There are no right or wrong emotions

• Children cannot help how they feel or
  change on command

• Emotions serve useful functions

              Kostelnik, 2006, Guiding chidren's
                     social development
        TRUE OR FALSE?
Children with greater emotional
  awareness and understanding are:
• not liked by peers & adults.
• more apt to experience difficulties in
  social interaction.
• associated with cooperative & friendly
  behaviour
• better able to get along with others.
                                Kostelnik et al. 4th edition. p. 125
              Kostelnik, 2006, Guiding chidren's
                     social development
Kostelnik, 2006, Guiding chidren's
       social development
  Stages in

 emotional
development



 Kostelnik, 2006, Guiding chidren's
        social development
        Primary emotions
joy (6 weeks)

      anger (4 – 6 months)

                sadness (5 – 7 months)

                        fear (6 – 12 months)
            Kostelnik, 2006, Guiding chidren's
                   social development
        TRUE OR FALSE?

1. Real emotions don’t appear until
   weeks after birth.


2. Primary emotions are the intense and
   relatively pure emotions that are
   first to develop in infancy.

             Kostelnik, 2006, Guiding chidren's
                    social development
       TRUE OR FALSE?
Children’s understanding of their
emotions becomes more complex as they
mature.


Children are unable to recognize other’s
emotions until the preschool years.

             Kostelnik, 2006, Guiding chidren's
                    social development
                 Emotional IQ

• Everyone has                      • Other people may
  emotions                            not feel the same
                                      way I do about
• Emotions are                        things
  prompted by
  different situations              • I can do things to
                                      affect how I feel
• There are different                 and how others feel
  ways to express
  emotions

                 Kostelnik, 2006, Guiding chidren's
                        social development
               Erik Erikson
   the emotional tasks of childhood
Trust versus mistrust “I am lovable and my
  world is safe and secure.”

Autonomy versus shame & doubt
 “I can decide.”

Initiative versus guilt
  “ I can do and I can make.”

Industry versus inferiority “I can learn, I can
  contribute, I can work with others.”
                Kostelnik, 2006, Guiding chidren's
                       social development
         What do you think?
              Read: Kostelnik Chapter 5

 Gender differences in children’s emotional
  expression (pg. 145)

 Family and cultural variations in children’s
  emotional development (pg. 145)

 Childhood fears from birth to adolescence
  (pg. 146)
                  Kostelnik, 2006, Guiding chidren's
                         social development
Emotional expression learned
         through…

       • Imitation

       • Feedback

       • Direct instruction


         Kostelnik, 2006, Guiding chidren's
                social development
      In your program…

Can you think of examples of children
 learning about emotional expression
   through imitation, feedback and
          direct instruction?




           Kostelnik, 2006, Guiding chidren's
                  social development
     Responding to children’s
           emotions
Kostelnik et al. text, read “Nonsupportive adult
  behaviour” pg. 149

     Discuss with a partner




                Kostelnik, 2006, Guiding chidren's
                       social development
             Things to avoid
• Sounding all-knowing             • Ignoring

• Accusing                         • Lying

• Trying to diffuse                • Denying
  too quickly
                                   • Shaming
• Coercing into talking
  about their feelings
                Kostelnik, 2006, Guiding chidren's
                       social development
     Appropriate responses to
       children’s emotions

• Talking about feelings

• Affective reflection

• Help children express through words


              Kostelnik, 2006, Guiding chidren's
                     social development
  Affective Reflections

 Non-judgmental statements that
describe the emotion of the child or
               adult.




                             Kostelnik et al. 4th ed. p. 491
          Kostelnik, 2006, Guiding chidren's
                 social development
     When formulating affective
           reflections…
Observe carefully            Make a brief statement
                             describing the emotion you
                             observed
Be sensitive to a
wide range of                Use a variety of feeling
emotions                     Words over time
                             Acknowledge emotions
Be non-judgmental
in your assessment           Revise inaccurate
                               reflections

                Kostelnik, 2006, Guiding chidren's
                       social development
 Benefits of using affective reflections

 Helps recognize own                 Adult acknowledgement
  feelings                             makes children feel
                                       heard & accepted

 Verbal labels help                  Helps to recognize that
  child remember past                  their emotions are not
                                       so different from
  situations & how to                  others
  handle
                                      Gives children
 Labeling helps to                    words/phrases to use in
                                       emotional situations
  differentiate similar
  emotions
                  Kostelnik, 2006, Guiding chidren's
                         social development
     Are you
in control of your
    emotions?




         Kostelnik, 2006, Guiding chidren's
                social development
                    Anger
           a primary emotion
normal
unpleasant
stressful - for those feeling it
          - for those targeted
          - and those helping others
               handle it.

              Kostelnik, 2006, Guiding chidren's
                     social development
     What causes anger?
When a goal is blocked or needs are
 frustrated

For infants & toddlers that could be…

For preschoolers that could be…

For school-agers that could be…

            Kostelnik, 2006, Guiding chidren's
                   social development
 Children express anger by…
VENTING:
 facial expressions, crying, sulking or
 talking but do little to solve or confront
 the issue.

ACTIVE RESISTANCE:
 physically or verbally defend their
 positions, self-esteem, or possessions in
 non-aggressive ways i.e. “give it back it’s
 mine!”
              Kostelnik, 2006, Guiding chidren's
                     social development
AGGRESSIVE REVENGE:
 physically or verbally retaliate i.e.
 hitting, name calling

Also, can express by:
• Expressions of dislike I.e. telling a child
  they can’t play
• Avoidance / escape from person
• Adult seeking - for comfort or solutions

               Kostelnik, 2006, Guiding chidren's
                      social development
 Children’s understanding of
            anger
As children develop cognitively they
 gradually understand anger
  – Memory
  – Language
  – Self-regulatory behaviours
                                                (Marion. NAEYC, 1997)




               Kostelnik, 2006, Guiding chidren's
                      social development
   How can we help children
      deal with anger?
1. Create a safe emotional climate

2. Model responsible anger management

3. Help children develop self-regulatory
   skills

                                       (Marion. NAEYC, 1997)
             Kostelnik, 2006, Guiding chidren's
                    social development
4. Encourage children to label feelings of
  anger

5. Encourage children to talk about anger-
  arousing interactions

6. Use books and stories about anger

7. Communicate with parents

                                        (Marion. NAEYC, 1997)

              Kostelnik, 2006, Guiding chidren's
                     social development
ECE Skills for supporting children
• Kostelnik (Pgs 154-163)




              Kostelnik, 2006, Guiding chidren's
                     social development

								
To top