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					                                                     模拟测试三
Part I Writing                                                          (30 minutes)
Directions: For this part, you are allowed 30 minutes to write a composition on the topic A Welcome Speech. You
should write at least 120 words based on the outline given below:
1.假如你是校长,代表教师和学生在 Marshall 大学教师访问团欢迎酒会上致辞,欢迎他们的到来;
2.介绍两校之间有着良好合作的历史,Marshall 大学在教师培训和学生互访方面给予了许多帮助,希望他
们能对学校的发展提出建议;
3.提议为友谊和他们的中国之行愉快干杯。
Part II Reading Comprehension (Skimming and Scanning)                    (15 minutes)
Directions: In this part, you will have 15 minutes to go over the passage quickly and answer the questions on
Answer Sheet 1.
For questions 1-7, mark
Y (for YES)                if the statement agrees with the information given in the passage;
N (for NO)                 if the statement contradicts the information given in the passage;
NG (for NOT GIVEN) if the information is not given in the passage.
For questions 8-10, complete the sentences with the information given in the passage.
                                        Origins of Money and of Banking
What Is Money?
      It is almost impossible to define money in terms of its physical form or properties since these are so diverse.
Therefore any definition must be based on its functions.
      Money is anything that is widely used for making payments and accounting for debts and credits.
Causes of the Development of Money
      One of the most important improvements over the simplest forms of early barter was the tendency to select
one or two items in preference to others so that the preferred items became partly accepted because of their
qualities in acting as media of exchange. Commodities were chosen as preferred barter items for a number of
reasons--some because they were conveniently and easily stored, some because they had high value densities and
were easily portable, and some because they were durable. These commodities, being widely desired, would be
easy to exchange for others and therefore they came to be accepted as money.
      Many societies had laws requiring compensation in some form for crimes of violence, instead of the old
Testament approach of "an eye for an eye". A similarly widespread custom was payment for brides in order to
compensate the head of the family for the loss of a daughter's services. Rulers have since very ancient times
imposed taxes on or exacted (强求)tribute(贡物) from their subjects. Religious obligations might also entail
payment of tribute or sacrifices of some kind. Thus in many societies there was a requirement for a means of
payment for blood-money, bride-money, tax or tribute and this gave a great impetus(促进)to the spread of money.
      Objects originally accepted for one purpose were often found to be useful for other non-economic purposes
and, because of their growing acceptability began to be used for general trading also, supplementing or replacing
barter.
Primitive Forms of Money
      The use of primitive forms of money in the Third World and North America is more recent and better
documented than in Europe and its study sheds light on the probable origins of modern money. Among the topics
treated are the use of wampum(贝壳)and the custom of the potlatch or competitive gift exchange in North
America, disc-shaped stones in Yap, cowrie shells over much of Africa and Asia, cattle, manillas and whales teeth.
      In Fijian(斐济) society gifts of whales teeth were (and in certain cases still are) a significant feature of certain
ceremonies. One of their uses was as bride-money, with a symbolic meaning similar to that of the engagement
ring in Western society. Whales teeth were "tambua" (from which our word "taboo" comes) meaning that they had
religious significance, as did the fei stones of Yap which were still being used as money as recently as the mid
1960s.
The Invention of Banking and Coinage
      The invention of banking preceded (先于)that of coinage. Banking originated in Ancient Mesopotamia where
the royal palaces and temples provided secure places for the safe-keeping of grain and other commodities.
Receipts came to be used for transfers not only to the original depositors but also to third parties. Eventually
private houses in Mesopotamia also got involved in these banking operations and laws regulating them were
included in the code of Hammurabi.
      In Egypt too the centralization of harvests in state warehouses also led to the development of a system of
banking. Written orders for the withdrawal of separate lots of grain by owners whose crops had been deposited
there for safety and convenience, or which had been compulsorily deposited to the credit of the king, soon became
used as a more general method of payment of debts to other persons including tax gatherers, ]priests and traders.
Even after the introduction of coinage these Egyptian grain banks served to reduce the need for precious metals
which tended to be reserved for foreign purchases, particularly in connection with military activities.
      Precious metals, in weighed quantities, were a common form of money in ancient times. The transition to
quantities that could be counted rather than weighed came gradually.
      Many primitive forms of money were counted just like coins. Cowrie shells, obtained from some islands in
the Indian Ocean, were a very widely used primitive form of money--in fact they were still in use in some parts of
the world (such as Nigeria) within living memory. Thus it is not surprising that among the earliest countable
metallic money or "coins" were "cowries" made of bronze or copper, in China.
Money Exchange and Credit Transfer
      The great variety of coinages originally in use in the Hellenic (古希腊的)world meant that money changing
was the earliest and most common form of Greek banking. Usually the money changers would carry out' their
business in or around temples and other public buildings, setting up their trapezium-shaped tables (which usually
carried a series of lines and squares for assisting calculations), from which the Greek bankers, the trapezitai
derived their name, much as our name for bank comes from the Italian banca for bench or counter. The close
association between banking, money changing and temples is best known to us from the episode of Christ's
overturning the tables in the Temple of Jerusalem ( Matthew 21.12 ).
      Money changing was not the only form of banking. One of the most important services was bottomry (船舶
抵押契约)or lending to finance the carriage of freight by ships. Other business enterprises supported by the Greek
bankers included mining and construction of public buildings. The most famous and richest of all was Pasion who
started his banking career in 394 BC as a slave in the service of two leading Athenian bankers and rose to eclipse
(超越)his masters, gaining in the process not only his freedom but also Athenian citizenship. In addition to his
banking business he owned the largest shield factory in Greece and also conducted a hiring business lending
domestic articles such as clothes, blankets, silver bowls etc. for a lucrative fee.
Paper Money
      In China the issue of paper money became common from about AD 960 onwards but there had been
occasional issues long before that. A motive for one such early issue, in the reign of Emperor Hien Tsung 806-821,
was a shortage of copper for making coins. A drain of currency from China, partly to buy off potential invaders
from the north, led to greater reliance on paper money with the result that by 1020 the quantity issued was
excessive, causing inflation. In subsequent centuries there were several episodes of hyperinflation (恶性通货膨胀)
and after about 1455, after well over 500 years of using paper money, China abandoned it.
Gold Standard
      For centuries earlier silver had been the standard of value. The pound was originally an amount of silver
weighing a pound. France and the United States were in favour of a bimetallic(金属的)standard and in 1867 an
international conference was held in Paris to try and widen the area of common currencies based on coins with
standard weights of gold and silver. However when the various German states merged into a single country in
1871 they chose the gold standard. The Scandinavian countries adopted the gold standard shortly afterwards.
France made the switch from bimetallism to gold in 1878 and Japan, which bad been on a silver standard, changed
in 1897. Finally, in 1900, the United States officially adopted the gold standard.
 1. All the daily necessities could be acted as media of exchange.
 2. In Fijian, the primitive forms of money had been used until the mid 1960s.
 3. Ancient Egyptian bought weapons from foreign countries through grain banks.
 4. Ancient Chinese money was made of bronze or copper.
 5. Pasion, a slave worked for two leading Athenian bands, later opened a bank of his own.
 6. Ancient Greek money changers carried a series of lines and squares to help them calculate.
 7. United States adopted gold standard in 1867.
 8. In ancient time, the requirement for payment for religious obligations, bride-money or tax contributed to
______.
 9. In the royal palaces and temples in ancient Mesopotamia where safe-keeping of grain and other commodities
were provided, ______ formed.
10. In ancient China, after paper money had been used for ______ it was given up because of the hyperinflation.
Part III Listening Comprehension                                            (35 minutes)
Section A
Directions: In this section, you will hear 8 short conversations and 2 long conversations. At the end of each
conversation, one or more questions will be asked about what was said. Both the conversation and the question
will be spoken only once. After each question there will be a pause. During the pause, you must read the four
choices marked A), B), C) and D), and decide which is the best answer. Then mark the corresponding letter on
Answer Sheet 2 with a single line through the center.
Questions 11 to 18 are based on the conversation you have just heard.
11. A) Expertly.                                B) Badly.
     C) All right.                                      D) Very hard.
12. A) Outside an art gallery.                     B) In an exhibition.
     C) Outside a bookstore.                           D) In front of a library.
13. A) He doesn't have time to read.
     B) He has no reading preference.
     C) He doesn't read the same kind of books as the woman.
     D) He prefers writing to reading.
14. A) He got out of the shower to answer the phone.
     B) He didn't hear the phone ringing.
     C) There's something wrong with the shower.
       D) He took a shower earlier than usual.
15. A) She needs to do some exercises.             B) She should put on her jogging suit.
       C) It's too hot to go running.                  D) His jogging suit isn't warm enough.
16. A) She's on a special diet.                     B) She doesn't like to eat in the canteen.
       C) She thinks the canteen is too expensive. D) She had no money with her.
17. A) There's no job available now.
       B) The job has already been taken by others.
       C) Only graduate students are qualified for the job.
       D) The man is a graduate student.
18. A) The man caused the magazine to be late.
       B) The man's article won't be published this month.
       C) She had no time to read the article.
      D) She didn't see the article.
Questions 19 to 22 are based on the conversation you have just heard.
19. A) The reproductive cycle of barnacles.
      B) A new source of protein.
      C) Types of sea animals.
      D) The adhesive quality of barnacles.
20. A) They eat protein.
      B) They never move from one location.
      C) They cause erosion of rocks.
      D) They will never be useful to people.
21. A) The location of certain ocean rocks.
      B) The effect of water pollution on barnacles.
      C) The medical value of some synthetic products.
      D) The composition of the barnacle's glue.
22. A) Nutrition.        B) Ecology.         C) Medicine.               D) Geology.
Questions 23 to 25 are based on the conversation you have just heard.
23. A)Europeans have a favorable opinion of the euro.
        B) The launching of the euro benefits both the governments and their people.
        C) How curious people were about the new money.
        D) What import role the euro would play ii1 boosting Europe's economy.
24. A) Economic conditions are better in Britain than in other European countries.
        B) Britain won't accept euros until there are enough facilities for changing currencies.
        C) Many British people view their currency as a symbol of national sovereignty.
        D) The British are too proud of the pound to adopt the euro.
25. A) Negative.         B) Critical.              C) Neutral.               D) Positive.
Section B
Directions: In this section, you will hear 3 short passages. At the end of each passage, you will hear some
questions. Both the passage and the questions will be spoken only once. After you hear a question, you must
choose the best answer from the four choices marked A), B), C) and D). Then mark the corresponding letter on
Answer Sheet2 with a single line through the center.
Passage One
Questions 26 to 28 are based on the passage you have just heard.
26. A) 130.         B) 3,900.           C) 13,000.            D) 1,300.
27. A) Because marketing groups have collected consumers' information for years.
        B) Because marketing groups can send messages around the world for free.
        C) Because people keep down junk mail to a manageable level.
        D) Because it is cheaper to mail packages to large groups of people.
28. A) Wasted time.                                   B) Connection costs.
        C) Lost emails.                                   D) All of the above.
Passage Two
Questions 29 to 31 are based on the passage you have just heard.
29. A) Vegetarian women are more likely to have girls.
        B) Non-vegetarian women are more likely to have girls.
        C) Vegetarian women are more likely to have boys.
        D) Vegetarian women are more likely to smoke during pregnancy.
30. A) Pregnant women who avoided meal and fish.
        B) Pregnant women who like to eat meat and fish.
        C) Women who are more likely to have girls.
        D) Women who are more likely to have boys.
31. A) Increase the sample number.
        B) Extend the time of the study.
        C) Observe the sample group of vegetarians.
        D) Both A and B.
Passage Three
Questions 32 to 35 are based on the passage you have just heard.
32. A) Holiday celebrations in the United States often ignore the importance of family.
       B) Holiday celebrations in the United States often are centered around the family.
       C) Holiday celebrations in the United States often are centered around work.
       D) Holiday celebrations in the United States often are centered around animals.
33. A) November.          B) December.              C) June.                 D) March.
34. A) She was too young to keep a baby.
       B) She had too many other children.
       C) She did not give up her claim to Mary.
       D) She had a drug addiction.
35. A) The Websters must give Mary back to her birth mother.
       B) The judge told the Websters they could be foster parents.
       C) The judge said that the adoption was final.
       D) The Websters must wait for a year to adopt Mary.
Section C
Directions: In this section, you will hear a passage three times. When the passage is read for the first time, you
should listen carefully for its general idea. When the passage is read for the second time, you are required to fill in
the blanks numbered from 36 to 43 with the exact words you have just heard. For blanks numbered from 44 to 46
you are required to fill in the missing information. For these blanks, you can either use the exact words you have
just heard or write down the main points in your own words. Finally, when the passage is read for the third time,
you should check what you have written.
      A good deal of fascinating research has been done about the reading patterns of young people, and it is
surprising to discover at what an early age children start expressing         (36) for particular kind of books. A
recent report, which examined in detail the reading habits of           (37) -school children, showed that even
seven-year-old boys and girls have clear view about what they want to read. Girls, in general, read more, and far
more girls than boys preferred reading stories. Boys were showing a        (38) for the more instant (39) of
picture stories, or else books about their hobbies.
      These tastes continue (40) until the children are          (41) . Apparently girls read more in general, but
more     (42) in particular. You could say that there are more opportunities for girls to read fiction: magazines
(43) the fiction habit in girls in their early teens, and by their late teens they have probably moved on to the
adult women's magazines.         (44)
      Adult reading tastes are also the subject of research. (45) .It seems that the majority of women still want
love stories. There has also been some analysis of what men actually read.      (46) .
Part IV Reading Comprehension (Reading in Depth)                         (25 minutes)
Section A
Directions: In this section, there is a passage with ten blanks. You are required to select one word for each blank
from a list of choices given in a word bank following the passage. Rend the passage through carefully before
making your choices. Each choice in the bank is identified by a letter. Please mark the corresponding letter for
each item on Answer Sheet 2 with a single line through the center. You may not use any of the words in the bank
more than once.
      To the casual observer who travels, the most visible travel and tourism industry employees are those holding
entry-level jobs in restaurants, hotels, service stations, airports, car rental outlets, etc. Wages earned by these
employees may indeed be below            (47)      However, one must note that wage statistics published by the
government are not fully reflective of actual earnings by many employed in this                    (48) , given that
underreporting of earnings from tips is a        (49) phenomenon. Behind these front-line service employees are
people employed as their supervisors; owners of businesses and their lawyers; accountants and a host of other
(50) who provide services to travel and tourism businesses; banks, construction companies and others who
(51) from travel and tourism businesses' investments; aircraft and auto manufacturers who build transport
(52) ; and so on.
      When one takes full       (53)     of all direct and indirect jobs created by travel and 'tourism industry,
compensation per person employed in this industry (54) very favorably to that received across all industries.
However, average travel and tourism industry employee compensation in countries with less            (55) economies
is likely to be less than in the United States because such countries export their "quality" travel and tourism
industry jobs, directly via filling high skill/ high pay jobs with foreign (56) or indirectly via importing
products e.g. , airplanes) produced in industries paying premium (高额的) wages.
A) compares                                           I) professionals
B) holds                                             J) vehicles
C) nationals                                        K) developed
D) industry                                         L) produce
E) global                                            M) average
F) owners                                             N) benefit
G) account                                           O) promotion
H) favourable
Section B
Directions: There are 2 passages in this section. Each passage is followed by some questions or unfinished
statements. For each of them there are four choices marked A), B), C) and D). You should decide on the best
choice and mark the corresponding letter on Answer Sheet 2 with a single line through the center.
Passage One
      What does it mean to say that we live in a world of persuasion'? It means that we live among competing
interests. Your roommate's need to study for an exam may take priority over pizza. Your instructor may have good
reasons not to change your grade. And the object of your romantic interest may, alas, have other options.
      In such a world, persuasion is the art of' getting others to give fair and favorable consideration to our point of
view. When we persuade, we want to influence how others believe and behave. We may not always prevail--other
points of view may be more persuasive, depending on the listener, the situation, and the merits of the case. But
when we practice the art of persuasion, we try to ensure that our position receives the attention it deserves.
      Some people, however, object to the very idea of persuasion. They may regard it as an unwelcome intrusion
into their lives or as a manipulation or domination. In contrast, we believe that persuasion is inevitable--to live is
to persuade. Persuasion may be ethical or unethical, selfless or selfish, inspiring or degrading. Persuaders may
enlighten our minds or prey on our vulnerability. Ethical persuasion, however, calls on sound reasoning and is
sensitive to the feelings and needs of listeners. Such persuasion can help us apply the wisdom of the past to the
decisions we now must make. Therefore, an essential part of education is learning to resist the one kind of
persuasion and to encourage and practice the other.
      Beyond its personal importance to us, persuasion is essential to society. The right to persuade and be
persuaded is the bedrock (基础) of the American political system, guaranteed by the First Amendment to the
Constitution.
57. What is the main idea of this passage?
       A) Persuasion is very important in our daily communication.
       B) We live among competing interests.
       C) Persuasion is both good and bad, and it is all around us.
       D) Persuasion is essential to society and is built into American government.
58. According to the passage, 'persuasion means to ______.
       A) make other people to consider your point of view
       B) get people to agree with you and do what you want
       C) exercise power over other people
       D) make your opinions known to others
59. Ethical persuasion can help people ______.
       A) to resist the temptation in life
       B) to make wise decisions based on their past experience
       C) to manipulate public opinion
       D) to be successful in their political lives
60. The passage states that some people object to persuasion because they think ______.
         A) it is an unwelcome intrusion
         B) it can never be successful
         C) it is unethical and selfish
         D) it can hurt the feelings of others
61. The author's purpose in writing this passage is to ______.
         A) entertain the reader with many interesting examples
         B) tell an interesting story
         C) appeal to the reader's senses
         D) persuade the reader that a point of view is correct
Passage Two
      Sir Elton John, the famous singer, got married to his long-time partner in a civil marriage ceremony held in
Windsor Guildhall on 21st December 2005. Nothing special about that, you might say, until you discover that Sir
Elton's marriage partner is a man.
      Fifteen days previously the law in England and Wales had changed to allow civil partnerships to take place
between people of the same sex. Fifteen days elapsed between the law coming into force and the first "gay
marriages" being performed as the couple has to declare publicly, in writing, their intent to marry, at least, two
weeks before the ceremony takes place.
      A civil partnership in England and Wales is a legally recognized partnership between two people of the same
sex which grants the participants new legal status as far as employment, pensions and inheritances are concerned.
The partners in the arrangement become next of kin to each other, as in a heterosexual (异性的) marriage. The
new law also alters the civil partners' rights in relation to immigration and nationality. Nevertheless, the
partnership is not legally the same as a marriage, according to UK law. This is partly due to the fact that the
ceremony itself does net need to be conducted in public and the participants do not need to be present together at
the same time to sign the necessary documents. Hence the terms "gay marriage" and "gay wedding" have no legal
meaning although some couples choose to use them.
      Many European countries have introduced legislation to officially recognize same-sex partnerships. Britain is
only the latest in quite a long line of countries to allow "gay weddings". As long ago as 1989, Denmark became
the first country to give same-sex partners the same rights as married couples.
      Outside Europe "gay marriages" have been allowed across Canada since July 2005, in Argentina since 2003,
and in New Zealand since the end of 2004. "Gay marriages" are permitted in some states in the USA, for example,
Massachusetts. Vermont was the first to permit them, giving same-sex partners the chance to make civil unions in
2000. In California, however, an attempt to legalize same-sex partnerships was stopped by the State Governor,
Arnold Schwarzenegger.
62. "Gay marriages" are ______.
       A) marriages between people of the opposite sex
       B) marriages of the elderly people
       C) marriages between people of the same sex
        D) marriages across the borders
63. In England and Wales, why did the first "gay marriages" take place 15 days after the law recognizing same-sex
partnership became effective?
       A) The couple has to declare publicly, in written form, that they are willing to marry each other at least two
weeks before the wedding ceremony.
       B) It normally takes the couple 15 days to get ready for the wedding.
       C) It takes time for the public to accept "gay marriages".
       D) People still have a bias against "gay marriages".
64. We learn from the passage that ______.
       A) same-sex partners are still strongly looked down upon in UK
       B) same-sex partners in England and Wales are granted many of the legal rights enjoyed by married couples
of different sexes
       C) same-sex partners are usually ashamed of their relationship
       D) many "gay marriages" have been declared void by British court
65. It can be inferred from the passage that, according to UK law, "gay marriage" ______.
       A) should be performed in a church
       B) is partnership not legally admitted
       C) doesn't allow the couple to adopt any children
       D) is not really a "marriage'~' in the literal sense of the word
66. Which of the following statements is NOT true?
       A) Britain is the first European country to allow "gay marriages".
       B) "Gay marriages" are officially recognized across Canada in 2005.
       C) Same-sex partnerships are still not legalized in California, USA.
       D) Vermont was the first American state to permit same-sex partners to get married.
Part V Error Correction                                                      (15 minutes)
Directions: This section consists of one passage. In the passage there are altogether ten mistakes, one in each
numbered line. You may' have to change a word, add a word or delete a word. If you change a word, cross it out
and write the correct word in the corresponding blank. If you add a Word, pat an insertion mark (∧) in the right
place and write the missing word in the blank, lf you delete a word, cross it out and put a slash (—) in the blank.
      Most parents, I suppose, have had the experience
of reading a bedtime story to their children. And they
must realize how difficult it is to write a good children's                   67. ______.
book. Either the author has aimed too high, so that the
children can't follow what is in his (or more often, her)
story, and the story seems to be talking to the readers.                       68. ______.
      The best children's books are neither very difficult
nor very simple, and .satisfy both the child who hears
the story and the adult who reads it. Fortunately, there                        69. ______.
are in fact few books like this, because the problem of                         70. ______.
finding the right bedtime story is not easy to solve. This
  may be why many books regarded works of children's                                 71. ______.
literature were in fact written for grown ups. "Alice's
Adventure in Wonderland" is perhaps the most obviously                            72. ______.
of this.
      Children, left for themselves, often show the
worst possible interest in literature. Just leave a child
in a bookshop or a library and he will most willingly                         73. ______.
choose the books written in an imaginative way, or
have a look at most children's comics, full of the
stories and jokes which are the objections of teachers
or right-thinking parents.                                                           74. ______.
      Perhaps we parents should stop trying to brainwash
children into receiving our taste in literature. After all               75. ______.
children and adults are so different that we parents should
not expect that they will enjoy same books. So I                                76. ______.
suppose we'll just have to compromise over that bedtime story.
Part VI Translation                                                       (5 minutes)
Directions: Complete the sentences on Answer Sheet 2 by translating into English the Chinese given in brackets.
77. The mother put her coat over the baby for fear that ____________________ (他会感冒).
78. Only when we have got sufficient information, ____________________ (我们才能做出正确的判断).
79. Experience shows that ____________________ (成功与其说是由于才能不如说是由于热情).
80. ____________________ (随着他的身体状况日渐好转), the patient's mood has changed visibly.
81. ____________________ (为了适应以后工作的需要), students must learn some practical skills.
答案
                                  模拟测试三
   Part I Writing
                                                        A Welcome Speech
Dear Honored Guests,
      On behalf of our teachers and students, I would like to say how delighted we are to receive such a group of
experienced teachers from Marshall University in our college. And it's been a great honor to have you visiting us.
As we are aware, your visit is a great opportunity to promote the mutual understanding and cooperation of the
both sides.
      We have a long history of good cooperation. In the last decade, we enjoyed good relations, both scholarly and
economically. Marshall University has helped us a lot from teachers' training to students' visiting programs. We do
hope you will make advisable suggestions on the development of our school. As the president, I do hope that
through our joint efforts, future communication between us will expand even further.
      To that end, may I ask you to raise your glasses and make a toast? Let's drink to the friend-ship between us,
to your health and to your pleasant stay here. Cheers!
      该题目属于“致辞类实用文体”作文,格式上接近书信。针对此类作文,考生应明确致辞中需包含的
主要内容。
致辞类实用文体仿写模式:
Dear Honored Guests:
      On behalf of ... , I want to extend a warm welcome to you. Your visit will increase the mutual understanding
between ... and .... and promote the established cooperation. (表达欢迎之意,强调访问的意义)....
     In the past ... years, we have had a happy and fruitful cooperation, and (回顾双方过去的合作和取得的成
果)....
     We do hope you will put forward your suggestions to our development, which wilt be ...
     As the president of ... , I wish you will have a good time in China and now ladies and gentlemen, please
allow me to propose a toast. Let's drink to our friendship, and to your health Cheers !
致辞常用句型:
                   .
1.On behalf of..,I would like to say how delighted we are to receive you here.
                   .
2.On behalf of.., I want to extend a warm welcome to you.
3.Please raise glasses in a toast to the…
4.Let's drink a toast to.. .
5.We are sure your visit to China will be rewarding.
6.We hope your success will mark the beginning of our cooperation.
Part Ⅱ Reading Comprehension(Skimming and Scanning)
1.N。见 Causes of the Development of Money 中的第一小段;
2.Y。见 Primitive Forms of Money。
3.NG。
4.Y。见 The Invention of Banking and Coinage 的最后一段。
5.N。见 Money Exchange and Credit Transfer 中的第二段。
6.Y。见 Money Exchange and Credit Transfer 中的第一段。
7.N。见 gold Standard。
8.the spread of money。见 Causes of the Development of Money 中的第二段。
9.banking。见 The Invention of Banking and Coinage 第一段。
10.500 years。见 Paper Money。
Part Ⅲ Listening Comprehension
Section A
11.C。I haven't heard anyone complaining about the way you do your job.说明别人对她的工作没意见。
12.C。some books on sale 说明他们在谈论书,Why don't we go in…说明他们在书店外面。
13.C。连词 but 说明他读的书与女士读的不同。
14.A。推理题。The floor is awfully wet 和另一短语 No sooner…than…(一……就……)可说明。
15.A。jogging 慢跑。
16.C。bring my own 意为自己带菜,因为菜涨价了。
17.C。available 可得到的。所以女士的意思是 Only graduate students can get the job。
18.B。细节题。We will not see it in this month's issue.=It won't be published this month.
19.D。barnacle 一种北极鹅;adhesive 黏合剂,同义词 glue。
20.B。从对话中 They also stay in the same place forever 可推断出正确答案。
21.D。figure out 弄明白,what the barnacles glue is made of 意为 the composition of the glue。
22.C。从信息词组 doctors and dentists could use such a glue to mend broken bones and fasten false teeth 可知
答案。
23.B。从对话中的 the single currency is a good thing for both the governments involved and for their people as
well 可得出答案。
24.C。sovereignty 主权。The British are unwilling to give up the pound and tend to see the adoption of the euro
as endangering Britain's sovereignty.英国人不愿放弃英镑,认为使用欧元会威胁到国家主权。
25.D。对话中他使用了肯定词 more united,stronger,and probably wealthier 及 Life is made so much easier。
Section B
26.D。短文第二段明确提到 On average,each email user received 1,300 spam messages last year。
27.A。短文中间提到 Junk mail is nothing new.For years,marketing groups have collected consumer
information。
28.D。从短文最后一句 spam costs companies millions of dollars every year due to wasted time, connection
costs and lost emails 可知选项 D 为正确答案。
29. 短文开头第一句 A British study…produced the surprise finding that vegetarian women are more likely to
     A。
have girls,故选 A。
                                                    即
30. 短文中间提到了 vegetarian mothers 的定义, vegetarian mothers were defined as pregnant women who
    A。
avoided meat and fish。
31.D。短文中提到为了进一步检验他们的发现,they increased the sample number…The study was extended
for a further six months,由此可知选项 D 为正确答案。
32.B。短文开头第一句 In the United States the family plays an important role in most holiday activities,与选
项 B 内容一致。
33.A。短文第二句明确提到 November is National Adoption Month。
34.D。短文中提到 Mary's birth mother was fighting drug addiction,所以不能抚养她。
35.C。短文中提到 A judge makes the adoption final,故选 C。
   Section C
36. preferences        37. primary                 38. taste               39. appeal 40. unchanged         41.
teenagers               42. fiction       43. encourage
44. Teenage boys tend to buy magazines about their hobbies: motorcycles, heavy transport and so on
45. Again the number of women who read for pleasure is considerably higher than the number of men
46. Apparently only 38% of men read anything, but 50% of what they read is fiction in the form of action-packed
stories or gunmen
Part IV Reading Comprehension (Reading in Depth)
Section A
47.M。average 平均数,平均水平;below average 平均水平以下。
48.D。industry 行业,产业。
49.E。global 全球性的。该句意为:然而,鉴于小费收入少报这一全球性现象,人们必须注意到由政府发
布的薪资数据并不能够完全反映这一行业许多从业人员的实际收入。
50.I。professional 专业人员。
51.N。benefit from 得益于。
52.J。vehicle 交通工具。
53.G。take account of sth.考虑到某事。
54.A。compare 比较。该句意为:当人们充分考虑到由旅游和旅游业创造的所有直接和间接的工作,这
一行业从业人员每个人的报酬与其他行业相比具有很大优势。
55.K。developed 发达的。
56.C。national 公民。
Section B
57.C。主旨题。劝说既有益又有害,它在我们周围无处不在。
58.A。答案可以从文章第二段推出。
59.B。答案可以从文章第三段第六、七句得出。
60.A。答案可以从文章第三段第一、二句得出。
61.D。考查对作者写作目的的理解。
62.C。考查词汇,正确答案也可以从文章内容中得出。
63.A。从文章的第二段第二句可以得出答案。
64.B。从文章的第三段第第一、二句话中可以得出答案。
65.D。从文章的第三段第四、六句话中可以得出答案。
66.A。根据文章第四段第二句,在一连串承认“伺性婚姻”的国家中,英国只是最近的一个。
  Part V Error Correction
67. realize → have realized
68. and → or
69. Fortunately → Unfortunately
70. because → so
71. regarded ∧ works → as
72. obviously → obvious
73. most → more
74. or → and
75. receiving → accepting
76. enjoy ∧ same → the
Part VI Translation
77. he should catch cold
78. can we come to sound judgment
79. success is due less to ability than to zeal
80. With his physical condition improving day by day
81. In order to meet the needs of future work
听力原文
                           模拟测试三
Section A
11. W: At work I sometimes feel as if I don't really understand anything about business.
M: I haven't heard anyone complaining about the way you do your job.
Q: How is the woman doing her work?
12. M: Stop for a minute, Mary. I want to have a look at the display in the window.
W: There are some books on sale. Why don't we go in and see if we can find something on art.
Q: Where does this conversation most probably take place?
13. W: There is nothing I like more than a good detective story when I've got some spare time.
M: I like to read too. But I prefer non-fiction: history, philosophy and others alike.
Q: What do we know about the man from this conversation?
14. W: The floor is awfully wet. What happened?
M: No sooner had I gotten into the shower than the phone rang.
Q: What does the man imply?
15. W: It's so cold today. My hands almost go numb.
M: You can do some jogging to warm up.
Q: What does the man mean?
16. M: I notice you don't buy your lunch in the canteen any more.
W: When prices went up, I decided to bring my own.
Q: What does the woman mean?
17. M: Hello, I'm calling about the position of the lab assistant.
W: Are you aware that it is only available to graduate students?
Q: What does the woman mean?
18. M: I'm really sorry. My article missed the deadline, I guess I held up everything.
W: Well, not exactly. But we will not see it in this month's issue.
Q: What does the woman mean?
Now you'll hear two long conversations.
Conversation One
M: Hi, Sue.
W: Hello, Jill, how are you?
M: I'm fine. Did you watch the TV special about barnacles last night?
W: No, I missed it. What did you learn about them?
M: They glue themselves to rocks in the ocean, shortly after birth. They also stay in the same place forever.
W: Right, have you ever tried removing one of these things? It would be easier to chip the rock away than to get
the barnacles off.
M: Exactly, and that's why scientists are trying to figure out what the barnacles glue is made of. It's considered one
of the strongest adhesives in nature.
W: And it would have the advantage of being able to work on wet surfaces too.
M: Precisely, and because it's natural protein, it probably wouldn't be harmful to people like so many synthetic
glues in use today.
W: Think of all the ways in which doctors and dentists could use such a glue to mend broken bones and fasten
false teeth.
M: There could be countless uses. Scientists hope to learn soon exactly how the glue is made, so that people can
make use of it.
W: That's good news for the general public. I hope it won't take long for the new glue to be put into use.
Questions 19 to 22 are based on the conversation you have just heard.
19. What is the main topic of the conversation?
20. What did the man learn about barnacles?
21. According to the conversation, what are scientists trying to discover?
22. According to the conversation, in what field might the scientists find this especially helpful?
Conversation Two
W: I think it's really amazing that twelve European countries have abandoned their old currencies and are now
using the euro as their common currency.
M: Yes. It's the most ambitious currency changeover in history.
W: The twelve countries have bound themselves together. Whatever happens to the euro affects them all.
M: Obviously they will be more united, stronger, and probably wealthier, as the designers of the euro hoped.
W: It is also a good thing for the general public. It is very convenient for those who travel a lot either for business
or for pleasure.
M: That's true. No need to waste time and energy changing money. No need to figure out how much you gain or
lose in the transactions. Life is made so much easier.
W: So it seems the single currency is a good thing for both the governments involved and for their people as well I
don't understand why Britain is not one of them.
M: The euro is still a very young currency whereas the pound has already had a history of hundreds of years and
has become a prestigious and reliable currency in international trading. The British are unwilling to give up the
pound and tend to see the adoption of the euro as endangering Britain's sovereignty.
W: But if the cure gets stronger, will Britain adopt the new currency sooner or later?
M: According to Prime Minister Tony Blair, Britain will adopt the euro only when the economic conditions are
right. I think this is a wise decision.
Questions 23 to 25are based on the conversation you have just heard.
23. What does the conversation mainly tell us?
24. What can we infer from the passage?
25. What is the man's attitude toward Britain's decision not to join the single currency?
   Section B
Passage One
      Make millions with no work! Lose 5 kg overnight! Clear your credit history! The secrets to getting hot girls!
Get out of debt!
      Junk email messages like these, also known as spam, are familiar to anyone with an email account. On
average, each email user received 1,300 spam messages last year, and that number is expected to increase to 3,900
by the year 2007.
      Junk mail is nothing new. For years, marketing groups have collected consumer information, including
addresses and phone numbers, and sold them as lists to interested advertisers. But with junk mail, the high cost of
mailing packages to large groups of people kept it down to a manageable level. But with email, anyone With a
computer and Internet connection can now send messages around the world for free.
      But it's the people who receive spam who wind up paying. It is estimated that spam costs companies millions
of dollars every year due to wasted time, connection costs and lost emails.
Questions 26 to 28 are based on the passage you have just heard.
26. How many junk email messages did an average email account receive last year?-
27. Why is junk mail nothing new?
28. For what reason does spam cost companies millions of dollars every year?
Passage Two
      A British study of how diet affects the health of new mothers and their babies produced the surprise finding
that vegetarian women are more likely to have girls, one of the report's authors said yesterday.
      In what is thought to be the first study of its kind, researchers at Nottingham University in central England
found significant differences in the sex of babies born to vegetarian and meat and fish-eating women. They were
examining the health conditions in vegetarian and non-vegetarian mothers, looking at things like hemoglobin
levels, which show how much iron the mother has in her blood, and birth weights.
      Altogether 5,942 pregnant women were involved in the study when they were booked in Nottingham's City
Hospital during 2001. According to the researchers, vegetarian mothers were defined as pregnant women who
avoided meat and fish. Nearly five percent were vegetarian among them, a total of more than 250 women.
      The birth ratio in Britain is that for every 106 boys born there are 100 girls, that's pretty constant. In their
sample group of vegetarians there were 81.5 boys born for every 100 girls.
      To further test their surprise findings, they increased the sample number to what scientists called a
"statistically significant" level. The study was extended for a further six months so that the sex of more babies
could be looked at. The results, covering around 150 more vegetarian women, were" just about exactly the same".
      The study also found that vegetarian mothers were less likely to smoke during pregnancy -- 10 percent did so,
compared with 20 percent of meat-eaters.
Questions 29 to 31 are based on the passage you have just heard.
29. What surprise findings does the study produce?
30. What did vegetarian mothers mean?
31. What did researchers do to further test their surprise findings?
Passage Three
      In the United States the family plays an important role in most holiday activities. November is National
Adoption Month. We visit with an American family that has an extra special reason to celebrate this year.
      It's not Mary Webster's birthday. It is the day that she is adopted. She came to the Webster family about two
years ago. When her new mother held Mary, she knew Mary would someday be part of their family.
      Mary's birth mother was fighting drug addiction. The Websters were never sure if the birth mother would
want to have Mary back.
      The Websters were foster parents. It is not known how long the child will stay. No attention is paid to the
emotions of the foster parents and the child. Once the birth mother has no more claim on the child, the foster
family can adopt tile child.
     A judge makes the adoption final. The judge says this ceremony touches her emotionally.
     The judge said that in times like this it is nice that some people are able to reach out to someone else and say
I want to protect you. I want to make this world a better place for you. I want to do the best I can to make sure that
you grow up to be a sale and happy child.
Questions 32 to 35 are based on the passage you have just heard.
32. Which of the following is true according to the passage?
33. Which month is the National Adoption month?
34. Why can't Mary's birth mother keep her?
35. What can we learn from the passage?
Section C
     A good deal of fascinating research has been done about the reading patterns of young people, and it is
surprising to discover at what an early age children start expressing (36) preferences for particular kind of books.
A recent report, which examined in detail the reading habits of (37) primary-school children, showed that even
seven-year-old boys and girls have clear view about what they want to read. Girls, in general, read more, and far
more girls than boys preferred reading stories. Boys were showing a (38) taste for the more instant (39) appeal of
picture stories, or else books about their hobbies.
     These tastes continue (40) unchanged until the children are (41) teenagers. Apparently girls read more in
general, but more (42) fiction in particular. You could say that there are more opportunities for girls to read fiction:
magazines (43) encourage the fiction habit in girls in their early teens, and by their late teens they have probably
moved on to the adult women's magazines. (44) Teenage boys tend to buy magazines about their hobbies:
motorcycles, heavy trans- port and so on.
     Adult reading tastes are also the subject of research. (45) Again the number of women who read for pleasure
is considerably higher than the number of men. It seems that the majority of women still want love stories. There
has also been some analysis of what men actually read. (46) Apparently only 38% of men read anything, but 50%
of what they read is fiction in the form of action-packed stories or gunmen.

				
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