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					 Science Assessment
       Update

SC Sela Professional
    Development
      Workshop

      March 18, 2011



Office of Assessment
 PASS - Spring 2011

• Grade 3 items are not read aloud.

• Separate answer sheets for all
  grades.

• Score results will be available
  in mid-June 2011.
  PASS - Spring 2011

• All students in grades 4 & 7 will take both
Science and Social Studies PASS.

• For grades 3, 5, 6 & 8 half of student
population to take science other half to
take social studies.
Sampling Information

• Students will be randomly selected by
grade level by school to take either the
Science or the Social Studies PASS.

• Instructions for teachers administering
the tests (TAMs) will be the same
(generic)    for both tests.
Science Test Blueprint
     Standard Item Distribution
Grade   Number of      Number          Items per
        Standards      of Items        Standard

 3          5             45                8-10
 4          5             45                8-11
 5          5             50                8-11
 6          5             55                9-12
 7          5             55                9-12
 8          6             60                9-12



        *Plus 6 field test items per form
Science Test Blueprint
 Generally, for standards
 with more indicators, or
 with more complex
 content, the number of
 questions will be towards
 the higher end of the
 blueprint range.
PASS – Spring 2010
 State Results (%)
 Grade   NM   M    E
   3     44   33   23
   4     31   54   15
   5     34   50   16
   6     39   47   14
   7     27   46   27
   8     32   36   32
PASS Science Scores
 80
 70
 60
 50
 40                                                     2009
 30                                                     2010
 20
 10
 0
      Grade 3 Grade 4 Grade 5 Grade 6 Grade 7 Grade 8


 % Passing = Met and Exemplary
PASS –State Results by Standard
Level 1 (%): Student test performance shows weaknesses

   Grade Std 1   Std 2   Std 3   Std 4   Std 5   Std 6
   3 ‘09   24    32      22      32      27
     ‘10   31    27      22      22      28
   4 ‘09   22    21      26      18      26
     ‘10   14    17      22      22      17
   5 ‘09   24    22      24      17      29
     ‘10   25    25      19      17      24
   6 ‘09   29    31      33      22      21
     ‘10   19    31      31      24      20
   7 ‘09   21    25      22      23      19
     ‘10   19    25      18      18      13
   8 ‘09   25    28      32      25      19      28
     ‘10   20    21      26      27      23      15
Curricular Considerations
 Areas of Student Weaknesses from
  SCDE results across grade level:
• Observation/inference/prediction
• Independent/dependent/controlled variables
• Qualitative/quantitative observations
  Grades 4-8
• Units of measure
• Technological design (steps) Grades 5-8
Curricular Considerations
                       Grade 3
•   Observation/Inference
•   Similar investigations: causes for different
    results
•   Measurements (changes over time)
•   Rock types & Soil grain size (sand/silt/clay-
    smallest)
•   States of matter changes (liquid to solid)
•   Temperature in Celsius
•   Properties of Water (condensation)
•   Insulators (prevent heat from moving
    through)
•   Pitch (vibrations affect pitch: length,
    thickness, tightness)
Curricular Considerations
3.1.7 Similar investigations: causes for different results
Four students recorded the length of the same
maple leaf on the same day. The data are shown
in the table.

                    Leaf Lengths (cm)
     Student 1               4.0
     Student 2               4.5
     Student 3               4.0
     Student 4               4.5
Curricular Considerations

During an investigation, what is the
  most likely reason the students
  recorded different lengths for the
  same leaf?
A. The students measured at different times.
B. There were incorrect readings of the ruler.
C. There were too many students recording
   data.
D. The measurements were recorded at
   different times.
Curricular Considerations
What is the most likely reason different
 leaf lengths were recorded?

A. The students measured at different times.
  (16%)
B. There were incorrect readings of the ruler.
  (24%)*
C. There were too many students recording
  data.(43%)
D. The measurements were recorded at different
  times. (17%)
Curricular Considerations
3.4.3 Explain how heat moves from one object to another
through direct contact in some materials (called
conductors) and not so easily through other materials
(called insulators).


                              Study the diagram.
Curricular Considerations

 How does this type of window help
 keep a house warm in the winter?

A. The   air between the glass is a conductor.
B. The   air between the glass is an insulator.
C. The   glass heats the air inside the house.
D. The   glass heats the air outside the house.
Curricular Considerations
How does this type of window help keep a house
warm in the winter?


 A. The air between the glass is a conductor.
    (25%)
 B. The air between the glass is an insulator.*
    (29%)
 C. The glass heats the air inside the house.
    (38%)
 D. The glass heats the air outside the house.
    (8%)
Curricular Considerations
                      Grade 4
•   Qualitative/Quantitative Observations
•   Manipulated/responding variables; axes
•   Observation/Inference
•   Classification of organisms
•   Inherited vs. acquired characteristics
•   Shadows (and time of day)
•   Earth’s rotation
•   Water cycle processes & cloud formation
•   Electric current (series/parallel circuits;
    insulators)
Curricular Considerations
A student wants to know whether water or soil holds
more heat. The student designs the investigation
(graphic: overhead lamp, beaker of water with
thermometer in it), beaker of soil with thermometer
in it and reads the thermometers after ten minutes.
Which observation is quantitative?
A. The soil contains small pieces of leaves and rocks.
B. The soil is slightly damp before the experiment
   begins.
C. The water feels cool, and the surface of
   the soil feels hot.
D. The water temperature increased more
   than the soil temperature.*
Curricular Considerations
4-2.4 Distinguish between the characteristics of an
organism that are inherited/acquired over time.
. Study the statements about bear behaviors

•   An adult bear eats large amounts of food
    in the fall.
•   She finds a den and sleeps in it through
    the winter.
•   During this time, her first cub is born.
•   In the spring, the mother leaves the den
    with her cub.
•   She returns to the meadow where she
    knows she will find her favorite food.
Curricular Considerations

 Which behavior is learned?

 A. eating large amounts of food in
     the fall
 B. sleeping through the winter
 C. giving birth to her first cub
 D. returning to the meadow for food
Curricular Considerations


Which behavior is learned?

A. eating large amounts of food in the fall
    (19%)
B. sleeping through the winter
    (18%)
C. giving birth to her first cub
    (17%)
D. returning to the meadow for food
    (43%)*
Curricular Considerations
4.2.1 Classify organisms into major groups according to their
physical characteristics.
Use the picture to answer the question.




All of these organisms belong to which
classification group?
A.   animals
B.   mammals
C.   vertebrates
D.   invertebrates
Curricular Considerations
Use the picture to answer the question.




All of these organisms belong to which
classification group?
A.   animals *       (21%)
B.   mammals         (18%)
C.   vertebrates     (51%)
D.   invertebrates   (10%)
Curricular Considerations
4.5.7 Illustrate path of electric current in series/parallel circuits.
    This is a diagram of a circuit.




    Which type of circuit is shown?
    A.   series circuit
    B.   parallel circuit
    C.   symbolic circuit
    D.   mechanical circuit
Curricular Considerations
This is a diagram of a circuit.




Which type of circuit is shown?
A.   series circuit       (39%)
B.   parallel circuit *   (39%)
C.   symbolic circuit     (11%)
D.   mechanical circuit   (11%)
Curricular Considerations
                    Grade 5
• Identify testable question for given scenario
• Independent/dependent/controlled variables
• Technological Design (steps)
• Weathering (chemical)/erosion/deposition
• Ocean features and waves (causes of)
• Mixtures: separation (including chromatography),
  solutes/solvents (terminology), concentration
• Balanced/unbalanced forces
• Physical/chemical changes (differences)
Curricular Considerations
5-1.2. Identify independent, dependent, controlled
   variables
A student investigates if the amount of water given to
corn plants affects how fast they grow. She plants 12
same-sized corn plants in identical soil and grows
them under identical conditions. Each time she waters
the plants she gives 4 plants 50 mL of water, 4 plants
75 mL of water and 4 plants 100 mL of water.

 What was the dependent variable in
 her investigation?

  A. type of soil
  B. type of plant
  C. growth of plants
  D. amount of water
Curricular Considerations
 A student investigates if the amount of water given to corn
 plants affects how fast they grow. She plants 12 same-sized
 corn plants in identical soil and grows them under identical
 conditions. Each time she waters the plants she gives 4 plants
 50 mL of water, 4 plants 75 mL of water and 4 plants 100 mL
 of water.

 What was the dependent
 variable in her investigation?

  A.   type of soil               (9%)
  B.   type of plant             (11%)
  C.   growth of plants *        (47%)
  D.   amount of water           (33%)
Curricular Considerations
 5-3.1 Explain how natural processes affect Earth’s
 oceans / land in constructive and destructive ways.

 Which term describes a constructive
 force that helps form sand dunes along
 the SC coast?

  A.   erosion
  B.   deposition
  C.   crustal deformation
  D.   chemical weathering
Curricular Considerations

Which term describes a constructive
force that helps form sand dunes along
the SC coast?

 A. erosion               (38%)
 B. deposition *          (32%)
 C. crustal deformation   (13%)
 D. chemical weathering    (15%)
Curricular Considerations
                   Grade 6
• Levels of classification
• Fertilization (process)/Germination
  (requirements)
• Respiration (oxygen, for energy–both plants
  & animals) and Photosynthesis – (comparing
  the processes)
• Atmosphere – temperature/gases
• Cloud types/weather conditions
• Fronts and barometric pressure
• Jet streams and winds
• Ocean currents – causes and transfer of heat
• Pulleys: direction of force and movable/fixed
Curricular Considerations
6-4.1 Compare the composition/structure of Earth’s
atmospheric layers.
In which layer of Earth’s atmosphere is
there the greatest amount of
pressure?

 A.   the   troposphere
 B.   the   stratosphere
 C.   the   mesosphere
 D.   the   thermosphere
Curricular Considerations

 In which layer of Earth’s atmosphere is there
 the greatest amount of pressure?


   A.the   troposphere* (27 %)
   B.the   stratosphere (23 %)
   C.the   mesosphere (27 %)
   D.the   thermosphere (23 %)
Curricular Considerations
6-4.2 Summarize interrelationships among the
  processes of the water cycle.
During cloud formation, what
happens to water vapor when air
temperature reaches the dew point?

A. Water   vapor   condenses and forms a cloud.
B. Water   vapor   evaporates and forms a cloud.
C. Water   vapor   increases and forms a cloud.
D. Water   vapor   heats up and forms a cloud.
Curricular Considerations

During cloud formation, what happens to
water vapor when air temperature reaches
the dew point?

A. Water vapor   condenses and forms a cloud.*
   (40%)
B. Water vapor   evaporates and forms a cloud.
   (31%)
C. Water vapor   increases and forms a cloud.
   (19%)
D. Water vapor   heats up and forms a cloud.
   (10%)
Curricular Considerations
                       Grade 7
 •   Trials in investigations
 •   Inherited traits
 •   Microorganisms (bacteria/protists)
 •   Levels of organization within ecosystems
     (Population/community/biomes)
 •   Soil properties (pH for plant growth)
 •   Element/compound/mixture
 •   Group characteristics in periodic table
 •   pH & acids/bases
 •   Litmus paper (no reaction = neutral or acid/base)
 •   Density/mass of matter
 •   Physical/Chemical Changes (differences)
Curricular Considerations
7-1.4 Explain the importance of repeated trials/well-chosen
   sample size to the validity of a controlled investigation.
Scientists developed a new vaccine and conducted a
human trial with 10 male subjects and 10 female
subjects. The vaccine is 95% effective. The drug
company makes plans to market and sell the drug.
 What is the main reason that this drug trial
 would not be considered a valid scientific
 investigation?
A. Using only 20 subjects made the sample size too
   small.
B. Less than 5% of the trial subjects developed the
   disease.
C. There was no control of what the subjects ate.
D. The scientists did not isolate the trial subjects.
Curricular Considerations
Scientists developed a new vaccine and conducted a human trial
with 10 male subjects and 10 female subjects. The vaccine is
95% effective. The drug company makes plans to market and
sell the drug.

What is the main reason that this drug trial
would not be considered a valid scientific
investigation?

A. Using only 20 subjects made the sample size too
   small. *(27%)
B. Less than 5% of the trial subjects developed the
   disease. (24%)
C. There was no control of what the subjects ate or
   drank. (30%)
D. The scientists did not isolate the trial subjects.
   (19%)
Curricular Considerations
7-5-9 Compare physical properties of matter to
chemical properties.

Which statement describes a physical
property of a substance?
 A.It   burns in air.
 B.It   reacts with acids.
 C.It   dissolves in water.
 D.It   decomposes with heat.
Curricular Considerations

Which statement describes a
physical property of a substance?

A.It   burns in air.           (14%)
B.It   reacts with acids.      (36%)
C.It   dissolves in water.*    (23%)
D.It   decomposes with heat.   (27%)
Curricular Considerations
                Grade 8
• Era/period/epoch relationship
• Timelines with organisms
• Adaptations and diversity
• Determining Earth’s interior
• Rock cycle
• Waves (electromagnetic/mechanical
  and radio vs. sound) and
  characteristics (including infrared)
• Ear/Eye
Curricular Considerations
8.3.4 Explain how igneous, metamorphic, and
  sedimentary rocks are interrelated in the rock cycle.
This diagram represents the rock formation process
from Steps 1 to 3.




 What kind of rock was formed in Step 3?
 A. foliated
 B. igneous
 C. sedimentary
 D. metamorphic
Curricular Considerations
8.3.4 Explain how igneous, metamorphic, and sedimentary rocks
   are interrelated in the rock cycle.
  This diagram represents the rock formation process from Steps 1 to 3.




   What kind of rock was formed in Step 3?
   A. foliated       (17%)
   B. igneous        (18%)
   C. sedimentary * (42%)
   D. metamorphic (23%)
Curricular Considerations
8.3.7 Illustrate the creation/changing of landforms
  that occurred through geologic processes.
Jason is pushing together two pieces of
clay. Each piece of clay is made out of
several different-colored layers.




What does this model represent?
      A. erosion
      B. weathering
      C. volcano formation
      D. mountain formation
Curricular Considerations
8.3.7 Illustrate the creation/changing of landforms that occurred
      through geologic processes.
 Jason is pushing together two pieces of clay. Each
 piece of clay is made out of several different-
 colored layers.




  What does this model represent?
   A. erosion             (34%)
   B. weathering           (15%)
   C. volcano formation    (18%)
   D. mountain formation * (33%)
Science Assessment Update

    End-of-course
       biology



                 Kathy Ortlund
             Linda Schoen Giddings,
                     Ed.D.
     EOCEP Biology
• Beginning with the 2010-11 school
  year, all students must have taken
  the Biology 1 EOCEP test by the
  end of their second year after their
  initial enrollment in ninth grade.
   EOCEP Biology

  2010-2011 School Year:

Test counts as 20% of final
 grade for Biology 1/Applied
 Biology 2
           EOCEP Biology
• Biology has replaced Physical Science as
  the required end-of-course test since it was
  approved by the Education Oversight
  Committee (EOC) and has been submitted
   for Federal Peer Review.
  – EOC alignment study was completed
    Spring 2010.
  – Peer review documentation was sent to
    Washington, DC February 26, 2010.
  – Updated Peer review documentation due
     to Washington, DC Spring 2011
  (after three test administrations.)
 EOCEP Biology
         Blueprint
Total number of items: 60

  Standard   Range
   B-1       10-11
   B-2        9-10
   B-3        9-11
   B-4       10-12
   B-5        9-11
   B-6        9-11
   EOCEP Biology
       Blueprint
      Spring 2011
8 field test questions
are embedded in each of
the operational test forms
for a total of 68 items.
Biology Field Test Trends

 Results from Field Testing show the
 following areas of weakness:
 Standard 1 –
 • Credible/accurate sources of information
   (peer-reviewed articles) (1.1)
 •Measurement units and
   Precision/Accuracy (1.3)
 •Independent/Dependent/Controlled
   Variables (1.4)
A.39.4 *
B.22
C.14.7
D.23.8
Results from Field Testing show the
following areas of weakness:
Standard 2
  •Eukaryotic/Prokaryotic organelle
  differences (2.3)
  • Cell differentiation (2.4)
  • Active/facilitated transport (2.5) – Cell
  membrane structure is not essential
  knowledge
  • Interphase and stages of mitosis (2.6)
  • Cell regulation: internal/external
    signals (2.7)
Organs consist of many types of tissues.
 What is different about these tissues at the
 cellular level?

A.   the types of DNA bases
B.   the activation of specific genes
C.   the number of chromosomes
D.   the process for RNA transcription

     A. 23.9   B. 33.8*   C. 23.9   D.18.3
 Results from Field Testing show the
 following areas of weakness:
Standard 3
• Photosynthesis: light/dark reactions (3.1)
• Aerobic respiration (cycle) and equation
  (how it differs from photosynthesis
  equation) (3.2)
• Monosaccharides (3.4)
• Functions of proteins/carbs/fats (protein
  not used for energy in most cases) (3.5)
• Energy pyramids (kilocals per trophic
  level) (3.6)
Which step in the process of photosynthesis
 is dependent on light energy?

A. splitting water into hydrogen and oxygen
B. combining hydrogen and oxygen to form
   water
A. splitting carbon dioxide into carbon and
   oxygen
A. combining carbon and oxygen into
   carbon dioxide

 A. 29 .7*   B. 22.1    C. 27.7    D.19.8
 Results from Field Testing show the
 following areas of weakness:
Standard 4
• Protein synthesis (transcription/translation)
  (4.4)
• Meiosis – stages, crossing-over and end
  result (4.5)
• Linked genes (e.g., sex-linked) and di-
  hybrid crosses (4.6, 4.7)
• Codominance and incomplete dominance
  (4.7)
During the process of translation, amino
 acids bind to                  ..

A. DNA
B. mRNA
C. rRNA
D. tRNA

 A.11.7 %    B. 36.8   C. 17.7   D. 33.8*
Which statement best explains the difference
  between the cells produced by mitosis and
  the cells produced by meiosis?
A. Mitosis – four haploid cells, Meiosis – two
   diploid cells
B. Mitosis – four diploid cells, Meiosis – two
   haploid cells
C. Mitosis – two haploid cells, Meiosis – four
   diploid cells
D. Mitosis – two diploid cells, Meiosis – four
   haploid cells.
   A. 24 B. 21.2 C. 27.7          D. 26.9*
Results from Field Testing show the
following areas of weakness:

Standard 5
• Concept of fitness (5.1)
• Genetic variability and genetic equilibrium
  (5.4)
• Patterns of evolution (e.g., coevolution and
  convergent evolution)(5.4)
• Homologous/Analogous structures (5.5)
• Convergence/Divergence (5.6)
Results from Field Testing show the
following areas of weakness:

Standard 6
• Limiting factors: density dependent/
  independent (6.2)
• Succession: primary/secondary (6.3)
• Role of organisms in cycles (6.4)
• Fertilizers
Which two processes that occur in the
 bodies of animals return water into the
 hydrologic cycle?

A.   respiration and elimination
B.   photosynthesis and respiration
C.   transpiration and condensation
D.   elimination and transpiration

     A. 35.6* B.17.3   C. 29.7   D.16.7
  Contact
Information:

    Kathy B. Ortlund
     kortlund@ed.sc.gov

       803-734-8529

Linda Schoen Giddings, Ed.D.
      lschoen@ed.sc.gov

       (biology only)

				
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