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					Copyright
   And
Plagiarism
Copyright & Plagiarism

  This presentation was created by Jennifer Smith,
 Librarian, Legacy Middle School, San Antonio, Tx.

  Permission to use this presentation was granted on
                   August 5, 2010.




           Email: jennifer.smith@fc.ecisd.net

          Website: http://www.ecisd.net/legacy
Copyright in the News
Brianna LaHara--Sued by the Recording
  Industry Association of America.
  Settled out of court for $2000, or $2
  per song, illegally shared over Kazaa.


Jammie Thomas--Sued by the
  Recording Industry Association of
  America. Lost her case. Fined
  $222,000, or $9,250 for each of 24
  songs, for sharing music illegally
  downloaded.
What Is Copyright?
Copyright is a form of protection
 provided by the laws of the United
 States (title 17, U.S. Code) to the
 authors of “original works of
 authorship,” including literary,
 dramatic, musical, artistic, and
 certain other intellectual works. This
 protection is available to both
 published and unpublished works.
 (Library of Congress)
What Is Copyright? (cont.)
Federal Law

Protection for authors of original works

Works can be literary, dramatic,
 musical, artistic, or other intellectual
 works

Works do not have to be published
Rights of Copyright Owners

Section 106 of the 1976 Copyright
 Act generally gives the owner of
 copyright the exclusive right to
 do and to authorize others to do
 the following:
Rights of Copyright Owners
(cont.)

To reproduce the work in copies or phonorecords;

To prepare derivative works based upon the work

To distribute copies or phonorecords

To perform the work publicly

To display the copyrighted work publicly
Copyright And The Constitution

Article 1

Section 8. The Congress shall have
 power:

To promote the progress of science
 and useful arts, by securing for
 limited times to authors and
 inventors the exclusive right to
 their respective writings and
 discoveries;
How Long Does Copyright Last?

Works by a single author: Life of the
 author plus 70 years

Works by more than one author: 70
 years after the author who dies last

Corporate works: 95 years from
 publication or 120 years from
 creation (whichever is shorter)

(For works created since 1978)
What Is Not Copyrightable?
Items not fixed in physical form

Titles, names, short phrases, slogans, familiar
   symbols, list of ingredients

Ideas, procedures, methods, systems,
  processes, concepts, principles, discoveries,
  or devices (distinguished from descriptions)

Common information : calendars, rulers

U. S. Government works
Public Domain
Public domain works are items
 that can be used without
 getting permission from the
 copyright holder.

However you must still give
 credit to the author
 (bibliography).
Fair Use
Fair Use exemptions are when
 students and teachers can
 break copyright while doing
 school work.
Print
Poems less than 250 words

Articles, stories, and essays less
 than 2500 words

Longer works: 10% or 1000
 words, whichever is less
Images/Pictures
5 images per artist

1 chart, graph, diagram, drawing,
  cartoon, or picture per book or
  periodical
Video
10 % of the work or 3
 minutes, whichever is less
Music
10% of the work or 30
 seconds, whichever is less
Ethics vs. Law
Ethics: The discipline dealing with
  what is good and bad and with
  moral duty and obligation.

Law: A rule of conduct or action
 formally recognized and enforced
 by a controlling authority.

(Merriam-Webster OnLine)
What is Plagiarism?
Plagiarism is using someone else’s
  words or ideas as your own.


Consequences of Plagiarism:
School
College
Work (Albert Flores)
How Do I Avoid Plagiarism?

  WRITE A BIBLIOGRAPHY

You must credit ALL work that
 is not your own original
 creation, even if it is in the
 public domain.
Sources
Davidson, Hall. The Educator's Guide to Copyright and
   Fair Use. 13 March 2003.
   http://www.techlearning.com/db_area/archives/TL/
   2002/10/copyright.html.

Merriam-Webster OnLine. 10 August 2005.
   http://www.m-w.com.

U.S. Copyright Office. Copyright Basics. 13 March
   2003. http://www.loc.gov/copyright/
   circs/circ1.html.
Copyright in the News
Brianna LaHara
12-year-old settles music swap lawsuit
http://www.cnn.com/2003/TECH/internet/09/0
   9/music.swap.settlement/

Music industry settles copyright lawsuit against
   12-year-old girl
http://www.usatoday.com/tech/news/
   techpolicy/2003-09-09-kid-pays-riaa_x.htm
Copyright in the News
Jammie Thomas
Minn. Woman to Pay for Illegal Music Downloads
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?
   storyId=15037223

Record companies win music sharing trial
http://www.usatoday.com/life/music/2007-10-
   04-3788645732_x.htm
Copyright in the News
Albert Flores
Adler, K. “TV meteorologist caught copying websites for his
  newspaper column.” San Antonio Express News 26 Oct.
  2002.

Daily nixes weather columnist
  http://www.texaspress.com/messenger/november02/ne
  wsbriefs1102.htm

Jakle, J. “After 20 years with KENS-TV, Albert Flores loses
  his job over plagiarized columns” San Antonio Express
  News 6 Nov. 2002.
Additional Teacher Resources
Copyright (check out the great Fair Use Checklist)
http://henricostaffdev.org/copyright

Copyright Kids
http://www.copyrightkids.org

Crash Course in Copyright
http://www.utsystem.edu/ogc/intellectualproperty/
   cprtindx.htm

A Fair(y) Use Tale
http://cyberlaw.stanford.edu/documentary-film-
   program/film/a-fair-y-use-tale

				
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