Confused by Lies by sarasloanemoney

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									Lies - Liars and Society

Christmas is a lie because it is based on sun worship and the
resurrection of the sun after the winter solstice in the Northern
Hemisphere. Santa Claus is a lie meant to fool children into thinking
that some magical, mysterious man has miraculously entered their house
during the night and left presents. The Tooth Fairy is a lie designed to
help children get over the loss of their teeth. The Easter Bunny is a lie
that supposedly delivers a lot of eggs to children in celebration of the
ancient festival of fertility when the sun warmed the earth and all
things resurrected. In fact, society is full of lies about almost
everything.

The big picture incorporates all mythology and make-believe. From
Hollywood designed movies to the fiction writers of books that stir the
imagination in ways it might not otherwise go lies rule the economy and,
therefore, the world. It takes in politics and politicians who lie to get
elected. They make promises that are rarely kept for one reason or
another, yet people vote for them.

Ask of someone to write a story and they immediately turn their brain to
some fictional idea that comes into their head. Why don't they think
about true stories and experiences that happened during their life? As
upsetting as it is to those of us who seek truth we know that the
conditioning of children from birth is to encourage their brains to think
of fiction as a good thing. From school to higher forms of education they
are rewarded for their imagined tales that might contribute to the
growing mass of stupidity and for which they will be paid - often
handsomely.

The Harry Potter stories are a case in point. Children quickly became
addicted to the magic and incredible feats of kids who have the ability
to fly through the air and perform incredible tricks. But what is the
lesson learned from it. The author, J. K. Rowling, has made millions from
the sale of the product. Kids who emulate films stars and other
celebrities' dream of one day becoming actors or models and reaping in
the hundreds of thousands of dollars many of them receive for just one
public appearance.

Perhaps that is the incentive for many to take excessive risks like
balancing on ledges in a precarious manner and filming it to post the
images on YouTube or some other social media site. Bullying might also
come into this realm of undesirable behaviour as many kids have been
targeted, even severely bashed, and the videos then publicly aired for
some attention. Others, as young as 14 or 15 years, steal cars and race
down highways to get some shots for posting in these places. Some are
killed and that is the price they pay.

But ultimately who pays the price for lies and tricks that hurt, often
maim and may even be deadly? The two DJ's in the news globally this week
have their season of fame now much to their regret. Their stunt of
ringing the King Edward VII hospital and pretending to be the Queen and
Prince Charles enquiring after the health of the Duchess of Cambridge,
has been blamed for the death of a nurse, an innocent victim, who
happened to answer the phone at 5.30am and mistake the call for a genuine
one and, out of shame, has killed herself.

Her family is devastated and the repercussions are severe. So what was
the point of the exercise in the first place? Surely it was to make a
fool out of someone and to get a few laughs from an audience conditioned
to enjoy fiction. It doesn't matter who they are when you ridicule
someone it hurts. There is always at least one victim to these pranks.
Men freely ridicule and discriminate against women and many are bullies
towards them. Lies of this nature breed hatred and disrespect. Women
forced to defend themselves against masochistic remarks may also
discriminate and exercise hatred towards their attackers.

Many people die as a result of lies and the world is in a constant state
of confusion and turmoil. The opinions of the majority are juxtaposed
over the need to be entertained and to shed the boredom that comes from
addiction to fantasy. Power is based on lies and wars are started by
them. But can we retract from the history we have made, from the many
stories that fill our heads or from the misguided examples set by parents
and others during our formative years? No! What you put in by the age of
seven stays forever.

That means that people cannot see the harm in ridicule, fiction, make-
believe, discrimination and the other lies and tricks that come with
these things. They cannot determine how others feel and of the
consequences when the truth is finally revealed. How does a child feel
when it realises that the parents have lied to it? The chances are that
when he or she grow up then the same lies will be recycled.

Lies cause massive discrimination and pain in areas where class is the
most important thing in society. The underclass make up the workers and
peasants, often too poor to eat properly, while the upper echelons' of
communities everywhere act like gods and have the best the world can
offer. The divide between rich and poor is generated by our imagination
and rights or heritage that some hold for themselves because they have
something that others want. If you are a drug lord you are rich. If you
invent a good product you can become rich. If you acquire to a good
education you can become better respected and ultimately wealthy.

Greed and poverty rule side by side. Power and confusion are bed mates.
Religion and mythology are virtually one. Fiction and wealth go together.
The weak support the strong and the lowest classes are the foundation
stones and strength of the dreams constructed upon them. Such dreams are
likely at any time to tumble-down and crush the ones beneath. That is the
result of lies and the product of liars.

In asking these questions one should be aware that the need to lie is
implanted in everyone from birth. The seeds are sown and the complexity
of thought begins at that point.

								
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