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					                                                                  Teaching In Cold Blood   1
In Cold Blood                                   Name ___________________________
The Last to See them Alive – Illustrated                          Block ________
    Chapter 1          Chapter 2             Chapter 3           Chapter 4




   Chapter 5           Chapter 6             Chapter 7            Chapter 8




   Chapter 9          Chapter 10            Chapter 11           Chapter 12




   Chapter 13         Chapter 14            Chapter 15           Chapter 16




   Chapter 17         Chapter 18            Chapter 19           Chapter 20




   Chapter 21         Chapter 22       Key:
                                       Background Color

                                           Family

                                           Criminals

                                           Townspeople



                                                                             Elizabeth Davis
                                                                       Westwood High School
                                                               Teaching In Cold Blood   2


                      Instructions for Part I:
               The Last to See them Alive Illustrated

Task One:
Choose three light colors to shade the boxes in your illustration.
You should choose one color for each of the character groups
represented in Part One: the family, the criminals, and the
townspeople. In the bottom right hand box on the grid, create a
key for the colors you choose. You should fill in the entire box
with the color. For example, if you choose yellow for the family,
color the background of the Chapter Two box yellow.


Task Two:
For each chapter, draw an illustration or include a symbol that
encompasses the major activity or information the reader gleans
from that chapter. For example, in the box for chapter one, a
chapter describing the town of Holcomb and introducing the
novel, you could draw a city limits sign, a map of the town, people
who begin to look at each other suspiciously, or even a shotgun to
illustrate the “four shotgun blasts that, all told, ended six human
lives.” The key is to create a visual image that will not only help
you, but also your classmates to focus on the important
information in the chapter and to see how Capote narrates the
events that unfold.

                                                                          Elizabeth Davis
                                                                    Westwood High School
         Teaching In Cold Blood   3




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Sample




                    Elizabeth Davis
              Westwood High School
                                                                                                            Teaching In Cold Blood   4
 In Cold Blood                                 Name ___________________________
The Last to see them Alive – Tension and Suspense                 Block ________

Suspense: Anticipation as to the outcome of events, particularly as they affect a character (or characters) for whom one has
sympathy. Suspense is major device for securing and maintaining interest. It may be either of two major types: in one, the
outcome is uncertain and the suspense resides in the question of who or what or how; in the other, the outcome is inevitable from
foregoing events, and the suspense resides in the audience’s anxious or frightened anticipation, in the question of when.

                                                                                           A Handbook to Literature – Harmon and Holman

Review the definition of suspense. In the space below, identify which kind of suspense Truman Capote employs in the first
part of his novel, In Cold Blood. Support your answer with details and a thorough explanation.




Review the individual chapters from Part One: The Last to see them Alive. Find at least one example from each chapter
of a quotation or detail that creates suspense for the reader. Fill in the chart below with your findings.

Chapter       Page                     Quotation or Detail that creates tension or suspense
   1           5        “four shotgun blasts that, all told, ended six human lives.”
    2
    3
    4
    5
    6
    7
    8
    9
   10
   11
   12
   13
   14
   15
   16
   17
   18
   19
   20
   21
   22

                                                                                                                       Elizabeth Davis
                                                                                                                 Westwood High School
                                                                     Teaching In Cold Blood                5
                                In Cold Blood, Part One Quiz

In Part One of In Cold Blood, Truman Capote introduces the reader to the important people,
places, and details surrounding the story of the Clutter family killings. For each of the
following pairs, choose one (a or b) to fully describe and discuss its significance. Your
paragraph should explain what the object is, how it is related to the story, and why it is a
significant detail in developing the characters or the setting, or in creating suspense in the
novel. You will have a total of five paragraphs when you are finished.

                      Point Scale
      20 =   Fully Developed
      16 =   Developed
      10 =   Undeveloped
       0=    No Response / Inaccurate



1.    a. the insurance policy
      b. the River Valley Farm


2.    a. miniature things
      b. cherry pie


3.    a. the Black Chevrolet
      b. rope


4.    a. Treasure of the Sierra Madre
      b. full moon


5.    a. Hartman’s Café
      b. Myrtle Clare




                                                                                              Elizabeth Davis
                                                                                        Westwood High School
                                                                                   Teaching In Cold Blood                6


Read the following examples of the detail of “stockings” from Part One. Model your responses on the
first example. Make sure you include a very detailed and accurate description and then discuss how and
why it is important.

20 – Developed (includes context and connection to significance)

        Half of the chapters in Part One of In Cold Blood chronicle the activities of Dick Hickock and Perry
Smith as they prepare to get the “big score,” ultimately resulting in the quadruple murder of the Clutter
family from Holcomb, Kansas. A big concern for the two criminals is that they leave “no witnesses” to the
crime; therefore, Perry suggests they buy women’s stockings to cover their faces. Dick believes the
stockings will be too light to camouflage the scars around his eyes. After much persuasion on Perry’s part,
Dick finally gives in to his insistence that dark stockings will keep them safe. Dick enters a Catholic hospital
to ask for black stockings from the nuns but returns empty-handed. The detail of the stockings reveals
several characteristics of Dick and Perry. About Perry, we learn that he pays attention to detail, is concerned
about getting caught, and also is superstitious. He does not want to go near the nuns, for they are bad luck.
About Dick, we learn that he is practical and focused, is more interested in taking care of the witnesses in a
violent manner, and, while he can be stubborn, he will seemingly give in to Perry’s requests sometimes just
to keep the peace. Ultimately, however, we learn from this dispute and its result that Dick Hickock is the
one in charge.


16 – Somewhat Developed (includes context and some attempt at significance)
        In the first part of the novel, In Cold Blood, the two killers, Dick Hickock and Perry Smith, buy a
number of items to use in their crime against the Clutter family. In addition to rope and adhesive tape, the
men discuss the need for women’s stockings to conceal their identity. Perry really wants the stockings, but
Dick doesn’t think they will help at all since he has deformities on his face. When Perry keeps insisting,
Dick finally gives in and goes into a Catholic hospital to ask the nuns for black hosiery. Dick never actually
asks for them and comes out empty-handed; however, this ultimately satisfies Perry who believes nuns are
“bad luck” anyway.


10 – Undeveloped (includes minimal detail and context and minimal attempt at significance)
        In the first part of In Cold Blood, we see the criminals buying supplies for the killings that will occur.
They talk about buying stockings, but decide not to get them since they will not help anyway. This shows
that they are trying to take care of details.




                                                                                                            Elizabeth Davis
                                                                                                      Westwood High School
                                                                                                         Teaching In Cold Blood                7
                                               In Cold Blood – Group Assignments
                                      (used with permission from Jennifer Cullen/Westwood High School)

You will be assigned to a group of 2-3 members. The group’s task will be to meaningfully practice the skills of passage analysis,
in preparation for the next major-grade timed writing. Your activities will correspond with the four major parts of In Cold Blood,
and you will earn multiple grades from this work.

Part I – Related Passage Analysis [Homework]

    A. Since this is a forum to strengthen your analysis skills as we continue to work on skills for the AP Language exam, you
       and your group will choose one meaningful, memorable passage from each section of In Cold Blood, which you will
       then notate. [I will attempt to provide you a few minutes before each due date to discuss possible passages, but the work
       itself will take place outside of class.]

         Each passage should be 1-2 pages long in the original work and clearly demonstrate careful selection. The passages,
         when viewed together, must represent the four people groups within the literary work: the victims, the townspeople, the
         investigators, and the criminals. You may focus on these groups in any order, but consider that Capote will likely
         focus on “the victims” in the earlier sections.

    B. For each passage, you will photo-copy it (or type it up) to create a clean, attractive copy; include Part, Chapter and
       Page(s) on your copy. Each group member must have this passage copy ready and notated by the dates listed below.
            Part I – October 14/15, 2008
            Part II – October 20/21, 2008
            Part III – October 28/29, 2008
            Part IV – November 7/10, 2008

         The fairest way to complete this process is to each take a “turn” in photocopying (or typing) the group’s chosen passage
         and distributing it to your group members, with enough time for them to complete their notations.

         On each due date, you will meet together to work on a related organizer. All group members will turn in their notations,
         previously and individually completed, with the organizer; that is, each member must submit his/her own notations, but
         you may collaborate, through email or in person, prior to the due date. Grades within the group may vary, based on the
         completion and quality of individual notations.

    C. Notation Directions (for each passage):
       Note: all notations must be written in blue or black ink; do not use pencil. For any step that requires highlighting
       on the passage, highlight your corresponding marginal comments in the same color.

         On each passage copy, complete (and clearly label) the following:
         1) In the space at the top of your passage copy (or on the back), clearly answer the following: What is happening at this
             point in the text? (Provide the context. Make sure to include the 5 Ws [who, what, where, when, why].)

         2) In pink, highlight meaningful diction (nouns, verbs, adjectives, and adverbs) in the passage. Comment marginally on
            at least two of the following: (1) What connotations do you glean from specific word choices? (2) What conflicts or
            connections (similarities) do you understand through specific word choices? (3) What significance (regarding
            character, event, etc.) do you understand through specific word choices? [Hint: Consult your Yellow Pages. In
            general, marginal comments will take the form of a phrase such as: “conveys ________”, “shows _________”,
            “suggests _________”, “fitting because _________” , or “significant because _________.”]

         3) In yellow, highlight the first four words of each sentence and meaningful punctuation choices (dashes, parentheses,
            ellipses, etc.). Comment marginally on one aspect of the syntax that seems meaningful to you. [Hint: Yellow
            Pages]

         4) In green, highlight evidence of at least one narrative strategy and one rhetorical device. (I have listed ideas in the
            boxes on the reverse side; the list is not comprehensive.) Label the strategy or device marginally and briefly
            comment on its effect. [Hint: Yellow Pages]



                                                                                                                                  Elizabeth Davis
                                                                                                                            Westwood High School
                                                                                              Teaching In Cold Blood                8
         5) In blue, draw brackets around two 5-10 line blocks of text within the passage; for each, choose an appropriate tone
            word from your Yellow Pages. Be as precise as possible in choosing tone words. In the space at the bottom of your
            passage copy, briefly justify these two tone words.

         6) In the space at the bottom of your passage copy (or on the back), clearly answer the following: What impresses you
            most about the passage (in terms of Capote’s style)?

Part II – Organizers [Class Work]

         On each due date (listed above), I will provide your group an organizer (much like the one you used on the day of the
         Kincaid timed writing). You will receive additional instructions, but, essentially, your group will work together to move
         from notating the passage to preparing for an analysis essay. We will focus on the concept of “Connecting Device to
         Meaning” (in your Yellow Pages).


For use with Notation Directions, #4

Some strategies and devices for narrative writing:
Point of view                                              Voice (of narrator)
Flash forward                                              Verb tense
Flashback                                                  Sentence length (rhythm, pacing)
Events/actions/thoughts                                    Irony
Pacing                                                     Language (colloquial, informal, jargon, etc.)
Figurative Language                                        Humor
Imagery                                                    Repetitions
Conflicts / Tension / Suspense                             Focus (of a chapter, of a paragraph, etc.)

Some rhetorical devices:
alliteration or assonance               metaphor                             personification
allusion                                simile                               rhetorical question
analogy                                 onomatopoeia                         paradox
apostrophe                              oxymoron                             extended metaphor
antithesis                              parallelism


Group Members:                               Phone Number:                      Email:
____________________________                 ____________________               ____________________________________

____________________________                 ____________________               ____________________________________


Grades from this Assignment:

    1.   On November 11/12, you will complete a timed writing over one passage that I will choose. – Major Grade – The timed
         writing passage will not be one you have previously notated, but your notations should help you do well.

    Parts I-II                                                      Parts III-IV

    ______ / 20 – Individual Notations for Part I                   ______ / 20 – Individual Notations for Part III

    ______ / 30 – Quality of Group Organizer, Part I                ______ / 30 – Quality of Group Organizer, Part III

    ______ / 20 – Individual Notations for Part II                  ______ / 20 – Individual Notations for Part IV

    ______ / 30 – Quality of Group Organizer, Part II               ______ / 30 – Quality of Group Organizer, Part IV


    ______ Total Grade                                              ______ Total Grade
                                                                                                                       Elizabeth Davis
                                                                                                                 Westwood High School
         Teaching In Cold Blood                9




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                                  Elizabeth Davis
                            Westwood High School
                                                                                 Teaching In Cold Blood                10
In Cold Blood
Discussion Questions
Part I, Chapters 12-17                       Name                                               Block

Answer the following questions fully in your chapter group. Jigsaw. Share your answers with your new
group.


Chapter 12

Who is Bob Johnson and why is he at the Clutter home?


What important fact do we learn about Herb Clutter’s financial practice? Explain his reasoning.



What is the “Solemn Moment” described in paragraph 2?



What is double indemnity?



How does this scene add to the reader’s experience with the rest of the novel?



Chapter 13

What is the name of the hymn that starts the chapters and how is it connected to the rest of the story?



Define “agoraphobic” and explain its context in chapter 13.



Explain the irony of the inclusion of a hymn in this chapter.



Approximately how far are Dick and Perry from the Clutter home at this point?




                                                                                                           Elizabeth Davis
                                                                                                     Westwood High School
                                                                                Teaching In Cold Blood                11
Chapter 14

When do we find out the facts about Saturday night from Bobby Rupp and in what context?


Explain the purpose of the jump in the chronology here.



What connects the end of chapter 13 with the beginning of chapter 14?



Make a list of the details Bobby Rupp offered about Saturday evening. Predict which details may be
important later in the investigation.



Chapter 15

Where are Dick and Perry at this point? Approximately how far are they from the Clutter home?



In the first paragraph, what item in the list of purchases does not seem to belong? Explain the effect of this
detail.



What is an “omen”? Explain how this reveals Perry’s emotions at the moment.



Explain fully why Dick befriended Perry and included him in the “score.”



Chapter 16

Explain what the details of Nancy’s room, her routine, and her diary reveal about her character. Be specific.



Chapter 17

Identify two tones in chapter 17 using this formula. “The tone of the chapter was _____, but also ____.”
Include a discussion of the word choices and punctuation to support your answer.”


                                                                                                          Elizabeth Davis
                                                                                                    Westwood High School
                                                                               Teaching In Cold Blood                12
In Cold Blood
Discussion Questions
Part II                               Name                                         Block

Answer the following questions fully in your chapter group. Jigsaw. Share your answers with your new
group.

I. The Townspeople

(ch. 1) Describe the actions and feelings of those involved in the Clutter home clean up.

(ch. 3) Discuss Myrtle Clare’s attitude toward her fellow Holcombites.

(ch. 5) Discuss the details revealed in Susan Kidwell’s testimony.

(ch. 12) Explain the significance of Mrs. Browne and Mrs. Ashida. Why does Capote include their stories?

(ch. 14) What information did Paul Helm share with the investigators?
         Who is Jonathan Daniel Adrian?


II. The Investigators

(ch. 2 and ch. 7) Take notes on the following:

Facts:
         Evidence on the scene:

Theories:
      One-killer theory

         Two-killer theory

         Robbery theory

Rumors:

Leads:

(ch. 16) History of crimes in the area
       1920
       1947
       1952
       1956

         Explain the metaphor “squalls preceding a hurricane.”

(ch. 17) Describe Marie Dewey’s Dream

                                                                                                         Elizabeth Davis
                                                                                                   Westwood High School
                                                                                Teaching In Cold Blood                13


III. Criminals’ Activity

(ch 4) Contrast Dick and Perry’s attitudes toward the murders.

       Discuss Perry’s dream of the parrot.

(ch. 6) Describe the killers schemes to get money.

(ch.8) What are Dick and Perry doing in this chapter?

(ch 10-11) Describe the doubts and fears of the criminals.

(ch. 13) Describe the activities and company of Dick and Perry.
        How does Capote reflect back to the parrot dream?

(ch. 18) What are the men doing in the Mojave desert?

IV. Perry’s Background / Father’s letter/ Sister’s Letter/ Willie Jay’s response

(ch 15) What are Dick and Perry’s plans?

       Explain Perry’s dad’s letter: “A History of My Boy’s Life”
              childhood
              youth
              recreation and interests
              relatives

       Explain the main idea of Barbara’s letter. Pay particular attention to the idea of personal
       responsibility.

       Discuss Willie Jay’s response to Barbara’s letter. Does he agree? Explain.

V. Perry’s Background / Perry’s Memories
Describe and discuss the significance of all of the following:
       Flo Buckskin
       Tex John Smith
       Catholic orphanage
       merchant marines
       army
       accident
       Alaska
       arrest




                                                                                                          Elizabeth Davis
                                                                                                    Westwood High School
                                                                                             Teaching In Cold Blood                14
In Cold Blood, Parts I-III
(used with permission from Jennifer Cullen/Westwood High School)

Directions: You have been assigned 1-2 of the principal characters from this creative nonfiction work. (Your
assigned characters are in bold, below.) You will also be provided a sheet of butcher paper on which you
will create a web that shows the secondary characters (from the list in the chart below) who are connected to
your assigned principal characters.

In other words, you and your partners will carefully consider the list of secondary characters, review the
content of Parts I-III of In Cold Blood, and decide which characters are connected to your assigned principal
characters through close relationships or through their testimonies following the murders.

As you draw your web, include a brief (but meaningful) explanation of each connection. You may need to
list more than one meaningful connection for a single character.

Example:

                                                                                 Secondary
                                                                    Explain      Character
                                                                   connection
                            Primary Character(s)


                                                      Herbert William Clutter
                                                       Bonnie (Fox) Clutter

         Alfred Stoecklein                                            Jonathan Daniel Adrian
         Alvin Dewey                                                  Larry Hendricks
         Barbara (Mrs. Frederic Johnson)                              Larry Rupp
         Bess Hartman                                                 Mabel Helm
         Beverly English                                              Marie Dewey
         Bob Johnson                                                  Mrs. Clarence Katz
         Bob Jones                                                    Mrs. Hideo Ashida
         Bobby Rupp                                                   Myrtle Clare
         Clarence Duntz                                               Nancy Ewalt
         Clarence Ewalt                                               Otto & “the Cowboy”
         Cookie                                                       Paul Helm
         David Hickock                                                Roy Church
         Eunice Hickock                                               Sadie “Mother” Truitt
         Eveanna Jarchow                                              Sheriff Earl Robinson
         Fern “Joy” Smith                                             Susan Kidwell
         Floyd Wells                                                  Tex John Smith
         Gerald Van Vleet                                             Vic Irsik
         Harold Nye                                                   Walter Hickock
         Inez & Maria                                                 Wendle Meier
         Jimmy Smith                                                  Willie-Jay
         Jolene Katz                                                  Wilma Kidwell



                                                                                                                       Elizabeth Davis
                                                                                                                 Westwood High School
                                                                     Teaching In Cold Blood                15
                       Kohlberg’s Six Levels of Moral Development

Level 1: Individual obeys rules in order to avoid punishment.
      “I don’t want to get in trouble.”
           Doing homework to stay out of trouble.
           Cautioning “Quiet down…the teacher is coming!”
           Fear-based
      Goal: People should do what’s right because they believe in it not because they will get
      in trouble.

Level 2: Individual conforms to society's rules in order to receive rewards.
      “I want a reward.”
          Candy for turning in all your homework.
          Allowance for behaving the right way.
          Pizza parties for being nice to a sub.
      Goal: Proper behavior is expected, not rewarded.

Level 3: Individual behaves morally in order to gain approval from other people.
      “I want to please somebody.”
          Completing work to please the teacher.
          Picking a college or career based on what your parents want for you.
      Goal: Do things not to please someone else, but do them because you know
            they’re right.

Level 4: Conformity to authority to avoid censure and guilt.
      “I follow the rules.”
          Rules to follow for each individual class, but you don’t abide by them outside of
             that class.
      Goal: Know the rules because you believe in them, but also know that at times it’s
      important to see past them. (MLK, Gandhi, Rosa Parks, etc.)

Level 5: Individual is concerned with individual rights and democratically decided laws.
      “I am considerate of other people.”
          Empathy for those around us.
          “You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of
            view…until you climb inside his skin and walk around in it.”
      Goal: Do things for no other reason than you know they are right and you believe in it.

Level 6: Individual is entirely guided by his or her own conscience.
      “I have a personal code of behavior and follow it.”
          The personal code of behavior lies within the soul of an individual.
          Doing things not for any kind of reward but because they are right.
      Goal: This level is the ultimate goal!


What are some examples of these people in literature, movies, or real life?




                                                                                               Elizabeth Davis
                                                                                         Westwood High School
                                                       Teaching In Cold Blood                16

                                 In Cold Blood
                               Character Analysis
  Kohlberg’s Levels     Character/Reference         Explanation
Level One:
 “I don’t want to get
in trouble.”



Level Two:
“I want a reward.”




Level Three:
“I want to please
somebody.”




Level Four:
“I follow the rules.”




Level Five:
 “I am considerate of
other people.”




Level Six:
 “I have a personal
code of behavior and
follow it.




                                                                                 Elizabeth Davis
                                                                           Westwood High School
                                                                             Teaching In Cold Blood                17
Argumentation

Review Part IV, chapter 5 to explore the following question.

Should Dick and Perry be afforded a comprehensive psychiatric evaluation from the state hospital in
Larned, Kansas to determine whether they are “insane, imbeciles or idiots unable to comprehend their
position and aid in their own defense”?

Look at the arguments made by both attorneys and take notes over the details of the argument distinguishing
between logical and emotional appeals.

                                   Defense Attorney                        Prosecution
                              _________________________             _________________________

      Logical Appeal




      Emotional Appeal




In the space below, fully explain Judge Tate’s ruling and identify what appeal drove his decision
making.

Explanation of Judge Tate’s Ruling




                                                                                                       Elizabeth Davis
                                                                                                 Westwood High School
                                                                            Teaching In Cold Blood                18
                                               Argumentation

   Review Part IV, chapter 5 to explore the following question.

   Should Dick and Perry be afforded a comprehensive psychiatric evaluation from the state hospital
   in Larned, Kansas to determine whether they are “insane, imbeciles or idiots unable to
   comprehend their position and aid in their own defense”?

   Look at the arguments made by both attorneys and take notes over the details of the argument
   distinguishing between logical and emotional appeals.

                                   Defense Attorney                         Prosecution
                                   Harrison Smith                           Logan Green

        Logical              No qualified psychiatrists in        Feared temporary insanity plea
        Appeal               Garden City                          M’Naghten Rule (define)
                             In Larned, doctors are trained       No rule in Kansas for special
                             to make serious judgments            qualification of doctors
                             It will only take 4-8 weeks          Law only requires a medical
                             There will be no cost                doctor
                             Psychiatry is a science with         In the past they have used
                             progressive ideas                    doctors in Garden City
                                                                  4-8 weeks is a waste of time
        Emotional            This is a special case – “two        Psychiatrists are a “pack of head
        Appeal               lives are at stake                   healers”
                                                                  They will be “crying over the
                                                                  killers



   In the space below, fully explain Judge Tate’s ruling and identify what appeal drove his decision
   making.

   Explanation of Judge Tate’s Ruling

    Judge Tate is a man of reason and a stickler for the rules. He thinks of things very logically;
therefore, the attorneys know their logical arguments should be at the forefront. He rules against the
request to use the state hospital and appoints three doctors in the area to conduct the interviews and
develop the evaluation. (Students should include details from his ruling also for support.




                                                                                                      Elizabeth Davis
                                                                                                Westwood High School
                                                                                Teaching In Cold Blood                19




                                                                                   Kansas Bureau of Investigation
                                                                                                 1620 SW Tyler
                                                                                              Topeka, KS 66612
                                                                                                  (785)-296-8200

08 April 2008

To: Agents in Training / Westwood High School Division
From: Curly
Re: Operation Tomcats
Code Name: Leavenworth

Your team has been assembled to report upon the important details involving the Clutter murder case. As
you know, the story has reached nationwide fame in recent days due to the nature of this shocking and
senseless crime. In an effort to get to the bottom of the issue, the KBI needs you to help to discover the
identity of the perpetrators, to locate them and bring them in to Garden City, and to help us convict them of
the heinous act and bring them to justice.

We have intercepted a text written by Truman Capote that may help us in our fact-finding mission. Your job
is to pour over the fourth part of the document called “The Corner” and present a debriefing session to the
rest of the investigative team on the important facts, details, characters, symbols, and quotations that may
help us illuminate the meaning of the whole disaster.

As you search for clues, choose FIVE of the following questions to answer fully on your own paper.

    What qualities do the main characters possess and why are these details important?

    What important objects or symbols help illuminate the family, the investigators, or the criminals?

    Who are the important people in the lives of the family, the investigators, and the murderers and what
     is their role in the incident?

    How does Mr. Capote develop a sense of suspense even when people know the ultimate outcome?

    From how many different points of view is this tale told? What are these and how do the shifts in
     point of view add to the effectiveness of the story?

    What philosophical questions surface in this particular part of the story?

    What themes does Capote communicate through this part of the story?

    How does the information in “The Corner” fit in to the entire narrative?


If you should need any additional help, contact Curly at headquarters.


                                                                                                          Elizabeth Davis
                                                                                                    Westwood High School
                                                                                                 Teaching In Cold Blood                20
                               Open-ended Argument Practice Prompts - SAT Format
Prompt 1
Think carefully about the issue presented in the following excerpt and the assignment below.
Often we see people who persist in trying to achieve a particular goal, even when all the evidence indicates that they will be
unlikely to achieve it. When they succeed, we consider them courageous for having overcome impossible obstacles. But when they
fail, we think of them as headstrong, foolhardy, and bent on self-destruction. To many people, great effort is only worthwhile when
it results in success.
Adapted from Gilbert Brim, "Ambition"
Assignment:
Is the effort involved in pursuing any goal valuable, even if the goal is not reached? Plan and write an essay in which you develop
your point of view on this issue. Support your position with reasoning and examples taken from your reading, studies, experience,
or observations.

Prompt 2
Think carefully about the issue presented in the following excerpt and the assignment below.
All around us appearances are mistaken for reality. Clever advertisements create favorable impressions but say little or nothing
about the products they promote. In stores, colorful packages are often better than their contents. In the media, how certain
entertainers, politicians, and other public figures appear is more important than their abilities. All too often, what we think we see
becomes far more important than what really is.
Assignment:
Do images and impressions have too much of an effect on people? Plan and write an essay in which you develop your point of
view on this issue. Support your position with reasoning and examples taken from your reading, studies, experience, or
observations.

Prompt 3
Think carefully about the issue presented in the following excerpt and the assignment below.
A person does not simply "receive" his or her identity. Identity is much more than the name or features one is born with. True
identity is something people must create for themselves by making choices that are significant and that require a courageous
commitment in the face of challenges. Identity means having ideas and values that one lives by.
Adapted from Thomas Merton, Contemplation in a World of Action
Assignment:
Is identity something people are born with or given, or is it something people create for themselves? Plan and write an essay in
which you develop your point of view on this issue. Support your position with reasoning and examples taken from your reading,
studies, experience, or observations.

Prompt 4
Think carefully about the issue presented in the following excerpt and the assignment below.
People are happy only when they have their minds fixed on some goal other than their own happiness. Happiness comes when
people focus instead on the happiness of others, on the improvement of humanity, on some course of action that is followed not as
a means to anything else but as an end in itself. Aiming at something other than their own happiness, they find happiness along the
way. The only way to be happy is to pursue some goal external to your own happiness.
Adapted from John Stuart Mill, Autobiography
Assignment:
Are people more likely to be happy if they focus on goals other than their own happiness? Plan and write an essay in which you
develop your point of view on this issue. Support your position with reasoning and examples taken from your reading, studies,
experience, or observations.

Prompt 5
It is not true that prosperity is better for people than adversity. When people are thriving and content, they seldom feel the need to
look for ways to improve themselves or their situation. Hardship, on the other hand, forces people to closely examine—and
possibly change—their own lives and even the lives of others. Misfortune rather than prosperity helps people to gain a greater
understanding of themselves and the world around them.
Assignment:
Do people truly benefit from hardship and misfortune? Plan and write an essay in which you develop your point of view on this
issue. Support your position with reasoning and examples taken from your reading, studies, experience, or observations.


                                                                                                                           Elizabeth Davis
                                                                                                                     Westwood High School
                                                                                          Teaching In Cold Blood                21
Carefully read the following passage containing Logan Green’s closing argument to the jury in the
Clutter murder trial. Answer the questions that follow.

     “I have no intention of engaging in a theological debate.   silver against so many ounces of blood. And how cheaply
But I anticipated that defense counsel would use the Holy        those lives were bought! For forty dollars’ worth of loot!
Bible as an argument against the death penalty. You have         Ten dollars a life!” He whirled, and pointed a finger that
heard the Bible quoted, But I can read, too.” He slapped         moved back and forth between Hickock and Smith. “They
open a copy of the Old Testament. “And here are a few            went armed with a shotgun and a dagger. They went to rob
things the Good Book has to say on the subject. In Exodus,       and kill—“His voice trembled, toppled, disappeared, as
Twenty, Verse Thirteen, we have one of the Ten                   though strangled by the intensity of his own loathing for the
Commandments: ‘Thou shalt not kill.’ This refers to              debonair, gum-chewing defendants. Turning again to the
unlawful killing. Of course it does, because of the next         jury, he hoarsely asked, “What are you going to do? What
chapter, Verse Twelve, the penalty for disobedience of that      are you going to do with these men that bind a man hand and
Commandment reads: ‘He that smiteth a man, so that he die,       foot and cut his throat and blow out his brains? Give them
shall be surely put to death.’ Now, Mr. Fleming would have       the minimum penalty? Yes, and that’s only one of four
you believe that all this was changed by the coming of           counts. What about Kenyon Clutter, a young boy with his
Christ. Not so. For Christ says, ‘Think not that I am come       whole life before him, tied helplessly in sight of his father’s
to destroy the law, or the prophets: I am not come to            death struggle. Or young Nancy Clutter, hearing the
destroy, but to fulfill.’ And finally” – Green fumbled, and      gunshots and knowing her time was next. Nancy, begging
seemed to accidentally shut the Bible, whereupon the             for her life; ‘Don’t. Oh, please don’t. Please. Please.’
visiting legal dignitaries grinned and nudged each other, for    What agony! What unspeakable torture! And there remains
this was a venerable courtroom ploy – the lawyer who while       the mother, bound and gagged and having to listen as her
reading from the Scriptures pretends to lose his place, and      husband, her beloved children died one by one. Listen until
then remarks, as Green now did, “Never mind. I think I can       at last the killers, these defendants before you, entered her
quote from memory. Genesis Nine, Verse Six: ‘Whoso               room, focused a flashlight in her eyes, and let the blast of a
sheddeth man’s blood, by man shall his blood be shed.’           shotgun end the existence of an entire household.”
     “But,” Green went on, “I see nothing to be gained by             … “So, gentlemen, what are you going to do? Give
arguing the Bible. Our state provides that punishment for        them the minimum? Send them back to the penitentiary, and
murder in the first degree shall be imprisonment for life or     take the chance of their escaping or being paroled? The next
death by hanging. That is the law. You, gentleman, are here      time they go slaughtering it may be your family. I say to
to enforce it. And if ever there was a case in which the         you,” he solemnly said staring at the panel in a manner that
maximum penalty was justified, this is it. These were            encompassed and challenged them all, “some of our
strange, ferocious murders. Four of your fellow citizens         enormous crimes happen only because once upon a time, a
were slaughtered like hogs in a pen. And for what reason?        pack of chicken-hearted jurors refused to do their duty.
Not out of vengeance or hatred. But for money. Money. It         Now, gentlemen, I leave it to you and your consciences.”
was the cold and calculated weighing of so many ounces of



 Mr. Green employs all of the following tactics in his closing argument EXCEPT
        a. appealing to the jurors’ religious views.
        b. name calling the jurors names.
        c. appealing to the jurors fear and concern for their own families.
        d. sympathizing with the jurors’ difficult position.

 The simile in paragraph 2 achieves all of the following EXCEPT
        a. it makes reference to the Bible.
        b. it reminds the jurors of the violence of the crime.
        c. it characterizes the killers as heartless and inhumane.
        d. it provides a familiar analogy to a rural audience.

 The visiting legal dignitaries “grinned and nudged each other” because
         a. Logan Green was their friend.
         b. they knew the judge was on the prosecution’s side.
         c. the recognized Green’s strategy to pretend to know the Bible verse by memory.
         d. they were impressed that Green could quote the Bible from memory.
                                                                                                                    Elizabeth Davis
                                                                                                              Westwood High School
                                                                             Teaching In Cold Blood                22

                                            Passage Analysis

Read carefully the passage on pages 304 to 305 that begins “And if ever there was a case in which the
maximum penalty was justified, this is it” and that concludes with “and let the blast of a shotgun end the
existence of an entire household.” In a well-organized essay, analyze how Logan Green utilizes the
elements of language to convince the jury to impose the “maximum penalty” in the case. Consider such
elements as diction, imagery, detail, and syntax. Be sure to connect device to meaning.




                                                                                                       Elizabeth Davis
                                                                                                 Westwood High School
                                                                                      Teaching In Cold Blood                23

 PROMPT: Carefully read the following passage which is the final chapter of Part III of Truman Capote’s
 nonfiction work In Cold Blood. Then, in a well-organized essay, explain how Capote’s rhetorical strategies help
 convey his purpose for including the scene.

          Among Garden City’s animals are two gray                        Indeed, the congregation in the square might
tomcats who are always together—thin, dirty strays with         have been expecting a parade, or attending a political
strange and clever habits. The chief ceremony of their          rally. High-school students, among them former
day is performed at twilight. First they trot the length of     classmates of Nancy and Kenyon Clutter, chanted
Main Street, stopping to scrutinize the engine grilles of       cheerleader rhymes, bubbled bubble gum, gobbled hot
parked automobiles, particularly those station in front of      dogs and soda pop. Mothers soothed wailing babies.
the two hotels, the Windsor and Warren, for these cars,         Men strode about with young children perched on their
usually the property of travelers from afar, often yield        shoulders. The Boy Scouts were present—an entire
what the bony, methodical creatures are hunting:                troop. And the middle-aged membership of a women’s
slaughtered birds—crows, chickadees, and sparrows               bridge club arrived en masse. Mr. J.P. (Jap) Adams, head
foolhardy enough to have flown into the path of                 of the local Veterans Commission office, appeared,
oncoming motorists. Using their paws as though they are         attired in a tweed garment so oddly tailored that a friend
surgical instruments, the cats extract from the grilles         yelled, “Hey, Jap! What ya doin’ wearin’ ladies’ clothes?
every feathery particle. Having cruised Main Street, they       –for Mr. Adams, in his haste to reach the scene, had
invariably turn the corner at Main and Grand, then lope         unwittingly donned his secretary’s coat. A roving radio
along toward Courthouse Square, another of their hunting        reporter interviewed sundry other townsfolk, asking them
grounds–and a highly promising one on the afternoon of          what, in their opinion, the proper retribution would be for
Wednesday, January 6, for the area swarmed with Finney          “the doers of such a dastardly deed,” and while most of
vehicles that had brought to town part of the crowd             his subjects said gosh or gee whiz, one student replied, “I
populating the square.                                          think they ought to be locked in the same cell for the rest
          The crowd started forming at four o’clock, the        of their lives. Never allowed any visitors. Just sit there
hour that the county attorney had given as the probable         staring at each other till the day they die.” And a tough,
arrival time of Hickock and Smith. Since the                    strutty little man said, “I believe in capital punishment.
announcement of Hickock’s confession on Sunday                  It’s like the Bible says—an eye for an eye. And even so
evening, newsmen of every style had assembled in                we’re two pair short!”
Garden City: representatives of the major wire services,                  As long as the sun lasted, the day had been dry
photographers, newsreel and television cameramen,               and warm—October weather in January. But when the
reporters from Missouri, Nebraska, Oklahoma, Texas,             sun descended, when the shadows of the square’s giant
and, of course, all the principal Kansas papers–twenty or       shade trees met and combined, the coldness as well as
twenty-five men altogether. Many of them had been               darkness numbed the crowd. Numbed and pruned it; by
waiting three days without much to do except interview          six o’clock, fewer than three hundred persons remained.
the service-station attendant James Spor, who, after            Newsmen, cursing the undue delay, stamped their feet
seeing published photographs of the accused killers, had        and slapped frozen ears with ungloved, freezing hands.
identified them as customers to whom he’d sold three            Suddenly, a murmuring arose on the south side of the
dollars and six cents’ worth of gas the night of the            square. The cars were coming.
Holcomb tragedy.                                                          Although none of the journalists anticipated
          It was the return of Hickock and Smith that these     violence, several had predicted shouted abuse. But when
professional spectators were on hand to record, and             the crown caught sight of the murderers, with their escort
Captain Gerald Murray, of the highway patrol, had               of blue-coated highway patrolmen, it fell silent, as though
reserved for them ample space on the sidewalk fronting          amazed to find them humanly shaped. The handcuffed
the courthouse steps–the steps the prisoners must mount         men, white-faced and blinking blindly, glistened in the
on their way to the county jail, an institution that occupies   glare of flashbulbs, and floodlights. The cameramen,
the top floor of the four-story limestone structure. One        pursuing the prisoners and the police into the courthouse
reporter, Richard Parr, of the Kansas City Star, had            and up three flights of stairs, photographed the door of the
obtained a copy of Monday’s Las Vegas Sun. The                  county jail slamming shut.
paper’s headline raised rounds of laughter: FEAR LYNCH                    No one lingered, neither the press corps nor any
MOB AWAITING RETURN OF KILLER SUSPECTS.                         of the townspeople. Warm rooms and warm suppers
Captain Murray remarked, “Don’t look much like a                beckoned them, and as they hurried away, leaving the
necktie party to me.”                                           cold square to the two gray cats, the miraculous autumn
                                                                departed too; the year’s first snow began to fall.

                                                                                                                Elizabeth Davis
                                                                                                          Westwood High School
                                                                                               Teaching In Cold Blood                24
                                               In Cold Blood Timed Writing
                                                    Scoring Guidelines

General Directions: The score is intended to reflect the paper’s quality as a whole. Since students have only 40 minutes to read
and write, the paper is evaluated as a draft and students are rewarded for what they do well. All papers, even those scored 8 or 9,
may contain occasional flaws in analysis, prose style, or mechanics. Such features do not enter into the holistic evaluation of the
paper’s overall quality. However, a paper with many distracting errors in grammar and mechanics cannot be scored higher than a
2.

9:        Papers earning a score of 9 meet the criteria for 8 papers and, in addition, are especially full or apt in
          their analysis, sophisticated in their explanation and argument, or impressive in their control of language.

8:        Papers earning a score of 8 effectively analyze how the rhetorical strategies Capote uses reveal his
          purpose. They refer to the passage explicitly or implicitly. The prose demonstrates an ability to control
          a wide range of the elements of effective writing but is not necessarily flawless.

7:        Papers earning a score of 7 fit the description of 6 papers, but provide a more complete analysis,
          explanation, or argument or demonstrate a more mature prose style.

6:        Papers earning a score of 6 adequately analyze how the rhetorical strategies Capote uses reveal his
          purpose. These papers may refer to the passage explicitly or implicitly or the evidence used is
          appropriate. The writing may contain lapses in diction or syntax, but generally the prose is clear.

5:        Papers earning a score of 5 analyze how the rhetorical strategies Capote uses reveal his purpose but do so
          unevenly, inconsistently, or insufficiently. The writing may contain lapses in diction or syntax, but it
          usually conveys the writer’s ideas.

4:        Papers earning a score of 4 respond to the prompt inadequately. They offer little discussion of how the
          rhetorical strategies Capote uses reveal his purpose, misrepresent these strategies, or analyze incorrectly
          their relation to Capote’s purpose. The prose generally conveys the writer’s ideas but may suggest
          immature control of writing.

3:        Papers earning a score of 3 meet the criteria for a score of 4, but are less perceptive about how the
          rhetorical strategies Capote uses reveal his purpose or less consistent in controlling the elements of
          writing.

2:        Papers earning a score of 2 demonstrate little success in analyzing analyze how the rhetorical strategies
          Capote uses reveal his purpose. They may misunderstand the prompt, offer vague generalizations,
          substitute simpler tasks such as summarizing the passage or simply listing rhetorical strategies. The
          prose often demonstrates consistent weaknesses in writing.

1:        Papers earning a score of 1 meet the criteria for a 2 but are undeveloped, especially simplistic in their
          explanation and/or argument, or weak in their control of language.

0:        Indicates an on-topic response that receives no credit, such as one that merely repeats the prompt.

--:      Indicates a blank response or one that is completely off-topic.



Scoring Guidelines derived from the AP English Language and Composition 2004 Scoring Guidelines.
                                                                                                                         Elizabeth Davis
                                                                                                                   Westwood High School

				
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