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Emergence of WWI

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					    WHY STUDY THE WEIMAR
          REPUBLIC?
• The history of the Weimar Republic (1919-
  1933) illuminates one of the most creative
  and crucial periods in the twentieth century
  and serves as a significant case study of the
  critical issues of our own time.
• Many of the questions asked about the Weimar
  Republic are relevant to problems that
  individuals and societies face in the twenty-
  first century.
  WHY STUDY THE WEIMAR
        REPUBLIC?
• Citizens and leaders of the Weimar Republic
  had to wrestle with the problems of a newly
  developing democracy:
  – the creation of a new constitution and political
    culture and the need for institutional reform
    particularly of the judiciary, the police, and the
    educational system.
  WHY STUDY THE WEIMAR
        REPUBLIC?
• The Weimar Republic experienced hyper-inflation
  and depression, gender and generational conflict,
  political violence and terrorism, conflicts dealing with
  the relationship between church and state, and racist
  antisemitism.
• The fourteen years of the Weimar Republic were a
  way station on the road to genocide, and yet they also
  witnessed the struggle of many decent, sincere people
  to create a just and humane society in a time of great
  artistic creativity.
               Gallery Walk
• Each assigned group is going to have 10-12
  minutes at each station (4 total stations)
• Museum (primary resources and secondary
  resources)
• At each station you are responsible to work on
  the sheet provided
• Finish at home.
           Gallery Walk Work
• Take notes and answer all aspects of the
  question
• Go home and type up answers
• 12 pt. Times New Roman – 1 inch margins –
  single spaced (points will be docked if you do
  not follow directions)
• If printer doesn’t work – email me that night,
  but get it to me the NEXT day or it is LATE
• See next slide for exact format
          Format of Any Typed Work
                 Name
                 Date
                 Class (Facing History and Ourselves)
                 Ms. Krupsky
                 Assignment (Weimar Republic Gallery Exhibition)




Do NOT bold or
                        Write your answers with the question in the answer.
type the word
                        I should be able to read your answer without
“Assignment”
                        referring back to the question!
Go Over Worksheet
      Analyzing Visual Art - Practice
• Step One:
  Look Deeply: Look at the picture for a good long time. Observe shapes,
  colors, textures, the position of people and/or objects, etc.

• Step Two:
  Write down below what you see without making any interpretation about
  what the picture is trying to say.
   I see...

• Step Three:
  What questions do you have about this picture that you would need
  answered before you can begin to interpret it? (Ask as many questions as
  you have.)
   I want to know... I was wondering...
   Who?...
   What?...
   Where?...
   When?...
   Why?...
  Analyzing Visual Art - Practice
• Step Four:
  Discuss your questions with two other people in the class to
  try to find some answers.

• Step Five:
  Given the historical context and subject of the piece, what do
  you think the cartoonist is trying to say (what does the piece
  mean?), and who do you think is the intended audience?
  I think the artist is saying...
  I think the intended audience is...

• Step Six:
  Discuss your interpretation with the class, and be prepared to
  support your view by referring to specifics in the drawing and
  in what you know about the history of the time.
“Farm Family from Kahlenberg” 1939 –
Adolph Wissel
                For Tomorrow
• You are to bring:
  1.   Gallery Walk Worksheet
  2.   Notebook with pen
  3.   Analyzing Art Worksheet
  4.   Homework from last night
               Homework
• Reading 12
• Reading 13
• Armistice
THE LEGACY OF WORLD WAR I
World War I, which was, to the generation of the 1920s and ‘30s,
  “the overwhelming catastrophe that dominated their epoch,”
  gave birth to the first German democracy, called the Weimar
  Republic. In the words of H. Stuart Hughes, this war “stacked
  the cards for the future.” Germans, who were suffering from
  the humiliation and loss of honor of unexpected defeat, cried
  out for vengeance. The Treaty of Versailles, which officially
  ended the war, contributed to the humiliation Germans felt. All
  Germans, no matter their political beliefs, regarded the treaty
  as unjust. It would remain a festering sore on the body of the
  new Republic. Yet, the anger, passion, hatred, and violence of
  the Weimar years were mixed with tremendous creativity and
  cultural excitement. In that dynamic environment, the viability
  of democracy was tested and failed. The struggles and even the
  failures of the Weimar Republic stand as warning signs and
  guides for future democracies.

				
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posted:12/17/2012
language:English
pages:13