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NRLM - Ministry of Rural Development

VIEWS: 4 PAGES: 44

									National Rural Livelihoods Mission
            Aajeevika
            Restructuring of SGSY
SGSY restructured as NRLM for the following
 reasons
Shortcomings experienced during implementation
 of SGSY
Large scale initiatives of some states – A.P, Kerala,
 Bihar, TN and experiences of N.G.Os
Steering Committee constituted by the Planning
 Commission for the 11th Plan – 2007
Recommendations of Prof. Radhakrishna
 Committee
        Key lessons from Experiences

Even the poorest family can come out of abject
poverty , in 6 - 8 years provided:

• They are organized, build and nurture own
  institutions, and, provided continuous
  handholding support
• able to access thrift and credit in repeat doses,
  for meeting varied priority requirements.
• External finance of Rs. 1.0 lakh per family
  required
                                                 3
                     NRLM

Goal:
   Poverty elimination through social mobilization,
   institution building, financial inclusion and a
   portfolio of sustainable livelihoods.

VISION:
   Each poor family should have annual income of
   at least Rs.50,000 per annum

Task:
   To reach out to 7.0 crore rural poor households
   and stay engaged with them till they come out
   of abject poverty
                                                      4
        N.R.L.M - SOCIAL MOBILISATION

Organising the poor, Inclusion of the poorest,
Institutions of poor and their social capital
 drive all project initiatives
Scaling up by community best practitioners
Dedicated, professional, sensitive and
 accountable support structure to initiate the
 process
Process intensive – hence phased approach
                                                  5
             N.R.L.M - financial inclusion

Financial inclusion at affordable cost holds the key

•   Access to credit key to coming out of poverty.

•   A minimum of Rs.1 lakh per family required, in
    several doses over a period of 5 – 6 years. Of
    this 90% has to come from financial
    institutions.
•   This is the biggest constraint – as bank linkages
    not happening in most of the states
     Strengthening Existing Livelihoods

   Critical livelihoods are: agriculture, livestock, forestry and
    non-timber forest produce

   Promote institutions around livelihoods

   M.K.S.P – special projects

   Promote end-to-end solutions, covering the entire value
    chain

   Key – knowledge dissemination. Development of
    community professionals in a large number
         Skill Development and Placement
• Short-term placement linked, market driven training for 6 to
  12 weeks to rural poor youth between the age of 18-35

• Implemented through private companies or NGOs. They are
  responsible for: skilling, placement, and post-placement
  tracking ( 1 – year)

• Up-scaling Skill development and placement through public-
  private partnerships – 1.0 crore youth over a period of 7 years
• Special initiatives for J&K, IAP Districts (78), Minority
  concentrated districts and North East

• Challenges – state missions need to gear up, and, at
  Ministry level – reforms in appraisal, monitoring
   Rural Self Employment Training Institutes
• 526 RSETIs have started functioning
• Each RSETI will train 750 youth / year and
  enable them to start their enterprises
• RSETIs graded, based on multiple criteria (
  state wise lists distributed to State RD
  Secretaries)
• MoU with N.A.R for capacity building

• Challenges: quality of RSETIs, linkages with
  D.R.D.A s, credit linkages for trainees
 Transition from SGSY to NRLM
Basic requirement for states:
• Setting up of a State Society or using an existing
  society

• Appointment of a full time CEO

• Recruitment of professionals at SPMU and approval
  for recruitment in the first phase districts/blocks

• Preparation of AAP/SPIP
               Progress -NRLM
Approval for rolling out of NRLM – 26 states/UT
  All States, except J&K, Arunachal Pradesh, Goa,
  Daman and Diu, Andman and Nickobar Island,
  Laksdweep and Dadra & Nagar Haveli
• Appointment of fulltime Mission Director- 16
  States
  (Andhra Pradesh, Assam, Tamil Nadu, Kerala,
  Karnataka, Bihar, Jharkhand, MP, Gujarat,
  Maharashtra, Chhattisgarh, Odisha, Rajasthan,
  Tripura, Mizoram, Puducherry)
                 Progress- NRLM
• Recruitment of SMMU core team -13 States
  (AP, Bihar, TN, Odisha, Kerala, Assam, Jharkhand, MP ,
  Maharashtra, Chhattisgarh, Rajasthan, Gujarat, Tripura)
• Preparation and submission of AAP -23 states
  (J&K, Punjab, Haryana, Rajasthan, Bihar, Odisha, MP,
  Jharkhand, Chhattisgarh, Gujarat, Maharashtra, Kerala, TN,
  AP, Assam, Sikkim, Arunachal Pradesh, Mizoram, Tripura,
  Meghalaya, Nagaland, HP, Pudducherry)
• Approval of AAP-10 States
  (AP, Bihar, TN, Odisha, Kerala, Assam, Jharkhand, ,
  Maharashtra, Chhattisgarh, MP)
        Implementation of NRLM
For implementation of NRLM two approaches will
   be followed
(i)Intensive approach in selected blocks/districts
(ii)Non- Intensive approach in remaining
   blocks/districts
• The implementation will be in phases
• After 8 years all the blocks will be under
   intensive approach
          Phasing strategy under NRLM
             Year         Districts                         Blocks


Phase I      1-2    150                               600


Phase II     3-4    150                               1500


Phase III    5-6    300 + ( all balance districts)    2100


Phase IV     7-8    ( all districts would have been   1800 + ( all balance
                    covered by phase III)             blocks)
                Intensive approach
What is intensive block?
• NRLM implementation in an intensified manner
• Dedicated 5 – 6 project staff
• Support system at District & State level with a team of domain
  experts
• Entitlement of Rs.300 lakh Community Investment Support per
  Block
• Saturation approach
   – 100% coverage of poor into S.H.G s
   – External C.R.P s for inducing the process
   – Creation of large pool of social capital
   – Food security, social security
   – Inclusion of most vulnerable
    Expected Outcomes of Intensive Block
•   All poor and poorest are covered under SHGs
•   All SHGs switch over to ‘panchasutras’
•   All SHGs are federated at Village level
•   Availability of Trained social capital
•   Cadre of para professionals functioning as part of internal
    sensitive support system
•   Self managed institutions of Poor at village, cluster/block
    level
•   Poor HHs access multiple doses of investments
•   Creation of sustainable livelihoods
•   Enhancement of HH level incomes
•   Internal C.R.P s
    Non- Intensive blocks - approach
•   Lean project staff at Block and district level
•   Focus on few activities in the block
•   Improving the quality of S.H.G s
•   Effective utilization of Revolving fund,
•   Promoting Bank linkages
 Capacity building in non-intensive blocks


SRLM hires a resource N.G.O, or, SIRD
In turn N.G.O/ SIRD hires 15 – 20 State resource
persons, and guides D.R.D.A s
Each DRDA hires a resource N.G.O or 5 DRPs,
SRLM trains the DRPs
In each district 1 block is adopted initially for
intensive capacity building
    Flow of Activities in the Non-Intensive blocks

• Block divided into 4 clusters, and a 4 – 5 member team
  of E.Os or N.G.O resource persons
• Block team trained by the SRPs in social mobilization,
  institution building and C.R.P strategy
• This team and the resource N.G.O identify internal
  Community Resource Persons (C.R.Ps) and Capacity
  building resource professionals (CBRPs), within the
  block or within the district
• C.R.P teams and the CBRPs are given intensive training
  by DRPs- 4 weeks training for CBRPs and about 2 weeks
  training for CRPs
    Flow of Activities in the Non-Intensive blocks

• Work starts in the block - C.R.P team spends 15 days in
  a village. The CBRP also stays in the village and follow
  up the work of CRP
• The C.R.P strategy is implemented for 2 years without
  interruption – by which team all the villages would
  have been covered.
• PRI reps, Bank managers, youth also get
  trained/exposed to best practices
• Bank mitra strategy introduced for effective bank
  linkages
• In each village, S.H.G book keepers are identified and
  trained by the CBRPs
   Flow of Activities in the Non-Intensive blocks

• A forum of S.H.G s is formed and sub-committee
  system (bank linkage) is also introduced for
  working on SHG Bank linkages
• Community Based Recovery Mechanism
  (C.B.R.M) is operationalized
• Focus will be on building good quality S.H.G s and
  fostering S.H.G – bank linkages
• The district team will run several campaigns in
  this block for sensitizing the S.H.Gs to various
  social issues and building their capacities around
  livelihoods
    Non-intensive blocks - Activities during
              Expansion Phase
• After 6 months of commencement of work in
  the 1st block, another 3 blocks are selected
  and the same process is repeated
• After 6 months, the balance blocks in the
  district are covered
• This will ensure that all S.H.G s in the district
  are trained and they are able to access bank
  loans without much trouble
    Non-intensive blocks - Financial
              inclusion
• Build relationship with Banks
• Give banks annual S.H.G – bank linkage targets
• Provide assurance to them on repayment
• Continuous training and orientation of
  bankers
• Take ex-bankers as ‘Relationship managers’
    Livelihoods and other initiatives
• Each district to identify its best livelihoods
  initiatives on ground working for more than 3
  years – N.G.Os and C.B.Os
• Prepare a project for consolidation, deepening
  and horizontal expansion ( a 3 – 5 year plan)
• Sustainability plan to be an integral part of the
  project
• Empanel livelihoods resource organizations to
  help districts. Plans appraised at state level, with
  the help of experts and sanctioned
   Micro enterprise development


• RSETIs – unique opportunity to train and
  nurture micro enterprises
• Take the support of EDI and other
  organizations working on micro enterprises
           Skills and placement
• Effective monitoring of ongoing skills and
  placement projects
• Identify one A.P.O exclusively for skills and
  placement

• Youth counselling – one block as resource
  centre

• Post placement monitoring
              Success Stories
CMSA- Andhra Pradesh

Convergence under NRLM/SGSY- Wayanad,
  Kerala

Bank mitra – Bihar and A.P

SHG Net working – West Bengal
     Community Managed Sustainable
        Agriculture (CMSA)-SERP
• CMSA is meant to support poor farmers to
  adopt sustainable agriculture practices
• It reduces costs of cultivation and increase net
  incomes to improve and sustain agriculture
  based livelihoods
• 28 lakh Acres during Khariff 2011-12 were
  under CMSA benefitting 11.79 lakh farmers in
  8556 villages in 553 mandals of 22 districts
CMSA- AGRICULTURE AS VIABLE LIVELIHOODS
 Community managed sustainable agriculture
  holds immense promise
 A family can secure additional annual incomes
  of Rs.50,000 with 0.5 – 1.0 acre of land ( 0.25 to
  0.50 acre irrigated + 0.50 to 0.75 acre rainfed
  lands )
 Natural farming, multi layer, poly crop models
  for food security and sustainable livelihoods
 Convergence with MG NREGS to improve soil
  and moisture conservation, and, soil fertility
  Historical Backdrop of the Initiation Wayanad
• The District faced agrarian crisis due to severe drought
  experienced 2001-2004
  – Fall in the price of Plantation crops – Coffee, Cardamom,
    Pepper.
  – Fall in agricultural Productivity
  • 83% of People Depends Agriculture for livelihood.
  • Alternative income generation schemes envisaged
    under SGSY and enquire the possibilities of convergence
    with other development schemes


                                                          30
• Ponds constructed under MGNREGA spending an
  amount of Rs.3 Lakhs
• Employment was given to 45 ST wage seekers while
  digging the pond
• Pisciculture Unit at Panamaram Grama Panchayath in
  Mananthavady Block Panchayath
• A Self Help Group-Athira SHG-was formed consisting
  10 members
• In one Pond fingerlings are reared and in another
  pond fishes are reared.
• The main source of income is selling fingerlings-
• Co-operative Bank Panamaram sanctioned
  Rs.1 Lakh as loan and Rs.1 lakh as subsidy
  under SGSY.
• In one pond fingerlings are reared and in
  another pond fishes are reared.
• The unit is making Rs.35000/- every month
  They are regularly repaying bank loan.
    Convergence with the Nutrition Programme of
            Social Welfare Department
• A Nutrimix Making Unit was formed at Vellamunda
  Panchayath to produce packed nutrition food
• An Agreement with Director, Social Welfare Department
  to purchase all the finished products to supply Anganvadi
  Children.
• Bank , sanctioned a loan amount of Rs.6,90,000/- and
  Rs.11000/- has been sanctioned as subsidy
• 11 Members are working in the unit and 3 of them
  belongs to Minority Communities
• On an average they earn Rs.64,000/- as income per
  month
They have an assured market since Social Welfare department
             will purchase all the final products
• In Service Sector, Auto Rickshaws given to 8
  women drivers in Edavaka Gram Panchayath.
• Out of the 8, 5 members belongs to Minority
  communiteis
• Given training in Driving with the help of AMRIT-
  (Ambedkar Memorial Rural Institute for Training)
  a Tribal Co-operative Society
• Rs. 11,29,600/- as loan and Rs.80,000/- as
  subsidy given
• Each member earn Rs.500/-per day as income.
             Bank Mitra Scheme
• Bank Mitras are community members, positioned as
  customer relationship managers in rural bank branches
• Bank Mitras are provided space and computers in the
  bank branches and trained managing documentation for
  opening accounts loan applications etc.
• Bank Mitras support rural SHG women in banking
  transactions and they are also an asset for the under
  staffed rural branches.
• It improves quality of banking services for the rural
  poor
• The scheme is successfully implemented in AP & Bihar
      Networking of SHGs- West Bengal
                 Initiative
• Objective- Strengthening of SHG movement,
  providing benefits of various programme,
  empowerment of rural poor
• Four tiers of SHG based institutions
  –   Starts from SHG
  –   Up – Sangha at Gram Sansad ( VO)
  –   Sangha at GP level
  –   Mahasangha at Block level
                Achievements
• 10 block level federations running MFI/CFI for
  providing credit to SHGs

• 4 BLF & 4 GP level federations manufacturing
  sanitary napkins to be supplied under NRHM

• BLF & GPLF cooking midday meal in schools
  supply to ICDS, supply of cooked diet to rural
  hospitals

								
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