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Painted Ceremonies

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					Painted Ceremonies
Used by Our Akela
These advancement ceremonies have been used at our pack meetings and the boys love them (parents, too!)

Painted Ceremonies
HISTORY: I came across these ceremonies in an old Pow-Wow book. It states that these originated in Pack 6 from the Mt. Baker Area Council. Pack 19 of the same council added to the original ceremonies and these are reflected here. The boys love the painting and this encourages them to complete the work on their rank so that they may be painted at the next pack meeting. Their parents also make sure that they are at the pack meetings to see their boys become painted Bobcats, Wolves, Bears, and Webelos. VARIATIONS: Ceremonies are not written in stone and you are encouraged to use your imagination and the theme of the month to vary them. I also made a Sioux headdress and capote coat to wear over my uniform to add to the dramatics. My Assistant Cubmaster is currently working on his Medicine Man's outfit to further add to the effects. It's great seeing their eyes (parents, too) as the room goes dim and the drum (played by a different Cub Scout each meeting) is beat softly in the background during these ceremonies. MATERIALS NEEDED: I'e tried a variety of paints and found that the soap-based paint sticks found in costume shops are the easiest and cleanest to work with. These are paints coated on tongue depressor-sized sticks and are water soluable. I have heard of another pack using colored frosting which their boys just love.      Painted Tiger Cub Graduation Ceremony Painted Bobcat Ceremony Painted Wolf Ceremony Painted Bear Ceremony Painted Webelos Ceremony

Painted Tiger Cub Graduation Ceremony
CHARACTERS: AKELA - Cubmaster BALOO - Assistant Cubmaster BAGHEERA - Tiger Cub Group Coach DRUMMER - A Cub Scout Assistant MATERIAL: Orange paint, Cub Scout Shirts, Yellow Neckerchief (already rolled), Neckerchief Slide (Drummer begins slow, rhythmic beat.) AKELA: Would the following Tiger Cubs and their parents please come forward. (BAGHEERA reads the names of the Tiger Cubs. They assemble in a line with the Tiger Cub in front, parents behind holding the boys' Cub Scout shirts.) AKELA: For the past several months, you and your family have explored new and exciting things and places. You have taken each part of the Tiger Cub Motto: Search, Discover, Share, and have used it in your home, school, and neighborhood. You and your adult partner have searched out, in your home and community, new activities which have shown you how people work together and have fun together. (With orange paint, BALOO draws foot prints on right cheek.) AKELA: You and your adult partner have discovered that by doing things together with friends and family, you feel a sense of being a part of the family, community, and country. (With orange paint, BALOO draws an open hand on the left cheek.) AKELA: The things you have searched out and shared with your family, friends, and fellow Tiger Cubs, which let them learn about you and the things you saw and did. Now it is time to move along the Scouting Trail. In Cub Scouting, your family is important, just as it is throughout your whole Scouting experience. Support in earning each badge comes from your family as well as from your den leader. Your parents will help you each step along the way. On behalf of our pack, I would like to welcome you into the next step of Scouting with your Cub Scout uniform shirt and the Cub Scout neckerchief.

(Parents put shirt on Tiger Cubs, over their Tiger Cub T-shirts. BAGHERRA places the neckerchief around each Scout's neck and ties it with the neckerchief slide.) (AKELA, BALOO, and BAGHEERA then shakes each Tiger Cub's and his parent's hand.)

Painted Bobcat Ceremony
CHARACTERS: AKELA - Cubmaster BALOO - Assistant Cubmaster DRUMMER - A Cub Scout assistant MATERIALS: Blue, yellow, white, red, and green paints, Bobcat badges and certificates, safety pins, parent's pins (Drummer begins slow, rhythmic beat.) AKELA: Tonight our pack has some Scouts who have worked hard since joining Cub Scouts. Will the following Scouts and their parents please come forward to take on the colors and spirit of Scouting. (BALOO reads the names of the Bobcat candidates. They assemble in a line with the Scout in front and parents behind.) (While AKELA recites the following, BALOO paints a blue paw on each Scout's forehead.) AKELA: Blue is from the sky. The paw print of the bobcat on your forehead is the spirit of the bobcat. This reminds you to Do Your Best on the Cub Scout trail. (BALOO then paints yellow under both eyes of each Cub Scout.) AKELA: Yellow is from the sun. The marks under your eyes will help you see the light of the Cub Scout trail. They also symbolize the bright spirit of Cub Scouting. (BALOO then paints a white line on each Scout's nose.) AKELA: White is for purity. The mark on your nose helps you know right from wrong as you go along the Cub Scout trail. (BALOO paints a red zig-zag on each Scout's chin.)

AKELA: Red is for courage. The mark on your chin reminds you to always speak the truth. (BALOO paints green triangles on both cheeks). AKELA: Green stands for the spirit of nature. The marks on each cheek will guide you to live in harmony with the great outdoors. Remember your markings of this night, new Cub Scouts, and have fun along the Cub Scout trail. Parents, please repeat the Parents' Pledge after me to remind you of your responsibility to your Scout as he finds his way along the Cub Scout trail. AKELA and PARENTS: I promise to do my best, to help my son be a good Cub Scout, to encourage him to fulfill the Cub Scout Promise and obey the Law of the Pack. I promise to assist him in his Cub Scout achievements and electives, to cooperate with his Den Leader, Cubmaster and Pack Committee Members, and participate actively in the Cub Scout Program. (BALOO presents the Bobcat Badges to the parents, who pin the badges, upside down, onto the boys' uniforms; and presents the parent's pin to the Scouts who pin their parent.) AKELA: Parents, when your new Bobcat does his first Good Turn, you may sew his badge onto his uniform right side up. (AKELA and BALOO then shakes each Scout's and each parent's hand.)

Painted Wolf Ceremony
CHARACTERS: AKELA - Cubmaster BALOO - Assistant Cubmaster DRUMMER - A Cub Scout assistant MATERIAL: Black paint, Wolf badges and certificates, safety pins, parent's pins (Drummer begins slow, rhythmic beat.)

AKELA: When a boy joins our Cub Scout pack, he earns the badge of the Bobcat and starts on an upward trail. This trail will lead him through the footsteps of of the wolf, the bear, and the webelos brave, and on his way to the highest honor of Cub Scouting, the Arrow of Light. Tonight, we honor those Scouts who have made a significant advancement along this journey. Would the following Scouts and their parents please come forward. (BALOO reads the names of the Wolf candidates. They assemble in a line with the Scout in front and parents behind.) AKELA: Do you seek to wear the sign of the Wolf? If you do, please say "yes." CUBS: Yes. AKELA: Please recite with me, the Cub Scout Promise: AKELA and CUBS: I promise to do my best, to do my duty to God and my country, to help other people and to obey the Law of the Pack. AKELA: I can see by your knowledge of the Cub Scout Promise and the achievements that you have completed, that you have worked hard along with your parents. These achievements are very important as they have helped you gain a deeper appreciation of manu things. You are now ready to wear the sign of the Wolf Cub. The first toe of the wolf paw is for your growth through feats of skill and having fun with your family. (BALOO draws a wolf toe on each Scout's forehead while AKELA is speaking.) AKELA: The second toe of the wolf paw represents what you have learned about your home, community, and country as well as your religious beliefs. (BALOO draws a second wolf toe on each Scout's forehead while AKELA is speaking.) AKELA: The third toe of the wolf paw stands for the skills you have gained in handling tools, tying things, using books, and making collections. (BALOO draws a third wolf toe on each Scouts's forehead while AKELA is speaking.) AKELA: The fourth toe of the wolf represents your new appreciation for conservation as well as safety in home and traffic. (BALOO draws a fourth wolf toe on each Scouts's forehead while AKELA is speaking.)

AKELA: The pad of the wolf paw represents your growth as a Cub Scout, and the increased responsibility you are now capable of handling. (BALOO draws the wolf pad on each Scouts's forehead while AKELA is speaking.) AKELA: Wolf Cubs, remember the inscription of this paw. It shows you are ready to move along the upward trail of Scouting. (BALOO presents the Wolf Badges to the parents, who pin the badges onto the boys' uniforms; and presents the parent's pin to the Scouts who pin their parent.) AKELA: Congratulations to you and your family on arriving on this part of the Cub Scout trail. (AKELA and BALOO then shakes each Scout's and each parent's hand.)

Painted Bear Ceremony
CHARACTERS: AKELA - Cubmaster BALOO - Assistant Cubmaster DRUMMER - A Cub Scout assistant MATERIALS: Brown paint, Bear badges and certificates, safety pins, parent's pins (Drummer begins slow, rhythmic beat.) AKELA: Tonight we are honoring some Cub Scouts who have reached a new rank. They have worked hard to take on the sign of the bear. Will the following Scouts and their parents please come forward. (BALOO reads the names of the Bear candidates. They assemble in a line with the Scout in front and parents behind.) AKELA: You are all well onto the Cub Scout trail to reach the honor of the Arrow of Light in Cub Scouting, and eventually, start the Boy Scout trail to seek the sign of the Eagle. To help you continue on your journey, we will now inscribe you with the sign of the bear.

(While AKELA recites the following, BALOO paints two round eyes on each Scout's forehead, above his eyes.) AKELA: To help you see along this trail, I am giving you the eyes of the bear. When the achievements become hard, these eyes will guide you over the rough spots. (BALOO then paints a line down each Scout's nose.) AKELA: The nose of the bear. Imagine for a minute with me. Let us walk in the forest. Smell the fresh air, the dirt, the trees. Smell the smoke from the campfire, dinner cooking outside. All these new adventures are waiting for you in the final part of your Cub Scout trail and along the Boy Scout trail towards Eagle. (BALOO then paints rounded bear ears on the cheeks of each Scout.) AKELA: The ears of the bear. Others may try to mislead you and cause you to stray from the trail. Do not hear them. Listen only to the call of the Eagle. (BALOO paints a curved mouth on each Scout's chin.) AKELA: The mouth of the bear. Bears know good from bad and so do you by now. The Cub Scout Promise has taught you to do your duty to God, and to your country, and to others. (BALOO paints green triangles on both cheeks). AKELA: The trail is getting steeper and harder. Not everyone will finish. Follow this guideline so no harm will come to you along the trail. (BALOO presents the Bear badges to each Scout's parent and the parent pin to the Scout. The parent pins the Bear badge onto the Scout's uniform shirt, and the Scout, in turn, pins the parent pin onto his parent's shirt.) AKELA: Congratulations to you and your family for your hard work. (AKELA and BALOO then shakes each Scout's and each parent's hand.)

Painted Webelos Ceremony
CHARACTERS: AKELA - Cubmaster BALOO - Assistant Cubmaster DRUMMER - A Cub Scout assistant

MATERIALS: Blue, yellow, green, and red paint, Webelos badges and certificates, safety pins, parent's pins (Drummer begins slow, rhythmic beat.) AKELA: Webelos stands for "We'll Be Loyal Scouts." Will the following Scouts and their parents please come forward. (BALOO reads the names of the Webelos candidates. They assemble in a line with the Scout in front and parents behind.) AKELA: The sign of the Webelos Scoute signifies a major step on the Cub Scout trail on your way to the Arrow of Light and onto the Boy Scout trail to Eagle. Just as Indian boys became warriors and were painted in the colors of their tribe, we will paint you with the colors of Scouting. (While AKELA recites the following, BALOO paints a round blue dot in the upper middle - along the hairline - of each Scout's forehead.) AKELA: The first blue dot represents the three activity badges you have earned as an active member of your Webelos den. (BALOO then paints a second blue dot to the left of the first dot.) AKELA: The second blue dot stands for your understanding of the Webelos badge and the Webelos uniform. (BALOO then paints a third blue dot to the right of the first dot.) AKELA: The third blue dot shows that you understand and intend to live by the Boy Scout Oath, Law, Motto, and Slogan. (BALOO paints a fourth blue dot below and between the first and second blue dots.) AKELA: The fourth blue dot shows that you know the Boy Scout Salute, Sign, Handclasp, and when to use them. (BALOO paints a fifth blue dot below and between the first and third blue dots.) AKELA: The fifth blue dot represents your agreement to follow the Outdoor Code. These five dots will now be connected by two "V's." (BALOO connects the first, second and fourth blue dots.)

AKELA: The first "V" stands for the flag ceremony that you have led. (BALOO connects the first, third and fifth blue dots. They should form a "W.") AKELA: The second "V" represents the practice of your religious faith. The letter that has been formed is a "W," symbolic of the total effort you have made to attain your Webelos badge. The Webelos colors are gold, green, and red. These colors represent the entire Scouting program. (BALOO draws a yellow line on each of the Scout's cheeks, from sideburns to just short of the nose.) AKELA: Gold represents the pack. Gold is the color of the sun and will light your way along the Scouting Trail. (BALOO draws green lines under the yellow lines.) AKELA: Green represents the Boy Scout Troop that you will shortly join. Green stands for the tree so that you may stand tall on the Scouting Trail. (BALOO draws red lines under the green lines.) AKELA: Red represents the Explorer Post. Red stands for fire so that you may have a burning desire to explore new areas. (BALOO presents the Webelos badges to each Scout's parent and the parent pin to the Scout. The parent pins the Webelos badge on the Scout's uniform shirt, and the Scout, in turn, pins the parent pin onto his parent's shirt.) AKELA: Wear your Webelos badge proudly while you are continuing to work toward your Arrow of Light. (AKELA and BALOO then shakes each Scout's and each parent's hand.)


				
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