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COMPOSTING AS A TOOL TO MANAGE AQAUTIC WEEDS

VIEWS: 29 PAGES: 24

various presentations on use of human excreta for biogas production and co-composting

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									 COMPOSTING AS A TOOL TO
MANAGE AQUATIC WEEDS IN THE
LOWER VOLTA BASIN IN GHANA

        DR. TED YEMOH ANNANG
   INSTITUTE FOR ENVIRONMENT AND
  SANITATION STUDIES, UNIVERSITY OF
             GHANA, LEGON.
THE AQUATIC VEGETATION SITUATION IN THE LOWER
VOLTA BASIN IS DUE TO FLOW REGIME CHANGE
RESULTING FROM DAMMING.

Out of the management / control options available ,manual / mechanical
removal was most suitable and therefore adopted.
HARVESTING AQUATIC PLANTS TO ALLOW FOR OTHER
USES OF THE AQUATIC RESOURCE
Community participation in reducing vegetation level to
allow for other uses of the water like fishing, boat
landing and even access to potable water.
Harvesting aquatic weeds
Community members engaged in harvesting plants that
have assumed nuisance levels.
VALUE ADDITION TO HARVESTED PLANTS TO BENEFITS
THE COMMUNITY. COMPOSTING TO THE RESCUE
The harvested plants are being prepared for
composting.
                INPUTS
• Brown: Dried Harvested plants (2
  weeks)
• Green : Freshly Harvested plants

• Manure: Chicken droppings/cow dung
• Wood ash (Obtained from the
  community)
                       Preparation
2 methods are employed: Pile and the Windrows
• The order of pile formation is as follows:
• a. Brown as base
• b. Green layer
• c. Manure
• d. Wood ash
• e. water
 For every layer in the pile, B: G ratio is 2:1
A pile is 4 – 5 layers ( 1.5 m high). A pile is then covered with a
   polythene sheet perforated at various points to conserve moisture,
   retain heat and aerate. A stick is used as Temperature probe.
                 Preparation
• The windrows type is also employed at time
  depending on availability of labour.
• Turning is done after every 21 days 3 times.
• Generally decomposition is completed by the 63rd
  but allows 21 days for curing/maturation. This is
  indicated by a lower temperature. Product is then
  spread to cool and ready for use.
• It is ensured that at any point in time the pile is
  moist. If not water is added during every turning
  session
Composting in progress
In this process other “waste” materials like chicken
droppings or other animal faecal matter, wood ash and
or saw dust serving as sources of nutrients are added to
enhance quality.
Harvested plants undergoing decomposition
Adding water to partially decomposed plant material
There is an added advantage here as harvested plants
contained lots of water.
Compost set up covered to complete the process.
Community members engaged in a discussion with a
resource person on the benefits of the process to their
livelihood.
Compost preparation
Turning compost heap after some time (21 days) to
enhance the decomposition process.
Plant material covered to enhance complete
decomposition
Plants of various types put together to bring different
properties including bulkiness to the finished product.
Compost from harvested aquatic plants ready for use.
Compost is ready to be used either in backyard /home
gardens or farms in the community or otherwise.
Compost is ready.
Compost bagged ready to be used
Compost from Harvested Aquatic plants for the Market
Bags of compost from aquatic plants ready for
application to enhance soil quality and improve
livelihood.
Compost from harvested aquatic plants in storage
THANK YOU!

								
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