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Extensions - Woodward School for Technology and Research

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					             Extensions for WSTaR Magnet Lessons
                          (refer to lessons in each magnet unit)


1st Grade Extensions

Unit 1
Lesson 1

Take students to the garden, playground, or down the KRVT trail and have them choose
3 different objects. Draw a picture of each object. Return to class and think about how
that object would be described. Label the characteristics of your object – have students
get into groups and share their objects and observations.

Have students describe shapes with their bodies. Show flat with your body. Show round.
Show crooked. This can be done outside. This should be playful, fun and easy to
remember.

Read Caps for Sale by Esphyr Slobodkina

Lesson 2

Take a walking tour of the school inside or outside – let students explore and search for
an object to make their own bag of objects for their blind fold activity. Have them
describe their objects and record their descriptions. Repeat the lesson activity with the
student objects – have each participant describe the objects before they see what it really
is. Compare the descriptions of the finder to the blindfolded participant descriptions.
How different are the descriptions? Why are they different?

The Missing Piece by Shel Silverstein would be a good book to go with this. Have
students draw a picture of the piece that should fit into the missing piece before they see
the actual piece.

Lesson 3, 4, 5

Use recyclable materials from the cafeteria to make a creature or a mascot for your
recycling efforts at the school. Include pictures of your creature in your posters. Let kids
brainstorm and plan what can be made. They will use the observable characteristics to
decide what works best for each part of the creature. Each class can make more than one
creature if you choose. Have students imagine and share what the creature sounds like
and smells like. How do you think the creature moves? Use descriptive words to share
ideas.
“Frog Belly Rat Bone” Is a good book about garden trash and cleaning it up so seeds can
grow. There is a trash-made creature in the book that comes to life.
Lesson 6
Invite in a neighborhood member or members to be an audience for students to share
their knowledge with. See if they will bring in a full recycling bin from home. Let the
students’ rate or grade them on their sorting skills. (Guest can be prompted ahead of time
to mess some things up.)

Take students on a walking field trip around the neighborhood on recycling day to count
how many people have recycling bins. Discuss if this is a lot or a little. Include this
information in the Stuart Newsletter.

Lesson 7

Have students share their book with a kindergarten class. They could also share with
neighborhood members or community members. Contact a local grocery store to see if
students can display their work (poster, stories, etc.) in the store for the community to
see.

Lesson 8

Take students outside after a rainy day and have them find places where rain has fallen.
Have them draw pictures of what shape this puddle or pond or storm water stream will be
if the temperature drops to freezing.

Freeze water in containers that have wide mouths and ones that have small mouths.
Challenge the students to predict how they will get the water out of the container after it
is frozen. See if they think about the water being stuck.

Lesson 9

Go fishing! Lay out many note cards on a large mat or the floor. Put magnets on the
bottom of some of them but not in others. Make sure all the note cards are numbered.
Have students go fishing and record which numbers they catch. After everyone is done
fishing have all students share what numbers they caught. Discuss why they all caught
the same numbers. Why is it no one caught number ____?


2nd Grade Extensions

Unit 1
Lesson 1
Have a potluck meal as a class. Divide students up into groups and have each group
come up with a dish for the class. Students will make a dish with scrap paper ingredients
that they color and cut up. Have students serve each other their dishes divided up into
proper serving sizes. Each group can be assigned a food group
Lesson 2
A visit to the grocery store would be appropriate for all of the lessons in this Unit. It may
work well to do the first 4 lessons and then go on a walking field trip. Prepare a
scavenger hunt type worksheet before-hand that asks students to look for all of the
information they have learned about so far at the grocery store. Check out lesson 3 field
trip ideas.

Lesson 3
Walk to the Peoples Food Co-op located on Harrison St., Walk to the Park Street Market.
Have students pick up 5 things that jump out at them. Record the sugar and protein
content in each one being careful to write down what product it is. When back in the
classroom compare and graph the data collected.

Lesson 4
Walk to the Park Street Market and record how many produce items are from Michigan.

Make a nutrition chart to hang in the cafeteria that shows vitamins and minerals found in
Michigan Foods.

Lesson 5
Invite a nutritionist from Bronson to come and talk to the class about fat, sugar and fiber.
http://www.bronsonhealth.com/MedicalServices/ChildrensHealth/page929 - School
out reach program.

Lesson 6
Take a Cafeteria lunch and have students research how many calories might be in their
lunch for the day. Ask the students to evaluate the health of the lunches served at
Woodward.

Do a group experiment. Exercise every morning at the beginning of class. Go outside on
the track – do stretches, stand in place exercises in the classroom, whatever works for
your students. Do this for one week. Ask kids to journal about how they feel after about
2 hours after exercise. Then spend the next week not exercising at all during class time.
Have the student’s journal about how they feel 2 hours into the day with no exercise.
When the experiment is over have students discuss their results. What did you find?

Laura Sprague will come and do a kids exercise lesson with the class. She is a Pilates
instructor, KPS mom, and very strongly focused on healthy bodies and body image. She
will do a class exercise visit in dance party form. spraguesnake@yahoo.com

http://www.learntobehealthy.org/parents-teachers/educational-materials/nutrition/
provides on-line activities and games concerning nutrition and being healthy.

Invite someone in from Gazelle Sports store running team to talk about his or her
experiences with running. Why run? How does it make them feel? Why is exercise
important to them? What is a runner’s diet like?
At the end of this Unit – Cook a healthy meal and share it. See if each student can
bring/donate an ingredient from home. Cook together and eat together.

Lesson 7, 8, 9
Present student work to community members. Connect with Bronson or Borgess to see if
student posters can be hung in the halls. Connect with local grocery stores (the People’s
Food Co-Op) to see if posters can be hung there.

Speakers
Cassandra Bey-Woodsen. Local caterer and KPS parent. May come and run a short
lesson on cooking, measuring, and portion size. She may cook a meal with the students.
(269) 598-9535
Hether Frayer – Local Fresh Food Fairy will come in costume to play with kids and talk
about the importance of fresh food. hether.jf@gmail.com

http://www.bronsonhealth.com/MedicalServices/ChildrensHealth/page929 - School
out reach program.

In School Resources
Use the science lab kitchen-
Provide the foods for a well-balanced, healthy meal so students can create their own
healthy meal.

Unit 2
Lesson 1
Have students write or draw stories of the water found around their homes to share with
the class. They can draw their house then make a picture map around it describing the
streams, lakes, puddles, storm water, and rivers that they have seen or visited near their
homes. Is there a lot of water near you or a little?
Take a field trip to the cafeteria and see if you can identify surface water in the city of
Kalamazoo map.


2nd grade
http://www.kalamazoocity.org/portal/water.php
Kalamazoo “protect your water” website.


Lesson 2

Take a walking field trip to Arcadia Creek. It crosses at Woodward and W. Main. Have
students mark the water level of the creek on a meter stick. Write observations of the
creek and its surroundings. Visit again one or more times to mark the water level and
observe its changes. The changes are part of the water cycle. Ask students to talk about
why and how the water levels change from day to day and week to week. Students can
take their water wheels with them to guide them with the discussion about the creek.

Lesson 3

Set up an experiment to track how much water your class uses a certain day or week.
(Ex. How many gallons are used when the toilet is flushed? How many times in a day
does your class flush the toilet? How much water is does this add up to in a day, in a
week, in a month, in a year?) Share the Woodward Water Book with the class created by
2nd graders and others in the 2008/2009 school year.

Lesson 4

http://waterstories.tulikabooks.com/
Choose different water stories from this website. Read various water stories from around
the world in groups, as a class, or individually. Have students identify and label different
parts of the water cycle from their stories. (Ex. In this story it is raining – precipitation.
In that story water is being gathered from a stream. In the same story the water empties
from a stream into a basin.) Have kids write a sentence describing each piece of the cycle
they can find in the story. Share with the class.

Lesson 5
Lesson 4 extension would fit well here as well – adding in a component for human
impacts identified in the stories. Water stories can be found everywhere, the above
website is just one resource.
Take a walking field trip to the Kalamazoo River or Arcadia Creek. Observe the human
infrastructure around the river. How does it impact the river? What happens to water
that hits the pavement instead of natural ground? (Impervious and pervious surfaces).

Lesson 6

http://www.globalwaternetwork.org/projects
Stories of community water projects around the world.
http://www.globalwaternetwork.org/
This site provides an opportunity for students to read water stories from around the world
and submit their own story. Write a story about what water resources are like in your
school. Do you have clean water? How do get it? What are you doing to protect it?

Lesson 7

Take students back down to the cafeteria maps (or bring the maps to you) observe the
City of Kalamazoo Map. Look at what choices people have made about Kalamazoo and
what is along the river. Ask students what they think about people’s choices and if there
is anything they would change.
Ask Kalamazoo River Watershed Council Coordinator, Jeff Spoelstra in to discuss the
“Kalamazoo River Eras” history and uses. krwc@kalamazooriver.org
Lesson 8, 9

Invite the current Kalamazoo county drain commissioner in to visit. Share class stories
and posters with the commissioner and ask for feedback and have them talk about his/her
perspective on the most pressing issues.

Office of the Kalamazoo County Drain Commissioner (269) 384-8117
Patricia A.S. Crowley, PhD, Drain Commissioner pacrow@kalcounty.com
Jeffrey Van Belle, Assistant Drain Commissioner jdvanb@kalcounty.com
Zeña Vos, Administrative Assistant zsvoss@kalcounty.com

Speakers
See each lesson

In school Resources
Use the school pond for water experimentation. Measure water levels. Can water levels
change due to water cycle steps? (Precipitation and evaporation) Collect water and ask
students if they think it is healthy or not. What pollutants might get into it? How might
pollution get into this water? Is it an important water source for anything? Use the
“Pond Investigation Station” box from the garden rotations (in storage in closet next to
science lab in hallway).

Unit 3

Lesson 1
In lesson

Lesson 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9

Research different project ideas that would work towards protection of the watershed and
resources used by Woodward. This project would be different every year. You could
work with different community organizations on designing a project with them. This
could be used throughout the unit. Ideas include installing a rain barrel to catch water
from the roof that will water the garden. Expanding the Wildlife garden outside that will
decrease the amount of mowed lawn and increase the amount of deep-rooted plants that
help filter pollutants out of water. Use posters or stories or presentations to educate the
neighborhood. Hold a rain barrel design workshop to teach families how to use them.

Take students on a walking field trip to the Peoples Food Co-op interview the manager
and ask for a tour of the facilities to look at how they are having a smaller impact on
water.

Lesson 6, 7, 8, 9
In lesson

Lesson 9
Take students out to observe the signs made in prior years.


Unit 4
Lesson 1
 Contact the North side Community Association. Set up a visit to the garden by the
   Park Street Market.
 Have students create a large paper mache’ plant for the classroom. Get in groups and
   have each group create a part of the plant. They will be connected at the end. Use
   photos attached to each plant part to illustrate the purpose of that plant part. (Ex.
   Cover the roots with images of water. Cover the leaves with images of air and sun.
   Cover the stem with images of different building structures like bridges or
   scaffolding, and straws or pipes.)
 Take a walking field trip around the neighborhood. Observe, analyze and record
   observations of different types of leaves, stems, and seeds. Discuss why a plant may
   have bigger or smaller leaves, roots, stems or seeds. Talk about plants working
   together to find different ways of living in plant community – living off of the same
   resources. Compare it to the classroom community. How do you share resources and
   get resources in different ways at school?

Lesson 2

In lesson


Lesson 3

Have students brainstorm natural resources that are available by their homes. What needs
could they meet for themselves right by their homes if they had the skills? (Ex. Could
they plant a garden? Do they have the resources? Could they water themselves? Could
they shelter themselves if their house wasn’t there? Repeat this exercise at the end of
Unit 4. Is there an increase in ideas?

Lesson 4

Take the students to the wildlife garden by the play ground ask them to identify resources
there. Are there enough resources for animals to live? What animals? What is missing
that might support other animals (bird house, bird food, water for toads) have students
add something to the garden that would support more life. Lots of recycled materials
could be used for this activity.

Lesson 5

Make a toothpick forest of Oak trees. It takes a new oak tree 50 -70 years or more to
grow large enough to be “renewed” (replace a tree that has been cut down and be able to
be used again as a resource). Make a toothpick forest of bamboo. Bamboo takes 1-5
years to re-grow strong and big enough to use again. Create scenarios for students to
read describing uses of trees. (Ex. 1- 30 bamboo plants cut to install a wood floor. Ex 2-
3 oak trees cut to build kitchen cabinets for apartment complex). Then decide on a
number of minutes for bamboo and oak trees to replenish depending on how much time
you have for the activity. (Ex. 1 minute = 1 year so every 1-5 minutes 10 bamboo trees
are re-grown – added to your toothpick forest and every half an hour 10 oak trees are re-
grown. After a while of this activity, students should observe that if you use trees before
they can be re-grown you will run out. Which resource is more sustainable? This can
also be done with water.
Visit the Oak tree out side in the school yard (in the back of the play ground) have
student guess how old it is. How many houses, cupboards, pencils, floors or tables or
chairs could you make with that tree? Could Woodward grow another in your lifetime if
you cut it down?

Lesson 6

Take a school tour or a downtown tour and allow students to look in windows of shops or
classrooms taking note of things they find that are made of natural resources they can
identify. Have them brainstorm ways to create products in a way that conserves
resources.


Lesson 7

Show students a Google image of another natural area that has been developed. Show
different perspectives. Find old pictures of Kalamazoo before much of its development.
Look at before and after photos. What would our lives be like if Kalamazoo was not
developed? Is some of it necessary? Then show an area that just has shopping malls and
shops that don’t meet basic needs. What is the difference?


Lesson 8

http://illinois.sierraclub.org/calumet/past/index.html
A picture and description of what Chicago used to be like, what it is not and what people
are looking towards in the future.
Read this with your class.
On This Spot: An Expedition Back Through Time by Susan E. Goodman and Lee
Christiansen (Mar 30, 2004)

A look through time at the development of one of our biggest cities

Lesson 9
Look at the Kalamazoo City plan www.kalamazoocity.org take a walking tour of
one of the areas that is cited for development or redevelopment. Have students observe
what is there and talk about the benefits and/or consequences of this new development.
3rd grade extensions
Unit 1
Websites
http://www.eia.gov/kids/index.cfm

A resource for teachers with thorough information about all types of energy sources used
in the U.S. This site is very teacher and kid friendly

Beauforts scale – created to measure force of wind – still used today
http://www.rcn27.dial.pipex.com/cloudsrus/beaufort.html

Speakers
      Wind Energy: Tom Sutton and Greg Meeuwsen from the KVCC Wind
       Technician Academy
          o tsutton@KVCC.edu or gmeeuwsen@KVCC.edu
      Biodiesel: Sarah Hill from WMU Biodiesel can connect you with a speaker
          o Sarah.hill@WMU.edu
      Geothermal: Kalamazoo Nature Center – visits to view and learn about their
       geothermal heated building. Contact: Jen Wright, Director of Education
          o jwright@naturecenter.org
In school resources

Lesson 1
    Hand crank generators for energy activity can be found in the science lab – they
       can be hooked up to small light bulb, each other, a multi-meter (registering energy
       on a scale that lights up to indicate an electrical current) also found in lab.
    Hand crank flashlights, jump ropes, and pinwheels, all in the lab.
    Find the Circuit box in the school to show students where all electricity in the
       school is connected. Do they know where the circuit box is in their home?
    Do an Internet search for the locations of our power plants in Kalamazoo and then
       identify them on the maps in the cafeteria.
Lesson 3, 4, 5
    Don’t forget to talk about and view the solar panel on the school. Check out how
       much energy it makes for the school.
    When talking about Geothermal the ground water model (found in science lab)
       may be used for a demo. Put a miniature house on top of the model and show
       where the pipes would reach down into the water with consistent temp.
      Research where the power plants are in our community. What is our main source
       of power? Find their locations and mark them on the maps in the cafeteria for the
       school to see.
Lesson 6, 7, 8
    Wind turbine kits – in the lab
    Get the pinwheels from the lab, take them outside and see if you can find the
       strongest Wind force. Use Beauforts scale found -
       http://www.rcn27.dial.pipex.com/cloudsrus/beaufort.html
    Bring in an electric bill that advertises wind energy.
    Where is wind energy produced in Michigan? Mark it on the maps in the
       cafeteria for the whole school to see.

   Lesson 8
    Bring in a bicycle into the classroom and turn it upside down. Turn the pedal
      with your hands. Ask the students to compare this to the wind turbine and how it
      works. Could the bike power something? Draw a diagram of the bike and label
      the energy transfers that are taking place.

   Lesson 9
    http://geothermal.marin.org/ a fun image for marketing artist project. This is
      advertising geothermal energy – not to be copied for wind – but is an exciting
      image to inspire students as artist marketing for wind power.



Unit 2
Websites

Lesson 1, 2, 3
    http://solarcooking.wikia.com/wiki/Haiti_Solar_Oven_Project - article relevant
       today. Solar ovens are donated to Haiti as part of Hurricane relief effort. There
       are solar ovens in the storage closet in the hall next to the Science lab
    http://solarcooking.org/ organization working to provide sustainable cooking tools
       to communities in need. Video footage included.
    http://www.rcn27.dial.pipex.com/cloudsrus/beaufort.html WMU solar car site –
       The Sunseeker

Lesson 4, 5, 6
    http://www.wisc-online.com/Objects/ViewObject.aspx?ID=SCE304 detail web
       tour covering heat conduction, convection and Radiation. Fun animated
       descriptions
Speakers
   abraham.poot@wmich.edu can connect with speaker who will talk about solar car
       at WMU.



In school resources
Lesson 1, 2, 3

      Take a “field trip” around the school. You can go inside or out. Teacher can
       designate the different stops on the trip. Bring a clipboard to take notes. At each
       site describe if it would be a good spot to collect solar energy. Why or why not.
       When you are done, compare all the stops to one another. Which would be the
       best spot to put a solar oven?

Lesson 4
    If there is snow on the ground. Take a “field trip” around the school. Identify the
       places where to snow is melting faster than others or where snow is dripping off
       of things and freezing on to icicles lower down. Why is the snow melting faster
       in some places than in others? What makes the snow melt once is touches the
       icicles? Be sure that students are on the right path with their train of thought
       rather than insisting they have the exact answer. This activity will get them
       thinking about the movements of hot and cold all around us.
           o What kind of heat transfer is melting the snow on the black top or lawn
               (sun=radiant)
           o What kind of heat transfer is melting snow on the windowsills of the roof?
               (Convection - heat rising inside the building. Radiant – heat from the sun)
           o What kind of heat is melting the snow under foot? (Conduction-heat is
               moving straight from our feet to the snow well - the consistent energy
               created from lots of little feet over the snow)
    Tape different materials to the window – which is the best conductor?

Lesson 5
        Take the kids outside for a minute without their coats (maybe just from the
         main building to the annex). How do they feel? Take them back in to get
         their coats and then repeat your minute outside.
             o What is the difference? Why do you feel warmer when you have your
                 coat?
             o Our coats provide insulation for our body heat. With out them our
                 bodies lose heat faster. Compare this to your house or school.


Unit 3
Web sites
http://www.vermiculturenorthwest.com/WormTalk/
Extensive info on worm bins and why they are important. Lots of links from this site as
well.
http://www.ecokids.ca/pub/games_activities/waste/index.cfm
Games kids can play online to support learning about waste.

http://www.kalamazoocity.org/portal/pubserve.php?page_id=557
Comprehensive guide to what you can and cannot recycle in Kalamazoo


Lesson 7: Extension: graph the break down rates of different materials using this
website:
http://www.divinecaroline.com/22355/49745-landfill-trash-really-last



Speakers
Chris Dilley at People’s Food Co-op can describe the process the Co-op went through in
designing a sustainable building – Using earth building materials wisely
chris@peoplesfoodco-op.org

http://www.kalcounty.com/hhw/index.htm
Household hazardous waste - invite a representative to come and talk about what to do
with the yuckiest chemicals in your house. csfost@kalcounty.com

Coffee grinds from Waterstreet coffee shop for your worm bin or garden.
http://www.waterstreetcoffeejoint.com/contact-us.php
There is an email contact form on this site – you can email in a request for a large amount
of coffee beans for the school – saving your more matter from the landfill.

Also Use food scraps from the cafeteria.

Potential speaker from the WMU society of plastics engineers
paul.engelmann@wmich.edu

Unit 4
Lesson 1

http://www.seedsavers.org/

Vegetables, Herbs & Fruit: An Illustrated Encyclopedia

Farm N’ Garden is within walking distance from school. - View greenhouse and rows of
growing seeds. Owner, Ben, is happy to talk with kids about how the greenhouse works
and other projects they have going on. This is also a great place to go see lots of different
seeds. They sell them in clear bulk jars. www.farmngarden.com
benyost@farmngarden.com
Fair Food Matters (FFM):
www.fairfoodmatters.org
EricaBarajas - erica@fairfoodmatters.org is the Growing Matters Garden educator for
FFM. She works at Woodward on a regular basis, Can help with worm bins too!
In the lab/storage you will find large light carts to start your seeds in, garden exploration
stations from our spring garden programs (each has directions in it for an activity in the
garden –in large bins), and microscopes that can be used to examine the plants on a
microscopic level. Magnifying glasses can be used to locate the different characteristics
of a seed and identify the where the seed will sprout, tweezers in the lab can be used to
hold the seeds. You will find little wooden pot makers that will turn any re-useable paper
into a plant pot!

It may be fun to take a daily picture of one of the starts and create a journal or presentation
showing the growth! Make a flow map of daily garden observations.

Lesson 2

Fair Food Matters Consultant

www.hhydro.com Horizon Hydroponics store – supplies! Can make small hydro units
that are very easy to deal with, build, and care for yourself. Manager can also come in as
a speaker.
Find Rainforest Hydroponics Units in Woodward storage or lab. Directions can be found
with it and online. Smaller units can be student made with 2 liter bottles (direction on the
Web).


      Explore how regions with poor soil could benefit from hydroponics growing.
    Discuss ways to market and sell your final product.

Visit Edison Elementary greenhouse.
They sell hydro plants to Food Dance Café and the Bronson Friday Farmers Market.

Lesson 3

http://plantsinmotion.bio.indiana.edu/plantmotion/earlygrowth/germination/germ.html
Videos that show slow motion plant growth and germination.

Use the Woodward garden! Connect with the Growing Matters Garden Manager Erica
Barajas Erica@fairfoodmatters.org

http://www.cfaitc.org/wegarden/
Resources for a school garden and lessons on agriculture.
http://classroom.jc-schools.net/basic/sciplants.html
Online plant part games (lots of them)
Visit the Northside Association for Community Development Greenhouse and garden.on
Visit the school food garden or wildlife garden and observe how plant needs are met.
Improve a plant habitat by picking up trash, watering, weeding or adding compost.

Organize a workday in the Woodward Garden. Give students an opportunity to try some of
the tools from the game. Have them journal about their experience.

www.eatersguild.com Bring in a local farmer to speak and share real experiences from
their farm. They will bring in food, stories and photos from their local CSA!

Garden on Park street (walking distance) nacd@sbcglobal.net

Lesson 4
Healthy Foods from Healthy Soils
Farming information: http://www.answers.com/topic/how‐do‐farmers‐grow‐food
Visit the school food garden or wildlife garden and observe how plant needs are met.
Improve a plant habitat by picking up trash, watering, weeding or adding compost.

Organize a workday in the Woodward Garden. Give students an opportunity to try some of
the tools from the game. Have them journal about their experience.


http://www.cityfarmer.info/2010/07/05/urban-agriculture-in-philadelphia-lessons-
for-citizenship-and-ecological-democracy/ an article for very interested teachers

Lesson 5

The experiment explained in this lesson can be done without starting a huge hydro
project. You can use hydro nutrients, add them to soil based plants and make the same
observations. www.hhydro.com will give you some ideas and contact the Kalamazoo
store for help.

Lesson 6


      http://www.organic.org/articles/showarticle/article-206
      Eaters’ Guild Farmers (resource for lesson 3) can talk about pesticides and
       organics with students.
      Blue Dog Greens of Bangor, another Organic CSA farm, very friendly and willing
       to educate www.bluedoggreens.com
      Jeff Spoelstra of the Kalamazoo River Watershed Council can speak about the
       issues with pesticide run-off. krwc@kalamazooriver.org
      Fair Food Matters has a lesson(s) on organic vs. non-organic agriculture and can
       connect you will other local food partners who may come to your classroom for
       free!
      K College Farms to K program – have a College student or professor come and
       share the work of this program and why it’s important with your class.
      Use the groundwater model in the lab to show how pesticides may get into our
       groundwater and run off the surface to local water bodies.
    http://farmosafarms.org/lessons.shtml
     A resource list for environment and agriculture lessons and connections to
     the world.
    www.usda.gov U.S. department of agriculture website. Explore the current
     events of agriculture in the United States. Check out the USDA kids links.



Lesson 7

See lesson 6 resources

Lesson 8

Good resources provided in lesson from GMG garden manager.

Lesson 9

See Lesson 6 resource websites. Look at other websites on Hydro vs. traditional
farming and observe the presentation of comparison.


Speakers
www.hhydro.com
Manager of the store will can come in and talk and work with class on how
hydroponics works. Free

Edison Science teachers and support staff will come and work with Woodward on
Hydro stuff.

Visit the Hydro set up at Edison! It’s really cool

4th Grade Extensions

Unit 1
Lesson 1
 Think pair share - Brainstorm businesses in your area that you may think are local
   businesses and ones students would guess are not. Mark them on a copy of the best
    map in the cafeteria or flag them on the actual map with sticky flags that can be
    removed.
   Use the maps in the cafeteria to look at what maps would cover local area and what
    maps would not.

Lesson 2
In lesson

Lesson 3

Eaters Guild or Blue Dog Greens have CSA (community supported agriculture) shares –
bringing food straight from Farmer to your table. They may share a sample share with
the class – they will bring it and talk about it if you ask nicely. www.eatersguild.com
www.bluedoggreens.com
(Some teachers at Woodward participate in CSA’s—ask around and see if any of them
would talk to your class about purchasing a share and how they benefit from the farmer’s
hard work)

Lesson 4

Have a cook off in the science lab. Make a meal with non-local foods and a meal with
local foods. Maybe you can get some local farmers to donate or cook with you. Have
students compare all things in the lesson and also do a taste off. Which one tastes better?
– Pizza or spaghetti are cheap and easy things to make.

www.fairfoodmatters.org look up the Can-Do kitchen on this web site. This is a non-
profit kitchen (in walking distance from the school) that provides a licensed and fully
functional, stocked kitchen for local people to cook and sell their food. For example –
you cannot make salsa at home and sell it because it is not made in a licensed kitchen.
You can rent the Can-Do kitchen to make it and then you are able to sell your products.
They may have space for 4th graders to come and cook a meal in the kitchen.

Lesson 5
Research and present your findings on the questions – What would make local food less
expensive?

Lesson 6

Set up a mock city in the classroom. Break students into groups and label each group a
different part of the city (local and non-local business people, consumers, government,
etc.) Have them go through a day of life in the city using monopoly money to make
purchasing decisions. Make sure to have some of the students get their paychecks from
the local and non-local businesses so they can see how the money flows through the
whole cycle.
Find a current news article on the economy to share an example of what we are facing
today. This will also show students how real and present these issues are.

Lesson 7, 8, 9

In lesson

In school Resources

The Roots of Knowledge Garden at Woodward. Use some of your own local ingredients
to cook a meal.


Speakers
   Fair Food Matters www.fairfoodmatters.org a non-profit that works toward raising
    awareness of fair and local food issues. Speaker will come to the classroom.

   Rich from Martini’s pizza is a local business advocate and owner call him in for pizza
    samples and ask him to talk with students about the importance of supporting local
    business. Ask questions about local businesses.
    Invite in a manager from Pizza Hut or Little Caesars. Have the students write up
    questions to ask the manager about local food and where their ingredients and where
    the money goes when you buy a pizza.
    Compare the two pizza businesses.

Unit 2
Lesson extensions are complete in lessons.

Speakers

MSU Graduate students are involved in climate change research and several National
Science Foundation scholars are required to do outreach education for a chosen school.
They do not have a partnership with KPS but will visit upon request. Contact Kellogg
biological station.

Jeff Spoelstra www.kwrc.org
 He will talk about the effects of climate change as pertaining to water issues, sharing
maps and photographs as well as personal experience.

Unit 3
Lesson 1, 2

http://resources.schoolscience.co.uk/britishenergy/11-14/circh3pg1.html
A handful of different challenges to try that enhance the circuit lessons. Try some of the
challenges and compare them to the lab.
Lesson 3

http://energyquest.ca.gov/teachers_resources/index.html teacher resources for energy and
circuits

http://www.oe.energy.gov/information_center/faq.htm Frequently asked questions about
electricity. This website takes a look at People and Policy around electricity.

Extension:
Take a look at cultures around the world how are they using electricity differently.
Which communities use if more? Less?

Lesson 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9

      abraham.poot@wmich.edu can connect with speaker who will talk about solar car
       at WMU.
      Wind Energy: Tom Sutton and Greg Meeuwsen from the KVCC Wind
       Technician Academy
           o tsutton@KVCC.edu or gmeeuwsen@KVCC.edu
      Biodiesel: Sarah Hill from WMU Biodiesel can connect you with a speaker
           o Sarah.hill@WMU.edu
      Geothermal: Kalamazoo Nature Center – visit to view and learn about their
       Geothermal heated building. Contact: Jen Wright, Director of Education
           o jwright@naturecenter.org
In school resources
      Hand crank generators for energy activity can be found in the science lab – they
       can be hooked up to small light bulb, each other, a multi-meter (registering energy
       on a scale that lights up to indicate an electrical current) also found in lab.
      Hand crank flashlights, jump ropes, and pinwheels, all in the lab.
      Find the Circuit box in the school to show students where all electricity in the
       school is connected. Do they know where the circuit box is in their home?
      Do an Internet search for the locations of our power plants in Kalamazoo and then
       identify them on the maps in the cafeteria.
      Don’t forget to talk about and view the solar panel on the school. Check out how
       much energy it makes for the school.
      When talking about Geothermal the ground water model (found in science lab)
       may be used for a demo. Put a miniature house on top of the model and show
       where the pipes would reach down into the water with consistent temp.
      Research where the power plants are in our community. What is our main source
       of power? Find their locations and mark them on the maps in the cafeteria for the
       school to see.
      Wind turbine kits – in the lab Used in 3rd grade curriculum
      Get the pinwheels from the lab, take them outside and see if you can find the
       strongest Wind force. Use Beauforts scale found -
       http://www.rcn27.dial.pipex.com/cloudsrus/beaufort.html
      Bring in an energy bill that advertises wind energy.
      Where is wind energy produced in Michigan? Mark it on the maps in the
       cafeteria for the whole school to see.
      Bring a bicycle into the classroom and turn it upside down. Turn the pedal with
       your hands. Ask the students to compare this to the wind turbine and how it
       works. Could the bike power something? Draw a diagram of the bike and label
       the energy transfers that are taking place.
      http://geothermal.marin.org/ a fun image for marketing artist project. This is
       advertising geothermal energy – not to be copied for wind – but is an exciting
       image to inspire students as artist marketing for wind power.

Unit 4
Lessons 1-5

Choose a large mammal that lives in the area to study. Talk about range and what this
animal’s habitat is. How much space does this animal need? Does this animal need to
roam? Take students to the cafeteria maps. Observe the connected green space in the
city, county or watershed. If you were a deer, would you have the space you needed to
roam with out running into roads? Or… use the maps to look at how much area is
covered by human infrastructure and natural ecosystems. What would you predict based
on this information? Who is able to survive better in this area? Humans? Other
creatures? How are they related?

Look at the Predator Prey studies on Isle Royal. www.isleroyalewolf.org

Use the wildlife area in the back of the school. Choose an animal that may live there.
Research its needs. Discuss the ecosystem it has available there. Is there anything you
can add that would increase health of the habitat or ecosystem for this creature? If it
there is time add this extra piece for your creature.

Jenny Doezema jennyjoy7@att.net will come and do an activity where students become
the ecosystem.

Invite Binney Girdler to speak. She is a biology teacher from Kalamazoo College.
Binney.Girdler@kzoo.edu

Lesson 6

Steve Kohler at WMU Environmental Studies Department. Will come and talk with your
classes about water species and their relationships – native and invasive.

Tyler Bassett keepitsimple7@yahoo.com will talk about the relationships between native
and non-native plants.
Lesson 7, 8, 9

In lesson

Take a walk on the Kalamazoo River Valley Trail. Compare this ecosystem to the
garden. Observe the human impacts along the trail. Take a walk to Arcadia Creek.
Observe the difference between aquatic ecosystems and terrestrial ecosystems. Observe
the human impacts on the creek. Include this information in your class posters. Compare
the needs of each. What do each of them need in order to be healthy systems? Ask Jeff
Spoelstra of the Kalamazoo River Watershed Council to lead one of these walking tours
krwc@kalamazooriver.org


5th Grade Extensions

Unit 1
Lesson 1

Challenge students to begin a Waste Audit in their homes during the same time period.

Connect with a classroom in another country to set up a waste audit partnership. Talk to
a school about the doing the waste audit at the same time and communicate with the
classrooms while this is happening.
http://www.marketwire.com/press-release/all-chilean-schools-doing-
environmental-projects-improve-our-earth-via-new-social-network-1515836.htm

www.projectearth.net
See these sites for a start on how to do this.


Lesson 2

Write a letter to your partner school sharing your action plan.

Lesson 3, 4

In lesson
www.ecoschools.com/Waste/Waste_wSidebar.html

Look at what other schools in our country are doing.

http://www.agcchicago.org/pdf/AGC_book_2_28_forweb.pdf a resource for creating a
sustainable school.
http://www.methodhome.com/behind-the-bottle/TerraCycle
Instructions on what to do with materials that cannot be recycled

Lesson 5

Have students set up a meeting with the administration and other involved/affected
parties to discuss their plan for the recycling program. Prompt the staff to ask
challenging questions to the students. Guide the students to develop the pertinent
questions to ask the staff. Make sure staff members are prepared to outline the real
challenges of a recycling program in the school. Have students create a meeting agenda
before the meeting and prompt them on how to run the meeting choosing a facilitator and
timekeeper, etc.

Brainstorm ways to use materials that cannot be recycled. Create new things with them.
Have students bring things from home that need to be thrown away (with guidelines).
Have the class work in groups to make new inventions or new materials for existing
products. Allow students to choose one of the ideas and make it.

Unit 2

Lessons 1

Ask students to make a list of things they do every day or very often that are not
necessary for life - they are “wants” rather than needs. They should be things that add to
the student footprint. Share your lists as a class. Now ask students if they are willing to
challenge themselves by choosing one or two things on the list to give up for the duration
of the Unit. Have the student’s journal about it as they go and share their experience with
the class periodically or at the end.

Lesson 2

In lesson

Lesson 3

Research where there are landfills in our community. What are they near? How do you
think they affect the people or environment around them? Did you know landfills there?
Have you seen them before? Predict what they will look like in 50 years if we continue
to use them like we do today. Mark the locations of the landfills on the maps in the
cafeteria.

Invite Jeff Spoelstra in to talk with the class about the landfill that sits right on the shore
of the Kalamazoo River. www.kalamazooriver.org
Lesson 4
What can we do if we don’t have landfills?

http://zerowastehome.blogspot.com/ Check out this blog for ideas. Have students read
pieces of it and discuss whether this is reasonable or attainable for them.

Unit 3

Lesson 1-4

Take students outside and have them locate the sun. Use the models to talk about and
decide how the earth’s movements make the sun look like it is rising and setting. Where
is it in our sky and why isn’t directly overhead? Draw the path of the sun across the sky
– making sure to be consistently clear that the earth rotates and revolves rather than the
sun actually moving across our sky. Draw the path of the sun on the Earth that students
created in their solar system models. Have student predict how this changes the climate
and weather of our community compared to communities in other places like Alaska or
Costa Rica.

Lesson 4

Have students walk the path of shadows. Take several visits outside during a school day
and trace the path of the shadow of a tree (the big Oak tree in the far south east corner of
the play ground would be good). They can mark points throughout the day with stakes of
some kind and at the end of the day connect the stakes by laying a rope down connecting
them all. Then have students draw the shadows .path

Present the following scenario: A person goes out to find the best location for a garden in
his or her yard. This person goes out each morning with his/her morning tea. They
decide to place their garden on the East side of their beautiful willow tree because it is the
sunniest there. What do you think about this person’s choice?

THE LESSONS ARE ALL NUMBERED FUNNY IN THE COPIES THAT I HAVE. I
AM DOING MY BEST TO LABEL THEM APPROPRIATELY PLEASE ASK
QUESTIONS IF NEEDED.

Lesson 5

Take a walking field trip and identify as many natural resources as possible. Discuss the
different ways you could use the resources identified.
Were any of the resources needed for making electricity found or identified on your
walking trip? Which ones?


Lesson 6
Research what kinds of natural resources are locally available in Hawaii. Compare and
Contrast these with Michigan. Now discuss how this changes the lives of people in
Hawaii compared to us. Discuss (simply) what life would be like in both places without
the ability to import and export goods. Pay special attention to the growing season and
the idea the Hawaii is able to grow almost all of its produces year round. Michigan can
only grow during a limited season. How does this affect our community in comparison?

Lesson 7 – 9

Write a fictional piece predicting what would happen if we lost our ability to import
goods from other places. In other words, what we have here now in Michigan is what we
get. How would this change your lifestyle? Would you make any changes in the way
you care for resources? Why or why not/

http://www.fairfoodmatters.org/eatLocal.php

http://www.localharvest.org/

These two websites cover local foods in Michigan. Use the map on the local harvest site
to compare the foods that are available locally in different parts of the country today.

http://1greengeneration.elementsintime.com/?page_id=9
Looks at a lifestyle that focuses locally in all aspects

Unit 4

Lesson 1

Make a list of the vitamins and minerals essential to a healthy diet and graph the class
data in a bar graph giving each meal item one point for whichever vitamin category it
falls into. Ex: If someone ate an orange for breakfast they will get one point in the
vitamin C category.

http://www.fauxpress.com/kimball/med/essentialv.htm

http://www.greenleafy.org/
A colorful chart the describes all the foods in each important nutrient category

Be sure to look at the click to view sample of the poster. Order one if you can!

Lesson 2

Bring in or collect as many mainstream magazines as you can. Have students bring
magazines in from home. Break students up into groups and have them cut out all the ads
for junk food they can find.
Then watch a kids television show – a popular one. Have students write down every time
they see a reference to or and advertisement for junk foods.

Have students choose their favorite healthy foods and make their own advertisement for
healthy foods. Display them in the cafeteria.

Lesson 3, 4

Have student keep a journal of how they feel just before lunch every morning for 2
weeks. Have them give their feeling a number between 1 and 5. Institute a classroom
fitness plan where the whole class exercises together each morning for 20 minutes. Do
not tell the class you are tracking changes in how they feel through their journaling – just
keep doing it. Do this for 2 weeks. At the end of the four weeks have the students graph
their feeling numbers by week on a class bar graph. Compare the first two weeks with
the second two. Is there a difference? Why?

http://www.livestrong.com/article/405563-physical-exercises-for-the-classroom/

http://www.edutopia.org/classroom-exercise-video

In the above websites are some ideas for exercises!

				
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