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					DRAFT PRELIMINARY TRAFFIC ASSESSMENT


FOR:

THE PROPOSED REDEVELOPMENT OF THE 27 UNIVERSITY SITE WITH A
THEATER, AND MIXED USE OFFICE / RETAIL DEVELOPMENT ON
STRUCTURED PARKING.




PREPARED FOR:

THE CITY OF PALO ALTO


PREPARED BY:

SANDIS




JULY 9, 2012
DRAFT PRELIMINARY TRAFFIC ASSESSMENT



FOR




THE PROPOSED REDEVELOPMENT OF THE 27 UNIVERSITY SITE WITH A
THEATER, AND MIXED USE OFFICE / RETAIL DEVELOPMENT ON
STRUCTURED PARKING.



PREPARED FOR:

THE CITY OF PALO ALTO



PREPARED BY:

SANDIS
936 EAST DUNNE AVENUE
SUNNYVALE, CA 94085




JULY 9, 2012
                                  TABLE OF CONTENTS

SECTION                                                             PAGE

1.0   INTRODUCTION/SUMMARY                                           1

2.0   EXISTING CONDITIONS                                            1

      2.1    Traffic Study Area                                      4
      2.2    Study Area Intersections                                4
      2.3    Freeway Segments                                        4
      2.4    Existing Traffic Volumes and Levels of Service (Los)    5
             2.4.1    Signalized Intersections                       5
      2.5    Existing Transit Service                                10
             2.5.1    Bus Service                                    11
             2.5.2    Commuter Rail Service                          12
      2.6    Transportation Demand Management                        12
      2.7    Applicable Plans and Policies                           13


3.0 PROJECT TRAVEL DEMAND ANALYSIS                                   14

      3.1    Trip Generation                                         14
      3.2    Trip Distribution                                       16

4.0 POTENTIAL TRANSPORTATION RELATED IMPACTS                         16

      4.1    Roadway Operating Characteristics                       16
             4.1.1 Intersection Traffic Signal Operations            17
      4.2    Urban/ Mitchell Lane Loop                               23



APPENDICES
APPENDIX A - LEVEL OF SERVICE CALCULATIONS                           A-1




                                                    i
                                          LIST OF FIGURES
Figure                                                                                Page

1        Project Location and Study Area                                               2
2        Proposed Site Plan                                                            3
3        Existing Peak Hour Traffic Volumes                                            7
4        Lane Configurations and Intersection Traffic Controls                         8
5A       Project Site Inbound Trip Distribution                                        17
5B       Project Site Outbound Trip Distribution                                       18
6        Base Year 2025 Peak Hour Traffic Volumes                                      19
7        Project Related Peak Hour Traffic Volumes                                     20



                                           LIST OF TABLES
Table                                                                                 Page

1        Study Intersections                                                           5
2        Level of Service Thresholds for Freeway Segments                              5
3        Existing Freeway Levels of Service                                            6
4        Signalized Intersection Level of Service Thresholds                           9
5        Existing Peak Hour Intersection Level of Service                              10
6        Project Trip Generation                                                       15
7        Cumulative Year 2025 Base Signalized Intersection Level of Service            21
8        Cumulative Year 2025 Plus Project Signalized Intersection Level of Service    22




                                                     ii
1.0 Introduction/Summary

The following study has been prepared to provide a preliminary assessment of potential
traffic and transportation related impacts associated with redevelopment of the
MacArthur Park Restaurant and Red Cross Dispensary site in the City of Palo Alto. The
project site is located on the easterly edge of the Stanford Campus between El Camino
Real and the Caltrain Commuter Rail Line adjacent to the main Palo Alto Train Station
(Palo Alto Intermodal Transit Station (PAITS) as indicated in Figure 1. The station is a
primary stop along the Peninsula route with numerous passengers commuting to the
University and Downtown area. Numerous buses operated by a variety of venders
including Marguerite (Stanford) VTA, SamTrans, AC Transit, and Union City Transit
provide service to the station throughout the day. Access to the site (MacArthur Park
Restaurant, Red Cross and Caltrain Station) currently requires use of Urban Lane or
loop which is part of a grade separated intersection of University Avenue and El Camino
Real located immediately west of and against the Caltrain Commuter tracks. The
intersection of El Camino and University has a basic diamond configuration. The rail
platform is accessed using Urban/ Mitchell Lane Loop within the large diamond
arrangement as indicated in Figure 2.

The Proposed Project would consist of a theater and four office buildings varying in
height spread across the site as indicted in Figure 2. The existing MacArthur Restaurant
and Red Cross site would be expanded to incorporate the current bus drop-off /parking
area adjacent to the westerly side of the Caltrain tracks and station as part of the theater
site. This in turn will require relocating the bus drop-off area to a reconfigured Urban/
Mitchell Lane loop road as indicated in Figure 2.

The office buildings, as currently proposed, would vary in height between four and nine
stories with a total of 290,000 gross square feet (250,000 net square feet) of floor space.
Approximately 260,000 gross square feet would be devoted to office and the remaining
30,000 gross square feet in the ground floor would be utilized as retail related space.
The theater, located in a separate building at the northwest corner of the site, would
have approximately 71,630 square feet of floor area with 800 seats. Parking would be
provided under the office buildings and theater with 875 spaces. The subsurface
parking garage would have two primary points of access, one linked directly to the
extension of Quarry Road and the other to the northbound on-ramp from University to El
Camino, as indicated in Figure 2.

The Project transportation assessment has been divided into two areas with one
focusing on traffic related impacts to the surrounding roadway network. The second
focuses on the reconfiguration of Urban Loop and the intersection of the northbound
ramps at University Avenue relative to accommodating increased bus traffic and loading
associated with the relocation of the current bus parking area.

In summary, the Project is forecast to result in a limited impact to the surrounding
roadway network. It is forecast to generate approximately 3,066 new vehicle trips per
day of which approximately 310 would occur during the morning peak hour and another
328 during the evening peak hour. There would be a significant increase in traffic on
Urban Loop with corresponding increases in delay dependent upon the final
configuration of site access and bus drop-off areas.



                                             1
The intersection of Quarry Road and El Camino would be reconfigured to extend Quarry
Road into the site but is forecast to continue to operate acceptably during peak commute
periods. The easterly side of the intersection of University Avenue and El Camino Real
would also be reconfigured. This intersection is forecast to operate at an LOS E by 2025
regardless of the Project making it important that the reconfiguration be carefully
implemented to improve operations.

2.0 Existing Conditions

As indicated in Figure 1, the proposed project site is located between the Caltrain
Commuter Rail tracks, El Camino Real, the extension of Quarry Road, and University
Avenue. Access to the site will be provided from an extension of Quarry Road east from
El Camino Real into the site, a driveway from Urban Loop Road, and a driveway from
the northbound on-ramp from University Avenue to El Camino Real. Continuous two-
way circulation may be included through the site from the extension of Quarry Road to
Urban Lane. Access to the subsurface parking garage as currently proposed, will be
provided with driveways to the northbound ramp to El Camino Real and the on-site
extension of Quarry Road.

2.1 Traffic Study Area:

The following assessment focuses on the more immediate Project area where potential
impacts are most likely to occur and be at their most intense level. Key areas are
access to the project, reconfiguration of the intersection of Quarry Road with El Camino
Real and the northbound on-ramp from University to allow the extension of Quarry Road
into the site, and overall access and circulation through the Urban Lane Loop. Other
key locations are primary intersections on El Camino Real between Sand Hill Road and
Page Mill Road, on Embarcadero Road, on University Avenue east to Middlefield and
U.S. 101, and on Sand Hill Road west to I-280. The overall area analyzed as part of this
study is shown in Figure 1. Table 1 provides a list of the intersections evaluated.

2.2 Study Area Intersections:

The initial traffic assessment focused on a total of nine intersections, all of which are
signalized. The intersections were selected as those considered to be most
representative of potential impacts associated with the Proposed Project. They are
expected to accommodate the majority of Project related traffic as commuters travel to
and from work with incidental trips/ linked trips to other uses. Intersections shown in
Table 1 are all located within the jurisdiction of the City of Palo Alto. The reader is
referred to Figure 1 - Project Location and Study Area, for the relative locations of
intersections analyzed.

2.3 Freeway Segments:

Santa Clara County uses vehicle density to evaluate freeway LOS. This is expressed in
passenger cars per mile per lane (pcpmpl). The analysis procedure used is based on
the 2010 HCM, with several modifications being made to conform to the LOS density
thresholds defined by Santa Clara County. Table 2 provides a summary of LOS
thresholds for freeway segments. Table 3 provides existing freeway segment LOS in the
Project vicinity.



                                             4
Review of the Average Annual Daily Traffic (AADT) for the six freeway segments
summarized in Table 3 will show three segments were identified to be operating at an
LOS F. The northbound and southbound segments of US 101 north of Embarcadero
Road up to the limit of the study operate at an LOS F during both the AM and PM peak
periods. The segment of U.S. 101 south of Embarcadero Road operates at a LOS F in
both the northbound and southbound directions during the PM peak period.


                                        Table 1
                                  Study Intersections

   #          Intersections                                       City/Jurisdiction

  1.   Sand Hill Road at El Camino Real                                   Palo Alto
  2.   El Camino Real at Quarry Road                                      Palo Alto
  3.   El Camino Real at University Avenue/Palm Drive                     Palo Alto
  4.   El Camino Real at Embarcadero Road/Galvez                          Palo Alto
  5.   University Avenue at Middlefield Road                              Palo Alto
  6.   Middlefield Road at Embarcadero Road                               Palo Alto
  7.   Sand Hill at Pasteur Drive                                         Palo Alto
  8.   Sand Hill Road at Arboretum Drive                                  Palo Alto
  9.   Quarry Road at Arboretum Drive                                     Palo Alto



                                       Table 2
                 Level of Service Thresholds for Freeway Segments

Level of Service                    Density                           Speed
                              (passenger cars/mile/lane)            (miles/hour)

       A                             density < 11.0                 67.0 < speed

       B                          11.0 < density < 18.0          66.5 < speed < 67.0

       C                          18.0 < density < 26.0          66.0 < speed < 66.5

       D                          26.0 < density < 46.0          46.0 < speed < 66.0

       E                          46.0 < density < 58.0           35.0 < speed < 46.0

       F                             58.0 < density                  speed < 35.0

Source: Traffic Level of Service Analysis Guidelines, VTA, June 2003.

2.4 Existing Traffic Volumes and Levels of Service (LOS)

The evaluation of traffic related impacts to the surrounding roadway network focused on
the weekday peak commute periods when Project related office and retail traffic would
peak concurrent with peak levels of traffic on surrounding streets. Critical or the most
congested periods of roadway and intersection operation on a weekday typically occur
during the peak commute periods of 7:00 AM - 9:00 AM and 4:00 PM – 6:00 PM.

                                           5
Counts of existing traffic volumes utilized in this analysis and assessment were obtained
from the SUMC EIR recently certified by the City of Palo Alto (Palo Alto, 2011) which
have been supplemented with current counts at the intersection of University and El
Camino Real. The SUMC EIR counts were used to maximize consistency with the
SUMC analysis and minimize the influence of temporary fluctuations in volumes which
could affect new counts completed during construction of the hospital improvements
(City of Palo Alto, 2012).

                                           Table 3
                                Freeway Segment Level of Service

                                                                      LOS            LOS
        Freeway Segment                 Direction      AADT           (AM)           (PM)

US 101 North of University                 NB          192,000         F              F
                                           SB                          F              F

US 101 South of University                 NB          200,000         F              F
                                           SB                          F              F

US 101 South of Embarcadero/               NB          202,000         E              F
Oregon Expressway                          SB                          D              F

I-280 north of Sand Hill Road              NB          102,000         D              D
                                           SB                          D              D

I-280 south of Alpine Road                 NB          103,000         C              C
                                           SB                          D              C

I-80 south of Page Mill Road               NB          109,000         D              C
                                           SB                          C              D

Source: City of Palo Alto, 2011, Caltrans 2006 Counts, 2007 San Mateo CMP and 2006 Santa
Clara CMP.
Note: Freeway segments determined to be operating at a LOS F are indicated in italics.


Existing traffic volumes for each of the analyzed intersections are summarized in Figure
3. Existing Peak Hour traffic volumes were utilized together with existing lane
configurations and signal phasing (for signalized intersections) as the basis for Level of
Service (LOS) calculations to evaluate current roadway operations. The existing
intersection lane configurations and traffic control devices (stop signs or traffic signals)
are shown in Figure 4.

Current procedures adopted for intersection operational analysis in the City of Palo Alto
and Santa Clara County are from the Highway Capacity Manual (HCM) 2000. HCM 2000
analysis methods were applied using the TRAFFIX software package (version 8.0) per
the requirements of the Santa Clara County Valley Transportation Authority (VTA), the
designated Congestion Management Agency (CMA) for Santa Clara County. This
methodology measures the operational performance of signalized intersections in terms
of four measures: average control delay, critical volume to capacity ratio, average critical
delay, and level of service (LOS). TRAFFIX simulates the HCM 2000 analysis



                                                6
methodology. TRAFFIX evaluates intersection operations based on both average vehicle
delay and critical movement delay. The Santa Clara County CMA and the City of Palo
Alto require the use of TRAFFIX and the evaluation of operations using critical
movement delay. In addition to calculating expected vehicle delay on which level of
service is based, TRAFFIX also calculates optimal signal cycle length and intersection
queuing.

     Control delay includes initial deceleration delay, queue move-up time, stopped
      delay, and acceleration delay. Average control delay weights the delay per
      movement according to the traffic volumes for that movement. Level of service
      for signalized intersections is defined in terms of control delay (see Table 4).

       The critical volume to capacity (V/C) ratio is an approximate indicator of the
        overall level of congestion at an intersection. The critical V/C ratio depends on
        the conflicting critical lane flow rates and the signal phasing. V/C is equal to 1.0
        when the flow rate equals capacity. When volumes exceed capacity, stop-and-
        go conditions result and operations are designated as LOS F.

       Average critical delay weights the delay for the critical (conflicting) movements
        based on the traffic volume for that movement.

                                          Table 4
                    Signalized Intersection Level of Service Thresholds

             LOS                      Average Control Delay (seconds/vehicle)

               A                                         delay < 10.0
               B+                                     10.0 < delay < 12.0
               B                                      12.0 < delay < 18.0
               B-                                     18.0 < delay < 20.0
               C+                                     20.0 < delay < 23.0
               C                                      23.0 < delay < 32.0
               C-                                     32.0 < delay < 35.0
               D+                                     35.0 < delay < 39.0
               D                                      39.0 < delay < 51.0
               D-                                     51.0 < delay < 55.0
               E+                                     55.0 < delay < 60.0
               E                                      60.0 < delay < 75.0
               E-                                     75.0 < delay < 80.0
               F                                         delay > 80.0

Source: Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority Congestion Management
Program, Transportation Impact Analysis Guidelines, March 2009.

Review of Table 5 will show the nine intersections evaluated all currently operate at an
LOS D+ or better during both the morning and evening peak commute periods. The four
intersections of Sand Hill Road with Arboretum and Pasteur, Quarry with Arboretum, and
University with Middlefield operate at an LOS C during both peak periods. The
intersections of El Camino Real with Sand Hill and University both operate at an LOS C
during the morning peak and LOS D during the evening peak. The intersections of
Embarcadero Road with El Camino and Middlefield operate at an LOS D during both
peak periods and the intersection of El Camino with Quarry Road currently operates at
an LOS B in the morning and LOS C during the evening peak hour.


                                              9
                                           Table 5
                       Existing Peak Hour Intersection Level of Service


                                               AM                                PM
                                        Avg Crit Avg Crit              Avg      Crit Avg Crit
#       Intersection            LOS    Delay V/C  Delay LOS            Delay    V/C   Delay

1.   Sand Hill Road/            C       24.1 0.567      34.2    D+      35.5    0.618    42.3
      El Camino Real

2    El Camino Real/            B       13.7 0.369      18.5    C       23      0.478     13
       Quarry

3.   El Camino Real/            C        30.1 0.714     33.4    D+      37.6    0.79     41.6
       University

4. El Camino Real/              D       44.7 0.729     47.5      D      45.4    0.753    48.1
      Embarcadero

5.   University Avenue/         C       26.1 0.462      27      C       27.7    0.527     30
      Middlefield

6    Embarcadero/               D+      37.3 0.572      39.2    D+      35.7    0.62     38.1
      Middlefield

7. Sand Hill Road/              C+      20.4   0.585    22       C+      22.5   0.534    22.8
     Pasteur

8. Sand Hill Road/              C+      20.4   0.443    22       C       24.8   0.601    27.8
     Arboretum

9. Quarry Road/                 C       31.5   0.513    31.2     C       28.6   0.604    31.4
      Arboretum


Source: Sandis, 2012, Stanford University Medical Center EIR, City of Palo Alto, 2011.


2.5 Existing Transit Service:

The Palo Alto/ Stanford area is currently served by a series of transit providers, including
San Mateo County Transit District (SamTrans), Santa Clara Valley Transportation
Authority (VTA), Alameda-Contra Costa Transit District (AC Transit), Stanford University
Marguerite shuttle routes, City of Palo Alto shuttle service, City of Menlo Park shuttle
service, and Caltrain. Both fixed route bus service and commuter rail service are
available within walking distance of the Project site. The Palo Alto Intermodal Transit
Station (PAITS), located adjacent to the Project site at the intersection of El Camino
Real and University Avenue, is an intermodal hub served by Santa Clara VTA,
SamTrans, Stanford University Marguerite shuttles, AC Transit, and Union City Transit.
Other concentrations of bus lines exist at the Stanford Shopping Center located across
Sand Hill Road from the site about one-quarter of a mile northwest of PAITS.




                                               10
       2.5.1 Bus Service:

Bus service in the City of Palo Alto and Stanford areas is provided by SamTrans, Santa
Clara VTA, AC Transit, Stanford University, Palo Alto, and Menlo Park.

SamTrans.

SamTrans currently serves PAITS with local lines 280, 281, express route KX,
BART/Caltrain connector routes 297 and 390. Connection to the Stanford Shopping
Center is provided by local routes 280, 281 and express RX/PX. Three SamTrans bus
layover locations are adjacent to the Stanford Shopping Center.

Santa Clara VTA.

VTA operates commuter/express and local routes through the Study Area, connecting
the City of Palo Alto to other Bay Area cities. VTA serves PAITS with local routes 22 and
35, and the limited-stop Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) Route 522.

AC Transit.

 AC Transit operates the Dumbarton Express, which provides service from the Union
City BART station to Palo Alto utilizing the Dumbarton Toll Bridge. It also serves the
California Avenue Caltrain Station, North Santa Clara County Offices, the Santa Clara
County Municipal Court, and the Stanford Research Park. AC Transit also operates the
Stanford U Line bus service from the East Bay and Stanford provides funding for this
service.

Stanford University Marguerite Shuttle.

Stanford University operates the Marguerite Shuttle, which provides free service to many
locations on the main campus and Palo Alto, such as the Medical Center, Stanford
Shopping Center, Stanford Linear Accelerator (SLAC), PAITS, and downtown Palo Alto.
All of the shuttle lines, except for the Downtown Express are wheelchair accessible. The
shuttle operates weekdays from 6:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m., except during University
holidays.

Marguerite's A and B lines meet most trains at the PAITS weekdays from 6:00 a.m. to
8:30 p.m. to serve commuters. Line A connects Escondido Village and Rains student
housing to the main campus and Medical Center. Line B serves Rains and the East
Residences, as well as several central campus locations such as Tresidder Memorial
Union, Terman Engineering Center, and the Law School. It runs to and from the PAITS
by way of Town and Country Village. Line C serves the California Avenue Caltrain
Station, the main campus, Medical Center and the Stanford West Apartments.

Other routes include the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) shuttle, the Midnight
Express, an evening and weekend service that operates from September through June,
linking the campus to the Palo Alto Caltrain Station and the Shopping Express which
operates daily during the academic year from September through June, linking the
SUMC and residential areas of Stanford University to the business districts in Palo Alto
(downtown, California Avenue, and Town & Country Village) and Mountain View (San
Antonio Shopping Center).


                                           11
City of Palo Alto Shuttle. The City operates two shuttle routes: the Crosstown Shuttle
and the Embarcadero Shuttle. On weekdays, both routes serve the University Avenue
Caltrain Station and Palo Alto Transit Center. The Palo Alto Shuttle is free and open to
the general public. Bus stops are marked with a "Palo Alto Shuttle" sign, a sticker on a
regular VTA bus stop sign, or a shuttle decal on a stop sign pole.

      The Crosstown Shuttle runs every half-hour from 7:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. It
       connects residential neighborhoods, senior residences and services, libraries,
       recreation centers, commercial districts.

      The Embarcadero Shuttle runs during the morning, noon and evening commute
       hours at 15-minute intervals. It is coordinated with the Caltrain schedule, serving
       employers in the East Bayshore area, residents in the Embarcadero Road
       corridor and students at Palo Alto High School.

City of Menlo Park Midday Shuttle Service. The Midday Shuttle Service is a free
community service route open to the general public. It is especially popular with senior
citizens. Its key stops include the Menlo Park Library, Belle Haven Library, Menlo Park
Senior Center, downtown Menlo Park, Menlo Park Caltrain station, Menlo Medical Clinic,
Stanford Shopping Center and SUMC. Hourly service is provided Monday through
Friday between 9:30 a.m. and 3:30 p.m. This service is funded by the City of Menlo Park
and the Bay Area Air Quality Management District (BAAQMD) Transportation Fund for
Clean Air.

       2.5.2 Commuter Rail Service:

The Peninsula Corridor Joint Powers Board (JPB) rail service, Caltrain, runs along the
Peninsula, from San Francisco in the north to San Jose and Gilroy in the south. Caltrain
is managed by SamTrans, and operates under the jurisdiction of the JPB. The travel
time between San Jose and San Francisco is approximately one hour and 20 minutes.
The closest Caltrain Station serving the Project site and Stanford University area is the
Palo Alto Transit Center (adjacent to the Project site at El Camino Real and University
Avenue). On weekdays, trains run every 5 to 30 minutes during the morning and
afternoon commute hours and hourly during off-peak times. Hours of operation are from
5:01 a.m. to 11:04 p.m. for northbound service and from 5:51 a.m. to 12:57 a.m. for
southbound service. Service is also provided on Saturdays. The hours of operation are
from 7:31 a.m. to 11:01 p.m. for northbound trains, and from 9:02 a.m. to 1:03 a.m. for
southbound trains Caltrain’s Baby Bullet Express skips several of the stops, such as
California Avenue, and is able to travel between San Francisco and San Jose in under
an hour. Twenty two train trips are provided during AM and PM Peak Hours.

2.6 Transportation Demand Management:

Transportation demand management (TDM) refers to policies and programs that are
designed to reduce the number of vehicle trips that are made, especially during the peak
time periods of the day when congestion on roadways is at its worst. The concept refers
to a wide array of measures, from telecommuting programs that allow employees to
work from home; to carpool and vanpool programs that encourage two or more people to
share their commute to work; to incentives to encourage people to leave their cars at
home and instead use public transit, or bicycle or walk to work.

                                            12
2.7 Applicable Plans and Policies

There are no relevant federal or State transportation policies applicable to the
implementation of the Project. Relevant traffic and transportation related policies in the
City’s Comprehensive Plan and Municipal Code are listed below and the Project is
reviewed for consistency with them in the following sections.

City of Palo Alto Municipal Code. The City of Palo Alto’s basic parking regulations are
described in Title 18 of the Municipal Code.8

      Parking Required. Off-street parking, loading, and bicycle facilities shall be
       provided for any new building constructed and for any new use established, for
       any addition or enlargement of an existing building or use, and for any change in
       the occupancy of any building or the manner in which any use is conducted that
       would result in additional spaces being required, subject to the provisions of this
       chapter.

      Parking Requirements. In each district, off-street parking, loading, and bicycle
       facilities for each use shall be provided in accordance with Table 3.4-9 and Table
       3.4-10. The requirement for any use not specifically listed shall be determined by
       the director on the basis of requirements for similar uses, and on the basis of
       evidence of actual demand created by similar uses in Palo Alto and elsewhere,
       and such other traffic engineering or planning data as may be available and
       appropriate to the establishment of a minimum requirement.

Minimum Off-Street Parking Requirements; Vehicle Parking Requirement, Bicycle
Parking Requirement, Use – Spaces; Spaces Long Term (LT) and Short Term (ST)

General Business Office - 1 vehicle parking space per 300 gross square feet of floor
area, 1 bicycle space per 3,000 gross square feet of floor area, and 60% long term and
40% short term bicycle parking spaces.

Source: City of Palo Alto Municipal Code.

Minimum Off-Street Loading Requirements Use Gross Floor Area Loading Spaces
Required

General Business Office - greater than 200,000 gross sq. ft = 3 loading spaces

Source: City of Palo Alto Municipal Code.

8 City of Palo Alto. Zoning Code Chapter 18.52: Parking and Loading Requirements.
http://www.cityofpaloalto.org/depts/pln/planning_forms.asp#Zoning%20Code.



Impacts and Mitigation Measures Standards of Significance

Significance criteria for project impacts were determined based on City of Palo Alto
significance criteria.


                                            13
City of Palo Alto Standards of Significance. Traffic impacts would be considered
significant if the Project would:

         Cause a local (City of Palo Alto) intersection to deteriorate below LOS D;

         Causes a local intersection already operating at LOS E or F to deteriorate in the
          average control delay for the critical movements by four seconds or more, and
          the critical V/C ratio value to increase by 0.01 or more;

         Cause a regional intersection to deteriorate from LOS E or better to LOS F;

         Cause a regional intersection already operating at LOS F to deteriorate in the
          average control delay for the critical movements to increase by four seconds or
          more, and the critical V/C to increase by 0.01 or more;

         Result in increased traffic volumes at an unsignalized intersection, and meet
          traffic signal warrants;

         Cause queuing impacts based on a comparison of the demand queue length and
          the available queue storage capacity for intersections and access points in the
          immediate vicinity of the project;

         Cause a freeway segment (for each direction of traffic) to operate at LOS F, or
          contribute traffic in excess of 1 percent of segment capacity to a freeway
          segment already operating at LOS F;

         Result in increased traffic related hazards to pedestrians and bicyclists as a
          result of increased congestion;

         Impede the operation of a transit system as a result of a significant increase in
          ridership;

         Result in inadequate on-site parking supply;

         Create an operational safety hazard;

         Result in inadequate emergency access; or

         Cause any change in traffic that would increase the TIRE index by 0.1 or more
          on a local or collector residential street.

3.0 Project Travel Demand Analysis:

3.1       Trip Generation

Table 6 provides a summary of trip generation estimates for the proposed Project assuming
a mixed use development with primarily office, a limited amount of retail space, and a
theater. The trip generation forecasts focus on peak weekday morning and evening
commute conditions to provide a worst case type analysis when adjacent roadways are
operating with peak traffic volumes. The trip generation estimates are based upon Institute
of Transportation Engineers standard trip generation rates for proposed uses but include an

                                               14
allowance for the close proximity of multimodal transit service. As described earlier, the
office buildings as currently proposed would vary in height between four and nine stories
with a total of 290,000 gross square feet (250,000 net square feet) of floor space.
Approximately 260,000 square feet would be devoted to office and the remaining 30,000
gross square feet in the ground floor would be for retail. The theater, located in a
separate building at the northwest corner of the site, would have approximately 71,630
square feet of floor area with 800 seats. Parking would be provided under the office
buildings and theatre with 875 spaces on three floors covering the majority of the site.

                                               Table 6
                                 Project Trip Generation Forecasts

Use             Size            Daily Traffic          AM Peak Hour            PM Peak Hour

                              Factor     Trips     Factor       Trips        Factor         Trips

Office         260,000         (2)        2784         (3)     355/48          (4)         63/307
               GSF(1)

Use of Alternative Modes of Travel        (638)                (81/11                      (14/70)
           @22.9% (5)

  Net Office Trips                       2,146                 274/37                      46/225

 Theatre      800 seats                                                    0.02/seat(6)      8/8

Retail         30,000          42.04      1261         Min       Min        2.81/2.21       84/66
               GSF (1)        TE/KSF                                         TE/KSF


Capture of Internal Trips from Site       (341)         -         -                        (23/18)
    Office Space @ 27% (7)

           Net Retail Trips               920                     -                         61/48

  Net Project Trips External to           3066                 274/37                      72/256
   Site on a Typical Weekday

    1)    Assumes 250,000 net square feet with a load factor of 1.158 yielding 290,000 gross
         square feet of floor area for the Project Exclusive of the theater. Assume ground floor or
         30,000 gross square feet of retail with balance of 260,000 gross square feet of office.
    2)   Ln(t) = 0.77Ln(x) + 3.65, ITE, Trip Generation 8th Edition, 2008
    3)   Ln(t) = 0.80Ln(x) + 1.55, 88% in/12% outbound, ITE, Trip Generation 8th Edition, 2008
    4)   T = 1.12(x) + 78.81, 17% in/83% outbound, ITE, Trip Generation 8th Edition, 2008
    5)   Travel by Alternative mode including Transit, walk, Ride Bike, carpool, SUMC EIR, 2011
         (Does not include use of “Go Passes” )
    6)   Trips per Seat, 50% inbound, 50% outbound
    7)   Table C.4 Internal Trip Capture, Page 125, Trip Generation, 8th Edition, ITE, 2008
Source: Sandis, 2012,


Review of the Table 6 will indicate the proposed project is forecast to generate
approximately 3,066 new vehicle trips per day of which approximately 310 would occur
during the morning peak hour and another 328 during the evening peak hour.

                                                  15
3.2    Trip Distribution

Trip forecasts for the Project were distributed to the roadway network using the same basic
distribution assumed for SUMC related employee traffic in terms of both local and regional
trip origins and destinations, (City of Palo Alto, 2011, 2012). A summary of the inbound and
outbound distribution relative to the roadway network is summarized in Figures 5A and 5B
respectively.

4.0    Potential Transportation Related Impacts

The transportation related evaluation focused on two key areas. The first was potential
impacts associated with increased traffic levels and the second was potential impacts
associated with the proposed relocation of the existing Marguerite/ VTA bus drop-off and
parking area to the loop road. The traffic evaluation assumes Year 2025 conditions with
versus without the Project. Year 2025 Baseline conditions (without the Project) assume
other projects in the surrounding area expected to be completed by 2025 including the
Stanford Medical Center improvements together with required transportation related
measures. Potential Project related impacts are identified and evaluated using a
comparison of Baseline conditions to Baseline plus Project conditions.

4.1    Roadway Operating Characteristics.

As discussed earlier, the evaluation of potential project related impacts to the roadway
network for this project focused on the nine intersections listed in Table 1. Project
conditions were evaluated and then compared using a peak hour intersection LOS analysis
as described below.

       4.1.1   Intersection Traffic Signal Operations:

The addition of cumulative Year 2025 base case traffic volumes to existing volumes are
forecast to not create a significant adverse impact at the majority of the study
intersections. The cumulative Year 2025 increase in traffic volumes include buildout of
the recently approved SUMC facility as well as all transportation related mitigation
measures associated with the project (Caltrain Go Pass, improved Marguerite service,
etc). Background Year 2025 Baseline Peak Hour Traffic volumes are summarized in
Figure 6. Project peak hour traffic volumes at the nine intersections are summarized in
Figure 7.

       Base Year 2025 without Project:

The results of the peak hour LOS analysis of the increased traffic volumes associated
with Year 2025 background conditions are summarized in Table 7. Review of the table
will indicate six intersections are forecast to operate at an LOS A-D which is acceptable
based upon City of Palo Alto Standards. However, the intersection of El Camino Real
with University Avenue is forecast to operate at an LOS F during the morning peak and
LOS E during the evening peak and the intersection of El Camino Real with
Embarcadero Road are forecast to operate at an LOS E during the evening peak period.




                                            16
                                          Table 7
                    Base Year 2025 Peak Hour Intersection Level of Service


                                                 AM                             PM
                                        Avg      Crit Avg Crit          Avg     Crit Avg Crit
#       Intersection            LOS    Delay     V/C   Delay LOS       Delay    V/C Delay

1.   Sand Hill Road/            C       28.3 0.617       36.2    D+     38.3    0.754    46.2
      El Camino Real

2    El Camino Real/            B       16.1 0.546       21      C      25.7    0.627    15.6
       Quarry

3.   El Camino Real/            F        95.8 1.165      120.9   E      71      1.017    79.8
       University

4.   El Camino Real/            D-      51.2 0.875      56.9     E+     57      0.948    65.3
       Embarcadero

5.   University Avenue/         C       28.9 0.618       31.2    C-     33.8    0.83     39.5
      Middlefield

6    Embarcadero/               D       41.2 0.679       43.5    D+     38.7    0.684    41.3
      Middlefield

7.   Sand Hill Road/            C+      20.7    0.631    23.3    C       29.3   0.698    34.4
      Pasteur

8. Sand Hill Road/              C+      22.2    0.591    26.1    C-      34     0.716    45.1
     Arboretum

9. Quarry Road/                 C-      33     0.589     33.8    C       29.2   0.657    33.3
      Arboretum


Source: Sandis, 2012, Stanford University Medical Center EIR, City of Palo Alto, 2011.


        Year 2025 with Project:

Review of Table 8 and comparison to the results in Table 7 will indicate completion of
the project is forecast to have a significant impact assuming cumulative Year 2025
conditions at two of the nine locations reviewed. These include the intersections of El
Camino with University Avenue and Embarcadero Road. The Proposed Project will not
cause peak hour operating conditions at the remaining seven intersections to deteriorate
below LOS D or the minimum level acceptable to the City of Palo Alto.

The intersection of El Camino Real with University Avenue is a grade separated
interchange with El Camino dipping under University and the extension of Palm Drive
into Stanford. The interchange has a basic diamond configuration with interconnected
signalized ramp junctures. The basic diamond configuration is further complicated by
the presence of the Urban Lane/ Mitchell Lane Loop which provides access to the

                                                21
Caltrain Station and the 27 University site. Currently the Loop intersects both sides of
the northbound ramp juncture with most movements limited to right turns. However, the
westbound exit from the loop to westbound University is controlled by the signals. This
is unique to this location and does impact the overall capacity of the interchange
because additional green signal time has to be allocated to this movement.

Traffic forecasts of Year 2025 conditions completed for the SUMC Project indicated this
intersection is forecast to operate at an LOS F in the morning and LOS E in the evening
peak commute periods regardless of the Proposed Project. Potential impacts
associated with the Project will vary dependent upon how access is finally provided to
the Project garages (will access be allowed from the Urban Lane Mitchell Drive Loop)
and if/ how the Loop is reconfigured as discussed below.

                                          Table 8
               Year 2025 Plus Project Peak Hour Intersection Level of Service


                                              AM                    PM
                                        Avg Crit Avg Crit     Avg  Crit Avg Crit
#       Intersection            LOS    Delay V/C Delay LOS Delay V/C Delay

1.   Sand Hill Road/            C       28.5 0.618      36.2    D       39.0    0.761    46.3
      El Camino Real

2    El Camino Real/            B       16.1 0.546      21      D       39.6    0.837    40.9
       Quarry

3.   El Camino Real/            F       115.4 1.221 144.5       E       71.3    1.031    80.4
       University

4.   El Camino Real/            D-      52.6 0.893 58.7         E       60.9    0.981    73.1
       Embarcadero

5.   University Avenue/         C       29.3 0.645     31.7     D+      35.6    0.855    41.5
      Middlefield

6    Embarcadero/               D       42.2 0.698      44.4    D       39.7    0.701    42.2
      Middlefield

7.   Sand Hill Road/            C       21.5   0.654    24.6    D       32.2    0.720    39.2
      Pasteur

8. Sand Hill Road/              C       22.7   0.638    27.5    D       37.5    0.740    51.8
     Arboretum

9. Quarry Road/                 C-      33.3   0.594    34.0     C       29.2   0.658    33.4
      Arboretum

Source: Sandis, 2012, Stanford University Medical Center EIR, City of Palo Alto, 2011.

The intersection of El Camino Real with Quarry Road is currently a tee intersection with
Quarry Road ending at El Camino. The Project includes extending Quarry into the site
as a primary means of access as indicated in Figure 2. The intersection currently serves
as the juncture point for the northbound on-ramp from University with the ramp
extending into the intersection slightly and movements from the ramp being limited to

                                               22
continuing northbound on El Camino Real. Vehicles on the ramp are not allowed to turn
left and are controlled with the same signal indications as northbound El Camino.
Assuming this basic configuration with the ramp is maintained would mean traffic cannot
turn right from the northbound through lanes across the on-ramp which in turn means
traffic attempting to enter the site northbound on El Camino Real will be required to exit
at University, cross University to the on-ramp and use the driveway from the ramp into
the garage. A preferred way may be to provide a separate signal phase for the ramp
which would allow vehicles to turn left into westbound Quarry from the ramp and allow
right turns from northbound El Camino in to the site. The concern is initial review of
traffic forecasts for the Project indicates signal operations at the intersection may not be
able to accommodate all the movements and will deteriorate to an LOS F. It is forecast
to operate at an LOS D with the Project if the current configuration is maintained. This
should be further evaluated as the Project continues to be refined in terms of size and
access.

4.2    Urban Lane/ Mitchell Lane Loop

As described earlier, the Project site is adjacent to the Palo Alto Intermodal Transit Station
(PAITS) and includes relocation of the current bus loading and parking area to
accommodate a new theater and subsurface parking. The current plan is to relocate the
bus area to a combination of the Urban/ Mitchell Lane Loop and the extension of Urban
Lane towards the Palo Alto Medical Foundation complex. Figure 2 shows a potential
realignment of the Urban Lane/ Mitchell Lane Loop with the northbound El Camino Real
ramps at University Avenue. As discussed previously, access to and from the loop is
partially controlled currently with westbound traffic from the loop being signalized.
Maneuvers from both off ramps are controlled by the signals.

Physically separating the loop road from the ramp junctures at University is being
considered to add capacity for bus loading to the loop road. Review of Figure 2 will show
the curb being squared and extended to lengthen space available for bus use. The loop
roadway will remain two-way and would also be widened to allow use of the curb in both
directions. The reconfiguration is continuing to be refined but current estimates indicate
being able to provide approximately 30 bus loading/ layover spaces between the loop and
the extension of Urban Lane.

The reconfiguration will require a series of modifications to the existing bridge structure
and existing traffic signal layout and timing dependent upon the final design. As indicated
in Figure 2, the squaring/ straightening of the Loop could shift the intersection of the ends
of the Loop away from the ramp junctures approximately 100 to 200 feet. They would
intersect the ramps directly, back from University. This will require a sophisticated vehicle
detection system and signal timing plan specifically tailored to the roadway conditions be
developed once the transit agencies determine their access and circulation patterns.

The current plan is also considering the use of two short segments of two-way traffic
between University and the relocated Loop Road intersections to facilitate improved bus
circulation through the site. This is still under evaluation dependent upon transit operator
needs but will require continued refinement of allowable movement and associated lane
requirements

The geometrics of the design to date demonstrate what will be needed to accommodate
bus turning and parking maneuvering. Further operational evaluation will be needed as


                                              23
transit agencies provide continued input regarding their needs. The proposed plan
alternatives should now be reviewed by transit providers relative to meeting each
agency’s drop-off and circulation needs. Some queue/ storage areas are limited
(northbound ECR off-ramp left turn at University, etc) which could impact transit
operations. These aspects will need to be further evaluated and refined once transit
users have determined how the overall concept could work for them. A key part of the
final solution will be developing a means of ensuring queue lengths don’t exceed storage
areas at entry points to the loop road. Vehicles eastbound on Palm Drive turning into
the loop road (Marguerite) in a counterclockwise direction will need to be able to do so
without being blocked by northbound off-ramp traffic waiting to turn left towards Stanford.
Similarly, buses circulating in a clockwise direction attempting to turn left onto
westbound University/ Palm may need to be metered to limit queues.




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