emotions

Document Sample
emotions Powered By Docstoc
					To persuade means to get
 others to believe or act in a
 certain way
To win over
To convince
 Companies use advertisements to
  persuade consumers to purchase their
  products.
 Peers sometimes use persuasion to get
  others to join them in an activity.
 People use persuasion to share their
  ideas when they feel strongly about
  something and they want others to
  agree.
   this technique, people
 In
 persuade others to join them
 by convincing others that
 everyone else is doing it too.
   A friend convinces another friend to go
    to a party by saying, “Everyone is going
    to be there! You’ll be laughed at if you
    don’t go too!”
 Bewhere the action is. Shop
 at Hang-out Mall.
 In this persuasive technique,
  numbers, tables, and graphs are
  used to show statistics of both
  sides.
   An advertisement might read, “This
    product kills 99% of your germs.”

 Surveys may be conducted and
the results graphed to show people’s
  opinions.
 In this technique, famous people
  promote an item and draw attention.
 For example:
Jessica Simpson on Pizza Hut commercials.
             Michael Jordan and Nike
              tennis shoes.
 Celebrity  endorsements - when a
  product is sold by using words from
  famous people or an authority figure
 If the celebrity/athlete/star uses the
  product, then it must be good, so I will
  purchase it too.
 Examples: Proactiv, Nike, Gap, Got
  Milk ads, T-Mobile
“After I skate, I just take the
  bottles out, wash my
  face, and I’m good-to-
  go. I use Proactiv® every
  day and my face looks
  great.”
Ryan Sheckler
World Skateboarding
  Champion
 Words or pictures that appeal to your
  emotions.
 They appeal to positive emotions like
  your desire for success.
 They can also appeal to negative
  emotions like fear.
 Example: Save the Children. Feed the
  Children.
 video
Luxury
Beautiful
Paradise
Economical
  Ad with
  emotional
  appeal
Emotional appeal
– make you look
younger

Expert
opinion
 They use experts such as doctors,
  dentists, engineers, or fitness trainers to
  say that they recommend this product.
 Example: 4 out of 5 doctors prescribe
  Bayer aspirin
Two items are compared to
 convince consumers that
 one is better than the other.
   Here is a
    recent ad
    comparing
    wireless
    networks.
 Advertisers try to convince you to make the
  right decision, smart decision or best choice
  in purchasing their product
 Examples:
     (It makes sense to buy this!)
         • Smart moms choose JIF
         • Save time and money with this
         • Shop smart, buy here
Logical
appeal –
smarten
up
 Words  or phrases in an
  advertisement are repeated
  several times for effect.
 Repetition gets your attention and
  stresses a slogan or product.
 Repeating something helps you
  remember the product or ad.
  What is repeated
in this ad?
“Head on, apply directly to the
 forehead. Head-on, apply directly to the
 forehead.
Head-on, apply directly to the forehead.
Head-on, apply directly to the forehead.”
A celebrity endorses a
 product without saying
 anything. (Unlike testimonial
 where a celebrity speaks
 about the product)
                Steven Speilberg


Penelope Cruz


                                   Mary J. Blige




                Chris Rock
 Makes an oversimplified statement
  about a group.
 Based on limited information.
 “A generalized picture of a person, created
  without taking the whole person into
  account.”(Discoveryeducation.com)
 “Context: When we stereotype a group of
  people, we depict all of the individuals
  within that group as having the same
  characteristics.” (Discoveryeducation.com)
   An attack on a person rather than an
    issue.
 Sometimes called a smokescreen.
 An attempt to distract the reader with
  details not relevant to the topic.
           "I think there is great merit in making the
           requirements stricter for the graduate
           students. I recommend that you support
           it, too. After all, we are in a budget crisis
           and we do not want our salaries
           affected."
            from Nizcor Project
 States the conclusion as part of the proof
  for the argument.
 Example: The school supports the dance.
  There will be cookies at the dance. The
  school supports cookies.
 Play this ad detective game!
 Look at the following pictures and find
  the advertisement.
 “Come  to Florida, Everyone
 loves our clear, sandy
 beaches. Don’t miss out.”

 Bandwagon
4out of 5 dentists recommend
 Sparkle toothpaste.

 Expert   opinion
 Amazing  much nutritious stuff they
 get with Kraft Macaroni &
 Cheese, isn’t it? A good source
 of protein, vitamins, and minerals.

Emotional    Appeal
Actress Kirstie Alley has lost
 50 pounds on the Jenny
 Craig diet plan.


Testimonial
                                          Bandwagon

This technique tries to persuade everyone to join in and do the
                          same thing.
                                            Transfer

An important person or famous figure endorses a product.
                                Emotional Words

Words such as luxury, beautiful, paradise, and economical are
       used to evoke positive feelings in the viewer.
                                     Name-calling

Negative words are used to create an unfavorable opinion of
           the competition in the viewer's mind.
Emotional Appeal
   Taco Bell made a
    "promotional
    partnership" deal
    with X-Box video
    games. That
    means that you
    see Taco Bell ads
    in X-Box games,
    and X-Box
    promotions in
    Taco Bell stores
   SAFECO, an insurance
    and investment
    company, is paying
    $40 million over 20
    years to get the Seattle
    Mariners' baseball
    stadium named
    SAFECO Field. Buying
    the name of a sports
    arena is one way for
    companies to make
    their name known.

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:2
posted:11/25/2012
language:Unknown
pages:41