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					Development and support
Key developers

Matt Mullenweg and Mike Little were cofounders of the project. The core contributing
developers include Ryan Boren, Mark Jaquith, Matt Mullenweg, Andrew Ozz, Peter Westwood
and Andrew Nacin.[69]

WordPress is also developed by its community, including WP testers, a group of volunteers who
test each release. They have early access to nightly builds, beta versions and release candidates.
Errors are documented in a special mailing list, or the project's Trac tool.

Though largely developed by the community surrounding it, WordPress is closely associated
with Automattic, the company founded by Matt Mullenweg. On September 9, 2010, Automattic
handed the WordPress trademark to the newly created WordPress Foundation, which is an
umbrella organization supporting WordPress.org (including the software and archives for plugins
and themes), bbPress and BuddyPress.

WordCamp developer and user conferences




A WordCamp in Sofia, Bulgaria (2011)

"WordCamp" is the name given to all WordPress-related gatherings, both informal
unconferences and more formal conferences.[70] The first such event was WordCamp 2006 in
August 2006 in San Francisco, which lasted one day and had over 500 attendees.[71][72] The first
WordCamp outside San Francisco was held in Beijing in September 2007.[73] Since then, there
have been over 150 WordCamps around the world, for an average of nearly one a week.[73]
WordCamp San Francisco, an annual event, remains the official annual conference of WordPress
developers and users.[74]

Support

As a free and open source platform, WordPress relies on peer support. Its primary support
website is WordPress.org.[75]
See also
     Automattic
     bbPress
     List of content management systems
     Weblog software


                                               Free software portal

                                                 Software portal

                                                    IT portal

                                                 Internet portal


References
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70. ^ "WordCamp Central". Central.wordcamp.org. 2011-12-12. Retrieved 2011-12-18.
71. ^ "WordCamp 2006". 2006.wordcamp.org. Retrieved 2011-12-18.
72. ^ "WordCamp 2011". 2011.sf.wordcamp.org. Retrieved 2011-12-18.
73. ^ a b "WordCamp Central > Schedule". Central.wordcamp.org. Retrieved 2011-12-18.
74. ^ WordCamp SF Announced (not WordCon), Jane Well, January 24, 2011
75. ^ "About WordPress". WordPress. Retrieved 28 October 2012.

				
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