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					       An Introduction
              to
        Theatre Arts
            at …




    Philomath High School



     Theatre Handbook




1
 Table of Contents

   SURVIVAL GUIDE ........................................................................................... 5
   CLASSROOM RULES ...................................................................................... 5
   GRADING POLICY ........................................................................................... 6
       Performance points: ...................................................................................... 6
       Grading Scale: ............................................................................................... 6
   Tardy Policy: ....................................................................................................... 6
           THEATRE 4 STUDENTS ...................................................................... 7
       THEATRE ARTS ORGANIZATIONS ....................................................... 8
       CHEATING: WRITING, PLAGIARISM, AND CONSEQUENCES ......... 8
BEWARE OF PLAGIARISM .................................................................................. 8
           Curriculum Enhancement ....................................................................... 9
Guest Artists: ............................................................................................................ 9
       International Thespian Society ..................................................................... 9
ITS for designers ....................................................................................................... 9
   PHS Theatre Production Program ....................................................................... 9
Mission Statement..................................................................................................... 9
           Student Directed Production Selection Process .................................... 10
   AUDITION AND CASTING POLICIES ........................................................ 10
       PHILOMATH THEATRE REHEARSAL PROTOCOL AND
EXPECTATIONS ................................................................................................... 12
           Actors and Technical Crew:.................................................................. 12
   Director and Designers ..................................................................................... 13
   Actors and Crew ............................................................................................... 13
       REQUIRED PARTICIPATION IN PRODUCTION WORKDAYS ......... 13
   STRIKE POLICY ............................................................................................. 13
   FINAL CONCLUSIONS .................................................................................. 14
   PHILOMATH THEATRE PRODUCTION GUIDELINES ............................ 14
   TERMINOLOGY ............................................................................................. 14
   COMPANY GUIDELINES FOR REHEARSALS AND PERFORMANCE .. 15
       PREPARATION, DUTIES, AND RESPONSIBILITIES .......................... 18
       Student FRONT OF HOUSE Assistant ...................................................... 18
           PRIOR TO THE SHOW ....................................................................... 19
           OPENING OF THE HOUSE ................................................................ 21
       AFTER EACH SHOW ............................................................................... 21
       STRIKE....................................................................................................... 21
   STAGE MANAGER ........................................................................................ 21
       TECHNICAL REHEARSALS ................................................................... 24
       FINAL DRESS AND PERFORMANCES ................................................. 25
       STRIKE....................................................................................................... 26
   ASSISTANT DIRECTOR ................................................................................ 27
       AUDITION AND REHEARSAL PERIOD ............................................... 27
   THE ACTOR .................................................................................................... 29
       BASIC REQUIREMENTS FOR ACTORS ............................................... 29
           AUDITION: .......................................................................................... 30

 2
               REHEARSALS: .................................................................................... 30
GET TO KNOW YOUR CHARACTER: .............................................................. 30
         WISDOM FOR THE ACTOR:................................................................... 31
               Example of the Actor’s Homework ...................................................... 32
   MAKE-UP DRESSING ROOM POLICIES .................................................... 33
         MAKE-UP .................................................................................................. 33
   STUDENT DESIGNERS ................................................................................. 34
         QUALIFICATIONS: .................................................................................. 35
         APPLICATIONS: ....................................................................................... 35
         DESIGN CONSULTATIONS .................................................................... 35
         PRODUCTION MEETINGS for Designers ............................................... 35
         TECHNICAL REHEARSALS ................................................................... 35
               STUDENT SCENIC DESIGNERS ...................................................... 36
FINAL RENDERING AND GROUND PLAN ..................................................... 36
PAINTING AND FINISH WORK ......................................................................... 36
         STUDENT COSTUME DESIGNER ......................................................... 36
         STUDENT LIGHTING DESIGNER ......................................................... 38
               FINAL DESIGN: .................................................................................. 38
         STUDENT SOUND DESIGNER ............................................................... 38
TECHNICAL REHEARSALS: .............................................................................. 39
SOUND TECHNICIAN ......................................................................................... 39
PLANNING PERIOD:............................................................................................ 39
               TECHNICAL AND DRESS REHEARSALS AND PERFORMANCES
   ........................................................................................................................... 40
               WORK PERIOD: .................................................................................. 40
               PERFORMANCE: ................................................................................ 41
               STRIKE: ............................................................................................... 41
         GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR CREW HEAD POSITIONS ........... 42
               PLANNING PERIOD, REHEARSAL, AND PERFORMANCES ...... 42
         PROPS HEAD ............................................................................................ 43
SOUTH PACIFIC EXAMPLE PROPERTIES LIST ............................................. 45
         MAKE-UP CREW HEAD .......................................................................... 45
               MAKE-UP CREW ................................................................................ 46
               WARDROBE HEAD............................................................................ 46
WARDROBE CREW: ............................................................................................ 47
               COSTUME PERSONNEL STRIKE RESPONSIBILITIES ................ 47
               MASTER ELECTRICIAN ................................................................... 48
PLANNING PERIOD:............................................................................................ 48
WORK PERIOD: .................................................................................................... 49
STRIKE................................................................................................................... 49




 3
        The Theatre Arts program at Philomath High School is part of the Performing
Arts Department. Philomath High School Theatre Students are responsible for
implementing our artistic mission as theatre practitioners. As such, it functions as the
central resource, designed to serve cultural needs - not only for the school, but also of the
community and region of which we represent.

         Our affiliation with The International Thespian Society reflects our view of
theatre and to some extent the order of our priorities. First, PHS Theatre views the theatre
as a way of ordering, clarifying, and understanding the human experience. From this
point of view, we see ourselves as humanists, sharing the general goal of discovering and
putting into communicable form conclusions about human beings and the world. Insofar
as we are artists, we must remember that we are scholars as well. As a result, we serve
the community and surrounding region in three capacities: as teachers, scholars, and
artists.

        AS TEACHERS our contribution is to the education of all the students with
whom we come in contact. We reinforce that the art of theatre as an integral part of
culture and human life. It is our mission to develop a sensitive, informed understanding,
and critical appreciation for theatre. PHS offers fundamental education and training for
future teachers, scholars, and professional theatre artists.

        AS SCHOLARS our responsibility extends beyond the immediate community,
and we share with theatre scholars throughout the world the task of studying, enriching,
and transmitting the heritage of theatre arts. Theatre productions are the laboratory to
access and the theatre process.

       AS ARTISTS, it is our conviction that theatre arts should be an integral part of
any cultural community. Theatre must be made readily accessible to all. Therefore, our
function as artists is to provide the highest possible quality of such art in Philomath.




       4
                                   SURVIVAL GUIDE
        How many times have you been in a situation where the only way to learn
everything you needed to know in order to do a project is by doing the project. This book
is designed to give you the information you need about Philomath High School Theatre
Productions and the Theatre Arts Program when you need it- before you start.

       FACT: Most of the fact-based information contained in this handbook is the map
you need to know to help you take care of PHS Theatre business. Beware of student
rumor and gossip. It contains detours and dead end streets.

       GENERAL KNOWLEDGE: This contains the Theatre Company guidelines for
auditions, rehearsals and performances, make-up and costume policies for actors, and
crew responsibilities. In other words, this handbook contains what you need to know
before you start, allowing you to get the most out of your theatre experience at Philomath
High School.

        Information has been arranged into two general categories: Information on the
Theatre Arts Program and information on Philomath Theatre Productions. Of special note
in the second section are brief job descriptions of positions. These descriptions will be
particularly useful as a reference and survival guide when you are interested in applying
for a position.

        Finally, this book will only be as useful as you allow it to be. Please take the time
to study over the information contained here. Use it as you would any other tool, an
instrument crafted for a specific purpose



                                 CLASSROOM RULES
       1.   Be Ready
       2.   Be Responsible
       3.   Be Respectable
       4.   Be Safe




       5
                                     GRADING POLICY

                   Theater is a performance-based course.
                  In order for you to reach your full potential,
                      your full and best effort is required.

          Daily participation points: (10 points per rehearsal -including after school or
lunch).

          Be on time
          Be prepared
          Be focused
          Be safe
          Be reliable


                                    Performance points:
          150 points each
          Nighttime performances, required contests/festivals

          50 points each
          In class performances
          Community performance with school group


                                       Grading Scale:
          A      90 % - 100%             D      60% - 69%
          B      80 % - 89%              F       0% - 59%
          C      70% - 79 %

                                          Tardy Policy:
        You will be marked tardy if you enter the classroom after the first sound of the
bell that is the signal for class is to begin and up to 30 minutes into the period. Three (3)
or more daily participation points will be deducted for an unexcused tardy. It is important
to note that four unexcused tardies in a term equals one unexcused absence and six
unexcused absences will cause credit denial.




          6
REQUIRED PRODUCTION ASSIGNMENTS

       You are required to be in a cast or on a technical (running) crew for each
production. If you are unable to participate in one of those, you need to have your written
excuse accepted by the Performing Arts Director.

        If you are on the running crew, confirm when your responsibilities begin.

        If unable to be on stage or on a running crew, you will be assigned to a work
crew.

        Work Crew Procedures: Within 2 days after the final work crew list is posted, you
must MEET with your supervisor to SET UP a permanent schedule that you will follow
for the assignment. This means that you will put in writing that you will work in the
scene shop, costume shop, publicity, or as an usher on these specified dates and times.
(ex. I will work in the costume shop each day from 2-3p.).

        You are responsible for:
        Signing-up
        Meeting with your supervisor
        Following your schedule
        Being punctual
        Fulfilling your obligation

        At the end of each trimester, Dr. Johnson will evaluate your academic progress
(grades & work completed), performance(s) on stage and backstage, participation in
workdays, strikes, auditions, and meetings. You will be allowed to continue with theatre
class only if your progress has been satisfactory.

                       THEATRE 4 STUDENTS
         A major project will be required of all Theatre 4 students. This project will
require the student to synthesize learning. This experience focuses on and draws from
theory, methods, and practice of the theatre arts discipline. It also allows the student to
experience the demands and rewards of producing creative or administrative work for the
public, demands self-discipline and adherence to deadlines and becomes part of the
student’s portfolio and resume′.

         Description of knowledge/skills each student should have attained: This
experience/project will demonstrate the following achievements by the student: an
understanding of aesthetic form and the creative process, competence in the basic
techniques of theatre; knowledge of the historical and cultural dimensions of theatre,
ability to think critically and to speak and write with precision, cogency, and force; and
experience in creating, preparing, and presenting for the public.
         The experience/project must include a careful record of the creative process and
implementation, and will have a public element, like a reading, performance, or showing.


        7
       The project will be evaluated on the following criteria: process journal, research
data, written, drawn or drafted record, pre-production through post-production planning
and deadlines, and performance, reading, or presentation.

                      THEATRE ARTS ORGANIZATIONS
        Philomath High School theater members enjoy working and playing together, as
well as working for self-improvement and producing quality shows! It’s fun, it’s doing
theatre, and it’s a great way to forge important friendships. Any person that works on a
PHS production, whether a major, minor, or technician, is automatically a member of the
PHS Theater Troupe. The most important aspect of PHS Theatre is that we stand for
quality.

    CHEATING: WRITING, PLAGIARISM, AND CONSEQUENCES
       Everything you need to know about preparing a written assignment, the way to do
footnotes, margins, indentation for quotes, as well as how to make endnotes in the proper
form, can be found in a style guide. All papers for PHS Theatre will use MLA.
Stylebooks are available in the library, most PHS classroom, and local bookstores.
       You may find that some teachers at PHS will require a different form for
documentation. Be sure to ask before doing any research project.

        BEWARE OF PLAGIARISM
        It is not creative!
        PHS has a policy of academic integrity. Know it and follow it!
        Students should be aware that there are severe penalties at this for plagiarism.
This is cheating. Penalties for cheating and plagiarism are severe. You might fail the
assignment; fail the class, or suspension.
        Plagiarism is using someone else’s work and claiming it is yours. This can include
math problems, essays, speeches, or design and artistic endeavors or using material from
the internet and claiming it is yours.
        Plagiarism can be duplicating another person’s sentence structure, an artist’s
design, someone else’s supporting evidence, and/or someone else’s lines of reasoning,
without giving due credit to the original author. Therefore, always document or footnote
any of the above and do your own homework and projects.
        Finally, remember that you are cheating if you allow someone to copy your paper,
design, ideas, or answers. If you do homework for someone or write a paper for him or
her, this is a punishable code violation for you and for him or her.

       Know your rights and respect the rights of others:
       Philomath has a policy of no tolerance for drugs or alcohol on the campus.
       Philomath has a policy with no tolerance for sexual or racial harassment.
       Philomath has a policy to limit the use of tobacco near its buildings in accordance
       with state and city laws.




       8
                       Curriculum Enhancement
       In order to give our students exposure to many theatre experiences we provide a
number of academic and creative enhancements by bringing in theatre artists to work
with our faculty and students.

        Guest Artists:
        By bringing directors, costumers, sound designers, playwrights, lighting
designers, casting directors, actors, and choreographers to the campus, students are able
to work with professionals, make contacts for the future, learn special skills, and get a
fresh view of the discipline outside Philomath.
        We continue to honor this commitment to enrich the educational experience of all
of our students and our community.

                           International Thespian Society
        PHS supports ITS. Traditionally we schedule a trip to the ITS improv festival
each fall, and enter at least one one-act production at the state conference each year. This
opportunity allows students to meet others in your region and state who are interested in
doing the best plays and refining their skills.

      ITS for designers
      A student designer, stage manager, director, or playwright may enter ITS
competitions.

                         PHS Theatre Production Program
       Mission Statement
       The Mission of the Philomath Theatre Production Program:
       1 To create for theatre students a laboratory in which they can test out and
       experiment with the practical and theoretical artistic skills that emanate from the
       academic curriculum;

       2. To enhance the cultural life of the community through the presentation of the
       best theatre possible;

       3. To provide as wide a range as possible of fine dramatic literature from various
       cultures and various ages, presented in a variety of theatrical modes and with a
       standard of excellence in the theatre as an art form;

       4. To support the evolution of American theatre by presenting new scripts that
       involve students in the process and product of creating theatre from raw state to
       finished production;

       5. And to provide the production environment that fosters a balance between the
       creative process and the completed product




       9
       Productions will engage, entertain, and enlighten audiences, not as an end, but
within and through this comprehensive and accountable production program.


                       Student Directed Production Selection Process
       The selection committee consists of the Director of Performing Arts, ITS
Officers, and one student appointed by ITS. The Director of Performing Arts will serve as
chair.
       Selection Process:

       1. Suggestions of scripts to be preformed must be presented by December 1 of
each school year.
       The committee considers the suggestions and generates additional ones if
       needed.

       2. Applications must be in writing and meet the following:
       a. scripts examined to fulfill the mission of PHS Theatre
       b. assigned to the following seven categories: (examples are full length
       plays)
       Period Classic: She Stoops to Conquer, A Mid-Summer Night’s Dream
       Modern Classic: Ghosts, Glass Menagerie
       Musical: HMS Pinafore, Nunsense, Evangeline, Into the Woods
       Modern Realism: Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, Cats Paw
       Modern Non-Realism: Waiting for Godot, The Birthday Party
       Risky: Rocky Horror, What the Butler Saw
       New Play: Becoming Bronte, Flesh and Blood, Roses and Thistles,
                c. consider training needs of the theatre students
       d. include issues that address concerns of marginalized, minority lives
       e. accommodate the professional development of the troupe
       f. the availability of resources to mount the production- budget, time, cast,
       and crew.

       3. The committee reads the selections for the first production, discusses them, and
decides by vote. It follows this procedure until all productions are selected.

                    AUDITION AND CASTING POLICIES
         Any student officially enrolled at PHS who has a 2.0 GPA is eligible to audition
for a Theatre Production. Theatre students are required to audition for all productions. If
not cast, theatre students are required to work on the show crew. Philomath High school
does not discriminate on the basis of race, religion, sex, age, or disability in its
educational programs and activities. At the same time, it must be acknowledged that
artistic needs sometimes require casting decisions to be based in part on physical
characteristics of the auditionees.
         Students attending auditions should consider themselves available for casting in
any production. Special conditions or circumstances regarding availability for casting


       10
should be noted on the audition sheets at the time of the auditions. Please note any and all
rehearsal conflicts that might occur.

       Scripts will be available in the director’s office for those students who would
       like to read the play before auditions.

       Any callbacks following auditions will be posted on the callboard or emailed.
       Directors will post the obligation of those cast in the production: the general
period of rehearsal, performance dates, both locally and on tour (when applicable), and
any other matters that may affect a student’s availability.

         If your name should appear on one or more callback list, that means the
         director(s) are considering you for a role or roles. Initial beside your name on the
list to acknowledge that you have read the notice.

        You will rehearse about 90-120 hours for a production. In general, persons cast in
leading roles will be expected to rehearse 5 nights a week. Persons cast in supporting
roles will be expected to rehearse at least three (3) – four (4) nights a week. Rehearsals
after the first two weeks will be five (5) evenings a week.

       6. Everyone must plan to attend technical and dress rehearsals every night for
       a week before opening and, of course, for the run of the show. A person should
       have no conflicts during these critical times to be seriously considered for any
       role in the show.

       7. All individuals cast in the production are required to attend strike immediately
       after the final performance. You will also be required to attend all Saturday
       workdays and an informal production critique after the final performance.

       8. At the first callback, if you know that there is some reason you do not wish to
       be considered further for a role in that production, you have the right to see the
       director and ask to have your name removed from the list or you may write a note
       to the director. ONCE AN ACTOR APPEARS AT A CALLBACK HE/SHE
       ACKNOWLEDGES WILLINGNESS TO ACCEPT ANY ROLE IN THAT
       PRODUCTION.

       9. It is strictly against the spirit of our production program for any director to pre-
       cast actors or to urge actors to attend one callback to the exclusion of others. If
       you intend to read at callbacks for a specific director, but are not able to appear at
       the specified time because of other callbacks, please let that director know of the
       problem and a later time for reading will be arranged.

       10. Faculty and staff members, guest artists, and community members are called
       upon to perform in designated productions as circumstances warrant. Such
       participation should be seen as an important educational and artistic dimension of
       the production program.

       11
       11. A posted cast list represents a commitment to the production. It is unethical
       for a student to proceed through auditions harboring any reservations about the
       size, kind, or role he/she will accept. Withdrawal from a posted cast list without
       the director’s approval carries with it the penalty of being ineligible for casting
       the remainder of that year.

       12. Students may be cast in productions for which they were not called back.
       Directors contemplating such casting will refer to the audition sheet for notations
       about your expressed conflicts and will normally assume you are available unless
       it is otherwise stated on the sheet. It is imperative that all who audition watch the
       callboard during the casting period.


        PHILOMATH THEATRE REHEARSAL PROTOCOL AND
                      EXPECTATIONS
                       Actors and Technical Crew:
       Arrive 15 minutes before a scheduled rehearsal. (if rehearsal is at 7p.m., arrive at
6:45p.m.)
        st
       1 late arrival – reminder
        nd
       2 late arrival – warning
        rd
       3 late arrival – dismissal from production

        You must contact your director or stage manager by telephone, in person, or by e-
mail, if you have an emergency that will delay you.

        Your time at rehearsal should be spent ON THE PLAY, not AT PLAY. Idle time
is your time to memorize lines, work on a scene or your character, or quietly observe the
work of others. Failure to do this will result in:
        st
       1 notice – reminder
        nd
       2 notice – warning
        rd
       3 notice – dismissal from production

        ALL scheduling conflicts MUST be reported, in writing, to the director AT THE
AUDITION. Missing a rehearsal due to an unreported conflict during the rehearsal
process will result in your immediate dismissal from the production Conflicts that arise
during the rehearsal process must be reported to your director as soon as you are aware of
them. The director will decide if the conflict warrants an excused absence.

       Unprofessional behavior toward anyone involved in the production:
        st
       1 incident – warning
        nd
       2 incident – dismissal from production

       12
       Anyone who arrives at a rehearsal or performance under the influence of alcohol
or drugs will be immediately released from the production. Philomath High is a drug free
environment.

       You must check YOUR EMAIL AND THE CALLBOARD each day.

                                  Director and Designers
       The director will organize rehearsals to use cast and crew time efficiently.
       The director will begin and end rehearsal on time.
       The director and designers will post rehearsal schedules and special calls on email
and the Call Board.

                                      Actors and Crew
       Missing a special call will be handled as if you were late for rehearsal. You are
responsible for reading and following all production procedures in the Theatre Handbook.
Ignorance of the law is not an excuse. If you have a question, ask Dr. Johnson. DO NOT
GUESS OR RELY ON RUMOR/GOSSIP!!!


     REQUIRED PARTICIPATION IN PRODUCTION WORKDAYS
        Prior to the opening of every production, the Technical Director will call for a
production Workday. Unless there are mitigating circumstances, workday is normally
from 10 a.m. - 5p.m. on the Saturday before the first technical rehearsal. All students in
the show are required to attend. If someone is unable to attend at this time, they should
contact the Technical Director to set up a time when they can complete their 7 hours
before the regular workday.
        This day is usually the first that the Theatre reserves the stage. On this day, the set
is assembled on stage for the first time and will remain on stage until the close of the
show. Setting up the stage, continuing to add elements to the set, working on props or
costumes, hanging and focusing the lighting instruments, and completing a great many
other aspects related to the show are created or developed at this time. There will be work
available to individuals of all skill levels.
        Come prepared to work! Wear clothes that can get splattered by paint, bring
gloves, keep long hair pulled back, do not wear open-toed shoes or shorts, and don’t
wander off thinking there’s nothing left to be done.
        The Technical Director can always find something for you to do whether it be
costuming, promotion and/or publicity.

                                     STRIKE POLICY
       No one will be excused from the strike unless arrangements have been made
ahead of time with the Director (very few excuses warrant missing strike). Those not

       13
excused from strike and who are absent or leave early will place their future opportunities
for casting in serious jeopardy.
        Actors and crew are expected to report to strike immediately following the final
performance allowing a brief period of time for the actors to remove their costumes and
make-up and to ensure that the house and backstage area are clear of audience members.
        When one area of Strike is completed (e.g. costumes), individuals assigned to that
area are to report to the Director for other assignments. Everyone participating in the
Strike Call must remain until released by the Director.

                               FINAL CONCLUSIONS
      All production cast, crew, designers, and creators should be part of the production
“company party” and the evaluation of the process and product.

                  PHILOMATH THEATRE PRODUCTION
                         GUIDELINES
        What follows is a brief outline of the way in which theatre works at PHS.
Included is a description of each of the technical rehearsals, a description of the
production personnel and their duties, and procedural guidelines for cast and crew during
rehearsals and production.
        Remember, just as every theatre operates a little differently, each show is going to
have specific requirements that dictate changes in procedures and duties. Therefore, what
follows is not a universal contract. When you are assigned a role, design duties, or a crew
position, you will be given a detailed job description that will give you deadlines, and
duties.
                                    TERMINOLOGY
        After the show is cast and crew assignments made, the real work of the theatre
begins. Every show has specific requirements that dictate the schedule. However, as a
general rule, most productions follow similar patterns. Below is a brief description, in
sequence, of the production process.

       DESIGN CONSULTATIONS are a series of early meetings between the design
team and the director in which they talk in general about the show, its themes, dramatic
questions raised, and the director’s approach to the work.

        PRODUCTION MEETINGS consist of the Technical Director, Director,
Designers, and any combination of the following personnel: Director of Performing Arts,
Publicity, Stage Manager, and Assistant Designers and Directors. Production Meetings
usually occur once a week until the show opens and are used to formalize and coordinate
all production areas.

       DRESS PARADE usually occurs two or three days before the first dress
rehearsal. Actors appear on stage under show lights in each of their costumes.

       14
Periodically, the actors will also be required to wear their character make-up, hair design
or wigs if found necessary or desirable. The purpose is for the Costume Designer and
Director to see and discuss each completed costume.

        PAPER TECH is run through by the Technical Director and consists of the
Designers, Stage Manager, and Director. All cues are numbered and entered into the
promptbook by the Stage Manager. Any foreseeable problems are worked out on paper at
this time.

        CREW WATCH is the required rehearsal attended by the running crew who has
been assigned their positions. The crew goes to a rehearsal to observe and see how their
positions fit into the production as a whole.

       DRY TECH is run by the Technical Director and is a complete rehearsal of all
technical aspects of the show without actors. In less complicated productions, this step is
frequently omitted. All crew is called.

       CUE-TO-CUE rehearsal is a complete rehearsal of all technical aspects of the
show without the majority of the dialogue. The actors only perform those parts of the text
where a cue discussed in the Paper Tech. The Cue to Cue is run by the Technical Director
with the Stage Manager giving the actors their starting and stopping lines. PATIENCE IS
A MUST!

        TECHNICAL REHEARSALS begin to incorporate the elements of scenery,
props, lights, and sound into the flow of the production. This is the first time these new
aspects have been added into the cast’s rhythm, which may be distracting and result in a
tedious (yet essential) rehearsal. The Stage Manager is in charge of all rehearsals and
performances.

        DRESS REHEARSALS are performances of the production without audience.
All technical and acting personnel perform their duties under show conditions.

       STRIKE is run by the Director and occurs immediately after the final
performance. All company members and student designers are required to attend.
Scenery, props, sound, and costumes are struck and the entire theatre returned to its pre-
performance condition.


         COMPANY GUIDELINES FOR REHEARSALS AND
                   PERFORMANCE
       The Production Company consists of everyone connected with the creation of the
production including The Production Team, Cast, Crew, Box Office Personnel, and other
persons involved in the production. The size of the production company will vary
depending on the numbers needed and personnel available.


       15
         As with all guidelines, this is just a brief outline. Procedures will vary from
production to production, and specific instructions will be posted for each production as
needed on the callboard.
         Check the Callboard, your Email, and the Production Board daily. The Call Board
is located in the hallway adjacent to the Department of Speech and Theatre Arts Office.
Always initial a posted notice next to your name so that others will know that you have
read it.
         Never miss a performance, rehearsal, costume fitting, photo call, dress parade, or
crew call. If you have a conflict, you must immediately contact the stage manager or
director to see if it is possible for you to re-schedule.

         BE ON TIME ALL THE TIME. Call times are start times for rehearsal not for
arrival. That means at our call you should be dressed in rehearsal clothes, warmed-up,
and ready to step on stage and begin your scene. You should arrive at least 15 minutes
before your call or you are late.

       VISITORS ARE NOT PERMITTED backstage during Dress Rehearsals and
Performances and at rehearsals only at the discretion of the Director. NO FRIENDS,
FAMILY OF STUDENTS

       CLEAN UP AFTER YOURSELF. If you see trash, throw it away.

        “HEADS UP!” is a warning to move out of the way immediately as an object is
out of control and falling. REACT IMMEDIATELY! DO NOT DELAY.

        Do not use any equipment or tools unless specifically directed by the Director or
Stage Manager. Immediately return any tool used to its proper location. If you do not
know where something goes, ASK!
        Return rehearsal room to an orderly fashion BEFORE leaving. Do this even if the
studio was in a mess when you got there. Pick up furniture when you move it, do not
push.
        If you use rehearsal props, return them to their designated locations.
        The State Manager is in charge of calling the show in rehearsals and performance.
In addition to the Director and Asst. Director, the Stage Manager should be looked upon
as a source of information and authority. It is his/her responsibility to make sure that
these guidelines are followed and no challenge to the Stage Manager’s authority will be
tolerated
        The Stage Manager will keep the company updated during pre-show announcing
“warnings” an hour and then 15 minute intervals. These warnings are for the benefit of
the cast and crew so they can make sure that they are performing their duties on time and
in plenty of time.
        Actors and Technicians alike should acknowledge every communication from the
Stage Manager with a “Thank you” so that the Stage Manager is sure that you understand
and have heard him/her.
        At “45 minutes till curtain”, the Stage Manager will announce to the actors that it
is 15 minutes till the house opens and it is time to check your props. This means that the

       16
props running crews has preset your props to their beginning position. It is now the
actors’ responsibility to check that they are in the correct position. At this time, the actor
should also preset any costuming that will be needed during a quick change. This will be
the last time that the actor will be allowed on stage until the performance begins, since
the audience will be allowed into the house at 30 minutes until curtain.
         At 30 minutes until curtain, the Stage Manager will announce the time and call:
“The stage clear – the house is open. The company will now remain backstage, the
backstage lights will be turned off, and the running lights turned on. The company must
now remain silent and move quietly backstage just as they would during performance.
         At the discretion of the Director, but usually at 15-30 minutes until curtain, the
Stage manager will call a Company or Cast Meeting. At this time, every actor and
technician should be ready for the show to open. The company meeting will usually take
place in the green room, and at that time, the director will speak. In the case of a
Company meeting, everyone is required to attend
         At 5 minutes to curtain, the Stage Manager will announce: “Places,” meaning the
entire company should take their place for the opening of the show. Technicians should
be at their posts, and the actors should be waiting outside their first entrance.
         After one of the performances, a PHOTO CALL will be scheduled. Everyone--all
technicians and actors –-are required to attend. After the performance the actors should
immediately freshen their make-up and, if necessary, stage and light to the position of the
first called photo, change into the costume called for in their first photo. Technicians
should return their work positions.
         As soon as the actors are ready, they should come out and sit quietly in the house.
The call will last as long as it takes. It will be accomplished quicker if you are quiet, think
ahead and react quickly and politely to your fellow actors and the photographer(s).
Copies of the photos on disk will be available for you if you bring in a CD or download
from the website.

        STRIKE will begin immediately following the close of the final performance. All
scenery, lighting, sound equipment, and properties are to be returned to their original
positions or proper storage areas.

        The Director will assign ALL COMPANY MEMBERS strike duties. Everyone
will stay until the strike is over. The Director will dismiss the company.

        No radios, video games, or tape players in the dressing rooms or backstage from
one hour before curtain. You may use headphones only. Once actors and crew arrive,
there will not be outside smoking or talking. Once they arrive, they are to remain awake
and in the building.
        After “Places” has been called everyone in the crew should be on headset and
remain there. No crewmember is to leave a post after this time -- to do so is a serious
offense and will affect your grade. You may be excused from headset to correct a
problem but must immediately check in with the Stage Manager upon your return to
headset.




       17
       Actors do not go outside or in public with make-up or costume prior to the show!
Greeting the audience in the lobby or green room following the production in makeup
and costume is at the director’s discretion only.


            PREPARATION, DUTIES, AND RESPONSIBILITIES
       Student Front of House Assistant (SFOHA)
       Stage Manager (SM)
       Assistant Director (AD)
       General Crew Head Requirements
       Props Crew Head Duties
       Procedures
       Sample Sheet for Hand Props, South Pacific
       Makeup Crew Head and Crew
       Master Electrician
       Sound Technician
       Actors
       Student Designers
       Scenic
       Wardrobe
       Lighting
       Sound


                     Student FRONT OF HOUSE Assistant
       Duties:
       Performance:
       Front of House should arrive one hour 15 minutes before curtain.
       FOH should have:
       A. A sign schedule with each usher’s name for that night
       B. Phone list of ushers
       C. Handouts for ushers to review

       Ushers should arrive one hour prior to curtain.

       Upon FOH arrival:
       Meet with stage manager and synchronize watches.
       Find out approximately when the house will open. This usually is thirty
       minutes prior to curtain. The stage manager will inform you when to open
       the house.
       Continually check with the stage manager throughout the show.

       If there is not a box office manager, label ticketing envelopes.
       They should be labeled with the following:
       Name of show
       Date

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       Time
       Ticket prices
       Comp Tickets
       *Consult supervisor if any extra categories have been added.*

        Have the ushers sign in upon arrival. Lock up their personal items in the
workroom if they wish. With the assistance of the ushers set up the lobby-get ticket box,
cube, doorstop, flashlights, programs (have extras), box office and any extra items that
may be needed. Consult the box office manager on the position of these items.
        Have the ushers check the restrooms. The restrooms should be clean and have
plenty of toilet paper and paper towels. Be sure all trash containers, including those by
the entrance, are empty.
        Have the ushers check the theatre for cleanliness. Put any insertions into the
programs.
        Have the ushers flip the seats to their upright position.
        If any chairs are broken, be sure precautions have been taken so that the audience
        does not use them
        Assign specific duties to ushers. Have:
        1(one) program provider: this person will hand out programs at the top of the
stairwell.

       b. 1(one) ticket taker: this person will tear the tickets in half giving the
       patron the appropriate half.

       c. 3-5 ushers: these will seat people in the appropriate seat.

       d. Review all seating procedures with the ushers. Show them where the
       emergency exits are located. Show them what a ticket stub looks like.
       Have the ushers practice seating each other.

       e. Five minutes prior to opening the house, have the ushers take there
       positions.

       f. Double check to see that the restrooms and the theatre are clean.

                       PRIOR TO THE SHOW
         Maintain an up-to-date list of volunteer ushers and their phone numbers. A phone
list is helpful.

       b. Familiarize yourself with the theatre seating arrangement including
       emergency exits.
       c. Check the theatre for broken or unsafe seats. Report any seats that need
       to be fixed. Tape the broken chairs. Keep a record of all seats reported. A
       seating chart is an easy way to keep a record.

       d. Check all flashlights making sure all are in working condition. Be sure

       19
       that there are extra batteries, at least six flashlights (always keep track of
       flashlights). (always keep track of flashlights) Secure a box of large
       envelopes and a doorstop.

       e. Make sure the ticket box, box stand (cube), box office, and all sign to be
       posted are presentable for the public.

       f. Approximately two weeks before opening night, make a sign-up
       schedule for the ushers. The schedule has dates and times for each show
       night. Keep in mind that each usher must work two nights. Consult your
       supervisor on the amount of ushers needed per night.

       g. One week before opening night, plan a meeting with the ushers. The
       meeting is a mandatory part of the usher’s duty. If ushers are unable to
       make it; they should notify FOH prior to the meeting. It is suggested that
       FOH use the Theatre Call Board to communicate with the ushers. Have
       them sign in at this meeting.

        At this meeting, FOH should inform the ushers of their duties. Handouts of these
duties along with dress code and time should be provided. Also, having extra seating
charts is helpful. Handouts should also be given to students unable to attend. The Ushers
should not make reservations. They will sit in the back row if seats are available. If the
usher plans to bring a date on one or his/her working nights, their reservations should be
made for the back of the theatre.
        Any questions should be answered at this meeting. The meeting will give FOH an
idea of those who are willing to work.
        If a shortage of ushers signing up occurs, call all of those who have not signed up.
If a shortage is still occurring, ask anyone involved in the Theatre for help.

       h. After the meeting, take down the schedule and make a neater copy.

       Around the time of the first dress rehearsal, meet with the director, stage manager
and technical director (if possible). At this meeting, see if there are any special duties that
they need from FOH (example, bringing actors through the front door). At this meeting,
FOH should also consult the stage manager on how the show will run. The procedure
should be understood before opening night.

       j. If FOH is interested in watching the show, ask the director’s permission
       to attend a few dress rehearsals.

       k. FOH and stage manager should have a trial run-through at one of the
       tech-dress rehearsals. Any problems that occur during the run-through
       should be handled immediately.

       l. At this run-through, put up the PERFORMANCE IN PROGRESS sign.
       It will remain posted throughout the run of the show.

       20
                       OPENING OF THE HOUSE
       After the stage manager has said to open the house:
       a. Open the stairwell door and turn on the light;

       b. Remind people about beeping devices. NO CAMERAS ALLOWED

       c. When seating people, always end by saying “ENJOY THE SHOW.”

       d. FOH should help hand out programs and seat people as needed. FOH
       should always be in the position to see or send someone to see the stage
       manager.

       e. Five minutes prior to curtain notify the stage manager of the current
       audience status.

       f. Five minutes before curtain, flash the lobby lights to signal the patrons
       that curtain time is approaching.

       g. The ushers must remain until the end of the show. They open doors and
       assist with exiting. They should have flashlights in case of an emergency.


                                AFTER EACH SHOW
       Put up the ticket box, stand, flashlights, programs, doorstop, etc.

       Check the theatre for any lost and found items. Turn in any items to the
appropriate supervisor.

       c. Supervise ushers who will pick up trash from the theatre.

                                         STRIKE
       a. Put up all equipment-tickets, programs, etc.

       b. Take down the PERFORMANCE IN PROGRESS sign.

         Get sign-in sheets from all performance nights. Compile the lists. Make a list of
         students who performed their duties and those who did not. Make copies of this
list for each of the cooperating instructors. It is helpful to have the students divided by
sections on this list.
         d. Collect any returned evaluation sheets.

       ALWAYS BE COURTEOUS TO PATRONS AND USHERS

                                   STAGE MANAGER

       21
         After the director of the production the position of Stage Manager is the most
important job in the theatre since this individual is the checkpoint for all aspects of the
Production; plus, a well-prepared Stage Manager can make the Director’s job easier. The
Stage Manager is the individual accountable for the smooth running of the show once the
Dress Rehearsals have begun. The Stage Manager should be an organized, levelheaded,
responsible individual who will greatly benefit the collaborative nature of the Production
and is in a position to gain the greatest level of satisfaction from the experience.
         The Stage Manager makes sure that all members of the Production Staff, Cast,
and Crew are aware of their responsibilities and maintains discipline backstage. The
Stage Manager will have a most difficult job ahead, so it is best to remain organized and
to prepare in advance for any possible problem that may come up. If the production does
not have an assistant director, then the stage manager fills those duties.
         PLANNING AND REHEARSAL PERIOD:
         The Stage Manager
         Will attend all production meetings, auditions, rehearsals, and
         performances.
         Become thoroughly acquainted with the play and the concepts of the
          Director.
         Knows both House and backstage areas of the theatre facility well: the
         location of all exits, fire alarms, smoke detectors, emergency lights, “panic”
lights, fire extinguishers, circuit breaker boxes, the location of spare fuses, controls for
both heating and air conditioning, telephones, and any other pertinent equipment of the
facility.

       Keeps an up-to-date Contact List of all Company Members with their
       telephone numbers.

       Has up-to-date rehearsal and work schedules. Post-weekly rehearsal
       schedules on Callboard and email.

      Is prepared to handle ANY emergency. (Refer to the selection below on
Emergency Preparedness).

        Works with the Technical Director in taping the outline of the set on the stage
floor or rehearsal space.

               h. Sees that the rehearsal space is in order both before and after rehearsal.

       i. Secures copies of the Ground Plan, Light Plot, Instrument Schedules,
       and all cue sheets for the production.
       j. Works with the Director and designers to create a correct list of
       properties needed for the Production and makes arrangements for suitable
       rehearsal properties.

       k. Makes and keeps an up-to-date prompt Script which includes:
       1. Script

       22
2. Blocking for each scene. (Be aware, this will change during the
rehearsal process).

3. Technical notes which refer to lights, sound, props, set changes,
costume changes, special effects, and placement of speakers for
sound effects.

4. Keeps an up-to-date Contact Sheet attached.

5. Police Department phone number.

l. Has extra copies of necessary forms such as Weekly Cast and Crew
Reports.

m. With the Properties master, makes a complete listing of Production
properties and their locations.

n. With the Master Electrician, checks over lighting needs of the
 production.

o. With the Sound Technician, checks over sound needs and the placement
of special speakers and live sound effects.

p. For information, the Stage Manager knows the operation of the House:
seating capacity, personnel in charge, number of ushers needed, and the
prices of tickets to the Production.

q. Knows the location of all scripts, sides, music, and other rented
materials for the Production.

r. Keeps a TO DO list of things that need to be done. Does not trust
memory alone, but writes down each item.

s. Acts as a liaison between the Director, the Production Staff, and the
Actors.

t. Is prepared to maintain backstage discipline. This includes everything
from keeping the Cast and Crew quiet, to enforcing Departmental Policy
and Safety Regulations.
u. Double-checks the stage area prior to any rehearsal to remove any debris or
tools that may have been left there prior to rehearsal. (This may mean that the
Stage Manager will have to sweep the floor.)

v. Arranges for rehearsals on stage with the Technical Director.



23
       w. In consultation with the costumer, announces times for costume fittings and
       makes certain that all actors attend all sessions required for measurements and for
       costume fittings.

       x. In consultation with the Costume Designer and the Director, announces the
       time and date for the Dress Parade.

       y. Informs actors of photo sessions for publicity.

       z. Works with the Director in getting the information ready for the program of the
       production. Sees that the Production Manager has the information when required
       for printing posters, press releases, and programs.


                          TECHNICAL REHEARSALS
      1. Informs Cast and Crew of the Departmental Policies relating to the use of the
House and backstage areas of the theatre, which may include the following:
      Beverages and food.
      Visitors backstage.
      Responsibilities of keeping the dressing rooms and makeup rooms in order.
      Treatment and care of costumes.
      Location of fire extinguishers and fire alarms.
      Special safety regulations governing the Production.
      Introduces those in charge of specific areas.
      Treatment and care of property items.
      Check in times and check out procedures.
      Emergency procedures.
      Procedures for calling cues, especially light and sound cues.
      Location of properties both onstage and offstage.

       3. Sees that the stage is in order BEFORE and AFTER each rehearsal and
       performance. Sweeps and mops the onstage and offstage areas or assigns this duty
       to crew.

       4. Double-checks to see that all scenery, properties, sound, and lighting
       equipment have been preset and/or checked prior to opening the House.

       5. Times the length of scenes, acts, and intermissions.
       Informs Cast and Crew of all calls for all rehearsals, dress rehearsals, and
       performances.

       Reminds actors that they are responsible for returning their costumes and
       properties to the proper locations after use.

       Coordinates the activities of the Director, Technical director, Cast, Crew, and


       24
      other Staff members. Keeps each informed of any problems and necessary
changes.

       Schedules and prepares lists of all pre-production and post-production checks
       for each crew. Double-checks to see that all assigned tasks are completed as
scheduled.

       Prepares a diagram with the appropriate crew heads of the placement and
       shifting of scenery and properties and spikes all essential prop elements and any
necessary lighting specials.

       11. Reminds running crewmembers to wear either all black or dark blue clothing.

       12. During paper tech, records warnings and cues in respective positions in the
       prompt script. Uses a definite code to distinguish between light, sound, and
       special effects cues are correctly written.

       13. Records all sound and light cues, including cue counts (where applicable)

       REMEMBER: Make duplicates of all cue sheets. One cannot afford to trust only
memory or only one set of written information. When a computerized control system is
used, make and safely store duplicate show disks, tapes, or other recorded material.

       14. When the Director requests ANY technical changes, makes absolutely certain
       that the Designer, Technical director AND the appropriate crew heads know
       them. Avoids unnecessary confusion, problems, or conflicts.

                    FINAL DRESS AND PERFORMANCES
       From this point on, the Stage Manager is now in charge of the Production and
does what is necessary within the means of his/her individual ability and authority to
keep the Production running smoothly.

        Reminds Cast and Crew that performances conditions are in effect. No cast or
Crew are allowed in the House but must remain backstage or in his or her assigned
location. The objective is to maintain a “professional” attitude about the Production. This
can be destroyed by the amateur attitude of being seen by the audience in costume or
makeup before or during a performance when not onstage and performing.

        If curtain is at 7:30p.m., the call is usually set for 6:00p.m. and the House
scheduled to open at 7:00p.m. The Stage Manager checks in Actors and Crewmembers as
they arrive or has them sign the sign-in sheet located at or near the backstage entrance.

       Gives curtain “warns” from 45 minutes to curtain to 5 minutes to “Places.” A
general policy is to call “warns” at 45, 30, 15, 10, 5 minutes prior to curtain, with
“Places” called at 2 minutes. At 30 minutes and at “Places” should be adequate during an


       25
intermission prior to the beginning of the next act. Be certain that the Cast and Crew
acknowledge the call.

        As specified by the director, assembles the Cast and available Crew for final notes
prior to performance.

        Before authorizing the House manager to open the House, double-checks to verify
that the set is ready, props are set, and that the lights, sound, and special effects are ready.
The Stage Manager makes certain that all elements of the Production are in order before
allowing the House to open.

      Curtain will go at a certain time UNLESS there is a hold given by the Stage
Manager or the House Manager.

        In the event of an emergency or a serious technical difficulty that necessitates
interrupting the performance, the Stage Manager calls for the House Lights to fade up.
The Stage Manager then steps on stage and says:

     LADIES AND GENTLEMEN, MAY I HAVE YOU ATTENTION, PLEASE.
DUE TO A TECHNICAL DIFFICULTY, WE ARE UNABLE TO CONTINUE
TONIGHT’S PERFORMANCE. PLEASE TAKE YOUR NEAREST EXIT TO THE
OTUSIDE AND WAIT THERE FOR FURTHER INSTRUCTIONS. THANK YOU
FOR YOUR PATIENCE AND COOPERATION.

       Upon request, produces for the Technical Director a Weekly Cast and Crew
Report each Monday.

                                          STRIKE
       Makes sure that the Cast and Crew know the Departmental Policy and that they
understand that the Strike of the production will begin as soon as possible following the
closing of the final curtain.

        Reminds the Technical Staff members that they are required to attend Strike as
well as those who are enrolled in Theatre courses requiring lab work.

        Reminds the actors that they are also expected to participate in the Strike as a
fulfillment of their roles in the Production.

        Helps the Technical Director and the Crew heads to organize the Strike. Makes
certain that arrangements have been made to protect and return all borrowed items.

        The Stage Manager and all supervisor personnel shall make safety the number one
priority throughout the Production and Strike.

        Turns in the Prompt Script and any “back up” materials to the Technical Director
at the close of strike.

        26
       Files any final Cast and Crew Reports no later than ten days following the final
performance.

                               ASSISTANT DIRECTOR
       The Assistant Director is the right arm of the Director of the production. NOTE:
Some Directors do not have an Assistant Director and simply choose to work with a
Stage Manager. When that is the case, the responsibilities listed below will be added to
those of the Stage Manager.
       PLANNING PERIOD MAKES A COMPLETE PROMPT SCRIPT WHICH
INCLUDES THE FOLLOWING:
       1. Title page.
       2. Table of Contents.
       3. Copy of program (obtain one from the Box Office when available)
       4. Designer’s ground plan showing the placement of all scenic units and furniture.
       5. List of all Actors with their addresses and telephone numbers.
       6. Rehearsal schedule.
       7. Work schedule for crews.
       8. Script.
       9. Blank pages for notes.


                    AUDITION AND REHEARSAL PERIOD
        Obtains names, addresses, and telephone numbers of all who attend auditions as
they arrive. By final casting, this list includes the entire company and is called the
“contact sheet.”

       Assists at auditions in the manner prescribed by the Director. (Hands out audition
forms, has extra pencils and paper on hand, watches for latecomers, etc.)

       With the Stage Manager, chalks or tapes the outline of the set on the floor of the
Stage or rehearsal space.

      Makes out a weekly or total production rehearsal schedule with the Director.
Checks all technical rehearsal times with the Technical Director.

        Writes into the prompt script all directions, changes of directions, movement,
points of interpretation, line changes, cues for sound, lights, and special effects, curtain
cues, and placement of scenery and properties as dictated by the director.

       Prompts the actor when they call for lines.

       Takes notes for the actors as dictated by the Director during rehearsals.



       27
         Notifies the Technical Director of any problem or required changes in the design
of sets, costumes, properties, lighting, or special effects, and of any revisions in the
rehearsal schedule.

       In consultation with the Stage Manager and Property Manager, checks placement
of props both onstage and offstage.

       Is prepared to read each role at any time during rehearsals.

       Gives actors permission to leave rehearsal and knows where each actor is during
each rehearsal.

        Sees that the Production Staff is notified of the technical requirements of publicity
pictures.




       28
                                        THE ACTOR
                   BASIC REQUIREMENTS FOR ACTORS
      Demonstrates ability and a desire to read everything that expands the students’
awareness of human behavior, thought and language.

       Consistently tunes the actor’s instruments - voice, body, and imagination.

        Dedicates to disciplined and mature behavior during the rehearsal process and
during the performances.

       Fulfills script analysis and memorization demands and deadlines.

       Demonstrates a positive commitment to maintaining one’s own health and well-
being during the rehearsal and performance process.

        Has an awareness and understanding of the department’s auditioning and casting
policies included in this handbook.

       Follows ALL rehearsal and performance guidelines found in this handbook.

       Helps when needed with the technical element of the production.

         Commits to the performance of the character(s) by focusing on the imaginary
circumstances of the play during the process and leaving your problems and bad attitudes
at the stage door.

       Works as a collaborator with the cast, crew, director, and stage manager.

       Expresses concerns and grievances only to the stage manager or assistant director.

       Follows directions.

       Does not deviate from rehearsed staging, design, or technical elements once in
performance.

       Knows that once into technical rehearsals, the stage manager is in charge, and
always acknowledge her or him with respect.

       Doesn’t wander off physically or mentally.

        Exits a scene, go all the way off stage. Don’t block other cast member’s entrances
or exits.

       Is punctual for all production calls.


       29
                         AUDITION:
          (1) You should show respect for the craft, yourself, and the director by having
          a prepared audition.

          (2) Audition as often as possible to become more at ease with the process.

          (3) Know the time commitment that you are making.

                         REHEARSALS:
          (1) You are responsible for being ready to work at the called time.

          (2) Arrive and give yourself 15 minutes to settle before our rehearsal call.

          (3) Always bring a pencil, script, and actor journal for notes.

          (4) From the beginning for blocking wear appropriate rehearsal shoes, hat, coat,
          skirt or trousers.

          (5) Take notes after rehearsal and read over them and the script prior to the next
          rehearsal.

       If you are late, miss a fitting, or ignore a deadline, you will probably be replaced.
       ACTORS’ HOMEWORK: It is your responsibility to complete the following
analysis of our character. Begin preparation after you have read your script about 4 times.
All preparation should be done in the first person, connecting you with your character.

          GET TO KNOW YOUR CHARACTER:
          Record everything that you say about yourself or that is implied about yourself.

          Identify the character’s SUPER OBJECTIVE. Explain your answer.

          Describe what the character expects to gain if he/she does succeed.

       Describe the GIVEN CIRCUMSTANCES in the character’s OWN WORDS.
Attention should be given to geographical location, specific place and time, economic
environment, social restrictions, climate, political interests, and religious and ethical
themes.

          The IMMEIDATE and LONG RANGE EXPECTATIONS of the character.
          Mark each beat using a ruler and a line. ID the character’s LITERAL
          ACTIVITY, ACTION, and OBSTACLE for each beat.

          Describe how this character responds to crisis.

          Identify the character’s PHYSICAL and VOCAL characteristics found in the
script.

          30
       Describe the character’s beliefs in his/her own words. What do they feel is right
and wrong, good and bad?

       What is the character’s age, occupation, religion, and education? Describe the
character’s relationship with another character.
       What do other characters say about your character? What does your character say
about him/herself?

       LANGUAGE: Examples of speech (formal or informal, concrete or abstract.)

       Sentence length, compare with other characters. Dramatic punctuation of speech.
Subtext for one beat.

       ALIGNMENT AND BREATHING: To prepare for rehearsal:
       Ground, align, and focus your energy and body.
       Do body inventory to eliminate tension spots.
       Inhale using your diaphragm.
       Relax jaw and use it to produce words.
       Keep hands, fingers and toes relaxed.
       Eat an hour before rehearsal. Do not use caffeine to pump up! It is not helpful for
your voice. Centering and calm focus is what you want. Don’t smoke in order to protect
your valuable vocal instrument.
       TWISTERS: Memorize and practice each day!
       Red leather yellow leather
       Big black bugs bleed blue blood
       Slippery snake slithery snake
       Six thick thistle sticks

       WORDS:
       Where When What Why
       Would you get it for me?
       Because I can just picture it
       Pour water with the pitcher
       Betty Botter bought a bit of bitter butter
       Melissa asked no help with her tasks
       Then when I found the pen my heart quietly beat
       The wild wind wound round the wilderness

                          WISDOM FOR THE ACTOR:

       What are we working toward? Acting that develops momentum, creates suspense
and anticipation, engages feelings and empathy, excites emotion, conveys a story,
demands attention, provides reflection, infects and moves fellow actors, surprises,
shocks, alarms, amazes, absorbs the spectator.
       Discipline and technique are underpinnings of the good actor, but must be
transparent.

       31
         Actor in character’s place/situation: the Actor must achieve the emotional state of
the person at the very moment the character reaches that place in “normal” life – is the
character alert, attentive, observing, believing, egocentric, etc...
         Magic happens when the actor can answer: “What would I do if I were him/her in
this situation. It is important to assimilate the character’s history in order to react in kind.
         Actors, like a necklace with gold links, must maintain the delicate connection
between themselves and the part they are portraying, or all is lost. Forgetting the audience
“circle of attention” with the other actor.
         Geste is a pattern of movement that the actor uses to create fundamental form for
the character. Physical or psychological.
         You may play well or badly, but play truly!
         What you do, not what you feel
         The life of a human body made up of living physical actions, motivated by an
inner sense of truth and belief in what actor is doing.

                        Example of the Actor’s Homework
         So, you were brave and auditioned, just for the experience, and, surprise, you
were cast in a play. How do you approach character research? Here are a few tips based
upon the following short monologue from Saroyan’s The Time of Your Life:
         Kitty Duval: I like champagne and everything that goes with it. Big houses with
big porches, and big rooms with big windows, and big lawns, and big trees, and flowers
growing every where, and big shepherd dogs sleeping in the shade. I’d walk out of house,
stand on the porch, look at the trees, smell the flowers, run across the lawn, lie under a
tree, and read a book. A book of poems, maybe.
         So you read the script several times and read about the playwright and about the
given circumstances of the world of the play. Then in your journal you might make notes
of the information from the script like those that follow for Kitty. Small, powerful
woman, delicate, rugged beauty, an angry purity, fierce pride, grace, arrogance, “a great
person,” “Doesn’t like being alone.” Angry with herself. Full of hate for the poor world,
full of pity and contempt for its tragic, unbelievable, confounded people.
         You read drama critics about Kitty: Missouri Waltz-sorrowful American music,
“her reality and rhythm, a perfect accompanist. Her music that the world drove out of her,
leaving her broken and spiritually crippled. “At once funny and unutterably sad.” “There
is drama in everything, because there is drama in myself.” Kitty is “tough, independent,
bitter, and hard voiced at the beginning, masking her fragility.”
         Act 1
         Dreaming to myself. I seem to be dreaming a dream. “What’s the dream now?”
         “Be careful what you think of me.”
         Used to be in burlesque, “not a two bit whore!” (but is)
         “I dream of home.”
         “Joe” I believe in dreams sooner than statistics.”
         Act 2
         I’ve been crying for an hour. “Like an angel, not like the other street walkers.”
         Toys, gifts, made me cry harder. Live in a “small room that clouds me.”
         ACT 3
         I remember, realize the changes in the mirror

        32
       I don’t like this life.
       I really love Tom
       I am “the most beautiful lady in the world.”
       Too many things have happened to me, but I’m truly innocent.
       I can’t stand being alone.
       Every person is a variation of me
       Seek goodness.

        Discover things beyond corruption.
        Destroy ugliness and death
        You note important lines from the script that connect with Kitty and you shape
information in the first person.
        This is a beginning for your homework. You are ready to have an intelligent
conversation with your director and to begin working on Kitty’s voice, movement, and
objectives and may score your script in pencil, pending the director’s input.
        Score your script.
        Divide into beats.
        Group the beat into units.
        Title each of the units.
        For each beat, write one of the following for your character:
        For Kitty’s speech about big houses and poems, you might begin with the
following:
        Objective: to escape
        Obstacle: immediate pain around me
        Tactic: imagination
        Expectation: to suspend reality
        Point of view: I’m a fairy princess, somehow mistakenly living in hell.

                 MAKE-UP DRESSING ROOM POLICIES
                                      MAKE-UP
      All actors will provide their own make-up kits (see Dr. Johnson for details).
Philomath High School Theatre will supply only unusual items of make-up.

       Actors are expected to clean up their dressing tables after each rehearsal and
performance.

       Actors who prepare their own make-up are subject to checking and approval by
the Head of Make-up. Actors who require the services of the Make-up Crew must
cooperate by adhering to a pre-arranged operation schedule.

        The members of the audience should never see the actor in make-up or costume
either before the show or during intermissions.

       Only authorized personnel should be in the dressing rooms.


       33
       Do not use aerosol sprays in the enclosed dressing rooms.

       COSTUMES
       After the final dress rehearsal, no change is to be made in costume, makeup or
accessories without the permission of the Designer and Director.

       Each actor is responsible for the condition of his costume, wig, or other
accessories. Any damage or problems should be noted on the repair sheet located on the
Production Board.

       Drinking (outside of clear liquids), and eating in costume is prohibited.

      In order to preserve costumes, actors should take steps to maintain body hygiene.
Shower before coming to the theatre.

       Once in costume remain backstage, do not go outside or to the lobby in costume.

       The performer should get out of costume immediately after rehearsal or
performance and hang his/her complete costume in the designated place in the dressing
room. Do not take any part of your costume home-for any reason.

       Please maintain a professional atmosphere. Actors should only change in a
dressing room. If you need to step out of the dressing room before you are fully in
costume wear a cover-up of some kind.

                               STUDENT DESIGNERS
        Philomath urges any student who is interested in designing for theatre to actively
participate in the creative process and upon the completion of certain prerequisites
described below to apply to the Director of Performing Arts for the opportunity to design
for main stage production under the supervision of the faculty designer and technical
director. It is hoped and assumed that the realization of a design element will enhance the
student’s appreciation for the impact that design has on the total theatre experience and
better prepare them for any future involvement in theatre in general and in design more
particularly.
        Designers are not engineers, but artists, who creates visual metaphors for the
enduring questions that the text proposes. Such as: “Who is the central character,” “What
does it all mean; what is the theme.” Specifically, the designer in conference with the
director answers these dramatic questions and determines the style for the production.
Then through a series of sketches, feedback from the director and design instructor, and
revisions the designer develops these ideas into a usable design element, which serves the
dramatic as well as practical function of the play. The designer is then responsible for
communicating his/her design to the technical director or costume shop supervisor
through research, concept statement, models, renderings, ground plans, elevations,
costume plates, sound or light plots.


       34
                                  QUALIFICATIONS:
       Any student currently enrolled at PHS is eligible to apply for consideration for a
student design position:
       It is important that you have an overall GPA of 2.0 or better.

                                    APPLICATIONS:
        Draft a letter of application to the director the trimester prior to the one you are
interested in your pursuing a realized design.
        Attend an interview where you will show your portfolio to the Director of
Performing Arts, Technical Director and the Production’s Director.

       The Technical Director will then post design assignments.

                            DESIGN CONSULTATIONS
        Design consultations are the series of first meetings between the designer and the
director in which they talk in general about the show, its themes, dramatic questions
raised, and the director’s approach to the work.
        You are expected to have done a thorough analysis of the script before you attend
your first consultation.

       During your consultation meetings you will be expected to support your ideas
with sketches.

       In addition you are required to present documentation of your research to your
design advisor. This documentation will consist of:
       A typed paper that describes you approach to the production and notes regarding
period or style;
       Visual support material; photocopies, sketchers;
       A bibliography of all material consulted.


                    PRODUCTION MEETINGS for Designers
       Production Meetings consist of the Director, Technical Director, Designers and
any combination of the following personnel: Director of Performing Arts, Publicity,
Stage manager, and Assistant Designers and are used to formalize and coordinate all
production areas.
       You are required to attend every Production Meeting.
       NOTE: In addition to your design consultations and production meetings you will
meet with your design advisor once a week to discuss any problems and for an evaluation
of your progress.


                            TECHNICAL REHEARSALS
      You are required to attend the Dry Tech, Cue to Cue, and all Technical and Dress
Rehearsals.

       35
                       STUDENT SCENIC DESIGNERS
        As a student scenic designer, you are expected to fulfill the following obligations
in addition to those described above.

       FINAL RENDERING AND GROUND PLAN

        When the Production Director approves your final design, you will be required to
present the following to the technical director for construction:
        A finished color rendering or a 1/2” fully realized color model. You will need a
different rendering/model to show each scene change.

       A 1/2’ ground plan.

       A complete set of working drawings and side elevations.

       Any smaller sketches or rendering that will be needed for construction.

       If you have any painted drops or projections in the design provide scale
rendering(s) or source material for each.

       PAINTING AND FINISH WORK

        After your set is constructed you are required to personally paint or supervise the
painting of the set. If your design entails projections or slides you are responsible for
either doing or personally overseeing the photography or assembling of any material to
be used.


                        STUDENT COSTUME DESIGNER
        The costume designer uses fabric and the basic elements of design: line, texture,
mass, color, composition to create a silhouette and look for each character. Although
construction experience is necessary, the designer is not a tailor but an artist. In addition
to the prerequisites and obligations of a student designer described earlier, the student
costume designer is also responsible for the items detailed below.

       FINAL RENDERINGS You will present your final design as:
       1. A separate finished color rendering with fabric swatches for each costume.
       2. A complete costume plot and scene break down.

        CONSTRUCTION While your design is being constructed, you are required to
check in everyday with the Technical director or the Costume Shop supervisor. While it
is not mandatory, it is advised that you try to work as much as possible on the actual
construction of your design.


       36
      You are responsible for executing your designs. This means you will:
      Either supervises or personally builds, assist in buying, pulling, or renting each
costume.

       Attend each fitting and either supervise or personally alter all costumes.

       Staying within the costume budget.
       Be aware that the Costume Shop has a Costume Supervisor who is in charge of
maintaining the basic shop supplies, maintaining the equipment, and allocating the shop
space and work-study time for the season. Though available to answer any questions you
might have on the construction of the costumes, she/he is not responsible for the
construction of costumes. The shop may be able to supply some labor in the form of
work-study students.

       Be required to have set hours in the costume shop.

       Measure each actor and meet with him or her to discuss his or her costume.

       Supervise on workday any final building and finish work that needs to be done.

      Be aware that for publicity purposes some of the costumes will have to be
completed before the Dress parade.

      Have the finished costumes at Dress Parade. All building and finish work should
be completed at this point.

       Attend publicity photo calls and prepare actors in costumes and accessories for
photographs.

       COSTUME PARADE AND DRESS REHEARSALS

       You are required to attend the dress parade, and all dress rehearsals. You need to:

       Answer questions the director, actors, or technicians may have.

       See the costumes under lights and with actors.

       Communicate to the Director any problems you see with the way the actors use or
wear the costume.

        Make sure that the actors are wearing the complete costume properly and at the
correct times.

        Your communication with the actors should be reserved to the fittings and Notes
posted in the dressing room. As a rule any notes on costumes involving action should be
addressed to the director.

       37
                        STUDENT LIGHTING DESIGNER
        The lighting designer uses lighting instruments combined with the basic elements
of design: angle, texture, color, shadow to carve out an environment in time and space for
the production to exist. The designer is then responsible for communicating his/her
design to the technical director through storyboards, renderings, lighting plots, instrument
schedules and a gel cut list. In addition to the prerequisites and obligations of the student
designer described earlier, the student lighting designer is also responsible for the
following items and duties.

                       FINAL DESIGN:
        A 1/2” lighting plot in plain view and side elevation

        An instrument schedule to be used in the hanging of the lights

        A storyboard

        A list of color media, gobos or specialty items that the designer requires that may
not currently be in stock

        Generate in consultation with the Production Director where there is a change in
lighting and notate those changes in the script

       HANGING AND FOCUSING: The student lighting designer will also serve as
Master Electrician for the production both in house and if the show travels. Which means
you will either supervise or personally:
       Prepare all schedules and sheets
       Hang, focus, and gel every instrument
       Design and build any special equipment for the lighting design (such as: a
Linnebach projector and any painted slides, “unique” gobos, etc.)

       TECHNICAL REHEARSALS: You are required to attend the Paper Tech, Dry
Tech, Cue to Cue, and all Tech and Dress Rehearsals. You will need to:

        See that the Production Stage manager has an accurate notation on all lighting
cues.

        Build all lighting cues and establish appropriate rates.

      See that cues are recorded either electronically or on paper, and that the Stage
manager has a back up copy of the cues.

        Generates a “Magic Sheet” for doing the nightly light check.

                          STUDENT SOUND DESIGNER
       The sound designer uses sound to enhance the physical and psychological
environment of the characters. The designer is responsible for communicating his/her
        38
design to the audience in either live or recorded cues that serve the dramatic, as well as,
practical functions of the play. In addition to the description of the duties of the student
designer expressed earlier, the student sound designer must also fulfill the following
obligations.

       EXECUTION: As Designer you are responsible for either overseeing or
personally:
       Recording all taped cues

       The rehearsal of all live cues

       Construction of any sound effects devices used in creating live cues

       Making complete and detailed cue sheets

       The generation of a sound plot that indicates the placement of all
       speakers, monitors, or microphones used in the sound design

        FINAL DESIGN: Your final design will be presented as a cue sheet that will
state every live or taped cue for the show as well as pre-show and intermission music to
be used. This cue will include:
        1. Source: live or recorded
        2. Title of music/sound effect or description of live sound
        3. Length of cue
        4. Cue number

       TECHNICAL REHEARSALS:
       You are required to attend all technical rehearsals to:
       Establish appropriate sound levels
       Answer any questions the director, actors, or technicians have
       Communicate with the Director or Technical Director any problems you here in
       the execution of cues

       SOUND TECHNICIAN

       The Sound Technician is Head of the sound Crew and runs Sound for the
Production. Her major responsibility is to execute the design as planned
       by the Sound Designer. As a result, the Sound Technician will assist the Sound
Designer in every way possible. In return, the experience will help train the Sound
Technician as a Sound Designer for subsequent productions.

       PLANNING PERIOD:
       Consults with the Sound Designer and Technical Director on the design and
treatment of sound and music for the production. If musicians will be used, makes
arrangements with the Sound Designer to be present at all rehearsals that include the
musicians.

       39
                    TECHNICAL AND DRESS REHEARSALS AND
               PERFORMANCES
        Double-checks all cues with the Stage Manager and makes certain that the Board
Operator and the Stage Manager have the same cue numbers and counts. Makes certain
that the Stage Manager has copies of all cue sheets, Instrument Schedules, and other
paper work or back up disks as a precaution against loss.
        Checks in with the Stage Manager at all designated times and calls.

       Makes backup copies of recorded effects and music. Sees that all cues are clearly
labeled with the cue number, the production, any special encoding for noise reduction,
the sound cues by number and description, and the date.

                      WORK PERIOD:
       Supervises the work of the Sound Crew. Always works with one or two
individuals to train them in the proper use of the sound system and the recording
equipment.

       In consultation with the Technical Director, establishes Production deadlines for
music, recorded and live sound effects, and sound reinforcement.

       Keeps an accurate listing for the Technical Director of sources used to record
music for the Production.

        In consultation with the Technical Director, schedules calls for the Sound Crew to
attend rehearsals.
        Assists the Sound Designer in making complete and detailed music, sound, and
reinforcement cue sheets in collaboration with the director and Technical Director.

       Trains all members of the sound Crew to operate all sound equipment properly in
case an operator must be replaced.

      Assists the Sound Designer in recording music and effects and in making the
show CD and backup CD.

       Records the complete sound patch (how each piece of sound equipment is
connected) and preset, then writes in the sound level(s) for sound cues for the Production.
Provides the Technical Director and Stage Manager with full sets of all sound patches,
presents, and cues in case the originals are lost or unusable.

       Sets up all speakers, monitors, and microphones.




       40
       Makes back up copies recorded effects and music. Sees that all CDs and cues are clearly
labeled with the number, the production, any special encoding for noise reduction, the sound
cues by number and description, and the date.

                       PERFORMANCE:
      Accepts responsibility for executing all sound and music effects and cues. Sees that the
Sound Crew has a working knowledge of these effects and cues.

        Checks the accuracy of cues with the Sound Designer. Makes copies of all cue sheets for
the Stage Manager that include the sound patch, all levels on each piece of sound equipment in
each cue, and the placement of all speakers and microphones.
        With the Technical Director, assigns a member of the Sound Crew to execute any live
sound effects, such as doorbells, telephone bells, or glass crashes. Assigns a member of the
Sound Crew to set up all microphones.

      Checks in with the Stage Manager at all designated times, calls, and sees that the Sound
Crew does likewise.

        At Crew Call, checks all sound systems and equipment. Has spare fuses and batteries on
hand for each piece of equipment and knows how to replace them in each unit that uses them.
Knows the power circuits, which control each piece of sound equipment, where the circuit
breakers are, and how to reset the breakers. If possible, has replacement equipment available in
case a unit fails- especially microphones and cables. Notifies Stage manager when check is
complete.

       Any equipment problems should be brought to the immediate attention of the Technical
Director.

        Accepts full responsibility for assisting the designer with any additional recording,
splicing, or rewiring of sound cues to make them work.

       Checks the intercom system and disburses headsets to all appropriate personnel, such as
the Director, Technical Director, Sound Designer, Light Designer, Stage Manager.

        Checks to see that all portable sound equipment not permanently placed for the
production, such as microphones or headsets, is secured under lock and key and stored properly
after each rehearsal and performance.

                       STRIKE:
       Returns all sound and music equipment to its proper storage area and secures it.

       Returns all borrowed or rented equipment within three days of the close of the
production.

        Files all show CDs with the Technical Director for Departmental Production Records.
Places the dates and title of the Production on the tape containers.

       41
         GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR CREW HEAD POSITIONS
        Crew Heads perform under the direct supervision of a specific supervisor (faculty, staff,
or student). Crew Heads aid the Technical Director in making maximum use of scheduled work
time. When requested, the Crew head will do necessary paper work and working drawings. The
Crew head will not make any design or cue changes without first obtaining the approval of the
technical director.
        The Crew Head will not purchase or borrow items without obtaining the approval of the
appropriate supervisor. When making purchases, the Crew Head will make certain to obtain all
receipts. The Crew Head will know and will instruct all crewmembers about Theatre policies
concerning the purchase or borrowing of items for the Production.


                      PLANNING PERIOD, REHEARSAL, AND PERFORMANCES
       Reads the play and about the play and playwright.

       Obtains all necessary plans from the Technical Director.

       Studies the drawings in conference with the Technical director.

       Executes designated drawings.

       In consultation with the Technical Director, plans a work schedule to be able to meet
deadlines. Posts weekly crew calls on the Callboard.

       Checks with the Stage Manager for all rehearsals that Crews need to attend.

       Does not borrow or use personal equipment belonging to any member of the crew or cast
without being given clearance to do so by the appropriate supervisor.

       Before such equipment can be used in the Production, a written agreement must be made
concerning its repair or replacement. If an item is used without proper authorization by the
department, its replacement or repair cannot be justified by the Administration.

      Keeps an up-to-date list of crewmembers including their addresses and telephone
numbers.

       Sees that work areas are clean and uncluttered. All work areas must be thoroughly
cleaned before the end of each work call.

        Usually will be a member of the running crew and will work with the Technical Director
in preplanning the necessary properties shifts and changes of scenery, costumes, lighting, sound,
and makeup.

       Is prepared to do repair work on damaged scenery, costumes, lights, sound tapes, and
other necessary production.


       42
      Enforces departmental policies concerning the purchase of production supplies, the
borrowing of production equipment, and smoking and beverage regulations.

       Reminds all Crews that the strike of the production will usually be scheduled
immediately after the final curtain of the closing performance.
       The crew head’s work is not completed until the stage and all respective areas have been
returned to normal conditions. This includes returning borrowed items as well as the proper
storage of departmental supplies.


                                         PROPS HEAD
        Reads and becomes familiar with the script and the Director’s vision of the world of the
play.
       Makes a list of all props anticipated in the production. Finalizes that list in consultation
with the Director and Scenic Designer. Notes if the list changes during the rehearsal process.

        Secures any pertinent elevations from the Scenic Designer.

        Executes any designated drawings.

       In consultation with the Technical Director, plans a work schedule that will permit
deadlines to be met. Posts weekly crew calls on the Call Board.

      Checks with the Stage Manager or Assistant Director for all rehearsals that the Props
Crew will need to attend.

        Assists Stage Manager in securing rehearsal props where needed.

        Follows departmental procedures regarding all borrowed or rented items.

       Sees that the work areas are clean and uncluttered. All work areas must be cleaned before
the end of each work call.

       Will work with the Technical Director and Stage Manager in pre-planning any necessary
prop shifts.

        Is prepared to do repair work on any prop damaged in rehearsal or performance.

        Reminds all crews that the strike of the production will usually be scheduled immediately
after the final curtain of the closing performance.

       The crew head’s work is not completed until the stage and all respective areas have been
returned to normal conditions. This includes returning borrowed items as well as the proper
storage of departmental supplies.

        Return all borrowed or rented items within three days of the close of the production.

        43
       Perform other duties as assigned by the Technical Director or Stage Manager.

       PROPERTIES PROCEDURES Creating props for a production involves several steps:
       Read script and make notes of props

       Meet with director to get list of props:

       Ask questions about what the props look like, how big, color, etc. Be clear about
deadlines. Understand purchasing or borrowing procedures.
       Create props using your resources and imagination.

       Attend rehearsals once a week to see if something is missing.

       6. Provide stage manager with rehearsal props for off book rehearsals.

       7. During Workday:
       Set up prop tables;

       (b) Create prop list;

       (c) Have all materials in Scene Shop with a list of things to do.

       Attend technical and dress rehearsals to finish and fine-tune your work.

        Be sure prop crew understands what goes where and provide list (See List A South
Pacific)

       Set up prop box.

       Report to scene shop each morning of performance to determine any repairs or problems
you need to resolve.

       Strike-Return all props to the appropriate storage area.

       Return all borrowed props.

       Write a thank you note to all people who loaned props. Postage Provided by Theatre.

        Attached is an example of the property list for South Pacific to use as a model. Prop
running crews are responsible to the prop designer, stage manager, technical director, and
director. They are responsible for:

       Attending one run through before technical rehearsals begin;

       Attending all tech rehearsals at call time;

       44
       Setting and striking props each night;

       Repairing props in emergencies or finding substitutes;

       Striking props box during strike and placing props neatly in prop storage;

       Cleaning prop area and kitchen.

       SOUTH PACIFIC EXAMPLE PROPERTIES LIST
       This is an example of the sheet made up by the crew head for the show run
       HAND PROPS:
       Act I/Scene I
       1 Ball- rubber
       1 Stuffed animal
       1 Large Silver Tray
       1 White napkin
       2 Brandy snifters
       2 Demi tasse cups & saucers
       1 Spoon on saucer
       1 Silver sugar bowl (lump sugar in it)
       1 sugar tongs
       1 Brandy bottle (filled)
       1 Newspaper clipping (Nellie’s Purse)
       SCENE 2
       5 Ammunition cases
       1 Long box
       3 Jerry cans
       1 shrunken Head
       1 White grass skirt
       SCENE 3
       Football
       1 Torn blue shirt-preset on laundry (SR)
       1 Package of laundry with woman’s pleated shorts
       Roll of bills
       Large bundle of grass skirts
       1 Muster Bag
       Kiosk-should be filled to maximum.
       A girl (Paulette) should pick up a dyed skirt from behind the riser.

                                 MAKE-UP CREW HEAD
        Generally the responsibilities of the Make-up Crew and Crew head begin with the first
dress rehearsal and end with the strike of the production following the final performance. If the
make-up requirements of the production are more extensive than normal, it may be necessary
that the Make-up Crew and Crew Head attend a training session and/or start work the evening of
the Dress Parade.

       45
          The Make-Up Crew Head will:
          Make certain that the dressing rooms and Make-up tables are clean and ready for the
actors.

       Make certain that the make-up storage area is clean and well organized and that each
“pot” of make-up is clean and usable.

          Assist in the application of any special make-up.

          Give approval of the actor’s make-up before they go on stage.

       Maintain an inventory of supplies (hair spray, bobbie pins, etc.) and notify the Technical
Director of any materials that need to be replaced or replenished.

       Make sure the dressing rooms and make-up tables are clean and ready for the next
rehearsal or performance.

        At strike, supervise the Make-up Crew in cleaning the dressing rooms, which include;
wiping any jars, cleaning mirrors, restoring any theatre equipment to the proper place, sweeping
floors, etc.

       Other duties assigned by the Technical director, Stage Manager, Costume and/or Make-
up Designer.

                         MAKE-UP CREW
          The number of crewmembers will depend upon the needs of the production.

       This crew will be assigned to one production—all dress rehearsals through the last
performance and the production strike.

          Crewmembers will be assigned certain duties for the run of the production.

          These students are directly responsible to the instructor, costume designer, and make-up
head.

          Each crewmember must sign in to receive credit for the assignment.

                         WARDROBE HEAD
        Generally responsible for costumes, dressing rooms, and backstage changes beginning
with dress parade and ending with strike. This work might be accomplished with the help of a
running crew and a maintenance crew. Any problems related to the performance of these crews
are to be immediately brought to the attention of the Technical Director.
        Prepare sheets for checking show out and in each night.

       Insure dressing rooms are clean and ready for first dress rehearsal and that all costumes to
be used in that rehearsal are in the dressing room.

          46
      Make Name Cards and post on costume racks with all of the performer’s costume
elements in the appropriate dressing room.

       Be aware of all backstage changes. Work out with the Costume Designer or Assistant
Designer and Stage Manager how backstage changes will be done. Train and supervise necessary
dressers for any backstage changes.

        Be present at Dress parade to assist and take notes for the Costume Designer, assist the
actors with their costumes, and to become more familiar with the design.

       As a member of the running crew, be present at all dress rehearsals and performances.

       Supervise running crew and instruct in procedures for checking show, pulling laundry,
maintaining the rules of the dressing room and backstage, assisting actors in the dressing room,
and emergency repairs.

        Post and collect list of special maintenance and repair requests each night of performance
and return this list to the costume shop after performance or delegate this job to a running
crewmember. Instruct actors in the use of these lists.

      Makes certain that repairs have been completed, any laundry done properly and that all
costumes are ready for that days’ rehearsal or performance.

       WARDROBE CREW:

       Dresser duties: Must be available for all dress rehearsals and performances.
       The number of crewmembers (if any) will depend on the needs of the production.

       Crewmembers will check costumes in and out of each rehearsal and performance.

       Crewmembers will be assigned certain duties for the run of the production, including
daily mending, laundry and ironing.

      These students are directly responsible to the instructor, costume designer, and the
wardrobe crew head.

       Each member must sign in daily to receive credit for the assignment.


                      COSTUME PERSONNEL STRIKE RESPONSIBILITIES
       Wardrobe Head and Running Crew:

       The Wardrobe head shall post, during the last performance, the arrangements for return
of any personal items used in the production.


       47
      Check that all costumes are returned to the dressing rooms and report any missing pieces
immediately to the Shop Manager. After checking is complete, costumes are to be returned to the
costume shop.

       Clean dressing rooms completely including mirrors, tabletops, floors, and bathrooms.

       Arrange with the maintenance crew for completion of laundry.

       II. Shop Manager, Costume Shop, and Maintenance Crew:
       Sort costumes into washing, dry cleaning, and direct re-stock.

       Begin laundry and carry as far as reasonable.

       Put all dry cleaning in one place for delivery to the cleaners.

       Begin the re-stock.

       Clean out cutting shelves, fabric shelves, and cutting box.

       Cutter should sort and store or discard all patterns.

       The shop is to be left clean and neat and ready for the next days’ work.


                       MASTER ELECTRICIAN
        The Master Electrician will be responsible for seeing that all lights for the Production are
hung and focused on schedule. Assistant Lighting Designers will serve as Master Electrician for
faculty and guest designers.

       PLANNING PERIOD:
       Obtains a copy of the script to be used for the Production.

       In conference with the Technical Director and Lightning Designer, goes over the lighting
design for the Production. Takes notes on its electrical requirements.

       Knows the number and type of lighting instruments used in the design.

       Knows the amount of cable required and tests to make certain that it is in safe operating
condition. If cable requires repair, notifies the Technical Director.

       Notifies the technical director if dimmers are in need of service.

       Knows the location of all circuit breakers in the Theatre and what each circuit controlled.

       Develops an instrument schedule if not given one by the lighting designer.


       48
       If follow spots are to be used, helps select and train operators.

       WORK PERIOD:
       Checks all lighting instruments, cleans all dirty lenses, and removes any debris from
within any instrument.

       Completes the instrument schedule that shows the type and placement of instruments and
which lamps and color filters are used in them.

      Hangs, circuits, and patches lights according to the light plot and instrument schedule.
Focuses lights with the lighting designer at calls scheduled by the Technical Director.

       If a lighting instrument doesn’t work, checks the lamp, the cable, the circuit breaker, and
the connection.

       A light check should involve two people, the Board operator in the Control booth and one
Crew Member on the stage. Each control circuit or dimmer is tested for the correct lighting
instruments and their proper focus. It is impossible for the Board Operator, sitting in the Control
Booth, to determine if all lights are working properly.

       Makes certain that the Light Board Operator remains at the Board until released by the
Stage Manager following the close of the Performance.

        STRIKE
        Unless directed otherwise by the Technical Director, the Lighting Crew returns all
lighting instruments, cable, and any other equipment used in lighting the production to their
original positions or storage areas.

       Removes all color filters and saves those that can be reused in future productions.

       Makes an up-to-date inventory of color filters and lamps.

       Notes any lighting equipment requiring repair and gives this report to the Technical
Director.




       49

				
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