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					Appendix A                                                                      Page A-1


Appendix A: Legislative and HECBoard Documents

                                    Legislative Findings

The legislature finds that the benefits of higher education should be more widely available to
the citizens of the state of Washington. The legislature also finds that a citizen’s place of
residence can restrict that citizen’s access to educational opportunity at the upper-division
and graduate level.

Because most of the state-supported baccalaureate universities are located in areas
removed from major metropolitan areas, the legislature finds that many of the state’s
citizens, especially those citizens residing in the central Puget Sound area, the Tri-Cities,
Spokane, Vancouver, and Yakima, have insufficient and inequitable access to upper-division
baccalaureate and graduate education.

This lack of sufficient education opportunities in urban areas makes it difficult or impossible
for place-bound individuals, who are unable to relocate, to complete a baccalaureate or
graduate degree. It also exacerbates the difficulty financially needy students have attending
school, since many of those students need to work, and work is not always readily available
in some communities where the baccalaureate institutions of higher education are located.

The lack of sufficient educational opportunities in metropolitan areas also affects the
economy of the underserved communities. Businesses benefit from access to the research
and teaching capabilities of institutions of higher education. The absence of these
institutions from some of the state’s major urban centers prevents beneficial interaction
between businesses in these communities and the state’s universities.

The Washington state master plan for higher education, adopted by the higher education
coordinating board, recognizes the need to expand upper-division and graduate educational
opportunities in the state’s large urban centers. The board has also attempted to provide a
means for helping to meet future educational demand through a system of branch
campuses in the state’s major urban areas.

The legislature endorses the assignment of responsibility to serve these urban centers that
the board has made to various institutions of higher education. The legislature also
endorses the creation of branch campuses for the University of Washington and Washington
state University.

The legislature recognizes that, among their other responsibilities, the state’s
comprehensive community colleges share with the four-year universities and colleges the
responsibility of providing the first two years of a baccalaureate education. It is the intent of
the legislature that the four-year institutions and the community colleges work as
cooperative partners to ensure the successful and efficient operation of the state’s system of
higher education. The legislature further intends the at the four-year institutions work
cooperatively with the community colleges to ensure that branch campuses are operated as
models of a two plus two educational system.

From RCW 28B.45.010




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Appendix A                                                                   Page A-2

                    HEC Board Role and Mission Statement

The primary mission of the branch campuses is to provide instruction in degree-granting
programs at the upper-division and master’s levels. Placebound individuals in the area
surrounding each branch campus will be the primary participants. As part of this mission,
branch campuses are also expected to support scholarly activity by faculty and students,
ensure the intellectual vitality of the institution, maintain high quality instruction, and
provide opportunities for professional growth. Finally, branch campuses are expected to
encourage and support public service activities which strengthen the local community and
enhance the educational experience of students.



Within the overall role and mission, each branch campus will be unique, recognizing local
student needs, diverse community resources, and the proximity of other institutions of
higher education. The individual character of each branch campus will be developed
gradually, in collaboration with the HECBoard’s budget recommendation and program
approval processes.



Higher Education Coordinating Board

Design for the 21st Century: Expanding Higher Education Opportunity in Washington, p. 15,
July 1, 1990




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Appendix A                                                                   Page A-3




                                    September 30, 2004



Guidelines for Branch Campus Planning

and Recommendations: HB 2707



INTRODUCTION

Engrossed Substitute House Bill 2707 (ESHB 2707), enacted in 2004, provides a policy
framework and directive for the re-assessment of the role and mission of the “branch
campuses.” The legislation emphasizes the unique role of each campus in responding to the
needs of placebound students and, at the same time, meeting emerging regional needs in a
manner that could alter the original role and mission of these institutions.

These guidelines provide a framework for developing and evaluating recommendations
concerning the role, mission, or governance of the upper-division and graduate campuses of
the University of Washington and Washington State University. The guidelines recognize
that the branch campuses will continue to evolve over time in different ways in response to
regional and state needs.

POLICY CONTEXT

The legislature, in adopting ESHB 2707, provided a clear statement of legislative intent.
Specifically, the legislation states, in part, that the:



“policy landscape in higher education has changed since the original creation of the branch
campuses. Demand for access … is increasing (and) … economic development efforts …
recognize the importance of focusing on … collaboration among communities, businesses,
and colleges and universities ….

Each branch campus has evolved into a unique institution, and it is appropriate to assess
the nature of this evolution to ensure the role and mission of each campus is aligned with
the state’s higher education goals and the needs of the region where the campus is located
….




UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON, TACOMA SELF-STUDY
Appendix A                                                                    Page A-4

Therefore, it is the Legislature’s intent to recognize the unique nature of Washington’s
higher education branch campuses, reaffirm the role and mission of each, and set the
course for their continued future development.”1




1
    Section 1(3) and (4) ESHB 2707.


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Appendix A                                                                   Page A-5

In line with this statement of intent, ESHB 2707 directs each branch campus to examine its
current role and mission in the context of student demand and regional needs and to submit
a recommendation to the Higher Education Coordinating Board (HECB) concerning the
“future evolution of the campus.”2

The HECB is then directed to evaluate the recommendations and provide the legislature with
policy options associated with the institutional recommendations. ESHB 2707 (Section 4)
delineates types of information and factors to be considered by the HECB in conducting its
evaluation and directs the HECB to develop common parameters for this evaluation. It is
assumed that the legislature desires to see recommendations that are best suited to meet
the needs of students, communities, and the state.

The following section provides these parameters. These information requirements were
developed in the context of the board’s 2004 Strategic Master Plan goals and planning
process. Specifically, institutional proposals to alter the role and mission of campuses will
be evaluated in the context of how the proposed change contributes to increasing degree
production or assisting in economic development. Additionally, one of the plan’s proposals
is to develop a new HECB policy which will establish a “pathway” to guide the evolution of
educational resources. Many of the criteria envisioned for the pathway are those presented
below (Benefits and Justification).

GUIDELINES FOR EVALUATING INSTITUTIONAL RECOMMENDATIONS

                                Scope and Applicability
The recommendations submitted by the institutions should include those which either

(1) propose maintaining the current role and mission of the campuses or (2) propose
changes which would modify the role, mission, or governance of the campuses. Such
institutional recommendations could include but are not limited to:

maintaining the current role, mission, and governance structure of the campus,

increasing or establishing the offering of lower-division coursework,

establishing doctoral programs, or

becoming a four-year and graduate degree-granting institution as either a campus of the
“parent” university system or as a new independent public institution.

                       Institutional Recommendation Process
The institutional recommendations are approved by the university’s governing board prior to
submittal to the HECB.




2
    Section 4 (1) ESHB 2707.


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Appendix A                                                                    Page A-6

The institutions should include in their submittal an explanation of the process used to
obtain student, community, and business participation in the development of the
recommendation.

                                    Recommendation
The recommended role, mission, and governance structure of the campus should be
specifically and thoroughly described, even if the recommendation represents no change
from current practices. The description of the recommendation should include estimates of
the number and level of students to be served, the number and type of new programs or
types of coursework to be offered, and the time period over which the proposed change
would occur. It should also address the role of research at the undergraduate and graduate
level.

                               Benefits and Justification
In the description of the recommendation, the institution should provide a clear summary
description of the specific problems, needs, or opportunities which the proposal
will address. Following from this statement, the institution should submit the following
types of information which describe the benefits of, and justification for, the proposal.

Student Demand: Provide demographic information concerning potential enrollment. This
estimate should include the estimated number of transfer students from “feeder” colleges.
Additionally, the institutional recommendation should address the following questions:

       (1)    Does the proposal respond to existing unmet student demand in the region?

       (2)   Does the proposal improve efficiency in the delivery of postsecondary
       programs in the region?

(3)  Does the proposal respond to a longer-term projected enrollment and student
demand?

Workforce Needs: Include an assessment of the number and type of higher education
credentials required to meet employer demand for a skilled workforce. This assessment
should be based on quantitative information concerning existing and projected
labor/industry employment needs of the region and state. This information may be based
on federal or state employment projections or regional surveys and studies conducted by
the institution or local entities.

 Costs: For recommendations proposing a change in role and mission, the institution
should provide information called for in Tables 1-4 of the HECB’s Guidelines for Program
Planning, Approval, and Review. This information should show the net annual and biennial
change in costs associated with the proposed change in role and mission.

System Impacts: The recommendation should include an assessment of what share of
future undergraduate demand the institution expects to assist the state in serving.
Additionally, the recommendation should include an assessment of how the proposal would
impact enrollment at other public and private institutions. This assessment must include an
estimate of the student FTE enrollment and program areas impacting other institutions. For
community and technical colleges, the assessment may be limited to those campuses in the
region. Impacts on four-year institutions should include all state and private institutions.


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Appendix A                                                                 Page A-7

Implementation Plan: Include a detailed, time-phased plan for implementing the
recommendation. This plan should include major activities associated with staffing,
facilities, diversity, and new program review and approval.



Timelines




         Action                                      Date




         Draft guidelines                            August 27, 2004




         Final guidelines                            September 9, 2004




         Institutions’ reports due to HECB           Week of November 15, 2004




         Presentation to HECB and public comment     December 10, 2004




         HECB adopts policy options                  January 27, 2005




UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON, TACOMA SELF-STUDY
Appendix A                                                              Page A-8




                            Substitute House Bill 2707

Secretary of State

State of Washington

_____________________________________________

SUBSTITUTE HOUSE BILL 2707

_____________________________________________

AS AMENDED BY THE SENATE

Passed Legislature - 2004 Regular Session

State of Washington      58th Legislature       2004 Regular Session



By House Committee on Higher Education (originally sponsored by

Representatives Kenney, Priest, Sommers, Jarrett, McCoy, Chase and

Hudgins)



READ FIRST TIME 02/05/04.



   AN ACT Relating to higher education branch campuses; amending RCW

28B.45.050 and 28B.80.510; adding new sections to chapter 28B.45 RCW; adding

a new section to chapter 28B.30 RCW; creating a new section; recodifying RCW

28B.80.510 and 28B.45.050; and repealing RCW 28B.45.070, 28B.80.500, and

28B.80.520.



BE IT ENACTED BY THE LEGISLATURE OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON:



   {+ NEW SECTION. +} Sec. 1. A new section is added to chapter 28B.45


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Appendix A                                                                   Page A-9

RCW to read as follows:

   (1) In 1989, the legislature created five branch campuses to be operated

by the state's two public research universities. Located in growing urban

areas, the branch campuses were charged with two missions:

   (a) Increasing access to higher education by focusing on upper-division

and graduate programs, targeting placebound students, and operating as models

of a two plus two educational system in cooperation with the community

colleges; and

   (b) Promoting regional economic development by responding to demand for

degrees from local businesses and supporting regional economies through

research activities.

   (2) Fifteen years later, the legislature finds that branch campuses are

responding to their original mission:

   (a) Branch campuses accounted for half of statewide upper-division and

graduate public enrollment growth since 1990;

   (b) Branch campuses have grown steadily and enroll increasing numbers of

transfer students each year;

   (c) Branch campuses enroll proportionately more older and part-time

students than their main campuses and attract increasing proportions of

students from nearby counties;

   (d) Although the extent of their impact has not been measured, branch

campuses positively affect local economies and offer degree programs that

roughly correspond with regional occupational projections; and

   (e) The capital investments made by the state to support branch campuses

represent a significant benefit to regional economic development.

   (3) However, the legislature also finds the policy landscape in higher

education has changed since the original creation of the branch campuses.


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Appendix A                                                                  Page A-10

Demand for access to baccalaureate and graduate education is increasing

rapidly. Economic development efforts increasingly recognize the importance

of focusing on local and regional economic clusters and improving

collaboration among communities, businesses, and colleges and universities.

Each branch campus has evolved into a unique institution, and it is

appropriate to assess the nature of this evolution to ensure the role and

mission of each campus is aligned with the state's higher education goals and

the needs of the region where the campus is located.

   (4) Therefore, it is the legislature's intent to recognize the unique

nature of Washington's higher education branch campuses, reaffirm the role

and mission of each, and set the course for their continued future

development.

   (5) It is the further intent of the legislature that the campuses be

identified by the following names: University of Washington Bothell,

University of Washington Tacoma, Washington State University Tri-Cities, and

Washington State University Vancouver.



   {+ NEW SECTION. +} Sec. 2. A new section is added to chapter 28B.45

RCW to read as follows:

   (1) The primary mission of the higher education branch campuses created

under this chapter remains to expand access to baccalaureate and master's

level graduate education in under-served urban areas of the state in

collaboration with community and technical colleges.

   (2) Branch campuses shall collaborate with the community and technical

colleges in their region to develop articulation agreements, dual admissions

policies, and other partnerships to ensure that branch campuses serve as

innovative models of a two plus two educational system. Other possibilities


UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON, TACOMA SELF-STUDY
Appendix A                                                                    Page A-11

for collaboration include but are not limited to joint development of

curricula and degree programs, colocation of instruction, and arrangements to

share faculty.

   (3) In communities where a private postsecondary institution is located,

representatives of the private institution may be invited to participate in

the conversation about meeting the baccalaureate and master's level graduate

needs in underserved urban areas of the state.

   (4) However, the legislature recognizes there are alternative models for

achieving this primary mission. Some campuses may have additional missions

in response to regional needs and demands. At selected branch campuses, an

innovative combination of instruction and research targeted to support

regional economic development may be appropriate to meet the region's needs

for both access and economic viability. Other campuses should focus on

becoming models of a two plus two educational system through continuous

improvement of partnerships and agreements with community and technical

colleges. Still other campuses may be best suited to transition to a four-

year comprehensive university or be removed from designation as a branch

campus entirely.

   (5) It is the legislature's intent that each branch campus be funded

commensurate with its unique mission, the degree programs offered, and the

institutional combination of instruction and research, but at a level less

than a research university.

   (6) In consultation with the higher education coordinating board, a

branch campus may propose legislation to authorize practice-oriented or

professional doctoral programs if: (a) Unique research facilities and

equipment are located near the campus; or (b) the campus can clearly

demonstrate student and employer demand in the region that is linked to


UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON, TACOMA SELF-STUDY
Appendix A                                                                    Page A-12

regional economic development.

   (7) It is not the legislature's intent to have each campus chart its own

future path without legislative guidance. Instead, the legislature intends

to consider carefully the mission and model of education that best suits each

campus and best meets the needs of students, the community, and the region.



   Sec. 3. RCW 28B.45.050 and 1991 c 205 s 11 are each amended to read as

follows:

   Washington State University and Eastern Washington University (({- are

responsible for providing upper-division and graduate level -})) {+ shall

collaborate with one another and with local community colleges in providing

educational pathways and +} programs to the citizens of the Spokane area(({-

, under rules or guidelines adopted by the joint center for higher education.

However, before any degree is authorized under this section it shall be

subject to the review and approval of the higher education coordinating

board. Washington State University shall meet its responsibility through the

operation of a branch campus in the Spokane area. Eastern Washington

University shall meet its responsibility through the operation of programs

and facilities in Spokane -})).



   {+ NEW SECTION. +} Sec. 4. (1) Each branch campus shall examine its

instructional programs, costs, research initiatives, student enrollment

characteristics, programs offered in partnership with community and technical

colleges, and regional context and make a recommendation by November 15,

2004, to the higher education coordinating board regarding the future

evolution of the campus. The board will analyze the recommendations of each

campus in the context of statewide goals for higher education and provide


UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON, TACOMA SELF-STUDY
Appendix A                                                                    Page A-13

policy options along with the original campus recommendations to the higher

education and fiscal committees of the legislature by January 15, 2005. The

recommendations and options must address:

   (a) The model of education that best suits the campus, including the

possibility of continuing as a two plus two model and areas for possible

improvement in working with community and technical colleges, making a

transition to a four-year university or some other alternative;

   (b) The mission that best suits the campus, including the possibility of

focusing on upper-division baccalaureate education, combining instruction and

research targeted to support regional economic development, or some other

alternative;

   (c) Data and analysis that illustrate how the model will increase

baccalaureate and master's degree production; and

   (d) An estimate of the costs to implement the recommendation.

   (2) In developing its recommendation, each branch campus shall solicit

input from students, local community and technical colleges, the main campus

and other four-year institutions, and community stakeholders such as economic

development councils and business and labor leaders.

   (3) The higher education coordinating board, in cooperation with the

branch campuses, shall develop parameters and a standard format for the

evaluation and recommendations to permit comparison by the legislative

committees.



   Sec. 5. RCW 28B.80.510 and 1989 1st ex.s. c 7 s 8 are each amended to

read as follows:

   (({- In rules and guidelines adopted for purposes of chapter 7, Laws of

1989 1st ex. sess., -})) {+ T +}he higher education coordinating board shall


UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON, TACOMA SELF-STUDY
Appendix A                                                                   Page A-14

{+ adopt performance measures to +} ensure a collaborative partnership

between the community {+ and technical +} colleges and the (({- four-year

institutions -})) {+ branch campuses +}. The partnership shall be one in

which the community {+ and technical +} colleges prepare students for

transfer to the upper-division programs of the branch campuses {+ and the

branch campuses work with community and technical colleges to enable students

to transfer and obtain degrees efficiently +}.



   {+ NEW SECTION. +} Sec. 6. (1) RCW 28B.80.510 as amended by this act

is recodified as a new section in chapter 28B.45 RCW.

   (2) RCW 28B.45.050 as amended by this act is recodified as a new section

in chapter 28B.30 RCW.



   {+ NEW SECTION. +} Sec. 7. The following acts or parts of acts are

each repealed:

   (1) RCW 28B.45.070 (Authorization subject to legislative appropriation)

and 1989 1st ex.s. c 7 s 14;

   (2) RCW 28B.80.500 (Branch campuses--Adjustment of enrollment lids) and

1989 1st ex.s. c 7 s 2; and

   (3) RCW 28B.80.520 (Branch campuses--Facilities acquisition) and 1989

1st ex.s. c 7 s 9.



--- END ---




UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON, TACOMA SELF-STUDY
Appendix B                                                              Page B-15


Appendix B: UWT Self-study Process

March        Substitute House Bill 2707 passes. Bill requires four upper-division
             campuses, including UWT, to “ . . .examine its instructional programs,
             costs, research initiatives, student enrollment characteristics, programs
             offered in partnership with community and technical colleges, and regional
             context and make a recommendation by November 15, 2004, to the Higher
             Education Coordinating Board regarding the future evolution of the
             campus.”

May 20       Interim Chancellor Steven Olswang appoints a Self-study Committee

May 28       UWT Future Web site opened to public. (The UWT Future Web site contained
             information on the Self-study committee’s composition, the open meeting
             schedule, actual text of the Substitute House Bill 2707, and feedback
             received from open meetings.)

             A Web-based comment form is added to the UWT Future Web site to gather
             comments and suggestions from UWT stakeholders – UWT students, faculty,
             and staff; local business leaders and employees; partner community college
             faculty, staff, and students; and interested community members.

May 25       Self-study committee meets with Dr. Barbara Holland, Executive Director of
             the Journal of Metropolitan Universities. Dr. Holland gave a presentation on
             the characteristics and life stages of urban and metropolitan universities.

June 1-4     Self-study committee holds four open meetings to discuss UWT’s future;
             one with faculty, one with staff, one with students, and one for the whole
             campus. (Broad discussion questions distributed in advance of each
             meeting.)

June 3       Self-study committee holds an open meeting to solicit feedback on the
             future of UWT from Green River Community College students, faculty, and
             staff (broad discussion questions were distributed).

June 4       Self-study committee holds an open meeting to solicit feedback on the
             future of UWT from Pierce College Puyallup students, faculty, and staff
             (broad discussion questions were distributed).

June 22      Self-study committee meets to discuss next steps in the self-study process.

July 12      Self-study committee reviews literature regarding metropolitan universities.

July 16      Survey concerning future of UWT is posted on UWT Future Web site and
             opened to the public.

             Request for participation in survey with Web address of the survey and
             paper copy of the survey is sent to approximately 500 business and civic
             leaders.

             Request for participation with Web address of the survey is sent to



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Appendix B                                                                   Page B-16


          •   approximately 4000 UWT alumni,
          •   approximately 1300 Phi Theta Kappa community college honor students,
          •   approximately 3800 individuals who made an inquiry about attending UWT,
          •   approximately 1200 students graduating from UWT’s community college partners
              (Tacoma Community College, Bellevue Community College, Green River
              Community College, and Highline Community College),
          •   approximately 1800 current UWT students.

July 22            Self-study committee holds a second open meeting to solicit feedback on
                   the future of UWT from Pierce College at Puyallup students (broad
                   discussion questions were distributed).

July 23            Self-study committee holds half-day meeting to review feedback received to
                   date and to construct tentative outline of report.

July 26-28         Advertisements run in The News Tribune, the Olympian and Bremerton Sun
                   announcing public meetings and availability of on-line survey.

July 29            Self-study committee holds two meetings to solicit feedback on the future of
                   UWT from local business and civic leaders.

July 30            Survey closed.

                   Advertisements runs in The News Tribune, the Olympian and Bremerton
                   Sun for public meeting and survey.

August 1           Advertisements ran in the News Tribune, the Olympian and Bremerton Sun
                   for public meeting.

August 4           Self-study committee holds open public meeting to solicit feedback on the
                   future of UWT from community members and other interested individuals.

August 13          First draft of UWT’s self-study report distributed to committee members for
                   their review and comment.

August 17          Second draft of the self-study report, incorporating suggestions from August
                   13 meeting, distributed to committee for further review.

August 18          Self-study committee meets to discuss the second draft of the self-study
                   report.

September 7        Committee’s final report is submitted to Interim Chancellor Steven G.
                   Olswang. Report also made available to the UWT campus community, the
                   Board of Regents, the President and Provost of the University of
                   Washington, and the Chancellor’s Advisory Board.

                  Interim Chancellor Olswang writes to the presidents of all Washington state
                  community and technical colleges and to the presidents of Pacific Lutheran
                  University and the University of Puget Sound requesting comments on
                  UWT’s Self-Study.

September 7-

UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON, TACOMA SELF-STUDY
Appendix B                                                              Page B-17


October 6     Self-study widely discussed on campus in various forums and with external
              constituencies. Vice Chancellor Jack Nelson meets with the faculty of each
              academic unit. Interim Chancellor Olswang attends most of these meetings.

October 7     Interim Chancellor Olswang submits report, with his changes and additions,
              to the campus and to the President of the University of Washington.

October 14-

November 19   President, Provost, and the Board of Regents review the study.

November 19   Self-study presented to the HEC Board.




UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON, TACOMA SELF-STUDY
Appendix C                                                            Page: C-18

Appendix C: Quick Facts about UWT

                             History and Milestones

   1987      Needs study conducted by UW
   1988      HECB approval of UW proposal
   1989      UWT created/funded by state Legislature
   1990      UWT opens with Liberal Studies program (B.A.)
   1991      First UWT graduation (four graduates)
   1992      Nursing program (B.S.N.) opens Education (M.Ed.) opens
   1993      Business Administration program (B.A.B.A.) opens
   1994      Teacher Certification added
   1996      Master of Nursing degree (M.N.) added
   1997      Permanent campus opens
   1998      Master of Social Work program opens
             Curriculum in Nonprofit Studies launched
             Donors fund Next Step Scholars Endowment
   1999      Computing & Software Systems (B.S.) opens
   2000      Dougan Addition opens
             M.B.A. and M.A. degrees added
   2001      Institute of Technology at UWT launched
             Urban Studies (B.A.) opens
             B.S. degree in environmental science added
             Educational Administrator certification added
   2002      Science and Keystone buildings open
             M.S. (in CSS), B.A. in social welfare added
   2003      Pinkerton Building opens as Institute headquarters
             KeyBank Professional Development Center opens
             $15 million Milgard gift names School of Business
             Regents approve master plan with housing/parking
   2004      Cherry Parkes, Mattress Factory open

                      Academic Programs and Degrees

   Milgard School of Business
       • Bachelor of Arts in Business Administration
       • Master of Business Administration
   Education
       • K-8 Teacher Certification (Residency and Professional)
       • Master of Education
       • Educational Administrator Certification
       •
   Institute of Technology
       • Bachelor of Science (in computing & software systems)
       • Master of Science (in computing & software systems)
   Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences
       • Bachelor of Arts
       • Bachelor of Science (in environmental science)
       • Master of Arts (in interdisciplinary studies)
   Nursing
       • Bachelor of Science in Nursing
       • Master of Nursing

UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON, TACOMA SELF-STUDY
Appendix C                                                          Page: C-19

   Social Work
      • Bachelor of Arts (in social welfare)
      • Master of Social Work
   Urban Studies
      • Bachelor of Arts
   KeyBank Professional Development Center

                       Student Demographics: Autumn 2003

                                      FTE              Headcount
      Undergraduate                            1,332        1,678
      Graduate                                  273          344
      Total                                    1,606        2,022


      Part-Time                                              71%
      Full-Time                                              29%


      Female                                                 64%
      Male                                                   36%


      Mean age                                                31
      Median age                                              28


 Race/Ethnicity (self-reported)
      Native American                                       1.6%
      Asian American                                       11.1%
      African American                                      6.0%
      Hispanic                                              2.1%
      Total                                                20.8%


              School transferred from (Self-reported Spring 2001)
      Pierce College                                         22%
      TCC                                                    21%
      Highline CC                                            12%
      Green River CC                                         11%
      Olympic College                                         6%
      South Puget Sound CC                                    4%
      Other Washington CCs                                    7%


UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON, TACOMA SELF-STUDY
Appendix C                                                             Page: C-20

      UW Seattle                                            6%
      Other 4-year in state                                 3%
      Out of state                                          2%
      Other                                                 6%
      Total                                                100%


 County of Residence
      Pierce                                               54%
      King                                                 23%
      Thurston                                              8%
      Kitsap                                                5%
      Other                                                10%
      Total                                                100%


              Average commuting distance to campus
      Up to 5 miles                                        28%
      6-15 miles                                           36%
      16-30 miles                                          30%
      Over 30 miles                                        16%


 Family information
               59% of students come from households where no parent has a baccalaureate
                                                                                degree.
                     29% care for dependent children
          12% are responsible for other adult dependents


 Student employment
               75% of students are employed or self-employed. Students who are
                                                                employed work
      1-20 hours per week                      28%
      21-30 hours per week                     24%
      31-40 hours per week                     32%
      41 or more hours per week                16%


 Financial Aid




UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON, TACOMA SELF-STUDY
Appendix C                                                                       Page: C-21

      61% reported financial assistance of some sort
      20% received tuition reimbursement from employer
      6% got some form of GI bill benefit




                          Faculty and Staff Demographics

 Faculty and Staff: Aut 2003            Male                         Female
 Gender                            Number Percent                Number Percent             Total
    Faculty                                  57          48.3%       61           51.7%        118
    Staff                                    42          31.8%       90           68.2%        132


 Ethnicity                                  Faculty                   Staff
   African American                          4            3.4%       14
                                                                                  10.6%            18
   Asian                                     9            7.6%        9            6.8%            18
   Hispanic                                  5            4.2%        6            4.5%            11
   American Indian                           -            0.0%        1            0.8%             1
   Caucasian                                100          84.7%       102          77.3%        202
 Total                                      118         100.0%       132         100.0%        250

  Faculty by Rank Spring 2004                   FTE                        Headcount
    Professor                                15.1         13.1%              16       11.7%
    Associate Professor                      26.0         22.5%              27       19.7%
    Assistant Professor                      48.6         42.1%              49       35.8%
    Senior Lecturer                           5.0          4.3%               6        4.4%
    Full-Time Lecturer                        4.0          3.5%               4        2.9%
    Part-Time Lecturer                       14.8         12.8%              32       23.4%
    Teaching Assistant                        1.0          0.9%               2        1.5%
    Teaching Associate                        1.0          0.9%               1        0.7%
  Total                                     115.5        100.0%             137      100.0%

    Staff by Rank: Spring 2004                    FTE                      Headcount
       Professional                          60            38.0%            63             26.9%
       Classified/CSA                        58            37.0%            64             27.4%
       Classified/WPRB                       12             7.4%            12              5.1%
       Hourly                                28            17.7%            95             40.6%
    Total                                   158           100.0%           234            100.0%




UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON, TACOMA SELF-STUDY
Appendix D                                                                  Page: D-22


Appendix D: Newspaper Clippings

A review of media coverage about the University of Washington, Tacoma shows the
economic development role of the campus was a focus particularly at the time the campus
was established and more recently as the transformation of downtown Tacoma has
unfolded. Community support is also evident in the coverage. Below is a series of excerpts
from articles that tell this story.

Clip 1: Newspaper Article

“Pierce County goes a-courtin’ for a campus”

News Tribune

March 1, 1987

EDB Chairman Rod Hagenbuch said the economic development agency is seeking an
arrangement that would help both to fill a gap in Pierce County Higher education and to
create business opportunities ... EDB Executive Director Ryan Petty said he initiated the
effort to attract WSU because of the lack of a graduate-level scientific and technical
university here has been a factor in Pierce County’s failure to attract new business
prospects.



Clip 2: Newspaper Article

“UW may branch out – to Tacoma”

The News Tribune

Sept. 26, 1987

The Tacoma-Pierce County Economic Development Board has been pushing the state board
to give top priority to establishing a graduate research center in Pierce County ... the (UW)
regents agreed unanimously to follow the lead of the Higher Education Coordinating Board,
which said a UW branch is one of three options for increasing undergraduate education to
cope with the region’s population growth.



Clip 3: Newspaper Article

“Tacoma gets UW branch campus”

Tacoma News Tribune

August 5, 1988

“Fantastic!” replied Rod Hagenbuch, chairman of the Economic Development Board for
Tacoma –Pierce County. “I frankly, personally believe it will be the most significant thing
that has happened in the second half of this century for the city of Tacoma.”


UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON, TACOMA SELF-STUDY
Appendix D                                                                    Page: D-23

        Hagenbuch said a branch campus will build a better-educated public and thereby
attract more businesses. Technology-related firms locate in areas where their employees
can complete graduate degrees in specialized fields, he said.



Clip 4: Commentary

“These first classes will become magnet to future generations”

by Bill Philip

News Tribune, special section commemorating opening of new physical campus

Sept. 21, 1997

These are exciting times for our community. The opening of the University of Washington
Branch Campus in Tacoma is probably one of the single most important things that has ever
happened to our community. When I make that statement, I am not referring to the
immediate economic impact – which is significant. More significant, however, is the fact that
the school provides more affordable access to higher education to segments of our
population that for one reason or another were unable to take advantage of the opportunity
to go to college when they were younger.



Clip 5: Magazine Article

”The Sweet Smell of Success: once doomed to play second fiddle to Seattle, Tacoma is
reclaiming its title as the City of Destiny”

Seattle magazine

November 2002

It all started with the University of Washington Tacoma. More than a decade ago, the UW
began buying up old buildings in what was then a desolate, dirty and sometimes dangerous
stretch of Pacific Avenue. One by one, buildings were cleaned up, new ones were built and
the result is a collection of beautiful brick and glass structures clustered on a hill overlooking
the stunningly renovated Union Station and the Washington state History Museum and
connected by tree-lined steps that double as seating for students on sunny afternoons.



Clip 6: Magazine Article

“Second City: Tacoma and Long Beach as Models of Second Cities Recreating Identities”

Arcade

Winter 2002, Volume 21/Number Two




UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON, TACOMA SELF-STUDY
Appendix D                                                                  Page: D-24

The creation of a new institute of higher learning (five others were already operating in the
city) coupled with the influx of a young and educated student population contributed to
Tacoma's progressive new direction.



Clip 7: Magazine Article

“The Smell of Success”

Metropolis magazine

April 2003

The anchor of the new historic district, a new branch of the University of Washington
immediately to the west of the History Museum, opened in 1990 ... UW’s initiative of
restoring commerce to lower Pacific Avenue has been echoed by private entrepreneurs
whose establishments now extend south of the campus ... Union Station and the History
Museum were the soup-and-salad courses of the historic district’s banquet, the UW was the
hearty entree, and now Tacoma is serving dessert in the form of two art museums and a
permanent outdoor art-glass exhibit.



Clip 8: Magazine Article

“City on the Rise”

Washington CEO

Sept. 2003

The state has helped out too, sitting a major branch campus of the state's most prestigious
public university in some of those rehabilitated buildings and adding a new institute to train
students for 21st-century jobs in software engineering and network administration. The
result is one of the most unique university campuses to be found anywhere in the nation ...
while the impetus for starting the program came from Olympia, the level of commitment
from the local community is what has made it work.



Clip 9: Newspaper Article

“City Leaders study Tacoma’s revival”

Quote of Scott Morris, Avista Utilities

Spokane Spokesman Review

Nov. 22, 2003

A key point heard, said Morris, was Tacoma’s experience in enhancing its downtown through
its branch campus of the University of Washington.


UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON, TACOMA SELF-STUDY
Appendix D                                                                   Page: D-25



Clip 10: Newspaper Article

“A candid conversation with Gary Milgard”

Quote of Gary Milgard, President, Milgard Manufacturing

Business Examiner

August 18, 2003

UWT has become the centerpiece of reconstruction and redevelopment in the downtown
area and we wanted to contribute to that process.



Clip 11: Commentary

“UPS, Tacoma benefit from joint lessons in citizenship”

by Ron Thomas, new president of the University of Puget Sound

News Tribune

Aug. 22, 2003

“... I was struck by the new University of Washington Tacoma campus amid the old
warehouses on Pacific Avenue and by the new residences at Thea's Landing. In a few short
blocks, I witnessed nothing less than a cultural renaissance taking place in this city, right on
the waterfront, before the still-active smokestacks, container ships and dockyards of
Tacoma's past."



Clip 12: Editorial

“Tacoma's hard times are wrong time for $7 million spire”

The News Tribune

Oct. 3, 2003

This editorial page has never been shy about championing investment in downtown Tacoma.
We have supported the rehabilitation of Union Station, the creation of the University of
Washington Tacoma, the transformation of the Thea Foss Waterway and many other
initiatives that have changed the face of the city in recent years.



Clip 13: Newspaper Article




UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON, TACOMA SELF-STUDY
Appendix D                                                                    Page: D-26

“Looking up to Tacoma: Rockford, Ill., sends renaissance-seeking delegation to a
rejuvenated city”

The News Tribune

Oct. 26, 2003

It's a story that goes like this: A gritty, blue-collar town famous for its smell and losing its
employment base decides to join the 21st century. City, county and state leaders join with
local business and cultural interests to build museums, theaters, hotels, a university
campus, a transportation infrastructure and a center for world trade.



Clip 14: Newspaper Article

“UW Tacoma celebrates completion of Phase 2B construction”

Tacoma Daily Index

Jan. 9, 2004

Rep. Adam Smith (D-9th District) agreed, calling the UW Tacoma the focus of the
community. “It’s like the city has grown up around it,” he said.



Clip 15: Newspaper Article

“Buildings mark end of era: Tight Budgets make growth tougher”

News Tribune

January 9, 2004

Thursday’s dedication of two new academic buildings at the University of Washington
Tacoma marked the end of an era for a campus that has played a pivotal role in revitalizing
downtown.

       For years construction at UW Tacoma has been nearly constant, leading first to the
opening of the permanent campus in 1997, then to a steady expansion in a formerly
blighted area of downtown now dotted with museums, apartments and restaurants.



Clip 16: Editorial

“Hats off to UW Tacoma”

Tacoma Weekly

Jan. 15, 2004



UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON, TACOMA SELF-STUDY
Appendix D                                                                   Page: D-27

The newly renovated buildings continue UWT’s mission of making college accessible and
breathing life into a once neglected section of downtown.



Clip 17: Newspaper Article

“Albers Mill supporter receives award”

News Tribune

Feb. 26, 2004

The University of Washington, Tacoma took the Union Station Award, which recognizes
leading companies or individuals that have built or sustained momentum for revitalization ...
the Tacoma-Pierce County Chamber and Heritage Bank sponsored the New Tacoma Awards,
which honor individuals, businesses and organizations for making Tacoma’s city center a
better lace to live, work, visit and play.



Clip 18: Newspaper Column

“Tacoma’s X factor”

Colunmist: Dan Voelpel

News Tribune

June 6, 2004

What Gen x says: Thank goodness for the University of Washington, Tacoma. Without it,
Tacoma’s ability to lure and keep young talent would be nil. The UWT – as an outlet for the
area’s community and technical college graduates – gives Tacoma a tool it must not waste.



Clip 19: Newspaper Article

“The lights are much brighter now downtown”

News Tribune

Aug 24, 2004

From the renovation of the theater district in the 1980s to the opening in the following
decade of the University of Washington, Tacoma branch campus, the state history museum
and the federal courthouse to the survival of the antique row district, business here is finally
booming.

      Other business leaders are touring Tacoma business districts, including the
downtown, to borrow the city’s good ideas.



UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON, TACOMA SELF-STUDY
Appendix E                                                                  Page: E-28

Appendix E: Analysis of Survey Results

                                   Survey Summary

In preparing our self-study we conducted a survey to obtain as much information as
possible about what our various constituencies think the future of UWT should be. This is a
summary of that survey process and the results. Detailed responses, by question, are
included at the end of this Appendix.

Paper copies of the survey were sent to some 400 business and community leaders.
Invitations to respond on line to the survey were sent to community college faculty, staff,
and students, UWT faculty, staff, students, and graduates, and all individuals who have
contacted UWT concerning applying over the past several years. Ads were placed in The
News Tribune inviting the general public to respond.

645 individuals completed the survey. This represents about 5.4% of the number of
individuals directly contacted by letter or e-mail (11,879). The majority (63.4%) of those
completing the survey live in Pierce County. Over 94% have an associate or higher degree;
34% have an associate’s degree as their highest level of education.

 Survey results show strong support for UWT expanding its programmatic offerings over the
next five to ten years, including support for

       •   Adding more master’s programs, including professional programs (79.6%);
       •   Expanding undergraduate offerings to a full range of majors (75.2%); and for
       •   Expanding continuing education offerings (62.2%).

There was slightly less, but still majority support (56.9%), for offering a small number of
doctoral programs.

Survey responders want UWT, as it grows, to accept all qualified transfer students from the
South Puget Sound region (80.8%) and to serve students from across the state (61.9%).

Respondents also support UWT’s adding capacity for transfer students (89.2%) and for
graduate students (81.6%) to meet the increasing demand for access to higher education.

A number of survey items address the partnership between UWT and community colleges.
There is support from a majority of respondents for UWT

       •   Hiring advisors to work with community college students on community college
           campuses (65.2%),
       •   Encouraging community college students to take upper-division courses at UWT
           while community college students (56%), and
       •   Offering lower-division courses (55.1%).

Those responding to the survey were asked if selected factors were ‘good’ reasons for UWT
becoming a four-year institution. The considerations that were seen as good reasons for
following that evolutionary path include

       •   Achieving some economies of scale (69.6%),


UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON, TACOMA SELF-STUDY
Appendix E                                                                 Page: E-29

       •   Creating a more attractive institution for students interested in science and math
           (66.2%),
       •   Creating a stronger institutional identity and more welcoming environment
           (65.5%),
       •   Enabling lower-division students and faculty to collaborate on research (59.7%),
       •   Providing placebound students the option of a four-year UW experience in
           Tacoma (58.5%),
       •   Allowing transfer students to take needed lower-division courses (52.1%), and
       •   Enabling UWT to have more active student life component (50.9%).

The following were supported as “good reasons” for UWT’s continuing to accept only
transfer students

       •   The two-plus-two model is the most economical path for students (72.5%),
       •   Expanding the two-plus-two model is less expensive than expanding capacity for
           freshmen at UWT (50.4).

Respondents were asked to prioritize goals to be considered when adding new programs at
UWT. Collectively, the respondents ranked these goals in the following order:

                       1. Meeting student demand,

                       2. Preparing graduates to contribute to their community,

                       3. Meeting employers’ needs,

                       4. Establishing programs to build on strengths of partner
                          community colleges, and

                       5. Fostering economic development.



With respect to initiating new undergraduate offerings, those seen as high priorities were (in
descending priority order):

                       6. Math and science majors (75.9%),

                       7. Professional degree programs (75.1%),

                       8. Secondary education teacher certificate in math and science
                          (71.4%),

                       9. Academic programs that cross discipline boundaries (64.9%),
                          and

                       10. Social sciences programs (61%).

                       11. Graduate programs receiving support were (in descending
                           priority order)


UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON, TACOMA SELF-STUDY
Appendix E                                                                Page: E-30

                       12. Selected doctoral programs (75.4%),

                       13. Natural sciences programs (67.3%),

                       14. ‘Niche’ programs (geographic information systems, glass art)
                           (61.3%),

                       15. Social sciences programs (54.6%) and,

                       16. Humanities programs (51.6%).

In planning for the future, over 75% of those responding to the survey agreed that it was
important for UWT to remain part of a multi-campus UW, have substantial local autonomy,
focus on teaching and research needs of the region, offer a wider range of majors and
degrees, and be a major driver of economic development of Tacoma and the South Puget
Sound.

It is noteworthy that the vast majority of respondents endorsed UWT’s

       •   Placing a high quality teaching and learning (98.9%),
       •   Producing well rounded and well educated graduates (97.6%), and
       •   Hiring faculty who are both good teachers and good scholars (93%).



Respondents also valued

       •   Faculty research and scholarship (77.1%),
       •   Preparing students for specific careers in response to employers’ needs (79.3%),
       •   Preparing students for graduate and professional school (76.6%),
       •   Encouraging research and scholarship focusing on regional topics (73.2%), and
       •   Involving faculty and students in the community (72%).

Two hundred and forty two responding UWT students and UWT graduates were asked what
area of undergraduate study they would pursue, if they could start their studies again and a
wider range of programs was available. Most proposed areas of study were rated “ neutral”
with the exception of student and alumni who would have been interested in studying social
sciences (50.4%), humanities (45.2%) and interdisciplinary studies (47.4%).

And, given the choice, nearly 40% of students and graduates indicated they would have
come to UWT as freshmen, had that been an option when they completed high school.

                Detailed Responses to Each Survey Question

Respondents completed a 17-item survey either online, via a website, or by completing and
returning a hard copy version of the survey. An invitation to participate in the survey was
sent by email, postcard, or letter to 11,875 individuals, including UWT alumni, current
students, faculty and staff; business and community leaders; and prospective students,
including members of the community college honor society, Phi Theta Kappa. There was an


UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON, TACOMA SELF-STUDY
Appendix E                                                                                                Page: E-31

overall return rate of 5.4%, based on 645 returned, useable surveys. The following
information describes the percent (%) of responses for the options within each survey
question.

Question 1.*

Please tell us who you are (select all that apply):


A majority (77.8%) of                             Note: Because multiple choices were allowed, the
respondents selected only one role                counts in the frequency distribution chart add up to
from among 14 possible choices.                   more than 100% of the total population.



        500
                                                        Business or community leader          98
        400
                                                                       Elected official       40
Count




        300                                       Parent of current/prosp UWT student         48

        200                                                  Prospective UWT student          122

        100                                                      Current UWT student          156
              502    102   35   5    1                   Alum: UWT bachelor's degree          84
               1     2     3    4    5
                                                          Alum: UWT graduate degree           13

                   Number of roles                                Alum: UWT K-8 cert          4
                   per respondent                                UWT faculty member           34

                                                                   UWT staff member           54

                                                               CC/TC faculty or staff         89

                                                                       CC/TC student          37

                                                               Other interested person        57
Approximately one-third of
respondents qualified to answer                              Alum: UWT ed admin cert
questions 15-17.
                                                                                          0         50       100       150


UWT student/alum
                                                                                                         Count
     37.52%
     n=242




                                         Other
                                         62.48%
                                         n=403




UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON, TACOMA SELF-STUDY
Appendix E                                                           Page: E-32

Question 2.*


Where do you live?



                       Grays Harbor County
                                     0.47%
                                     n=3
                          Other
                           3.88%         Mason County
                           n=25          0.16%
            Kitsap County                n=1
                    7.44%
                    n=48

   Thurston County
             7.91%
             n=51



      King County                                    Pierce County
            16.74%                                   63.41%
            n=108                                    n=409




Question 3.


What is your highest level of educational attainment?


          Less than diploma    High school diploma
                       0.16%   4.97%
                       n=1     n=32
   Graduate degree
             30.59%
             n=197                      Associate's degree
                                        33.85%
                                        n=218



  Bachelor's degree
              30.43%
              n=196




UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON, TACOMA SELF-STUDY
Appendix E                                                                                   Page: E-33




                   Frequency of Responses to Questions 4-17

Question 4.


Most public baccalaureate institutions offer between 100 and 200 majors and a substantial
number of graduate programs. UWT offers fewer than 30 majors, six master's programs and
no doctoral programs. UWT recently started a self-supporting continuing education program
that offers credit and non-credit courses and certificates.
Over the next five to ten years, UWT should:



                                                                     4a Response frequencies
                                                               600
              a. Expand undergraduate offerings                500




                                                       Count
              to include a full range of traditional           400

              majors as well as interdisciplinary              300

              majors.                                          200
                                                               100
                                                                      281     199       78         62       18
                                                                Strongly agree        Neutral        Strongly disagree
                                                                              Agree             Disagree




                                                                     4b Response frequencies
                                                               600
                                                               500
              b. Offer a wide range of master's
                                                       Count




                                                               400
              programs, including more                         300
              professional programs.                           200
                                                               100
                                                                      246     260       95         27        7
                                                                Strongly agree        Neutral        Strongly disagree
                                                                              Agree             Disagree




                                                                     4c Response frequencies
                                                               600
                                                               500
                                                       Count




              c. Offer a small number of doctoral              400

              programs.                                        300
                                                               200
                                                               100
                                                                      173     189      180         69       26
                                                                Strongly agree        Neutral        Strongly disagree
                                                                              Agree             Disagree




UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON, TACOMA SELF-STUDY
Appendix E                                                                             Page: E-34



                                                                 4d Response frequencies
                                                           600
                                                           500




                                                   Count
             d. Expand UWT's continuing                    400

             education offerings.                          300
                                                           200
                                                           100
                                                                  156     237      188         36       16
                                                            Strongly agree        Neutral        Strongly disagree
                                                                          Agree             Disagree




                                                                 4e Response frequencies
                                                           600
                                                           500
             e. Become a four-year institution



                                                   Count
                                                           400
             accepting freshmen in addition to             300
             transfer students.                            200
                                                           100
                                                                  172     78       120        152      113
                                                            Strongly agree        Neutral        Strongly disagree
                                                                          Agree             Disagree




                                                                 4f Response frequencies
                                                           600
                                                           500
             f. Continue to accept only transfer
                                                   Count




                                                           400
             and graduate students and expand              300
             capacity at both levels.                      200
                                                           100
                                                                  201     159      105        102       66
                                                            Strongly agree        Neutral        Strongly disagree
                                                                          Agree             Disagree




                                                                 4g Response frequencies
                                                           600
                                                           500
                                                   Count




             g. Establish residence halls and              400

             recreational facilities.                      300
                                                           200
                                                           100
                                                                  101     150      203        110       71
                                                            Strongly agree        Neutral        Strongly disagree
                                                                          Agree             Disagree




UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON, TACOMA SELF-STUDY
Appendix E                                                                            Page: E-35



Question 5.


Currently UWT's student body consists largely of timebound and placebound students,
students who cannot relocate. UWT has both traditional-aged students and older students
who are returning to school.

As UWT grows, it should:



                                                                5a Response frequencies
                                                          600
                                                          500
              a. Accept all qualified transfer




                                                  Count
                                                          400
              students from the South Puget               300
              Sound region.                               200
                                                          100
                                                                 286     230       80         35        8
                                                           Strongly agree        Neutral        Strongly disagree
                                                                         Agree             Disagree




                                                                5b Response frequencies
                                                          600
              b. Open admissions to South                 500
                                                  Count




              Sound high school graduates who             400

              want a four-year University of              300

              Washington experience in Tacoma.            200
                                                          100
                                                                 150     118      139        147       85
                                                           Strongly agree        Neutral        Strongly disagree
                                                                         Agree             Disagree




                                                                5c Response frequencies
                                                          600
                                                          500
                                                  Count




              c. Serve students from across the           400

              state of Washington.                        300
                                                          200
                                                          100
                                                                 153     242      171         60       12
                                                           Strongly agree        Neutral        Strongly disagree
                                                                         Agree             Disagree




UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON, TACOMA SELF-STUDY
Appendix E                                                                                Page: E-36



                                                                 5d Response frequencies
                                                           600
                                                           500




                                                   Count
              d. Enroll more students who are              400

              ethnic minorities.                           300
                                                           200
                                                           100
                                                                  142      150      281         37       29
                                                             Strongly agree        Neutral        Strongly disagree
                                                                           Agree             Disagree




                                                                 5e Response frequencies
                                                           600
                                                           500




                                                   Count
              e. Enroll more international                 400

              students.                                    300
                                                           200
                                                           100
                                                                  66       134      296         86       55
                                                             Strongly agree        Neutral        Strongly disagree
                                                                           Agree             Disagree




Question 6.


Currently UWT enrolls about 2,000 students. Within the next decade demand for access to
higher education in Washington State is expected to increase by 31,000 students. There is
currently no capacity in the public higher education system to accommodate this increased
demand.


What should be UWT's role in responding to this increased demand?



                                                                 6a Response frequencies
                                                           600
                                                           500
                                                   Count




                                                           400
              a. Remain the size it now is.                300
                                                           200
                                                           100
                                                                  13       37        86        324      159
                                                            Strongly agree         Neutral        Strongly disagree
                                                                          Agree              Disagree




UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON, TACOMA SELF-STUDY
Appendix E                                                                              Page: E-37



                                                                6b Response frequencies
                                                          600
                                                          500




                                                  Count
              b. Add capacity for more transfer           400

              students.                                   300
                                                          200
                                                          100
                                                                 266     303       50         16        3
                                                           Strongly agree        Neutral        Strongly disagree
                                                                         Agree             Disagree




                                                                6c Response frequencies
                                                          600
                                                          500




                                                  Count
              c. Add capacity for more graduate           400

              students.                                   300
                                                          200
                                                          100
                                                                 221     299       92         21        4
                                                           Strongly agree        Neutral        Strongly disagree
                                                                         Agree             Disagree




                                                                6d Response frequencies
                                                          600
                                                          500
                                                  Count




                                                          400

              d. Admit freshmen and                       300

              sophomores.                                 200
                                                          100
                                                                 138     111      117        157      112
                                                           Strongly agree        Neutral        Strongly disagree
                                                                         Agree             Disagree




Question 7.


At the undergraduate level UWT currently operates on the two-plus-two model. Incoming
students have completed 90 credits of lower-division work. They then take 90 credits of

UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON, TACOMA SELF-STUDY
Appendix E                                                                             Page: E-38

upper-division work at UWT. The vast majority of these students come from community
colleges in the South Sound region. Students who enter four-year institutions as freshmen
take a mixture of upper- and lower-division courses when and as they need them. In the
two-plus-two system students do not have this flexibility.


How should the partnership between UWT and community and technical colleges
be modified?



                                                                 7a Response frequencies
                                                           600
                                                           500
             a. Allow upper-division campuses




                                                   Count
                                                           400
             such as UWT to teach selected                 300
             lower-division courses.                       200
                                                           100
                                                                  136     215      114        121       51
                                                            Strongly agree        Neutral        Strongly disagree
                                                                          Agree             Disagree




                                                                 7b Response frequencies
                                                           600
                                                           500
             b. Allow community and technical
                                                   Count




                                                           400
             colleges to offer selected upper-             300
             division courses.                             200
                                                           100
                                                                  83      195      156        149       54
                                                            Strongly agree        Neutral        Strongly disagree
                                                                          Agree             Disagree




                                                                 7c Response frequencies
                                                           600
             c. Allow and encourage community              500
             college students to take selected
                                                   Count




                                                           400
             courses at baccalaureate                      300
             institutions during their sophomore           200
             year.                                         100
                                                                  80      277      171         88       21
                                                            Strongly agree        Neutral        Strongly disagree
                                                                          Agree             Disagree




UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON, TACOMA SELF-STUDY
Appendix E                                                                              Page: E-39



                                                                  7d Response frequencies
                                                            600
              d. Introduce dual-admissions                  500
              programs under which qualified




                                                    Count
                                                            400
              high school graduates are admitted            300
              simultaneously to a community                 200
              college and UWT.                              100
                                                                   114     196      156        110       61
                                                             Strongly agree        Neutral        Strongly disagree
                                                                           Agree             Disagree




                                                                  7e Response frequencies
                                                            600
              e. Fund UWT to hire advisers to               500




                                                    Count
              work with community college                   400

              students from the time they begin             300

              attending community college.                  200
                                                            100
                                                                   160     254      140         62       19
                                                             Strongly agree        Neutral        Strongly disagree
                                                                           Agree             Disagree




                                                                  7f Response frequencies
                                                            600
                                                            500
              f. Allow UWT to accept freshmen
                                                    Count




                                                            400
              and sophomores while continuing               300
              to accept transfer students.                  200
                                                            100
                                                                   138     116      117        159      105
                                                             Strongly agree        Neutral        Strongly disagree
                                                                           Agree             Disagree




Question 8.


Do you think any or all of the following are good reasons for converting UWT into a four-
year institution?




UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON, TACOMA SELF-STUDY
Appendix E                                                                                 Page: E-40



                                                                   8a Response frequencies
                                                             600
             a. Providing placebound South                   500




                                                     Count
             Sound students the option of a                  400

             four-year University of Washington              300

             experience in Tacoma.                           200
                                                             100
                                                                    190     184       96        103       66
                                                              Strongly agree        Neutral        Strongly disagree
                                                                            Agree             Disagree




                                                                   8b Response frequencies
                                                             600
             b. Allowing students who enter                  500




                                                     Count
             UWT as freshmen to take lower-                  400

             and upper-division courses as they              300

             need them, when they need them.                 200
                                                             100
                                                                    135     178      128        127       70
                                                              Strongly agree        Neutral        Strongly disagree
                                                                            Agree             Disagree




                                                                   8c Response frequencies
                                                             600
                                                             500
             c. Allowing transfer students to
                                                     Count




                                                             400
             take lower-division courses at                  300
             UWT.                                            200
                                                             100
                                                                    118     213      138        115       51
                                                              Strongly agree        Neutral        Strongly disagree
                                                                            Agree             Disagree




                                                                   8d Response frequencies
                                                             600
             d. Providing a stronger institutional           500
                                                     Count




             identity for UWT and a richer and               400

             more welcoming environment for                  300

             incoming transfer students.                     200
                                                             100
                                                                    196     217      120         61       37
                                                              Strongly agree        Neutral        Strongly disagree
                                                                            Agree             Disagree




UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON, TACOMA SELF-STUDY
Appendix E                                                                            Page: E-41



                                                                8e Response frequencies
                                                          600
                                                          500
             e. Making UWT more attractive to




                                                  Count
                                                          400
             students with interests in science           300
             and mathematics.                             200
                                                          100
                                                                 191     229      147         43       24
                                                           Strongly agree        Neutral        Strongly disagree
                                                                         Agree             Disagree




                                                                8f Response frequencies
                                                          600
             f. Allowing UWT to achieve some              500




                                                  Count
             economies of scale and eventually            400

             lower its per-student operating              300

             cost.                                        200
                                                          100
                                                                 208     231      119         51       22
                                                           Strongly agree        Neutral        Strongly disagree
                                                                         Agree             Disagree




                                                                8g Response frequencies
             g. Exposing lower-division                   600
             students to faculty members who              500
                                                  Count




             are active researchers and allow             400

             such students to participate in              300

             research projects with those                 200
                                                          100
             faculty members.                                    167     211      146         75       34
                                                           Strongly agree        Neutral        Strongly disagree
                                                                         Agree             Disagree




                                                                8h Response frequencies
                                                          600
             h. Allowing UWT to offer more                500
                                                  Count




             extracurricular programs and                 400

             activities, improving campus life            300

             for all students.                            200
                                                          100
                                                                 141     180      173         89       48
                                                           Strongly agree        Neutral        Strongly disagree
                                                                         Agree             Disagree




UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON, TACOMA SELF-STUDY
Appendix E                                                                              Page: E-42

Question 9.


Do you think any or all of the following are good reasons for UWT's continuing to accept
only transfer students (not freshmen or sophomores) at the undergraduate level?



                                                                  9a Response frequencies
                                                            600
                                                            500




                                                    Count
              a. The two-plus-two model works               400

              well and doesn't need fixing.                 300
                                                            200
                                                            100
                                                                   91      186      198        115       42
                                                             Strongly agree        Neutral        Strongly disagree
                                                                           Agree             Disagree




                                                                  9b Response frequencies
                                                            600
              b. It is cheaper for the state to             500
                                                    Count


              fund this model as opposed to                 400

              expanding capacity at the                     300

              freshman level at UWT.                        200
                                                            100
                                                                   126     193      202         80       32
                                                             Strongly agree        Neutral        Strongly disagree
                                                                           Agree             Disagree




                                                                  9c Response frequencies
                                                            600
                                                            500
              c. The capital expansion that would
                                                    Count




                                                            400
              be required at UWT is just too                300
              expensive.                                    200
                                                            100
                                                                   83      147      221        133       48
                                                             Strongly agree        Neutral        Strongly disagree
                                                                           Agree             Disagree




UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON, TACOMA SELF-STUDY
Appendix E                                                                              Page: E-43



                                                                  9d Response frequencies
                                                            600
             d. Attending a community college               500
             for two years and then attending a




                                                    Count
                                                            400
             baccalaureate institution for two              300
             years is, for students, the cheapest           200
             path to a bachelor's degree.                   100
                                                                   238     221      115         43       16
                                                             Strongly agree        Neutral        Strongly disagree
                                                                           Agree             Disagree




                                                                  9e Response frequencies
                                                            600
             e. As a four-year institution UWT              500




                                                    Count
             could draw the best students away              400

             from the region's community                    300

             colleges.                                      200
                                                            100
                                                                   81      140      178        170       64
                                                             Strongly agree        Neutral        Strongly disagree
                                                                           Agree             Disagree




Question 10.


UWT offers students far fewer academic options than do most public universities. In adding
programs, we will consider how new programs will accomplish goals such as the following.


Please prioritize the five goals listed below:


             Meeting student demand


             Meeting employers’ needs


             Preparing graduates to contribute to
             their community


             Establishing programs that build on
             strengths of our partner CCs


             Fostering economic development



UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON, TACOMA SELF-STUDY
Appendix E                                                                              Page: E-44

Question 11.


What new undergraduate program offerings would you like to see at UWT?



                                                                 11a Response frequencies
                                                           600
                                                           500
             a. Majors in social sciences, such




                                                   Count
                                                           400
             as psychology, sociology, political           300
             science.                                      200
                                                           100
                                                                  183        201    161      39         46
                                                             High priority         Neutral         Not a priority
                                                                             50              -50




                                                                 11b Response frequencies
                                                           600
                                                           500
             b. Majors in science and math such
                                                   Count
                                                           400
             as biology, chemistry, physics,               300
             statistics and math.                          200
                                                           100
                                                                  262        217    115      14         23
                                                             High priority         Neutral         Not a priority
                                                                             50              -50




                                                                 11c Response frequencies
                                                           600
                                                           500
             c. A secondary ed teacher
                                                   Count




                                                           400
             certification program in math and             300
             science.                                      200
                                                           100
                                                                  220        231    153      9          19
                                                             High priority         Neutral         Not a priority
                                                                             50              -50




UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON, TACOMA SELF-STUDY
Appendix E                                                                              Page: E-45



                                                                 11d Response frequencies
                                                           600
                                                           500
             d. Majors in the humanities, such




                                                   Count
                                                           400
             as English, history, philosophy,              300
             literature, art, foreign languages.           200
                                                           100
                                                                  147        207    182      52         43
                                                             High priority         Neutral         Not a priority
                                                                             50              -50




                                                                 11e Response frequencies
                                                           600
             e. Professional degree programs in            500




                                                   Count
             areas such as engineering, the                400

             health professions, architecture              300

             and urban planning.                           200
                                                           100
                                                                  251        225    106      26         26
                                                             High priority         Neutral         Not a priority
                                                                             50              -50




                                                                 11f Response frequencies
                                                           600
             f. More niche programs, such as               500
                                                   Count




             geographic information systems,               400

             museum management, glass arts,                300

             non-profit management.                        200
                                                           100
                                                                  77         134    224      120        76
                                                             High priority         Neutral         Not a priority
                                                                             50              -50




                                                                 11g Response frequencies
                                                           600
             g. More academic programs that                500
             cross existing program boundaries,
                                                   Count




                                                           400
             such as a program including                   300
             courses in business and liberal               200
             arts.                                         100
                                                                  188        220    155      40         26
                                                             High priority         Neutral         Not a priority
                                                                             50              -50




UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON, TACOMA SELF-STUDY
Appendix E                                                                              Page: E-46



                                                                 11h Response frequencies
                                                           600
                                                           500




                                                   Count
             h. An honors program, perhaps                 400

             with an international focus.                  300
                                                           200
                                                           100
                                                                  131        179    202         63        53
                                                             High priority         Neutral           Not a priority
                                                                             50                -50




             i. If there are specific
             undergraduate academic programs
                                                 149 responses submitted
             you would like to see UWT offer,
             please list them here:


Question 12.


UWT offers master's degrees in Business, Computer Science, Interdisciplinary Studies,
Education, Nursing, and Social Work.


What additional graduate programs do you think UWT should offer?


                                                                 12a Response frequencies
                                                           600
                                                           500
                                                   Count




                                                           400
                                                           300
             a. More social sciences, such as
                                                           200
             psychology, sociology, political              100
             science.                                             158        183    195         61        27
                                                            Strongly agree         Neutral        Strongly disagree
                                                                          Agree              Disagree




UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON, TACOMA SELF-STUDY
Appendix E                                                                             Page: E-47


                                                                 12b Response frequencies
                                                           600
                                                           500




                                                   Count
                                                           400
                                                           300
             b. More natural sciences, such as
                                                           200
             environmental science, geology,               100
             math, physics.                                       179     239      171         18       14
                                                            Strongly agree        Neutral        Strongly disagree
                                                                          Agree             Disagree




                                                                 12c Response frequencies
                                                           600
                                                           500




                                                   Count
                                                           400
                                                           300
             c. More humanities, such as
                                                           200
             English, history, philosophy,                 100
             literature, art, foreign languages.                  123     199      212         54       33
                                                            Strongly agree        Neutral        Strongly disagree
                                                                          Agree             Disagree




                                                                 12d Response frequencies
                                                           600
                                                           500
                                                   Count




                                                           400
             d. More professional degree                   300
             programs such as engineering,                 200
             computer science, architecture,               100
                                                                  75      130      245        101       73
             law.                                           Strongly agree        Neutral        Strongly disagree
                                                                          Agree             Disagree




UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON, TACOMA SELF-STUDY
Appendix E                                                                            Page: E-48


                                                                12e Response frequencies
                                                          600
                                                          500




                                                  Count
                                                          400
             e. More niche programs, such as              300
             geographic information systems,              200
             museum management, glass arts,               100
                                                                 179     201      146         42       52
             non-profit management.                        Strongly agree        Neutral        Strongly disagree
                                                                         Agree             Disagree




                                                                12f Response frequencies

                                                          600
                                                          500




                                                  Count
                                                          400
                                                          300
                                                          200
             f. Selected doctoral programs.
                                                          100
                                                                 235     235      117         20       16
                                                           Strongly agree        Neutral        Strongly disagree
                                                                         Agree             Disagree




             g. If there are specific graduate
             programs you would like to see      141 responses submitted
             UWT offer, please list them here:




UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON, TACOMA SELF-STUDY
Appendix E                                                                            Page: E-49

Question 13.

How important is it for UWT to:


                                                              13a Response frequencies
                                                        600
                                                        500




                                                Count
                                                        400
                                                        300
             a. Remain part of a multi-campus           200
             University of Washington.                  100
                                                               278     220       99         28        8
                                                         Strongly agree        Neutral        Strongly disagree
                                                                       Agree             Disagree




                                                              13b Response frequencies
                                                        600
                                                Count   500
                                                        400
                                                        300
             b. Have substantial local                  200
             autonomy.                                  100
                                                               213     264      119         26       10
                                                         Strongly agree        Neutral        Strongly disagree
                                                                       Agree             Disagree




                                                              13c Response frequencies
                                                        600
                                                        500
                                                Count




                                                        400
                                                        300
             c. Focus on the teaching and               200
             research needs of the region.              100
                                                               254     264       83         25        4
                                                         Strongly agree        Neutral        Strongly disagree
                                                                       Agree             Disagree




UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON, TACOMA SELF-STUDY
Appendix E                                                                                Page: E-50


                                                                  13d Response frequencies
                                                            600
                                                            500




                                                    Count
                                                            400
                                                            300
             d. Offer a wider range of majors               200
             and degrees.                                   100
                                                                   255     249       80         43        4
                                                             Strongly agree        Neutral        Strongly disagree
                                                                           Agree             Disagree




                                                                  13e Response frequencies
                                                            600
                                                            500




                                                    Count
                                                            400

             e. Be a major driver of the
                                                            300
                                                            200
             economic development of Tacoma
                                                            100
             and the South Puget Sound.                            230     252      114         30        8
                                                             Strongly agree        Neutral        Strongly disagree
                                                                           Agree             Disagree




             f. What other UWT activities do you
                                                   104 responses submitted
             see as very important?




UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON, TACOMA SELF-STUDY
Appendix E                                                                              Page: E-51

Question 14.

How high a priority should UWT place on the following:


                                                              14a Response frequencies
                                                        600
                                                        500




                                                Count
                                                        400
                                                        300
             a. High-quality teaching and               200
             learning.                                  100
                                                                542       82       4       1        2
                                                              Very high          Neutral         Very low
                                                                          High             Low




                                                              14b Response frequencies
                                                        600
                                                Count   500
                                                        400
                                                        300
             b. High-quality faculty research           200
             and scholarship.                           100
                                                                222       262     108      27       9
                                                              Very high          Neutral         Very low
                                                                          High             Low




                                                              14c Response frequencies
                                                        600
                                                        500
                                                Count




                                                        400
                                                        300
             c. Faculty members who are both            200
             good teachers and good scholars.           100
                                                                368       215      38      5        1
                                                              Very high          Neutral         Very low
                                                                          High             Low




UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON, TACOMA SELF-STUDY
Appendix E                                                                                  Page: E-52


                                                                  14d Response frequencies
                                                            600
                                                            500




                                                    Count
                                                            400

             d. Preparing students for specific
                                                            300
                                                            200
             careers in ways that are directly
                                                            100
             responsive to employers' needs.                        270       227     103      22       5
                                                                  Very high          Neutral         Very low
                                                                              High             Low




                                                                  14e Response frequencies
                                                            600
                                                            500




                                                    Count
                                                            400
                                                            300
             e. Preparing students for graduate             200
             and professional school.                       100
                                                                    180       299     125      18       3
                                                                  Very high          Neutral         Very low
                                                                              High             Low




                                                                  14f Response frequencies

                                                            600
                                                            500
                                                    Count




                                                            400
             f. Producing well-educated, well-              300
             rounded graduates who think                    200
             critically, communicate clearly, and           100
                                                                    496       115      12      2        1
             are problem solvers.                                 Very high          Neutral         Very low
                                                                              High             Low




UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON, TACOMA SELF-STUDY
Appendix E                                                                                Page: E-53


                                                                  14g Response frequencies
                                                            600
                                                            500




                                                    Count
                                                            400
                                                            300
             g. Encouraging research and
                                                            200
             scholarship that focuses on                    100
             regional issues and needs.                             179       279     139      25       4
                                                                  Very high          Neutral         Very low
                                                                              High             Low




                                                                  14h Response frequencies
                                                            600
                                                            500




                                                    Count
                                                            400
                                                            300
             h. Involving faculty members and               200
             students in community initiatives.             100
                                                                    214       238     134      32      10
                                                                  Very high          Neutral         Very low
                                                                              High             Low




             i. What other priorities should UWT
                                                   100 responses submitted
             set for itself?




UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON, TACOMA SELF-STUDY
Appendix E                                                                               Page: E-54

Question 15.


(Applies to UWT students and alumni only.)


If you could start at UWT again, and UWT offered a wider range of programs, what area of
undergraduate study would you pursue?


                                                                 15a Response frequencies

                                                           200




                                                   Count
             a. Majors in social sciences, such            100

             as psychology, sociology, political
             science.                                       0
                                                                  73         42     50      16         47
                                                             High priority        Neutral         Not a priority
                                                                             50             -50




                                                                 15b Response frequencies

                                                           200
                                                   Count




             b. Majors in science and math such            100

             as biology, chemistry, physics,
             statistics and math.                           0
                                                                  40         31     72      20         63
                                                             High priority        Neutral         Not a priority
                                                                             50             -50




                                                                 15c Response frequencies

                                                           200
                                                   Count




             c. A teacher certification program            100

             in math and science for high school
             teachers.                                      0
                                                                  31         39     72      25         63
                                                             High priority        Neutral         Not a priority
                                                                             50             -50




UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON, TACOMA SELF-STUDY
Appendix E                                                                               Page: E-55


                                                                 15d Response frequencies

                                                           200




                                                   Count
             d. Majors in the humanities, such             100

             as English, history, philosophy,
             literature, art, foreign languages.            0
                                                                  56         47     72      20         33
                                                             High priority        Neutral         Not a priority
                                                                             50             -50




                                                                 15e Response frequencies

                                                           200




                                                   Count
             e. Professional degree programs in            100
             areas such as engineering, the
             health professions, architecture                     41         50     67      20         50
             and urban planning.                            0
                                                             High priority        Neutral         Not a priority
                                                                             50             -50




                                                                 15f Response frequencies

                                                           200
                                                   Count




             f. More niche programs, such as
                                                           100
             geographic information systems,
             museum management, glass arts,                       25         37     64      32         72
             non-profit management.                         0
                                                             High priority        Neutral         Not a priority
                                                                             50             -50




UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON, TACOMA SELF-STUDY
Appendix E                                                                               Page: E-56


                                                                 15g Response frequencies

                                                           200




                                                   Count
             g. More academic programs that
             cross existing program boundaries,            100

             such as a program including
             courses in business and liberal                0
                                                                  48         60     67      17         36
             arts.                                           High priority        Neutral         Not a priority
                                                                             50             -50




                                                                 15h Response frequencies

                                                           200




                                                   Count
                                                           100
             h. An honors program, perhaps
             with an international focus.                         35         52     69      27         45
                                                            0
                                                             High priority        Neutral         Not a priority
                                                                             50             -50




             i. Other:                            19 responses submitted




UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON, TACOMA SELF-STUDY
Appendix E                                                                               Page: E-57

Question 16.


(Applies to UWT students and alumni only.)


If you could start at UWT again, and UWT offered a wider range of graduate programs, what
area of graduate study would you pursue?


                                                                 16a Response frequencies

                                                           200




                                                   Count
             a. More social sciences, such as              100

             psychology, sociology, political
             science.                                       0
                                                                  69      44        76         18       19
                                                            Strongly agree        Neutral        Strongly disagree
                                                                          Agree             Disagree




                                                                 16b Response frequencies

                                                           200
                                                   Count




             b. More natural sciences, such as             100

             environmental science, geology,
             math, physics.                                 0
                                                                  35      30        89         25       40
                                                            Strongly agree        Neutral        Strongly disagree
                                                                          Agree             Disagree




                                                                 16c Response frequencies

                                                           200
                                                   Count




             c. More humanities, such as                   100

             English, history, philosophy,
             literature, art, foreign languages.            0
                                                                  58      37        79         20       26
                                                            Strongly agree        Neutral        Strongly disagree
                                                                          Agree             Disagree




UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON, TACOMA SELF-STUDY
Appendix E                                                                            Page: E-58


                                                              16d Response frequencies

                                                        200




                                                Count
             d. More professional degree                100
             programs such as engineering,
             computer science, architecture,                   56      49        77         18       25
             law.                                        0
                                                         Strongly agree        Neutral        Strongly disagree
                                                                       Agree             Disagree




                                                              16e Response frequencies

                                                        200




                                                Count
             e. More niche programs, such as            100
             geographic information systems,
             museum management, glass arts,                    23      28        84         39       48
             non-profit management.                      0
                                                         Strongly agree        Neutral        Strongly disagree
                                                                       Agree             Disagree




                                                              16f Response frequencies

                                                        200
                                                Count




                                                        100

             f. Selected doctoral programs.
                                                               63      53        67         14       24
                                                         0
                                                         Strongly agree        Neutral        Strongly disagree
                                                                       Agree             Disagree




             g. Other:                         17 responses submitted




UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON, TACOMA SELF-STUDY
Appendix E                                                                                Page: E-59

Question 17.


(Applies to UWT students and alumni only.)


If UWT had been a four-year institution when you finished high school, would you have
come to UWT as a freshman?



                                                                  17 Response frequencies

                                                            200




                                                    Count
                                                            100


                                                                      66        28     35      13       96
                                                             0
                                                                  Very likely        Neutral         Not likely
                                                                                50             -50




             Percentage Analysis of Responses to Questions 4-17

This section provides graphs describing general support levels for each scenario item in
survey questions 4-17. The text of each question is provided, followed by a graph
illustrating the percent of respondents who chose “Agree” and “Strongly Agree” (or
equivalent choices) for each item. Data represents the entire population of 645 surveys.

Question 4.

Most public baccalaureate institutions offer between 100 and 200 majors and a substantial
number of graduate programs. UWT offers fewer than 30 majors, six master's programs and
no doctoral programs. UWT recently started a self-supporting continuing education program
that offers credit and non-credit courses and certificates.


Over the next five to ten years, UWT should:




UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON, TACOMA SELF-STUDY
Appendix E                                                                                          Page: E-60

                                                  % Who Strongly Agreed or Agreed

    Expand traditional/interdisciplinary undergraduate majors          75

                Expand master's and professional programs              80

                 Offer a small number of doctoral programs             57

                       Expand continuing education offerings           62

          Become 4-yr with freshmen and transfer students              39

    Accept only transfer/graduate students and expand both             57

          Establish residence halls and recreational facilities        40
                                                                   0            25     50      75   100


                                                                                     Percent




Question 5.

Currently UWT's student body consists largely of timebound and placebound students, students who
cannot relocate. UWT has both traditional-aged students and older students who are returning to school.

As UWT grows, it should:

                                                  % Who Strongly Agreed or Agreed


     Accept all qualified transfer students from South Sound               81

    Admit South Sound HS grads wanting 4-yr UW in Tacoma                   42

        Serve students from across the state of Washington                 62

                Enroll more students who are ethnic minorities             46

                              Enroll more international students           31
                                                                       0        25      50     75    100


                                                                                     Percent



Question 6.

Currently UWT enrolls about 2,000 students. Within the next decade demand for access to higher
education in Washington state is expected to increase by 31,000 students. There is currently no capacity
in the public higher education system to accommodate this increased demand.


What should be UWT's role in responding to this increased demand?




UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON, TACOMA SELF-STUDY
Appendix E                                                                                                   Page: E-61

                                                      % Who Strongly Agreed or Agreed

                      Remain the size it now is       8

     Add capacity for more transfer students          89

     Add capacity for more graduate students          82

             Admit freshmen and sophomores            39
                                                  0             25            50        75        100


                                                                          Percent

Question 7.

At the undergraduate level UWT currently operates on the two-plus-two model. Incoming
students have completed 90 credits of lower-division work. They then take 90 credits of
upper-division work at UWT. The vast majority of these students come from community
colleges in the South Sound region. Students who enter four-year institutions as freshmen
take a mixture of upper- and lower-division courses when and as they need them. In the two-plus-two
system students do not have this flexibility.


How should the partnership between UWT and community and technical colleges be
modified?

                                                      % Who Strongly Agreed or Agreed

             Allow UWT to teach selected lower-division courses          55

            Allow CC/TC colleges to offer upper-division courses         44

Allow CC students take upper-division courses at 4-yr institution        56

                  Allow HS grads dual admission to CC and UWT            49

                   Fund UWT advisers to work with CC students            65

     Allow UWT to accept freshman, sophomores and transfers              40
                                                                     0             25        50         75   100


                                                                                        Percent




UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON, TACOMA SELF-STUDY
Appendix E                                                                                                              Page: E-62

Question 8.

Do you think any or all of the following are good reasons for converting UWT into a four-year institution?



                                                   % Who Strongly Agreed or Agreed


      Provide placebound South Sound students 4-yr UW in Tacoma                59

      Allow UWT freshmen to take upper- and lower-division courses             49

    Allowing transfer students to take lower-division courses at UWT           52

          Provide stronger identity for UWT, welcoming environment             65

    Make UWT attractive to students with interests in science, math            66

     Allow UWT to achieve economies of scale, lower operating cost             70

Expose/allow lower-divison students to work with faculty researchers           60

     Allow UWT to offer more extracurricular programs and activities           51
                                                                           0            25          50        75           100


                                                                                                  Percent



Question 9.

Do you think any or all of the following are good reasons for UWT's continuing to accept
only transfer students (not freshmen or sophomores) at the undergraduate level?



                                                   % Who Strongly Agreed or Agreed

              The two-plus-two model works well and doesn’t need fixing            44

      Cheaper for state to fund this model vs. expanding for freshman              50

                Capital expansion required at UWT is just too expensive            36

    Attending a CC, then 4-yr institution is less expensive for students           73

As a 4-yr institution UWT could draw the best students away from CCs               35
                                                                               0             25          50        75        100


                                                                                                   Percent




UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON, TACOMA SELF-STUDY
Appendix E                                                                                               Page: E-63

Question 10.

UWT offers students far fewer academic options than do most public universities. In adding programs, we
will consider how new programs will accomplish goals such as the following.


Please prioritize the five goals listed below:

                                            %Who Prioritized Goal as Most Important

                                          Meeting student demand           49

                                        Meeting employers’ needs           10

            Preparing graduates to contribute to their community           26

Establishing programs that build on strengths of our partner CCs           9

                                Fostering economic development             6
                                                                       0            25      50      75    100


                                                                                          Percent

Question 11.

What new undergraduate program offerings would you like to see at UWT?

                                               % Who Indicated a High priority

                                                          (or next highest priority)


           An honors program, perhaps with an international focus              49

 More academic programs that cross existing program boundaries                 65

                                               More niche programs             33

                                     Professional degree programs              75

                                           Majors in the humanities            56

A secondary ed teacher certification program in math and science               71

                                        Majors in science and math             76

                                           Majors in social sciences           61
                                                                           0         25      50     75    100


                                                                                          Percent




UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON, TACOMA SELF-STUDY
Appendix E                                                                                              Page: E-64

Question 12.

UWT offers master's degrees in Business, Computer Science, Interdisciplinary Studies, Education,
Nursing, and Social Work.


What additional graduate programs do you think UWT should offer?

                                                 % Who Strongly Agreed or Agreed


                 More social sciences       55

                More natural sciences       67

                      More humanities       52

    More professional degree programs       33

                 More niche programs        61

           Selected doctoral programs       75
                                        0            25                50        75          100


                                                              Percent

Question 13.

How important is it for UWT to:

                                            % Who Strongly Agreed or Agreed


                         Remain part of a multi-campus UW         79

                            Have substantial local autonomy       75

     Focus on the teaching and research needs of the region       82

                  Offer a wider range of majors and degrees       80

Drive economic development in Tacoma and the South Sound          76
                                                              0             25          50         75   100


                                                                                      Percent




UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON, TACOMA SELF-STUDY
Appendix E                                                                                                          Page: E-65

Question 14.

How high a priority should UWT place on the following:

                                  % Who Indicated a Very High or High Priority


                                 High-quality teaching and learning       99

                    High-quality faculty research and scholarship         77

 Faculty members who are both good teachers and good scholars             93

 Preparing students for careers that respond to employers' needs          79

         Preparing students for graduate and professional school          77

                  Producing well-educated, well-rounded graduates         98

Encouraging research and scholarship focusing on regional issues          73

Involving faculty members and students in community initiatives           72
                                                                      0             25          50        75          100


                                                                                              Percent

Question 15.

(applies to UWT students and alumni only)

If you could start at UWT again, and UWT offered a wider range of programs, what area of
undergraduate study would you pursue?

                                                   % Who Indicated a High Priority

                                                         (or next highest priority)


                                               Majors in social sciences       50

                                             Majors in science and math        31

                  HS teacher certification program in math and science         30

                                                Majors in the humanities       45

                                          Professional degree programs         40

                                                    More niche programs        27

      More academic programs that cross existing program boundaries            47

                An honors program, perhaps with an international focus         38
                                                                           0             25          50        75           100


                                                                                                Percent




UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON, TACOMA SELF-STUDY
Appendix E                                                                                         Page: E-66

Question 16.

(applies to UWT students and alumni only)

If you could start at UWT again, and UWT offered a wider range of graduate programs, what
area of graduate study would you pursue?

                                                % Who Strongly Agreed or Agreed


                More social sciences       50

               More natural sciences       30

                     More humanities       43

   More professional degree programs       47

                More niche programs        23

          Selected doctoral programs       52
                                       0                 25        50        75        100


                                                               Percent

Question 17.

(applies to UWT students and alumni only)

If UWT had been a four-year institution when you finished high school, would you have
come to UWT as a freshman?



                                                         % Who Indicated Very likely

                                                          (or next highest priority)




   Would have come to UWT as a freshman             39




                                                0             25        50        75         100


                                                                    Percent




UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON, TACOMA SELF-STUDY
Appendix F                                                                    Page:F-67



Appendix F: Data Tables

                                             Table F-1
                            Space Denied Applications to UWS from
                                 Residents of Washington state
                                            2003-2004


                Quarter         Sum '03 Fall '03     Win '04    Spr '04       Year


                Freshman                5    1,681         24             7      1,717
                2 Yr Transfer          43      977        664        488         2,172
                4 Yr Transfer          60      427        109         81             677


                Total                 108    3,085        797        576         4,566


                Source: Tim Washburn, Executive Director, Admissions and Records


                                            Table F-2
                          Direct Transfer Admission Students at UWS:
              % Upper vs. % Lower-division Credits at Anticipated Time of Graduation

             Credit Type                                         Percentage
             Lower-division Credits                                 27%
             Upper-division Credits                                 72%
             Graduate Credits                                        1%

                                                     Source: AH,Data-Mgmt, UWS
             File Path: s:UWTDEAN/Noreen/Sharon/2707 Reports/DTA Percentage
             Notes: Population is students who entered UW under a Direct Transfer
                     Agreement, and received an undergraduate degree
                     academic years 00-01, 01-02, and 02-03
                     Credit count taken 1 year after student classified as 'senior'




UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON, TACOMA SELF-STUDY
Appendix F                                                                       Page:F-68



                                                Table F-3
           Cities on the 100 Largest US Cities List without a Public Baccalaureate University

 City/State                  Population           Nearest Public 4-Year Institution         Miles from City
 Dallas, TX                           1,208,318   University of Texas at Dallas                           18
 Fort Worth, TX                         585,122   University of Texas at Arlington                        13
 Oklahoma City, OK                      523,303   University of Central Oklahoma                          16
 Viriginia Beach, VA                    439,467   Old Dominion University                                 13
 Oakland, CA                            398,844   University of California- Berkeley                       6
 Santa Ana, CA                          342,510   University of California-Irvine                         10
 Anaheim, CA                            332,361   California State University-Fullerton                    6
 St. Louis, MO                          332,223   University of Missouri-St. Louis                         7
 Aurora, CO                             290,418   Metropolitan State College of Denver                    10
 Stockton, CA                           271,466   California State University-Sacramento                  42
 Plano, TX                              241,991   University of Texas at Dallas                            6
 Hialeah, FL                            226,401   Florida International University                        24
 Garland, TX                            218,027   University of Texas at Dallas                            9
 Scottsdale, AZ                         217,989   Arizona State University-Main Campus                    12
 Rochester, NY                          215,093   SUNY Brockport                                          19
 Chandler, AZ                           211,299   Arizona State University-Main Campus                    11
 Chesapeake, VA                         210,834   Norfolk State University                                 7
 Modesto, CA                            206,872   California State University-Stanislaus                  14
 Fremont, CA                            204,525   California State University-Hayward                     10
 Glendale, CA                           200,499   California State University-Los Angeles                  9
 Chula Vista, CA                        199,060   San Diego State University                              11
 Yonkers, NY                            197,388   CUNY Lehman College                                      6
 Tacoma, WA                             196,790   University of Washington, Seattle                       33




UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON, TACOMA SELF-STUDY
Appendix G                                                        Page: G-69

Appendix G: Employment of Graduates

MILGARD SCHOOL OF BUSINESS: Firms recently or currently employing graduates

Advantage Rent-a-Car                    Heritage Financial
AirTouch Paging                         Hinshaw’s Acura
Albertsons                              IBM
Alpha Steel Buildings                   IKON Office Solutions
American Genl. Financial Grp.           InsynQ
Athletic Supply Co.                     Intel
Bank of America                         JC Penney
Battelle-Northwest                      Kids Incorporated
Beneficial Finance                      Kinkos
Better Business Bureau                  Kitsap County
The Boeing Company                      K-Mart
Borderless Investment Group             Knight Vale & Gregory
Burlington Northern Santa Fe            KOMO TV
California State Auto Association       Labor Ready
Columbia Bank                           Merck Human Health
Deloitte and Touche                     MetroPark District of Tacoma
Departnet of Defense                    Microscan Systems, Inc.
Deutsche Financial Services             Midland National LIfe
DSHS                                    Milgard Manufacturing
Dwyer, Pemberton and Coulson            Moss Adams
Eddie Bauer                             MultiCare
Electronic Arts                         Network ACI
Emeral Solutions                        New York LIfe
Enterprise Rent-a-Car                   Nike
Equifax Inc.                            Nordstrom
Filterfresh Coffee                      Northwest Administratords
Financial Pacific Leasing, LLC          Office Team/Account Temps
Foote, Cone and Belding Advtg.          Olympic College
Franciscan Home Care                    Orthopedic Associates
Frank Russell Company                   (Providence Med. Ctr.)
Greco Homes                             Oxford Insights, Denmark
Group Health Cooperative                Pacific Office Automation
Harborstone Credit Union                Passage Marketing

UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON, TACOMA SELF-STUDY
Appendix G                                                            Page: G-70

Pierce County                                Tacoma Fire Department
Puget Sound International                    Tacoma School District
Raineir Plywood Co.                          Total Renal Care
Rainier Square Merchants                     Sound Credit Union
Rich-Lite Plywood                            UNICO Properties
Right Management Consultants                 Unionbay Sportswear
Rondal Blue & Co., LLC                       United Way, Portland
Safeco                                       UW Tacoma
Sam’s Club                                   Virginia Mason
Seattle Public Utilities                     Waddell & Reed Fin. Services
Seattle Thunderbirds                         Washington state Investmnt Bd.
Secord                                       Wells Fargo
Social Security Adminsitration               West Coast Paper
Solomon Smith Barney                         Weyerhaeuser
St. Joseph’s Medical Center                  William B. Pope
State Auditor’s Office                       Windermere
State Farm Insurance                         World Trade Center
State of Washington                          Yelm Telephone
SuperValu
Tacoma Community College



  INTERDISCIPLINARY ARTS & SCIENCES Positions currently or recently held by
                               graduates

Admissions Specialist, University of Puget   Commander, Washington state Basic Law
Sound                                        Enforcement Academy
Apprenticeship Coordinator, Wash. Dept.      Company Commander, School of Infantry,
of Labor & Industries                        Camp LeJeune, NC
Artist working and showing in Polynesia      Educational Planner/Tutoring Coordinator,
                                             TCC
Assistant Director, Center for
Holocaust/Genocide Studies                   EEOC Counselor, Department of the Navy
Assistant Director, Thurston Regional        Emergency Services Mgr., W. Sound
Planning                                     Chapter, American Red Cross
Branch Director, Boys and Girls Clubs of     Environmental Scientist, GeoEngineers
Pierce County
                                             ESL Teacher, Tacoma Public Schools
Buyer, Multiple Zones International
                                             Exploring Executive, Boy Scouts of
Clinical Case Manager/Counselor              America



UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON, TACOMA SELF-STUDY
Appendix G                                                            Page: G-71

Financial Advisor, Morgan Stanley Dean       Operations Systems Administrator, Port of
Witter                                       Anacortes
Government Relations Assistant , Pierce      Pierce County Auditor
County
                                             Production Supervisor, University of Puget
Human Resources Manager, Milgard             Sound
Manufacturing
                                             Program Coordinator, Washington state
Import Rep./Customs Broker, Expeditors       Historical Society
International of Wash.
                                             Proprietor, Keynote Speech Services
Instructor, Skagit Valley Community
                                             Research Assistant, NASA
College
                                             Senior Analyst, TransAmerica Insurance
Instructor/Academic Advisor, The Art
Institute of Seattle                         Senior Consultant, Kaiser/Group Health
Law Clerk, King County Bar Association
Licensed Insurance Agent                     Sr. Community Campaign Associate,
                                             United Way
Literacy Program Coordinator, Tacoma
Community College                            Training Specialist , Tacoma Urban League
Manager/Customer Service Metrics,            Tribal Liaison, U.S. Environmental
Weyerhaeuser                                 Protection Agency, Region 10
Marketing Representative, Oxford &           Vice President, Branch Offices, Key Bank
Associates
MIS Analyst, Interactive Banking Division,
Bank of America
Operations Manager, Lane Transit District
Operations Supervisor/Information
Center, Asarco
 INSTITUTE OF TECHOLOGY: Recent job or internship placements for students or
                               graduates
Business Internet Services                   U.S. Geological Survey
Department of Social and Health Services     Veterans Affairs Medical Center
Imprintstore.com                             Washington Mutual
Intel                                        Weyerhaeuser
Microsoft                                    World Trade Center Tacoma
Museum of Glass: Center for
Contemporary Art
Optic Fusion
Port of Tacoma
Sagem Morpho
The Boeing Company
Topia Ventures
TVW


UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON, TACOMA SELF-STUDY
Appendix G                                                           Page: G-72

      NURSING: Positions recently or currently held by students or graduates
Acute Care ARNP                               Pierce County Juvenile Court, Dependency
                                              Unit
Allied Health Programs Coordinator Pierce
College                                       Kitsap County Juvenile Court
Clinical Coordinator, Northwest               Tacoma Public Schools, Alternative High
Orthopaedic Institute                         School
Community Health Nurse                        Crisis Unit, Good Samaritan Mental
                                              Healthcare
Director of Pediatric Home Care
Family Nurse Practitioner, Seabeck
Health Services Charge Nurse, Green Hill
Correctional Facility, Chehalis
High-Risk Perinatal Nurse Specialist,
Tacoma-Pierce County Health Dept.
Independent ARNP Practice and Co-Owner
Lecturer, UWT BSN Program
Neonatal ICU Nurse, Mary Bridge Hospital
Nurse Anesthetist Student, L.A.
Nursing Educator, MultiCare
Oncology Program Implementer, Istanbul
Tacoma Community Col. Faculty Member
Trauma Case Manager
Trauma Coordinator, Pierce County
Volunteer, Pierce Cnty. Sexual Assault
Cntr.
Washington state Representative
Women’s Clinic Coordinator, Pierce County
Breastfeeding AlliancSOCIAL WORK: Jobs
held or organizations recently or currently
served by students or graduates
Foster Care Program, Catholic Community
Services
SCA-Pacific
Pediatric Interim Care Services, Catholic
Community Services
Social Work Services, Canterbury House
Private Practice, Chemical Dependency
Counseling
Metropolitan Development Council




UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON, TACOMA SELF-STUDY
Appendix G                                                          Page: G-73



Social Worker, Medical Social Worker, Psychiatric Social Worker or Mental Health
Worker

Auburn Regional Medical Center              Pierce County AIDS Foundation
Division of Children and Family Services    Puget Sound Behavioral Healthcare
Evergreen Counseling Services               Puyallup Tribal Health Authority
Family Advocacy Program Madigan Army        Region 5 Division of Children and Family
Medical Center                              Services
Franciscan Hospice                          Tacoma Public Schools ECEAP/Head Start
Madigan Army Medical Center                 Veterans Administration of Puget
Multicare/Tacoma General Hospital           Sound/American Lake



EDUCATION Partner school districts for placement of teacher and principal interns

Auburn
Bethel
Central Kitsap
Clover Park
Eatonville
Federal Way
Fife
Franklin Pierce
Kent
Olympia
Peninsula
Puyallup
South Kitsap
Sumner
Tacoma
Tahoma
Tumwater
University Place
Yelm




UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON, TACOMA SELF-STUDY
Appendix H                                                                  Page: H-74

Appendix H: Cost of Lower Division Education to the State

The cost, to the state, of educating a lower-division student at UWS is actually lower than is
the cost of educating a lower-division student at a community college, as the following table
shows.


                   Cost to the State for Lower Division FTEs: 2001/02
                                   2001/2002
                                   1               2                3
                                                                    Cost to State
                                   Total Cost      Tuition and Fees per FTE
                                   per FTE1        per FTE2         Col 1 minus Col 2

Community and Technical Colleges $             4,840 $            1,743 $             3,097
Comprehensive Institutions3       $            6,211 $            3,059 $             3,152
University of Washington, Seattle $            5,148 $            3,983 $             1,165

UWS/CTC Difference                   $          308 $             2,240 $             (1,932)
Comprehensive/CTC Difference         $         1,371 $            1,316 $                 55



Notes:


1
  These cost numbers are taken from Table 1 (attached) of the HEC Boards 2001-02 Education
Cost Study, page 11, which can be found at


2 Tuition and fees for full-time in-state students. Data from Appendix B of the HEC Board


    2001-02 Tuition and Fee Report, which can be found at
    Appendix B is also attached.
3 Central, Eastern, Western, and Evergreen. This is an average of tuition and fee rates, but not a
    weighted average.

Here is how these cost figures are arrived at. The costs of educating lower-division students,
at the specified institutions, were identified using the HEC Boards 2001-02 Education Cost
Study. These numbers are shown in Column 1. Column 2 lists the tuition and fees for
undergraduate students at each kind of institution. This number, for the comprehensives, is
an average of the numbers for the four separate comprehensives. These numbers are taken
from the HEC Boards 2001-02 Tuition and Fee Report. The cost to the state, per FTE
student, is the actual cost, as determined by the HEC Board, minus the amount the student
pays, the tuition and fees number. Column 3 shows the cost to the state by institution or
institution type.




UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON, TACOMA SELF-STUDY
Appendix H                                                                 Page: H-75

In 2001/02 it costs the state $1,932 less, per FTE lower-division student, at the University
of Washington, Seattle than it did at the community and technical colleges. Similarly, it cost
the state $55 more to support an FTE at the comprehensive institutions than it did at the
community and technical colleges.

Were UWT to become four year we could not, of course, achieve the efficiency of UWS,
because we would not have an enrollment that allows us to teach freshmen and sophomores
in sections of several hundred. and because we do not have large numbers of teaching
assistants. But in time we might well achieve the efficiencies of the comprehensive
institutions, and the cost, to the state, is not significantly higher, per FTE, at the
comprehensive institutions than it is at the community and technical colleges.

The above table is meant to show only that there no decisive financial advantage, to the
state, of expanding the 2+2 system as opposed to expanding capacity at four-year
institutions or establishing new four-year institutions. When the fact that retention and
graduation rates are markedly higher for students starting at a four-year institution than
they are for students starting at a community college, making UWT a four-year institution
becomes a financially viable, indeed a financially preferable, alternative to simply expanding
the two-plus-two model.

The 2+2 system obviously does offer a financial advantage to students. As the above table
shows, in 2001/02 a freshman paid $2,240 less to attend a community college than to
attend the University of Washington.

The above analysis was done on the basis of the actual expenditures of UWS to educate
lower-division students, as determined by the HEC Board. The funding model for UWS and
other public higher education institutions is on a per FTE basis that does not take into
account the level of student being funded (lower-division, upper-division, graduate). This
one number is not adequate to educate upper-division and graduate students, but it is more
than enough to educate lower-division students. The money not spent on lower-division
students is spent on upper-division and graduate students.




UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON, TACOMA SELF-STUDY
Appendix H                                    Page: H-76




UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON, TACOMA SELF-STUDY
Appendix H                                    Page: H-77




UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON, TACOMA SELF-STUDY
Appendix J                                                                    Page: J-78

Appendix I: Possible New Programs and Centers

Here is a list of new majors and degrees that have been suggested for consideration during
the preparation of this study. We list these as examples of possible areas of expansion, not
as new initiatives endorsed by the study:

Undergraduate majors

   •   Additional majors in Business, e.g., International Finance
   •   Arts Majors: Digital arts, glass, photography
   •   Asian/Pacific Rim Studies
   •   Behavioral Studies
   •   Computer Engineering
   •   Conflict Resolution and Global Peace Studies
   •   Electrical Engineering
   •   Geographic Information Systems
   •   Museum Studies
   •   Non-Profit Studies
   •   Performing Arts
   •   Public Health
   •   Traditional majors in the sciences, social sciences, and humanities.
   •   Urban Planning

Undergraduate minors

   •   Africana Studies
   •   Business for non-Business majors
   •   Nursing - Women’s health
   •   CSS - Security

Masters and Post Baccalaureate Programs

   •   Additional concentrations in Master of Nursing
   •   CFA – Certified Financial Analyst
   •   CPA – Certified Public Accountant
   •   MA in Arts Management
   •   MA in Urban Studies
   •   MFA in Glass
   •   MIT – Masters in Teaching
   •   MN – Master of Nursing, new concentrations
       Gerontology


UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON, TACOMA SELF-STUDY
Appendix J                                                 Page: J-79

       Palliative Care
       Public Health
   •   MPA – Master of Public Administration
   •   MPH - Master in Public Health
   •   MS in Accounting
   •   MS in Environmental Science
   •   MSW – Master of Social Work add full-time program




UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON, TACOMA SELF-STUDY
Appendix J                                                               Page: J-80

Appendix J: UWT Mission and Vision Statement

In light of this report’s heavy reliance on the notion of a Metropolitan University, we
recommend UWT’s Mission and Vision Statement be amended as follows (the changes are
underlined).

MISSION

The University of Washington, Tacoma educates diverse learners and transforms
communities by expanding the boundaries of knowledge and discovery.

VISION

The University of Washington, Tacoma envisions itself at the center of a vibrant community
that is recognized as being among the best educated in the country. As a metropolitan
campus of a world-class university, UWT serves transfer students, qualified high school
graduates, and graduate students and is dedicated to interdisciplinary and innovative
teaching and scholarship and to engaging the community in mutually beneficial
partnerships. UW Tacoma's commitment to diversity is central to an environment where
students, staff, faculty and South Sound residents find abundant opportunities for
intellectual, personal and professional growth.




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