shipping by xuyuzhu

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     Packing & Shipping Seafood
What did Grandma always say about packing and shipping seafood?


                        KEEP IT COOL
                        KEEP IT CLEAN
                        KEEP IT MOVING
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                       Air-Fresh Seafood
   Sturdy Boxes: Wetlocks are still the standard, but other specialty
    boxes are available

   Use 4-Mil Poly Liners: Airlines hate leakers…so will your customers

   “Wet” Ice: Don’t use regular ice. It melts & creates a huge mess

   Chill Before Packing: Make sure the fish is 32°F – or a bit less –
    before it goes into the boxes

   Gel Ice: Must be hard frozen & leak free / Use 2 X 1.5 lb gel packs per
    50 lb box & 4 X 1.5 gel packs per 80 lb box / Put gel packs on both top
    and bottom of box

   Insulation: Really helps maintain the chill / Highly advised during
    warmer months
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       Effect of Insulation & Gel
                  Packs
 50 lbs Chilled Salmon / Time to Reach
                   40°F
Fish Pre-Chilled to 32°F / Ambient air temperature of
                          60°F Without       With
 Box Type
                               Gel Packs   Gel Packs

 Uninsulated Wet-Lock            6 hrs       9 hrs

 Insulated Wet-Lock
                                12 hrs       21 hrs
 3/8 “ styrofoam
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          Planning Your Air Shipment

   Doing It Yourself?
       Read MAP’s “Air Shipment of Fresh Fish”
       Ask lots of “stupid” questions
       Don’t take anything for granted

          There are a ton of issues you need to consider!
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       Planning Your Air Shipment
 Choosing a carrier
   Service to destination – direct flights, minimum connections, timing,
    etc.
   Experienced staff / general reputation
   Adequate chilling facilities enroute, etc. etc.
   Is your shipment “priority”, or can it be bumped for mail or
    passenger baggage


 Insurance
   Basic insurance is minimal
   Declared value protects against loss / Full value insurance is usually
    quite expensive / Loss to customer is uninsurable
   Claims take months to settle
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         Planning Your Air Shipment

   Documentation
     Anything other than the Air Waybill is your responsibility
     Correct documentation is particularly critical on international
      shipments
     Are you a known shipper?



   Other
       We could go on and on with various contingencies

                           our sage advice?
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               Use a Freight Forwarder
    They know the system
    They negotiate the best rates & schedules
    They monitor shipments
    They get more respect from the airlines than
     you ever will
    In short - “They are pros”

 In Alaska there are a number of freight forwarders that specialize in
seafood. They ship millions of pounds each year, and they live by their
                              reputations.
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                           Shipping Frozen
              SAME BASIC CARE AS WITH FRESH
   Sturdy Insulated Boxes: Really a must with frozen shipments. Full
    “styros” with well fitted corrugated “outer” is best

   Deep Freeze Before Packing: Make sure the fish is as cold as possible
    – minimum -5°F / -22°F (-30°C) is better

   Gel Ice: Use lots! Must also be deep frozen & leak free

   Dry Ice: Can be very good…but pricey. Shippers have limits on how
    much you can use, so check in advance

   “KEEP FROZEN” Labeling: Use lots of labels!

   Freezers Enroute: Verify that freezers are available at every stop and
    point of plane change. Make sure they are adequate to take your
    shipment if need be.
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                       Shipping by Truck
Did you know that as much fresh fish now leaves Alaska
by truck as by air?
 Volume: Well over 20 million pounds of Alaska seafood goes to
  the Lower ’48 on trucks

   What Species?: “Sturdy” fish like halibut stand up well in
    trucking, but lots of fresh salmon gets trucked too

   Good Rates: “Back haul” from Alaska is much cheaper than air

   Reliable: Unlike aircraft, “refer” trucks have reliable
    temperature control systems for either chilled or frozen freight

   Speed: Can be surprisingly competitive with air depending on
    destination & when all stops, and potential delays are
    considered

   Check with your Forwarder: Trucking may be right for you.
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And Remember What Grandma
          Says

         KEEP IT COOL
         KEEP IT CLEAN
         KEEP IT MOVING
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     Credits
•   Quentin Fong, Seafood Marketing Specialist, Alaska Sea Grant Marine
    Advisory Program and Kodiak Fishery Industrial Technology Center, School
    of Fisheries and Ocean Science, University of Alaska-Fairbanks
•   Greg Fisk, SeaFisk Consulting
•   Glenn Haight, Seafood Business Specialist, Alaska Sea Grant Marine
    Advisory Program, School of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences, University of
    Alaska-Fairbanks
•   Charlie Sparks, Associate Professor, School of Business Management,
    University of Alaska-Fairbanks
       Alaska Sea Grant
Marine Advisory Program (MAP)
Glenn Haight
Fisheries Business Specialist
1108 F Street, Suite 215
Juneau, Alaska 99801
Phone: (907) 796-6046
Fax: (907) 796-6301
E-mail: glenn.haight@uaf.edu




                                Main Office / Anchorage
                                1007 West 3rd Ave, Suite 100
                                Anchorage, AK 99501
                                Phone: (907) 274-9691
                                Fax: (907) 277-5242
                                E-mail: map@sfos.uaf.edu

								
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