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North Dakota GIS Users Conference_ 2011 - University of North Dakota

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North Dakota GIS Users Conference_ 2011 - University of North Dakota Powered By Docstoc
					         North Dakota
  GIS Users Conference, 2011

           Program and Abstracts




                 Alerus Center
                Grand Forks, ND
                October 11-13



                    Hosted by:
              State of North Dakota
Department of Geography, University of North Dakota
              U.S. Geological Survey
                                        Sponsors
                                          GOLD
                                         AE2S
                                 Bartlett & West, Inc.
                                       GEC, Inc.
                                  GIS Workshop, Inc.
                               Kadrmas, Lee & Jackson
                           North Point Geographic Solutions
                             Pro-West & Associates, Inc.
                           UND College of Arts and Sciences
                UND Department of Geography/Graduate Certificate in GISc
                  UND Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost
                                U.S. Geological Survey

                                         SILVER
                              Applied Data Consultants Inc.
                       Environmental Systems Research Institute Inc.
                                 Frontier Precision, Inc
                               Houston Engineering, Inc.
                                        Intermap
                         MidAmerica GIS Consortium (MAGIC)
                                Pictometry International
                                      Tetra Tech

                                       OTHER
                                   Ayres Associates
                                  CompassTools Inc.
                                Sanborn Map Company
                   Department of Earth System Science & Policy, UND
                   Greater Grand Forks Convention and Visitors Bureau
                                        Sidwell
                                 Edgetech America, Inc.

                          Conference Planning Committee:
               North Dakota GIS Technical Committee, Bob Nutsch, Co-Chair

               UND Department of Geography, Gregory Vandeberg, Co-Chair

              U.S. Geological Survey, Stephen P. Shivers , Co-Chair

UND Division of Continuing Education, Professional Services, Gretchen Schatz & Debbie Vance
                                         Welcome!
       On behalf of the University of North Dakota Department of Geography, the North Dakota
GIS Technical Committee, and the U.S. Geological Survey, we welcome you to the 2011 North
Dakota GIS Users Conference. We recognize that you took valuable time away from your
personal and work lives and that by attending this conference you committed financial
resources. We hope that you enjoy your experience at the Alerus Center and find the conference
to be very beneficial to you. We have a large number of presentations, workshops, sponsors,
and exhibitors which we believe will give you an outstanding opportunity to network and to
gain valuable information. Please be sure to thank the sponsors of the conference and please be
sure to stop by the exhibitors’ booths to make valuable connections with them. Thank you
again and enjoy the conference!
                                              —Bob Nutsch, Stephen Shivers, and Gregory Vandeberg,
                                                                              Conference Co-Chairs

                                         Exhibitors
                                            AE2S
                               Applied Data Consultants, Inc.
                                      Ayres Associates
                                       Bartlett & West
                                     CompassTools Inc.
                         Department of Earth System Science & Policy
                        Environmental Systems Research Institute, Inc.
                                   Frontier Precision, Inc
                                         GEC, Inc.
                                 Houston Engineering, Inc.
                                          Intermap
                                  Kadrmas, Lee & Jackson
                                           MAGIC
                              North Point Geographic Solutions
                                  Pictometry International
                                Pro-West & Associates, Inc
                                  Sanborn Map Company
                                           Sidwell
                                         Tetra Tech
                              UND - Department of Geography
                                   U.S. Geological Survey




                                                                                                 2
                                                          Table of Contents
Schedule At-A-Glance ................................................................................................................... 4
Conference Schedule ...................................................................................................................... 5
Keynote Abstracts ........................................................................................................................ 13
Paper Presentation Abstracts ........................................................................................................ 14
Poster Presentation Abstracts ....................................................................................................... 26
Workshop Abstracts ..................................................................................................................... 31
Conference Survey ....................................................................................................................... 32
Notes ............................................................................................................................................. 33


                    State of North Dakota GIS Technical Committee (GISTC)

                                     State Water Commission - Rod Bassler
                                        Department of Health - Ann Fritz
                                   Department of Transportation - Brian Bieber
                                    Game and Fish Department - Brian Hosek
                                       Geological Survey - Elroy Kadrmas
                                  Parks and Recreation Department - Chris Dirk
                                Information Technology Department - Bob Nutsch
                                       Land Department* - Levi Erdmann
                                   Public Service Commission* - Bruce Johnson
                                      Oil and Gas Division* - Nathan Kirby
                               Department of Emergency Services* - Jon Tonneson
                                                             *Associate Members




                                                                                                                                                    3
                                                Schedule At-A-Glance
               Presentations                      Workshops                      Exhibits                      Other
Tuesday, October 11, 12:00-3:30 - Registration
                                                                Bluebird/Finch
1:00-2:00                                                     Full GISTC Meeting
                                     Oriole                                                      Hawk
2:15-3:45
                          I-A: Census Data Part A                                       I-B: ArcGIS in the Field

                                                              Pre-Function Hallway
3:45-4:00                                                            Break
                                     Oriole                                                      Hawk
4:00-5:30
                          II-A: Census Data Part B                                    II-B: Homeland Infrastructure

                                                          Exhibit Area - Ballroom 4
3:00-5:00                                                      Exhibit Setup

Wednesday, October 12, 7:30-3:30 Registration
                                                         Exhibit Area - Ballroom 4
7:30-8:30                                                      Exhibits Setup
                                                         Exhibit Area - Ballroom 4
9:00-7:00                                                      Exhibits Open
                                                                Ballroom 5
8:00-8:15                                                  Welcoming Remarks
8:15-9:00                                                    Keynote Address
9:00-10:15                                               Gold Sponsor Presentations
                                                         Exhibit Area - Ballroom 4
10:15-
10:45                                                                 Break
                                                     Oriole                      Pheasant                      Hawk
11:00-
11:30                                                                            I-B: Water
                                              I-A: Remote Sensing                                          I-C: Agriculture
                                                                              Issues/Flooding
11:30-1:00                                                Lunch: On Your Own
                 Ballroom 5                          Oriole                    Pheasant                        Hawk
1:00-2:30                                                                    II-C: Water
                II-A: ArcGIS              II-B: Land Management                                           II-D: Federal GIS
                                                                           Issues/Flooding
                                                       Exhibit Area - Ballroom 4
2:30-3:00                                                        Break
                 Ballroom 5                        Oriole                      Pheasant                        Hawk
3:00-4:30
             III-A: Transportation             III-B: Ag & Forestry       III-C: Flooding/LiDAR           III-D: Local GIS

                                                           Pre-Function Hallway
4:00-5:00                                                      Poster Session
                                                          Exhibit Area - Ballroom 4
4:30-6:30                                                          Social

Thursday, October 13, 7:30-1:00 Registration
                                                          Exhibit Area - Ballroom 4
8:30-1:30                                                      Exhibits Open
                                                                 Ballroom 5
8:00-9:00                                                     Keynote Address

                                                                                                                              4
9:00-9:30                                          Gold Sponsor Presentations
                                                    Exhibit Area - Ballroom 4
9:30-10:00                                                   Break
                     Ballroom 5                 Oriole                    Pheasant            Hawk
10:00-
11:30                                    IV-B: Emergency                IV-C: Water
                    IV-A: ArcGIS                                                          IV-D: Local GIS
                                            Response                  Issues/Flooding
11:30-1:00                                             Lunch: On Your Own
                      Ballroom 5                Oriole                  Pheasant              Hawk
1:00-2:30            V-A: Water
                                          V-B: State GIS             III-A: CAD and GIS     III-B: Open
                   Issues/Flooding
                                                           Ballroom 5
2:30-2:45                                              Closing Comments
                                                    Exhibit Area - Ballroom 4
1:30-3:00                                              Exhibit Tear Down


                                           Conference Schedule
TUESDAY, OCT. 11

1:00 - 2:00 p.m.         Full GISTC Meeting (Bluebird/Finch)

                         The purpose of the Full GISTC meeting is to provide a venue to allow GIS professionals
                         working within North Dakota, or having some involvement with North Dakota GIS, an
                         opportunity to learn about the state's GIS Program and provide comments and
                         suggestions to the executive GISTC committee. The "Full" GISTC membership is
                         defined in Executive Order 2001-06.

1:00-1:05 p.m.           Introductions
1:05-1:30 p.m.           Executive GISTC report
                                Accomplishments
                                Current Work and Goals
1:30-2:00 p.m.            Group Discussion
                                Feedback to Executive GISTC
                                Statewide data needs
                                Other

2:15 – 3:45 p.m.         Workshop Session I

Workshop I-A             Analyzing Census and American Community Survey Data in GIS, Part I (Oriole Room)
                         Jim Castagneri, US Census Bureau, Denver, CO

Workshop I-B             Taking ArcGIS to the Field (Hawk Room)
                         Kyle Heideman, GIS Consultant, Pro-West & Associates, Inc., Walker, MN

3:45 - 4:00 a.m.         Break (Exhibit Area)

4:00 – 5:30 p.m.         Workshop Session II

Workshop II-A            Analyzing Census and American Community Survey Data in GIS, Part II (Oriole Room)
                         Jim Castagneri, US Census Bureau, Denver, CO

                                                                                                                  5
Workshop II-B        Homeland Infrastructure Foundation Level Data Working Group (Hawk Room)
                     Jeremiah Steele, Information Exchange Broker, Booz Allen, McLean, VA

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 12

8:00 - 8:15 a.m.     Welcoming Remarks (Ballroom 5)

                     Bob Nutsch, GIS Coordinator, State of North Dakota, Bismarck, ND

                     Gregory Vandeberg, Assoc. Professor & Director of the Graduate
                     Certificate in GISc, UND Department of Geography, Grand Forks, ND

8:15 - 9:00 a.m.     Keynote Address (Ballroom 5)

                     Brian Vanderbilt, Chief, Geospatial Services Branch, USDA-FSA Aerial Photography
                     Field Office Salt Lake City, UT. USDA Farm Service Agency (FSA) Imagery Programs –
                     1930’s to Present Day

9:00 - 10:15 a.m.    Gold Sponsor Presentations (Ballroom 5)

10:15 - 10:45 a.m.   Break (Exhibit Area)

11:00 - 11:30        Paper Session I

Session I-A ArcGIS (Ballroom 5)

Moderator: Bob Nutsch

11:00 - 11:30 a.m.   Preston L. Debele, GIS Technician, Bartlett & West, Bismarck, ND. Alignments and
                     Profiles in ArcGIS

Session I-B Remote Sensing (Oriole Room)

Moderator: Brad Rundquist

11:00 - 11:30 a.m.   David R. Dvorak and William H. Semke, Mechanical Engineering Department, and
                     Bradley C. Rundquist, Department of Geography, University of North Dakota, Grand
                     Forks, ND. Using an Unmanned Aircraft to Collect Multispectral Imagery during a
                     Landsat 5 Pass and Comparing the Results to a Ground-Based Multispectral Radiometer

Session I-C Water Issues/Flooding (Pheasant Room)

Moderator: Ann Fritz

11:00 - 11:30 a.m.   Ann M.K. Fritz, North Dakota Department of Health-Division of Water Quality, State of
                     North Dakota, Bismarck, ND. Coping with Ever Evolving Digital Data: The North
                     Dakota Watershed Boundary Dataset and US-Canadian Harmonization Efforts


                                                                                                             6
Session I-D GIS Applications – Agriculture (Hawk Room)

Moderator: Angi Kitzan

11:00 - 11:30 a.m.   Sumadhur Shakya, Upper Great Plains Transportation Institute, NDSU, Fargo, ND, &
                     William W. Wilson, Bruce Dahl, Department of Agribusiness and Applied Economics,
                     NSDU, Fargo, ND. Market Boundaries for Durum Wheat Elevators in North Dakota and
                     Montana

11:30 - 1:00 p.m.    Lunch (on your own)

1:00 - 2:30 p.m.     Paper Session II

Session II-A ArcGIS (Ballroom 5)

Moderator: Emily Knish

1:00 - 1:30 p.m.     Steve Moe, Ramsey County, Devils Lake, ND. Parcel Management with ArcGIS 10

1:30 - 2:00 p.m.     Tom Koehler, GIS Technical Division Manager, Applied Data Consultants, Inc. Eau
                     Claire, WI. Data Integrity and Geodatabase Topology, Practical Approaches to
                     Geospatial Data Maintenance

2:00 - 2:30 p.m.     Joey Diehl and Daniel Fish, GIS Technicians, Bartlett & West, Bismarck, ND. Utilizing
                     ArcSDE to Connect ArcGIS with AutoCAD

Session II-B GIS Applications – Land Management (Oriole Room)

Moderator: Gregory Vandeberg

1:00 - 1:30 p.m.     Veena U. Joshi and Vishwas S. Kale, Department of Geography, University of Pune,
                     Pune, India. Conflict mapping in Sanjay Gandhi National Park, Mumbai, India: Using a
                     spatial multiple criteria decision approach

1:30 - 2:00 p.m.     Greg C. Liknes and Dacia M. Meneguzzo, USDA Forest Service, St. Paul, MN. High-
                     resolution mapping of tree cover in the Great Plains

2:00 - 2:30 p.m.     Jordan L. Neau, David M. Mushet, & Ned H. Euliss, Jr., U.S. Geological Survey,
                     Northern Prairie Wildlife Research Center, Jamestown, ND. Biodiversity Modeling with
                     InVEST: Assessing Amphibian Habitat Quality

Session II-C GIS Applications – Water Issues & Flooding (Pheasant Room)

Moderator: Rhonda Fietzek-DeVries

1:00 - 1:30 p.m.     P. G. Oduor, M. Kangas, L. Kotchman, T. Claeys, P.F. Rozario, M.J. Anar, A.W.
                     Wamono and B.D.Madurapperuma, NDSU, Fargo, ND. A Map Odyssey on 2011 Record
                     Flooding in North Dakota: Ramifications on Riparian Forests

                                                                                                             7
1:30 - 2:00 p.m.    Papia F. Rozario, Mohammad J. Anar, Anthony W. Wamono, Buddhika D.
                    Madurapperuma, NDSU, Fargo, ND. An assessment of inundated riparian forests along
                    Missouri River at Bismarck-Mandan Wildland Urban Interface in North Dakota

2:00 - 2:30 p.m.    Chad Qualley, Erik Nelson, Houston Engineering, Inc.,
                    Fargo, ND. Using GIS to Analyze Impacts Associated with the Proposed Fargo-
                    Moorhead Diversion Project

Session II-D Federal GIS (Hawk Room)

Moderator: Stephen Shivers

1:00 - 1:30 p.m.    Jim Castagneri, Geographer, US Census Bureau, Denver, CO. Census and TIGER: 30
                    years of change

1:30 - 2:00 p.m.    Stephen P. Shivers Geospatial Liaison for North and South Dakota, U.S. Geological
                    Survey, Rapid City, SD. A New Generation of Maps: the USGS’s US Topos

2:00 - 2:30 p.m.    Rynn M. Lamb and Brenda K. Jones, USGS/EROS Center, Sioux Falls, SD. USGS
                    Emergency Operations (EO) and Hazards Data Distribution System (HDDS)

2:30 - 3:00 p.m.    Break (Exhibit Area)

3:00 - 4:30 p.m.    Paper Session III

Session III-A GIS Applications – Transportation (Ballroom 5)

Moderator: Mari Moore

3:00 - 3:30 p.m.    Nimish Dharmadhikari and EunSu Lee, Upper Great Plains Transportation Institute,
                    NDSU, Fargo, ND. Overcoming computational performance constraints of agricultural
                    transportation planning in Geographic Information Systems

3:30 - 4:00 p.m.    EunSu Lee & Denver Tolliver, Upper Great Plains Transportation Institute, Peter G.
                    Oduor, Dept. of Geosciences, Kambiz Farahmand, Dept. of Industrial and Manufacturing
                    Engineering, NDSU, Fargo, ND. Dynamic Algorithm for Geospatial Analysis to Predict
                    Feasible Freight Routes

4:00 - 4:30 p.m.    Mari Moore, GIS Department, GEC Inc., Baton Rouge, LA. The Louisiana Department
                    of Transportation & Development Roadway Base Mapping Project

Session III-B GIS Applications – Agriculture & Forestry (Oriole Room)

Moderator: Patrick Bright

3:00 - 3:30 p.m.    Mark Sommer, U.S. Forest Service, Chippewa National Forest, Cass Lake, MN, and
                    Jeffrey S. Ueland, Department of Geography, Bemidji State University, Bemidji, MN. A
                    spatial model for identifying potential blueberry habitat on the Chippewa National
                    Forest

                                                                                                           8
3:30 - 4:00 p.m.     Buddhika D. Madurapperuma, Environmental and Conservation Science Program,
                     NDSU, Fargo, ND, Peter G. Oduor, Dept. Of Geosciences, NDSU, Fargo, ND & Larry
                     A. Kotchman, North Dakota Forest Service. Forest change detection using stochastic
                     simulation models in Cass County, North Dakota.

Session III-C GIS Applications – Water Issues & Flooding/LiDAR (Pheasant Room)

Moderator: Matt Dinger

3:00 - 3:30 p.m.     Henry Van Offelen, MN Center for Environmental Advocacy, Detroit Lakes, MN, Grit
                     May and Charles Fritz, International Water Institute, Fargo, ND. Strategic Flood Damage
                     Reduction Using LiDAR: Prioritizing Water Detention Areas in the Red River Basin

3:30 - 4:00 p.m.     Peter White, Regional Technical Manager, Pictometry International, Lakeville, MN. High
                     Resolution LiDAR, Oblique and Ortho imagery for Flood planning, mitigation and
                     response

4:00 - 4:30 p.m.     Kyle Glazewski, Bethany Kurz, Wesley Peck, Megan Grove, and Jason Braunberger,
                     Energy & Environmental Research Center, UND, Grand Forks, ND. A Methodology to
                     Identify Potential Distributed Water Storage Sites in the Red River Basin Using LiDAR

Session III-D Local GIS (Hawk Room)

Moderator: Lori Young

3:00 - 3:30 p.m.     Liz L. Beck, 911/IT/GIS, Pembina County, Cavalier, ND. Practical Application of GIS in
                     the County

3:30 - 4:00 p.m.     Adam R. Jonasson, Information Technology GIS Services, City of Grand Forks, Grand
                     Forks, ND. Sharing GIS data - The Grand Forks GIS Services Open Data Warehouse

4:00 - 4:30 p.m.     Roger E. Grimsley and Lucas R. Rengstorf, Geomatics Department, Advanced
                     Engineering and Environmental Services, Grand Forks, ND. Aberdeen, SD GIS –
                     Reconstructing Plats, Parcels, and Utility Data

4:00 - 5:00 p.m.     Poster Session (Pre-Function Hallway)

Forest Resource Information for Geospatial Analyses
Greg C. Liknes, David E. Haugen, Andy J. Lister, Susan J. Crocker, Barry T. Wilson, Patrick D. Miles, and
Dacia M. Meneguzzo, USDA Forest Service, St. Paul, MN

Plat Book, Map Book and Atlas Production
Tom Koehler, GIS Technical Division Manager, Applied Data Consultants, Inc. Eau Claire, WI

Identifying Landscape-Level Patterns in Grassland Songbird Community Richness and Diversity
Jessica Shahan, Brett Goodwin, Department of Biology, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND and
Brad Rundquist, Department of Geography, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND




                                                                                                             9
Market Structure of Grain Elevators in Mid-West Region
Sumadhur Shakya, PhD Student, Upper Great Plains Transportation Institute, North Dakota State University,
Fargo, ND, and William W. Wilson (Professor), Bruce Dahl (Research Scientist), Department of Agribusiness
and Applied Economics, North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND

Using GIS to Discern Patterns in a Social Sciences Dissertation: An Example
Denyse K. Sturges, Chester Fritz Library, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND

Surface Hydrological Modeling for Identifying Infiltration Zones in Devils Lake watershed, North
Dakota
Mohammad J. Anar, Student, Environmental and Conservation Science Program, North Dakota State
University, Buddhika D. Madurapperuma, Student, Environmental and Conservation Science Program, North
Dakota State University, and Peter G. Oduor, Department of Geosciences, North Dakota State University,
Fargo, ND

Extracting High-resolution Land Use and Land Cover Maps Using an Integrated Method of Object-
Oriented Classification, Python Scripting, and Spatial Modeling
Philipp Nagel, Student, Department of Geography, Minnesota State University, Brad Cook, PhD, Department of
Biological Sciences, Minnesota State University, Fei Yuan, PhD, Department of Geography, Minnesota State
University, Mankato, MN

Improvements in Watershed Modeling using LIDAR Data
Hasin Shahad Munna and Dr. Yeo Howe Lim, Dept. of Civil Engineering, University of North Dakota, Grand
Forks, ND

Watershed Delineation and Area Calculation: Devils Lake Area
Dipesh Das, Graduate Teaching Assistant, Department of Civil Engineering, University of North Dakota, Grand
Forks, ND

Combining LiDAR and Stormwater Infrastructure to Delineate Sub-neighborhood Scale Watersheds
Eric E. Castle, Ph.D. Candidate, University of North Dakota, Michael D. Knudson, M.S. Candidate, University
of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND

Cost Effective Method for Identification of Highway Noise Abatement Location
Hasibul Hasan, Department of Civil Engineering, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND

Hydrologic Sensitivity Analysis Using LiDAR
Damon Grabow, Regional Weather Information Center, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND

The use of Geographical Information Systems to Interpret Research Aircraft Measurements
Nicole Bart and David Delene1 Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of North Dakota, Grand
Forks, ND

Overcoming computational performance constraints of agricultural transportation planning in
Geographic Information Systems
Nimish Dharmadhikari, Ph.D. Student, North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND

An Analytical Approach for Winter Road Maintenance System Design by Integrating Geographical
Information Systems
Poyraz Kayabas, Upper Great Plains Transportation Institute, North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND
                                                                                                            10
Transporting Water for Oil Production in Western North Dakota
Christopher DeHaan, Transportation and Logistics Program, North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND

Identifying Locations of Highly Eroded Areas using GIS Terrain Analysis, Devils Lake, ND
Matthew J. Dinger and Gregory S. Vandeberg, Department of Geography, University of North Dakota, Grand
Forks, ND

4:30 - 6:30 p.m.     Social (Exhibit Area)

THURSDAY, OCT. 13

8:00 - 9:00 a.m.     Keynote Address (Ballroom 5)

                     Robert O. Kelly, President, University of North Dakota,          Welcoming Comments

                     Doug Olsen and Ho Jin Kim. Earth System Science and Policy, University of North
                     Dakota, Grand Forks, ND. International Space Station Agricultural Camera (ISSAC)

9:00 - 9:30 a.m.     Gold Sponsor Presentations (Ballroom 5)

9:30 - 10:00 a.m.    Break (Exhibit Area)

10:00 - 11:30 a.m.   Paper Session IV

Session IV-A ArcGIS (Ballroom 5)

Moderator: Brian Fischer

10:00 - 10:30 a.m.   Brian Fischer, Houston Engineering, Inc., Maple Grove, MN. Experiences in Developing
                     Recreation Information Portals using the ESRI Silverlight API

10:30 - 11:30 a.m.   Tyler Prahl and Phil Holleran, Esri, St. Paul, MN. A New Implementation Pattern for GIS

Session IV-B GIS Applications – Emergency Response (Oriole Room)

Moderator: Mark Ingram

10:00 - 10:30 a.m.   Jason Horning, Operations Manager, BullBerry Systems, Inc., Bismarck, ND. Next
                     Generation 9-1-1: A GIS Analyst's Crash Course

10:30 - 11:00 a.m.   Poyraz Kayabas (presenter) and EunSu Lee (co-presenter), Upper Great Plains
                     Transportation Institute, North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND. An Analytical
                     Approach for Winter Road Maintenance System Design by Integrating Geographical
                     Information Systems

11:00 - 11:30 a.m.   Bill Wiesepape and Carlos Perez, GIS Department, GEC Inc., Baton Rouge, LA. GIS
                     Support of Long Term Disaster Recovery from Hurricanes Katrina, Rita, Gustav, and Ike


                                                                                                          11
Session IV-C GIS Applications – Water Issues & Flooding (Pheasant Room)

Moderator: Jon Tonneson

10:00 - 10:30 a.m.   Jon Tonneson, GIS Chief, North Dakota Department of Emergency Services, Bismarck,
                     ND, and Gregg Thielman, Houston Engineering, Fargo, ND. Using GIS to Assist with the
                     2011 North Dakota Flood Fight

10:30 - 11:00 a.m.   David Enns, Map It Out Inc., Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. After The Ark is Parked: The
                     Role of GIS Technologies in Community Flood Recovery

Session IV-D Local GIS (Hawk Room)

Moderator: Adam Jonasson

10:00 - 10:30 a.m.   Mari Moore, GIS Department, GEC Inc., Baton Rouge, LA. St. Landry Parish Assessors
                     Office GIS Update and Integration

10:30 - 11:00 a.m.   Jessi Rawlings, GIS Analyst, Bartlett & West, Bismarck, ND. Utilizing GIS for Economic
                     Development

11:00 - 11:30 a.m.   Adam R. Jonasson, Information Technology GIS Services, City of Grand Forks, Grand
                     Forks, ND. Going Mobile with GIS – From Public Safety to Public Works

11:30 - 1:00 p.m.    Lunch (on your own)

1:00 – 2:30 p.m.     Workshop Session III

Workshop III-A       Combining CAD and GIS in an SQL Spatial Geodatabase (Pheasant Room)
                     Adam R. Jonasson, Information Technology GIS Services, City of Grand Forks, Grand
                     Forks, ND

1:00 - 2:30 p.m.     Paper Session V

Session V-A GIS Applications – Water Issues & Flooding (Ballroom 5)

Moderator: Bill Wiespape

1:00 - 1:30 p.m.     Brian Fischer, Houston Engineering, Inc., Maple Grove, MN and Charles Fritz,
                     International Water Institute, Fargo, ND. What’s New with the Red River Basin Decision
                     Information Network

1:30 - 2:00 p.m.     Dave Kirkpatrick, GIS Specialist, Houston Engineering Inc., Fargo ND. GIS Workflows
                     to Support the Red River Basin Wide HMS Hyrdologic Modeling

2:00 - 2:30 p.m.     Bill Wiesepape, GIS Department, GEC Inc., Baton Rouge, LA Flood Inundation
                     Mapping and Economic Damages Modeling


                                                                                                           12
Session V-B State GIS (Oriole Room)

Moderator: Bob Nutsch

1:00 - 1:30 p.m.        Bob Nutsch, Information Technology Department, State of North Dakota, Bismarck, ND.
                        Finding and Using Data on the North Dakota GIS Hub

1:30 - 2:00 p.m.        Tom Koehler, GIS Technical Division Manager, Applied Data Consultants, Inc. Eau
                        Claire, WI 54703, and Lindsey B. Narloch, M.S., Research Analyst, Division of EMS
                        and Trauma, North Dakota Department of Health. Developing Spatial Data Sets from
                        Multiple Sources for the North Dakota Department of Health, Division of EMS &
                        Trauma

2:00 - 2:30 p.m.        Poyraz Kayabas (presenter) and EunSu Lee (co-presenter), Upper Great Plains
                        Transportation Institute, North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND. Location Optimality
                        for Ambulance Service in North Dakota

2:30 - 2:45             Closing Remarks (Ballroom 5)

                        Bob Nutsch, GIS Coordinator, State of North Dakota
                        Gregory Vandeberg, Assoc. Professor & Director of the Graduate
                                     Certificate in GISc, UND Department of Geography

                                               Keynote Abstracts
Doug Olsen and Ho Jin Kim. Earth System Science and Policy, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND 58202,
olsen@aero.und.edu International Space Station Agricultural Camera (ISSAC)

Built by students and faculty at the University of North Dakota (UND), the International Space Station (ISS) Agricultural
Camera (ISSACTM) is a multi-spectral Earth-imaging sensor currently onboard the ISS. Capabilities include three
spectral bands (green, red, near-infrared), medium (~20m) spatial resolution, and off-nadir pointing (+/-30 degrees) for
episodic rapid-response imaging. The low-cost electro-optical design approach is described, which utilizes a student-
centered design and operations team and relies on modified commercial components operating within a passive vibration
isolation mounting, installed inside the Window Observational Research Facility, viewing the Earth through the US
Laboratory Science Window. Interfaces, safety, and other factors unique to the human-rated operational environment of
the ISS are outlined. An element of the ISS National Laboratory, an upgraded ISSAC sensor was launched on HTV-2 to
the ISS in January 2011. Initial operations began in June 2011. Some initial imaging results are shown, and plans for
ongoing and future operations, including worldwide imaging capabilities, are discussed. Methodologies for determining
geolocation of imagery from the ISS are outlined, and a technique for coarse geolocation of ISSAC imagery is presented.

Brian Vanderbilt, USDA Farm Service Agency, Salt Lake City, UT brian.vanderbilt@slc.usda.gov. USDA Farm
Service Agency (FSA) Imagery Programs – 1930’s to Present Day

The USDA Farm Service Agency (FSA) has been acquiring aerial imagery in support of the administration of various
farm programs for three quarters of a century. This talk will discuss the progression of aerial imagery acquisition from the
1930’s to the present day National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP), and will culminate with an application of
historical imagery in land use/change detection with an example from the Devils Lake area in North Dakota.




                                                                                                                         13
                                       Paper Presentation Abstracts
Liz L. Beck, 911/IT/GIS, Pembina County, Cavalier, ND 58220, lbeck@nd.gov
Practical Application of GIS in the County

Pembina County has been able to utilize GIS data in numerous ways that has benefited local offices such as the Recorder,
Auditor, Highway, Tax Assessor, Water Board, Emergency Management, and 911. GIS has become another tool amidst
many to perform daily tasks, small or large projects, and respond to requests from private or government entities. Others
benefiting have been electric companies, oil & gas, engineering firms, brokers, assessors, FEMA, water related
organizations and state agencies, cities, townships and local residents.

Practical examples of how GIS data can result in time and/or cost savings will be shared. Ideas on how to maximize
existing resources to benefit the most people will be discussed. If you’re overwhelmed with the idea of starting GIS in
your county, come learn how you don’t necessarily need to have a dedicated GIS expert on staff, rather how existing
people can work together to bring about solutions in your county’s every day workflow.

Jim Castagneri, Geographer, US Census Bureau, Denver, CO 80235, james.d.castagneri@census.gov. Census and
TIGER 30 Years of Change

Since TIGER data was introduced to the public shortly before the 1990 census, geographic information has grown
exponentially. Before that time, spatial data covering the whole country was non-existent. TIGER and associated Census
data allow for block-level data analysis, re-apportionment, and demographic trend analysis for everything from the
decennial census to the American Community Survey. This session will explore thirty years of change in TIGER and
Census data and cover some of the behind the scenes maintenance issues associated with the world’s largest topological
dataset.

Preston L. Debele, GIS Technician, Bartlett & West, Bismarck, ND 58503, Preston.Debele@bartwest.com. Alignments
and Profiles in ArcGIS

Alignments and profiles are very useful tools for map creation and project design work. Some processes that are more
often done in AutoCAD can be utilized in ArcGIS in a less complex format. The versions created in ArcGIS are simple
and effective. Stations can be created on an alignment by using the hatching option in the features properties. This
doesn’t work exactly like AutoCAD’s alignments and stationing but it makes it possible to include stations in a map
created in ArcGIS. Having this information included in an alignment creates a good opportunity for including a profile
graph in your layout. Adding profile graphs is quite easy and it can really make a map useful in pipeline design. This is a
good alternative when AutoCAD is unavailable.

Nimish Dharmadhikari and EunSu Lee, Upper Great Plains Transportation Institute, North Dakota State University,
Fargo, ND 58108, Nimish.Dharmadhikari @ndsu.edu Overcoming computational performance constraints of
agricultural transportation planning in Geographic Information Systems

Agricultural industry is crucial for the economy in North Dakota. Estimating the traffic is the important process for the
transportation planning to support the agricultural industry. This study discusses about the process of estimating traffic
derived by agricultural activities. We utilize the satellite imagery to predict the number of trucks across the state. The
study uses publicly available datasets to estimate crop production in North Dakota using Geographic Information
Systems. We focus on generating origin-destination matrices and problem solving techniques to overcome the
computational performance constraints.




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Joey Diehl and Daniel Fish, GIS Technicians, Bartlett & West, Bismarck, ND 58503, Joey.Diehl@bartwest.com.
Utilizing ArcSDE to Connect ArcGIS with AutoCad

This project involves the integration of GIS data into AutoCad to stream-line production methods while reducing errors
inherently involved in data migrations between the two platforms. The goal is to show end users it is possible to work in
both platforms at the same time using ArcSDE geodatabase feature classes. Using Bartlett & West as a case study, the
presentation will utilize a past to present approach. The workflow process utilized in the past to migrate data between
AutoCad and GIS has become tedious to use while creating numerous opportunities for error. As technology advances, so
does our opportunity to better handle data continuity. Areas discussed will include network capabilities, ArcSDE
databases, initial connection of SDE data into AutoCad, multiple users working on the same data layers simultaneously,
and potential problems encountered.

David R. Dvorak and William H. Semke, Mechanical Engineering Department, and Bradley C. Rundquist,
Department of Geography, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND 58202, david.dvorak@und.edu. Using an
Unmanned Aircraft to Collect Multispectral Imagery during a Landsat 5 Pass and Comparing the Results to a
Pole-Mounted Multispectral Radiometer

The University of North Dakota’s Unmanned Aircraft Systems Engineering team collected remotely sensed data of a
target area using an unmanned aircraft and a low-cost multispectral camera in the spring of 2011. Concurrently, Landsat 5
acquired cloud-free Thematic Mapper imagery of the site and a pole-mounted multispectral radiometer was used to record
surface reflectance at 14 different locations throughout the site. The goal of this simultaneous collection endeavor was to
compare the radiometric readings of each sensor at particular locations. All three sensors are responsive to green, red, and
near-infrared energy. The multispectral camera and pole-mounted radiometer were designed by their manufacturers to
mimic Landsat’s Thematic Mapper bands 2-4 and 1-5, respectively. Of particular interest is analysis of the Normalized
Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) values derived, as each sensor yields data used for Precision Agriculture
applications. By having a side-by-side comparison of sensor readings, it is possible to gain a better understand of their
validity under real-world data collection conditions. In addition, the pros and cons of using and depending upon each
sensor system become more apparent. Ultimately this study will determine if an unmanned aircraft carrying a low-cost
multispectral camera can produce data that is radiometrically comparable to better-known sensor systems while providing
enhancements in terms of spatial resolution and/or deployment flexibility.

David Enns, Map It Out Inc., Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, R2H 2P6, david@mapitout.com. After The Ark is Parked:
The Role of GIS Technologies in Community Flood Recovery

GIS technologies used in flood situations typically focus on flood prevention with the identification and prediction of
vulnerable areas and the use of that information to create temporary protection with dykes, sandbags, tubes, or other water
barriers. But moving forward GIS technologies can also play a significant role in community flood recovery efforts after
the flood protection activities have ended.

Remnants of intrusive and often hastily created flood barriers are an impediment to the return to productivity for many
flood-threatened or flood-damaged communities. A quick restoration of public assets to pre-flood standards is critical for
the economic well-being of every flood-impacted community.

GIS technologies can play a critical role in community flood restoration in the following ways: Define pre-flood asset
status and location to provide an accurate guideline for post-flood repair, restoration, or replacement activities; Accelerate
the administrative component by automating work order generation and tracking, etc. of public asset repair, restoration, or
replacement; Facilitate the sharing of GIS information between individuals within the community and local government in
real-time; Easily integrate the public asset restoration schedules and activities of multiple internal departments and
external community groups; Reduce the time to gather data and prepare reports necessary for flood-relief funding
applications. Map It Out President David Enns explores these GIS flood recovery opportunities using the 9,000 person
Rural Municipality of East St. Paul 2011 flood recovery efforts as a back drop.




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EunSu Lee and Denver Tolliver, Upper Great Plains Transportation Institute, North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND
58105, Peter G. Oduor, Department of Geosciences, North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND 58105, Kambiz
Farahmand, Department of Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, North Dakota State University, ND 58103,
eunsu.lee@ndsu.edu. Dynamic Algorithm for Geospatial Analysis to Predict Feasible Freight Routes

Implementation of seamless intermodal routes has been evolved with world container transportation. Geographic
Information Systems (GIS) are a useful informational tool to construct the seamless networks and to analyze the spatial
relationship. This study investigates the feasible intermodal routes for containerized freight in the Unites States. By
developing flexible GIS traffic assignments using dynamic algorithm, we geovisualize and predict the container supply
chain through intermodal networks from foreign partners to the U.S. inland markets. However, the physical and
managerial factors of segments affect the network flow. It is difficult task to find the factors without integrating delicate
GIS networks, Data-Base Management Systems (DBMS), and algorithms. Our geospatial dynamic programming shows
the denser traffic segments from Asia to the West Coast in the Unites States, and the traffic continues to the Mississippi
River Valley and the state of Texas by avoiding the Rocky Mountains by rail. From the rail terminals trucks deliver the
containers for the last miles. In addition to the last miles connected by rail, the East Coast shows highly denser truck
transportation from the marine portal areas.

Brian Fischer, Houston Engineering, Inc., Maple Grove, MN 55369, bfischer@houstoneng.com and Charles Fritz,
International Water Institute, Fargo, ND, 58108, Charles.fritz@ndsu.edu. What’s New with the Red River Basin
Decision Information Network

The International Water Institute has found a renewed interest in the Red River Basin Decision Information Network
(RRBDIN) www.rrbdin.org due to recent flooding events and feasibility studies underway to find solutions to the flooding
problems. The goal of the RRBDIN website is to provide shared tools for regional problem solving. The presentation
will discuss the purpose of the RRBDIN as well as latest developments on the website.
The presentation will also demonstrate and discuss the current GIS tools and LiDAR information accessible from
websites. These include the LiDAR download portal, LiDAR viewer, BasinViewer, Regional Drought DSS and Project
Planning Evaluation tools. Most of the tools were developed with ESRI ArcGIS Server and a combination of the FLEX
and JavaScript web mapping APIs. Finally the presentation will discuss tools and projects that are currently underway
and the future of the RRBDIN.

Brian Fischer, Houston Engineering, Inc., Maple Grove, MN 55369, bfischer@houstoneng.com. Experiences in
Developing Recreation Information Portals using the ESRI Silverlight API
Houston Engineering recently developed four separate recreation information portals for Counties in Minnesota
(http://www.goanokacounty.org/, http://goramsey.org, http://gocarvergo.org/, and http://www.gosoutheastmn.com). The
projects were funded by a Statewide Health Improvement Program Grant and focused around promoting healthy
lifestyles. These projects included three components which a Silverlight web viewer, online feature editing and a mobile
application for smartphones and tablet devices.
The presentation will demonstrate the public web applications that were created using ArcGIS Server 10 and ESRI’s
Silverlight web mapping API. The web application includes highly customized functionality to search parks, trails and
recreation facilities. The presentation will discuss the path to success, working with a large project stakeholder groups
and challenges encounter during the project. The presentation will demonstrate and discuss a second application for
online feature editing of recreation facility data. The presentation will conclude with discussion around the development
of a mobile application for Android and iOS smartphone and tablet devices.

Brian Fischer, Houston Engineering, Inc., Maple Grove, MN 55369, bfischer@houstoneng.com and Charles Fritz,
International Water Institute, Fargo, ND, 58108, Charles.fritz@ndsu.edu. What’s New with the Red River Basin
Decision Information Network
The International Water Institute has found a renewed interest in the Red River Basin Decision Information Network
(RRBDIN) www.rrbdin.org due to recent flooding events and feasibility studies underway to find solutions to the flooding
problems. The goal of the RRBDIN website is to provide shared tools for regional problem solving. The presentation
will discuss the purpose of the RRBDIN as well as latest developments on the website.
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The presentation will also demonstrate and discuss the current GIS tools and LiDAR information accessible from
websites. These include the LiDAR download portal, LiDAR viewer, BasinViewer, Regional Drought DSS and Project
Planning Evaluation tools. Most of the tools were developed with ESRI ArcGIS Server and a combination of the FLEX
and JavaScript web mapping APIs. Finally the presentation will discuss tools and projects that are currently underway
and the future of the RRBDIN.

Ann M.K. Fritz, North Dakota Department of Health-Division of Water Quality, State of North Dakota, Bismarck, ND
58501-1947, afritz@nd.gov. Coping with Ever Evolving Digital Data: The North Dakota Watershed Boundary
Dataset and US-Canadian Harmonization Efforts

The watershed boundary dataset (WBD) in North Dakota took almost 9 years and the collaborative efforts of eight state
and federal agencies to bring it to completion. However, is a geospatial dataset ever really complete? During the last two
years the WBD in North Dakota was expanded to include hydrologic unit boundaries at their natural extent rather than just
the political extent of the international border. With the support of the International Joint Commission, the U.S.
Geological Survey and Agriculture and Agri-Foods Canada, the provincial and state data stewards have worked together
to develop hydrologic unit boundaries that cross the U.S.-Canadian boundary. The dataset will become a truly
international dataset, allowing scientists to more accurately model water resources basin wide. Simultaneous integration
of the national hydrologic dataset (NHD) with the WBD, lack of joint WBD/NHD editing tools, and navigating the path of
new data stewardship has proved problematic, but not hopeless.

Kyle Glazewski, Bethany Kurz, Wesley Peck, Megan Grove, and Jason Braunberger, Energy & Environmental
Research Center, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND 58202, kglazewski@undeerc.org. A Methodology to
Identify Potential Distributed Water Storage Sites in the Red River Basin Using LiDAR

Within the last decade, billions of dollars have been spent on flood preparation and recovery efforts within the Red River
Basin (RRB), underscoring the need for flood mitigation approaches that provide basinwide protection from devastating
springtime floods. Most decision makers, engineers, and water management authorities agree that some form of upstream
retention is needed to mitigate the downstream impacts of a proposed diversion and to augment existing and proposed
structural measures. In 2007, the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) completed a multiyear study to
evaluate the feasibility of employing a basinwide, temporary storage strategy as a means of augmenting existing and
proposed flood control efforts. This approach could be accomplished by temporary storage of springtime runoff in
existing “depressions” within the RRB, primarily ditches and low-relief fields bounded by existing roads.
The 30-meter-resolution digital elevation models (DEM) available from the U.S. Geological Survey presented a
significant challenge to the EERC’s study of the topographic data. These DEMs restricted the ability to accurately assess
the potential storage available on the landscape. However, with the present availability of light detection and ranging
(LiDAR) topographic data across the RRB, a more detailed terrain analysis can be performed within GIS (geographic
information system) to evaluate the potential distributed storage across the landscape.
This presentation will focus on the methodology of evaluating the landscape for potential distributed water storage sites in
the RRB using LiDAR.

Mark Forsyth, Brook Bourgeois, and Mari Moore, GIS Department, GEC Inc, Baton Rouge, LA 70806,
mmoore@gecinc.com. Flood Inundation Mapping and Economic Damages Modeling

The authors developed economic damage models for approximately 2,085 linear miles along the Arkansas and Red rivers.
The models calculated economic damages for structures, contents, vehicles, and agricultural losses for the 10-year, 50-
year, 100-year, and 500-year frequency flood events. These models were developed using Hydrologic Engineering
Center-Flood Impact Analysis (HEC-FIA), and were based on ArcGIS and Hydrologic Engineering Center-River
Analysis System (HEC-RAS) inputs along with Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) HAZUS-Multi-Hazard
(MH) MR4 (v1.4) structure inventory data and U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) National Agricultural Statistics
Service (NASS) agriculture data. The project area included rivers, reservoirs, and navigation systems located primarily in
Oklahoma. Reaches in Kansas, Arkansas, and Louisiana were included in the modeling.

Two different methods were used to develop the models. The first method of analysis was performed on 52 of the 54
economic damage reaches. It utilized steady state HEC-RAS results to assess damages to structure inventory generated
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from the HAZUS MR4 database. This method also included an assessment of damages to agricultural crops which
assumed a 100 percent loss of crops in the ground on the day of flooding. The second method, performed on 2 of the 54
economic damage reaches, utilized unsteady state HEC-RAS results to assess damages to a more accurate structure
inventory generated from assessor data. This method’s agricultural damage assessment modeled the duration of flooding
for each acre of farmland, thus reporting a more accurate depiction of the percent crop loss on the day of flooding.

Jason Horning, Operations Manager, BullBerry Systems, Inc., Bismarck, ND 58501,
jason.horning@bullberrysystems.com. Next Generation 9-1-1: A GIS Analyst's Crash Course

This presentation will provide an overview of an NG9-1-1 system, will cover the mission critical role that GIS plays in
that system and will provide information on how NG9-1-1 will simplify the GIS Analysts ability to support PSAP
operations.

Adam R. Jonasson, Information Technology GIS Services, City of Grand Forks, Grand Forks, ND 58201,
ajonasson@grandforksgov.com. Going Mobile with GIS – From Public Safety to Public Works

Getting GIS data to the field is a constant battle. This presentation will look at a few of the ways that the City of Grand
Forks has implemented mobile technology to share and update data in the field. Topics covered will include the use of
mobile products in public safety dispatch and routing as well as public works field entry of utility data. Techniques for
data maintenance will be covered as well as ways to push GIS data to standard formats for mobile devices like smart
phones and tablets. Examples of how the city is editing their water system in the field, routing fire trucks, and
coordinating city events will be discussed.

Adam R. Jonasson, Information Technology GIS Services, City of Grand Forks, Grand Forks, ND 58201,
ajonasson@grandforksgov.com. Sharing GIS data - The Grand Forks GIS Services Open Data Warehouse

Sharing GIS data is a huge responsibility for a local government agency. In the past year, the City of Grand Forks has
developed a method for dealing with this responsibility. The Open Data Warehouse is an online data clearing house of the
most requested City GIS data. GIS data of many types is shared on the warehouse in several different formats. Data is
updated daily from the city’s SQL server. This presentation will look at the process of building the site, the daily up keep
and the current usage and time savings. The open data warehouse has been up and running since January and been very
well received. In the future, we hope to create a true open community where others who have used the GFGIS data can
submit their own data for sharing as well. The open data warehouse can be accessed at www.gfgis.com/data.

Poyraz Kayabas and EunSu Lee, Upper Great Plains Transportation Institute, North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND
58102, poyraz.kayabas@ndsu.edu Location Optimality for Ambulance Service in North Dakota

The focus of this study is to investigate the location optimality of ambulance service in the state of North Dakota. Due to
increasing traffic on the interstate highway and the oil roads in the western North Dakota, ambulance service is critical to
save lives from the severe damage in crashes. In this study, we use Geographic Information Systems to find the service
rate of the current ambulance locations using historical crash data, randomly generated crash data, and geometry
characteristics of the transportation networks. The analysis of historical crash data locations show that most services are
dispatched from largely urbanized areas along the major highways. However, the analysis of randomly generated crash
data locations indicates that service locations should be relocated to serve all the roads in the state. We recommend
alternative relocation scenarios of ambulance services in western North Dakota. We address challenges and opportunities
in analyzing crash data locations to improve location optimality for ambulance service in North Dakota.

Poyraz Kayabas and EunSu Lee, Upper Great Plains Transportation Institute, North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND
58102, poyraz.kayabas@ndsu.edu. An Analytical Approach for Winter Road Maintenance System Design by
Integrating Geographical Information Systems

Winter road maintenance system design involves several inter-related decision making problems for different operations
that are often performed with expensive and limited resources. The complexity involved in winter road maintenance
operations has resulted in problem solving procedures that consider each of the winter road maintenance system design
problems separately. This study involves developing an integrated framework for depot location selection, district design,
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and vehicle routing problems in the context of snow plowing. The approach is illustrated using an example of road
network of the North Dakota Department of Transportation Fargo Service District. Results indicate that the proposed
framework can be used as decision making support tool for planning winter road maintenance operations.

Dave Kirkpatrick, GIS Specialist, Houston Engineering Inc., Fargo ND 58102, dkirkpatrick@houstoneng.com. GIS
Workflows to Support The Red River Basin Wide HMS Hyrdologic Modeling

The primary scope of work for this study encompasses the development of consistent hydrologic models for various Red
River tributary watersheds that contribute above the Red River of the North below Halstad, MN. Stakeholders in the Red
River Basin (RRB) have identified a need to generate a uniform set of tributary hydrology models that can be employed to
analyze the hydrology of the basin as a whole. This study represents the initial step towards achieving a combined set of
hydrologic/hydraulic models that could then be used to evaluate different flood mitigation projects or programs
undertaken in the basin. More specifically, these HEC-HMS models could be utilized to supply input hydrographs for the
HEC-RAS model of the Red River main stem currently under development as part of the ongoing FM-Metro Feasibility
Study.

Primary and derived GIS data needed to be collected and organized; the following data was collected across three states
and nine watersheds: SSURGO Soils, NLCD Land use, DEM data, Rainfall data, NWI, Curve Numbers, Synthetic
Rainfall, Travel Time, NEXRAD data, NHD, and HUC 12 boundaries.

GIS processes needed to be created and streamlined for the development of the final HMS Model. These processes
included the development of a hydro-corrected DEM, determine contributing and non-contributing, development a stream
and catchment network, creation of an Arc Hydro data model and exporting of the model in Geo-HMS, update and test
MN DNR Travel Time Tools, import NEXRAD base data at time steps, and lastly export the attributed Geo-HMS model
into HMS.

The secondary purpose of this project outside of the direct model outputs was to create a standard process, with datasets
having uniform attribute information and structure for consultants to apply in future model development. This project will
create the link between the spatial GIS based data and the HMS models developed.

Rynn M. Lamb and Brenda K. Jones, USGS/EROS Center, Sioux Falls, SD 57198, lamb@usgs.gov. USGS
Emergency Operations (EO) and Hazards Data Distribution System (HDDS)

Remotely sensed imagery such as aerial photography and satellite images are often an invaluable resource used by GIS
professionals to support the response for many types of disasters such as floods, earthquakes, landslides, and other natural
or human-induced disasters. This presentation will provide an overview of the USGS/EROS Emergency Operations (EO)
area, with particular emphasis on aerial/satellite image access and availability through the USGS Hazards Data
Distribution System (HDDS).

Veena U. Joshi and Vishwas S. Kale, Department of Geography, University of Pune, Pune 411 007, India,
veenaujoshi@gmail.com. Conflict Mapping in Sanjay Gandhi National Park, Mumbai, India: Using a Spatial
Multiple Criteria Decision Approach

Multiple uses of the natural resources, especially more so in the past few decades due to the increasing population
pressure, inevitably have lead to spatial conflicts all over the world. Combined multicriteria - optimization approaches are
increasingly being used in environmental planning to facilitate spatial planning, particularly as a means of reducing
conflict. This paper examines a methodology designed to identify and map conflict hotspots. We used the case study of a
National Park in the heart of Metropolitan City of Mumbai in India to illustrate how the methodology of identifying
conflict hotspots can be implemented.

In the present study, multicriteria decision analysis (MCDA) and geographical information systems (GIS) were adopted
for conflict mapping in the Sanjay Gandhi National Park (Park). Spatial information about the physical environment, the
ecosystem and the urban land use was integrated into the multicriteria framework. The Land cover/use map for the study
area was developed using 5.8-m resolution IRS LISS IV images, whereas other type of information was obtained from the
reports of Government departments and NGOs. This spatial information was overlaid in GIS to identify overlapping
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interests and areas of intense conflict. These values were structured hierarchically into goal, criteria and sub-criteria using
the Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP). After constructing the AHP hierarchy, weights were assigned to individual
criteria and sub-criteria at each level of the hierarchy. The pairwise comparison technique is applied in assigning the
weights. The weight represents the degree of importance attached to the criteria and sub-criteria relative to others under
consideration.

The GIS phase involved defining a buffer zone of 1-km around the Park and representing each sub-criterion as a map
layer in the GIS database. The attribute weights were then added to respective sub-criteria map layers in GIS to determine
the coefficient of conflict. The coefficient serves as a rating of the effectiveness of each sub-criterion in achieving the
goal. The resulting map layers were combined to obtain the overall conflict ratings. Three levels of criticality were
defined — low, moderate and high.

Greg C. Liknes and Dacia M. Meneguzzo, USDA Forest Service, St. Paul, MN 55108, gliknes@fs.fed.us. High-
resolution Mapping of Tree Cover in the Great Plains

Tree cover in the Great Plains is primarily found in agroforestry plantings or in riparian corridors. As such, interest in
these Trees outside Forests (ToF) spans both agricultural and forestry disciplines. Yet ToF in North Dakota are either
excluded from national inventory and monitoring efforts related to natural resources or grouped with other land use
features. While some geospatial datasets representing tree cover over broad areas of the Great Plains do exist, they are
derived from satellite sensors with resolutions too coarse to accurately capture small or narrow groupings of trees. In
order to address this information need, efficient techniques for mapping tree cover from 1-m aerial imagery from the
National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP) have been developed. An object-based image analysis (OBIA) approach
was employed in which aerial imagery was segmented into meaningful image objects and a statistical data mining
technique was used to determine which objects contained tree cover. The result was a new high-resolution tree cover map
for Pembina County, ND. The efficiency of the mapping workflow has made it possible to develop 1-m geospatial layers
of tree cover for very large areas, potentially filling a strategic information gap.

Buddhika D. Madurapperuma, Environmental and Conservation Science Program, North Dakota State University,
Fargo, ND 58108, Peter G. Oduor, Department of Geosciences, North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND 58108 and
Larry A. Kotchman, North Dakota Forest Service, Bottineau, ND 58310, b.madurapperuma@my.ndsu.edu. Forest
Change Detection Using Stochastic Simulation Models in Cass County, North Dakota

We examined forest cover changes from one cover type to another based on pairs of classified images of Cass County
from 2001 to 2010. Grid data from National Agricultural Statistic Service (NASS) published by USDA was used as
preliminary inputs to ascertain land-use/land-cover dynamics and Markovian stochastic models were generated.
Transition probabilities for each pair of years were subjected to multivariate analyses. Results showed that forest to non-
forest transition probabilities (Pfnf) conversion was high with forest land transiting to agricultural use, namely, (a) grain,
hay & seeds for years 2002 to 2010 and 2005 to 2010 and (b) for row crops for years 2006 to 2010 with a time step of 1-
year. The transition probabilities for unchanged forest (Pff) were significant from 2007 to 2010 time range. Trend and
relationship between each pair of years yielded three distinct statistical clusters. The main group comprised of ten pairs of
year combinations with years 2002 & 2005, which showed significant deviation from the other groups in both cluster and
Principal Component Analyses. Eight pairs of year combinations with years 2001 and 2006 separated as a second group.
The third group included 6 year combinations between 2007 to 2010 displaying high transition probability of unchanged
forest (0.22≤ Pff ≤ 0.74) comparatively. This study offers a glimpse into forests on the edge in an urban environment.

Jesse Rozelle, Doug Bausch, Sean CJ McNabb, Nikki Robles and Austen Cutrell, FEMA Region VIII Mitigation GIS,
Denver, CO 80225, sean.mcnabb@dhs.gov. Analyzing Flood Losses in Minot, North Dakota

The City of Minot, ND, population 40,888 (2010) is located along the Souris (Mouse) River in Ward County in the north
central portion of the state of North Dakota roughly 50 miles south of the Canadian Border. Abnormally high amounts of
rainfall, a record snowpack, saturated soils and reservoir capacities being met led to record river flows along the Mouse
River impacting significant numbers of people and infrastructure in the City of Minot. FEMA Region VIII Mitigation GIS
along with several others partners (NDDES, USACE, USGS, ImageCat, Houston Engineering, Pictometry and the City of
Minot) compiled and analyzed data to assist in the response and recovery phases of the flooding event along the Mouse
River. Structure specific data, elevation data, river level data and imagery were all used in conjunction with depth damage
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functions provided by HAZUS-MH to estimate flood depths and losses to those areas and structures impacted along the
Mouse River in Minot, ND.

Steve Moe, Ramsey County, Devils Lake, ND 58301, smoe@nd.gov.
Parcel Management with ArcGIS 10

Parcels are an essential part of any local government GIS but can be difficult to maintain. With ArcGIS 10’s introduction
of the Parcel Fabric, a new data model is available specifically for managing parcels. Ramsey County has recently
adopted this solution and been using it with the templates available on the ArcGIS for Local Government Resource
Center. Among the many benefits are improved workflows for day-to-day operations, topological integrity, and history
tracking. The presentation will go over the steps, issues and benefits of migrating to the parcel fabric.

Mari Moore. Mark Forsyth, and Brook Bourgeois, GIS Department, GEC Inc, Baton Rouge, LA 70806,
mmoore@gecinc.com. The Louisiana Department of Transportation & Development Roadway Base Mapping
Project

GEC working along with Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development (LADOTD) was responsible for
gathering and adjusting data in order to develop an accurate, geo-referenced, and topologically correct public road feature
class for the state of Louisiana.

GEC completed the project using a Two-Phase Approach; the first phase involved gathering data from multiple data
sources to be the foundation of all state and non-state maintained roads. Local data from 32 of the 64 Louisiana parishes
was used for part of the non-state maintained source. For the remaining parishes, a combination of TIGER and Tele Atlas
data was utilized. Existing LADOTD road datasets were used as the foundation of the state maintained roads sources.
During this phase, direction of travel was confirmed as well as positional accuracy. Road centerlines were aligned within
one meter of positional accuracy and contained address range information. The final step of the first phase was to merge
the state and non-state maintained roads. During Phase Two the data was assigned a 12 or 18-digit Linear Referencing
Identification number for creating routes for dynamic segmentation. State-maintained roads were assigned the 12 digit
code and non-state maintained roads were assigned the 18-digit LRS ID. FGDC-compliant metadata accompanied the
deliverable in Geodatabase format. GEC used ArcSDE to manage the geodatabase and ArcGIS to edit datasets.

Mari Moore, Mark Forsyth and Bill Wiesepape, GIS Department, GEC Inc, Baton Rouge, LA 70806,
mmoore@gecinc.com. St. Landry Parish Assessors Office GIS Update and Integration

This presentation will describe an effort to move an existing parcel map inventory into a GIS database, integrate the parcel
data with the assessment duties of the assessor, and update all parcels to current status.
The primary focus of this project was to take the existing digital parcel map inventory, which had ceased being
maintained, locate ownership of all unknown parcels, and split parcels that had been subdivided. The authors were given
a database of all property currently assessed by the St. Landry Assessor and received access to the St. Landry Clerk and
Recorder’s online database of recorded deeds and plats. By developing and running queries, lists were created of all
parcels that had not been identified in the GIS parcel map.                   These parcels were then located through
section/township/range, acreage, legal description, 911 addressing, and recorded surveys/plats (when available). Parcels
were drawn to survey descriptions when surveys were available and were noted as such. The parcels were updated with
the assessment number, current owner, acreage, and other information to assist the assessor’s office in their assessment
and appraisal duties. Shortcut tools were created for the staff to automate weekly updates to the GIS.
The project’s end result provided the St. Landry Parish Assessor with a current parcel inventory of all real property in St.
Landry as well as a method to continue updating and correcting map inventory and assessment inventory as information is
obtained through deeds, surveys, and public input.

Jordan L. Neau, David M. Mushet, and Ned H. Euliss, Jr., U.S. Geological Survey, Northern Prairie Wildlife Research
Center, Jamestown, ND 58401, jneau@usgs.gov. Biodiversity Modeling with InVEST: Assessing Amphibian Habitat
Quality

Land-use and land-cover (LULC) across the landscape are rapidly changing in response to social, political, and
environmental influences. One major change occurring across the U.S. landscape is the ever increasing conversion of
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lands from traditional small grain production, or conservation plantings associated with programs such as the U.S.
Department of Agriculture (USDA) Conservation Reserve Program (CRP), to corn and soybean production. The changes
in LULC and the rate of change vary across space and time producing a transformation of ecosystem services (ESS).
Using the open source Integrated Valuation of Ecosystem Services and Tradeoffs (InVEST) model, amphibian habitat
quality was assessed as a measure of biodiversity across the three Omernik Ecoregions located within the boundary of the
U.S. Prairie Pothole Region. Projected LULC scenarios focused on an increased loss in CRP lands, and were used as a
forecasting metric to assess future amphibian habitat quality across the ecoregion landscapes. Comparisons of amphibian
habitat quality under present LULC and projected LULC scenarios were used as an indication of the ESS value provided
by CRP lands. The Subsequent loss of quality amphibian habitat land area in conjunction with CRP land area loss was
used to indicate changes in ESS across the landscape associated with CRP lands. Further modeling of biodiversity will
include habitat quality assessments for grassland birds, native plants, waterfowl, and wetland birds. Future InVEST
modeling will also focus on other ESS such as carbon storage/sequestration, sediment retention, and crop pollination.

Bob Nutsch, Information Technology Department, State of North Dakota, Bismarck, ND 58505, bnutsch@nd.gov.
Finding and Using Data on the North Dakota GIS Hub

The North Dakota GIS Hub data have been available for download and as web-based data services for years. As the
technology used on the GIS Hub has changed, so has the means of finding and accessing the data. This presentation will
provide a look at how you can locate data and how you can consume it with your desktop-based or browser-based GIS.
Special emphasis will be placed on using the Hub Data Portal and using the GIS Hub’s REST interface. The presentation
will wrap up with a review of future changes including a preview of the new Hub Explorer.

P. G. Oduor, M. Kangas, L. Kotchman, T. Claeys, P.F. Rozario, M.J. Anar, A.W. Wamono and
B.D.Madurapperuma, Department of Geosciences, North Dakota State University, Environmental and Conservation
Science Program, North Dakota State University, Peter.Odour@ndsu.edu. A Map Odyssey on 2011 Record Flooding in
North Dakota: Ramifications on Riparian Forests

North Dakota experienced record flooding along two of its major rivers, namely Souris River and Missouri River. While
the tailwaters migrated substantially slower in most areas, they left behind a trail of destruction. Most of North Dakota’s
forest outside Turtle Mountain and Killdeer Mountain reside within floodplains as riparian forests. Their critical
functionality is ensuring bank stability especially for clayey soils and in purification of ambient waters from agricultural
pollution. The main aim of this project was to document inundated forests and trees along the floodplains and estimate
total amount of inundated forest acreages along both Souris River and Missouri River using GIS and Remote Sensing
tools. The inundation extents were digitized in ArcGIS 9.3® using base satellite imagery (from georeferenced LandSat
TM 4-5, and GeoEye-1) and aerial photographs (with high encoding ratios and pixel resolutions ranging from 0.5 ft - 1m)
at associated sections. A map catalog was generated with each section at an apt scale of 1:26,000 depicting observable
cultural features with a graphically-defined 40% transparent inundation boundary overlain on top of river, lake or pond
segments. From this project, we ascertained that the total inundated forest acreage for Missouri River floodplain within
North Dakota was 25,014.94 acres compared to 11,531 acres for Souris River floodplain.

Tom Koehler, GIS Technical Division Manager, Applied Data Consultants, Inc. Eau Claire, WI 54703, and Lindsey B.
Narloch, M.S., Research Analyst, Division of EMS and Trauma, North Dakota Department of Health,
mpietz@adc4gis.com. Developing Spatial Data Sets from Multiple Sources for the North Dakota Department of
Health, Division of EMS & Trauma

State agencies are often presented with the challenge of creating statewide geographic data sets by combining data sets
that are created and maintained at the local government level. If standards are not in place to coordinate efforts at the local
level and to define how the data should be delivered to the State, then the process of merging the local data into a
statewide coverage can take more effort than would otherwise be needed. This session will describe and explain the
process that was used to create statewide geodatabase feature classes of Ambulance Service Areas, Ambulance Service
area locations and for the Quick Response Units for the state of North Dakota. A main focus will be a discussion of the
variety of data sources that went into the project as well as a description of the processes that were used to ensure both
that the resulting dataset was complete and accurate and that it meshed geographically with other bases layers already
developed by the State.
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Tom Koehler, GIS Technical Division Manager, Applied Data Consultants, Inc. Eau Claire, WI 54703,
mpietz@adc4gis.com. Data Integrity and Geodatabase Topology, Practical Approaches to Geospatial Data
Maintenance

One of the most commonly cited truisms in computing and analysis is the old cliché, "garbage in, garbage out." This
concept is abundantly relevant to the geospatial data world where queries, analyses, processes, and cartographic display
all rely upon geographic data with precise and accurate modeling of spatial objects and their relationship to one another.
Geospatial datasets that have been haphazardly created or poorly maintained frequently contain topology errors that can
severely limit the usefulness of the data. Fixing the problems can be very labor intensive and costly and, in extreme cases,
might even require rebuilding the data from scratch. The ultimate solution to avoiding these problems is to carefully
choose the topology rules appropriate for each data set and to frequently validate the topology and fix any errors that
occur during regular maintenance. This session will present an introduction to topology maintenance in ESRI
geodatabases using the tools available in ArcGIS Desktop. Topics covered will include general topology concepts, real
life data scenarios, cluster tolerances, choosing topology rules, using topology tools, etc.

Tyler Prahl and Phil Holleran, Esri, St. Paul, MN 55121, tprahl@esri.com. ArcGIS.com

ArcGIS.com is a Web site designed as a fundamental part of the ArcGIS system. The site provides a gateway to your
online GIS experience and is intended to be a useful destination for anyone—GIS professionals, Web developers, and
"non-GIS" professionals that want to view or create maps simply and quickly. The site and its resources are published in
the Amazon cloud and represent a free set of cloud services for the ArcGIS system.

At ArcGIS.com you can: View and learn about featured maps, apps, and mobile apps; Quickly make maps using the
ArcGIS Web Map; Discover a variety of basemaps to use in your GIS applications; Take advantage of a large library of
user contributed content (maps, layers, tools, and applications) shared by users from around the world; Create and
discover groups to network with other users and share specific interests or needs; and Access ArcGIS Explorer Online.
ArcGIS.com offers significant benefits to the GIS community and is going to continue to evolve with additional
functionality. This presentation will discuss and showcase how you can access and use ArcGIS.com in your work.

Chad Qualley and Erik Nelson, Houston Engineering, Inc. Fargo, ND 58105-5054, enelson@houstoneng.com. Using
GIS to Analyze Impacts Associated with the Proposed Fargo-Moorhead Diversion Project

The Fargo-Moorhead Metro Flood Risk Management Project feasibility study investigated flood risk reduction
alternatives for the Cities of Fargo, ND and Moorhead, MN and the surrounding area. A detailed unsteady HEC-RAS
model of the Red River of the North and several tributaries, covering over 650 river miles with over 2900 cross sections
and 880 storage areas, was developed to evaluate potential downstream impacts associated with proposed diversion
alternatives that were being considered. The impacts are primarily related to the loss of floodplain storage and changes to
timing as a result of proposed alternatives.

The model was run with many alternative scenarios and water surface elevations were shown in GIS using flood
inundation polygons created with the resulting HEC-RAS outputs. This was done to show the amount of impacted area
upstream and downstream to determine the least impact from the project.

Creation of a digital elevation models covering the entire extent of the Red River had to be created for the flood mapping
process to take place. The International Water Institute LiDAR collection made this possible since it had complete
coverage of the entire Red River Basin.

This presentation will detail the use of LIDAR and GIS applications for creating water surface tins, flood inundation depth
grids, flood inundation polygons and stage related water surface elevations for use in flood preparation and response.




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Jessi Rawlings, GIS Analyst, Bartlett & West, Bismarck, ND 58503, Jessi.Rawlings@bartwest.com. Utilizing GIS for
Economic Development

Bartlett & West has developed a tool to assist Economic Development agencies showcase available lands for new
buildings or office sites, called SwiftSite. SwiftSite has the capability to incorporate a large amount of GIS data and
display it in a simple to use format for site selectors. They can quickly gather data about a site they are interested in and
determine what local utilities are associated with that particular location.

Roger E. Grimsley and Lucas R. Rengstorf, Geomatics Department, Advanced Engineering and Environmental
Services, Grand Forks, ND 58201, Lucas.Rengstorf@ae2s.com. Aberdeen, SD GIS – Reconstructing Plats, Parcels,
and Utility Data

The City of Aberdeen maintains a significant amount of CADD data (plats, parcels, utilities, transportation, etc.) that is
vital to its operations and infrastructure management. Existing plat and parcel maps for the city are drawn square and
based on perfect plat distances that do not match real-world conditions, and thus will not properly overlay on geo-
referenced aerial photographs or surveyed data. Discussions of this project include assessment, conceptual design, and
implementation of starting a GIS for the City of Aberdeen, SD. This GIS project demonstrates the methodology for
reconstruction of plat, parcel, and utility data into one city-wide map by utilizing survey grade GPS points, existing
CADD files, and record drawings. In order to arrive at a solution, the consultant performed a GIS Needs Assessment to
formulate a plan by which the City may consolidate all pertinent data into one organized and useful system for capture,
storage, maintenance, and use of spatial data. The reconstructed GIS includes a geodetic coordinate system compatible
with public data sources, consultants, county, and state agencies. The consultant outlined a conceptual design stating data
structure, City Departmental responsibilities, and personnel training needed to create a reliable and user-friendly GIS for
the City. In consideration of budget and planning efforts, an implementation plan estimated the cost for initial start-up and
continuation of GIS technology. The methodology for reconstruction of plat, parcel, and utility data has implications for
other GIS start-up and restructuring projects.

Papia F. Rozario, Mohammad J. Anar, Anthony W. Wamono, Buddhika D. Madurapperuma, Environmental and Conservation
Science Program, North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND 58108 and Peter G. Oduor, Department of Geosciences, North Dakota
State University, Fargo, ND 58108, papia.rozario@my.ndsu.edu. An Assessment of Inundated Riparian Forests Along Missouri
River at Bismarck-Mandan Wildland Urban Interface in North Dakota.

The Bismarck-Mandan area of the Missouri River in North Dakota experienced record flooding this year. The crux of this
study was to highlight the procedures and emergent results in estimating inundation levels using geospatially-sound
techniques. Landsat 4-5 TM geo-referenced image for 25th May 2011 corresponding to path 32 and row 28 was
downloaded from the USGS Global Visualization Viewer web site. The floodplain of the associated demarcated area was
digitized using the TM image as base input in ArcGIS 9.3®. Then forests within the inundated boundary were digitized
using National Agricultural Imagery Program 2010 (NAIP) and base forest data acquired from previous studies. The
forest cover acreage in terms of forest types was determined through geospatial analysis using 2001 National Land Cover
Database (NLCD). The results were pooled into five uniform catalogue blocks within the Wildland Urban Interface. The
NLCD data for the inundated forests showed that 50% of inundated forests were deciduous and 4% were forested wetland.
The remaining area was the shrub wetland. The analysis based on the NAIP image comprised of 1,192 acres of inundated
forests. Our results can be used as integral components of ground vegetation survey data to estimate the extent of forest
dieback and to evaluate the susceptibility of forest tree species post-flooding. Findings from this study can be used to
guide, plan and implement future projects that may be affected by flood hazards in this area.

Sumadhur Shakya, Upper Great Plains Transportation Institute, North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND-58102, and
William W. Wilson, Bruce Dahl, Department of Agribusiness and Applied Economics, North Dakota State University,
Fargo, ND-58102. Sumadhur.Shakya@my.ndsu.edu. Market Boundaries for Durum Wheat Elevators in North
Dakota and Montana

Market Boundaries of elevators catering to Durum Wheat North Dakota and Montana of United States, are calculated.
Market boundaries are in short the drawing areas for any particular plant/shuttles/elevator (Destinations). A Linear
programing was used to find optimum flow of wheat from origins to destination based on equation presented below with

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certain constraints. It is assumed that farmer would sell their produce to maximize their revenue and not just to the nearest
elevator.
There are 42 destinations points, with an additional destination point (Surrey, ND) of interest. There are 2481 origin
points that are spatially distributed across the selected counties (center of grid cell when divided in 6 X 6 miles approx.).
Each destination has a price associated with it. For this case study, it is assumed that a farmer from any origin point will
ship to destination based on following model:
                            Π = Pj - Cij
Where P is price at destination j and Cij is total cost of shipping from origin I to j.

Note: There may be more shuttles/elevators/ethanol plants in concerned geographic area that could have been treated as
destination points, however, factors like published price at destination points and their annual capacity etc. were taken into
consideration.

Jon Tonneson, North Dakota Department of Emergency Services, Bismarck, ND 58506, and Gregg Thielman, Houston
Engineering, Fargo, ND 58102.
Jstonneson@nd.govUsing GIS to Assist with the 2011 North Dakota Flood Fight

The spring and summer of 2011 has been memorable for all of the wrong reasons. Higher than normal snowpack coupled
with epic rainfall totals in Montana and the Dakotas led to flooding that covered every corner of North Dakota.
In every phase of the 2011 flooding disaster, GIS products were critical to emergency operations. Flood depth grids and
polygons were especially valuable in determining temporary levee placement, protecting infrastructure, and outlining
what homes were a total loss in Minot.
See how Federal and State Agencies, Local Governments and private companies utilized GIS products during the flood:
Forward Looking Infrared Video; Civil Air Patrol Oblique Imagery; Archer Images; NGA Satellite Images; NDDOT
Aerial Photography; High Resolution LiDAR; Flood Depth Grids and Inundation Polygons; Predator Drone Data;
Pictometry Data; and ESRI Flex and Silverlight Apps.

Mark Sommer, United States Forest Service, Chippewa National Forest, Cass Lake, MN 56633, and Jeffrey S. Ueland,
Department of Geography, Bemidji State University, Bemidji, MN 56601, jueland@bemidjistate.edu. A Spatial Model
for Identifying Potential Blueberry Habitat on the Chippewa National Forest

In recent years there has been increased attention on the wider and sustainable use of public lands. Within this discourse, a
focus on cultivation and harvesting of natural products like wild rice and berry crops has emerged. In particular,
blueberries have featured prominently in this discussion as they tend to thrive in disturbed landscapes, which fits well with
many of the harvesting and burn strategies initiated through private and public conservation efforts. As part of the process,
the utilization of Geographic Information Systems along with widely available public datasets has proven valuable in the
identification of potential areas for these activities. As such, this project employs a logistic regression framework with US
Forest Service relevé data and a host of spatial variables derived from GAP land cover, elevation data, and soil surveys.
The outcome of the modeling process allows for the development of a mapped, probability surface which identifies areas
with high and low potential for natural blueberry production. The final product will be used by the National Forest
Service and Native American communities to develop strategies for forest harvest, regeneration, and blueberry
production.

Stephen P. Shivers, Geospatial Liaison for North and South Dakota, U.S. Geological Survey, Rapid City, SD 57702,
spshivers@usgs.gov. A New Generation of Maps: the USGS’s US Topos

The U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) new US Topo is an implementation and derivative of The National Map. The US
Topo is the quadrangle map of the future. Although it is not a geographic information system (GIS), the US Topo is a new
kind of georeferenced map that is a synthesis and evolution of USGS's legacy digital map data files, the digital raster
graphics (DRGs). The US Topo maps are different from other available imagery or maps; for example, the maps have
richer content than other maps and are compiled from more current data. They are a first step toward a comprehensive
portrayal of the Nation's landscape.



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The US Topo includes orthoimagery, contours, roads, geographic names, and hydrographic features in the traditional 7.5-
minute quadrangle format. The file format is a georeferenced GeoPDF. The user can interact with the features on the map
using free PC-compatible software. The map files are available, at no cost, for digital download from the USGS Store.
This presentation will demonstrate how to acquire and make use of these new products.

Henry Van Offelen, MN Center for Environmental Advocacy, Detroit Lakes, MN 56501, Grit May and Charles Fritz,
International Water Institute, Fargo, ND, 58108. henry.vanoffelen@mncenter.org. Strategic Flood Damage Reduction
Using LiDAR: Prioritizing Water Detention Areas in the Red River Basin.

LiDAR-derived hydrologically conditioned digital elevation models (DEM) and advanced finescale hydrologic models
(HEC-HMS) have been completed for the Red River Basin upstream of Halstad, Minnesota. A variety of ArcHydro-
based tools were applied to the conditioned DEM of two pilot watersheds (10 and 12 digit HUC) to identify areas on the
landscape that could detain different rainfall runoff events. The outcomes of these analyses have been integrated with the
results of HEC-HMS modeling and mainstem Red River modeling to prioritize water detention sites for their flood
damage reduction potential. Procedures used to develop these data products could be applied throughout the Red River
Basin and integrated into the Red River Decision Information Network for public use and to assist land and water
managers in effective development of flood damage reduction projects.

Peter White, Pictometry International, Lakeville, MN 55044, peter.white@pictometry.com. High Resolution LiDAR,
Oblique and Ortho imagery for Flood planning, mitigation and response

Leverage precision elevation data and high resolution images of every square inch of your geography. Identify and
measure buildings, culverts, roads, utility assets and elevations at the touch of a mouse. High resolution imagery of before
and after flood events provides an invaluable dataset for all phases of disaster management, FEMA assessments and for
historical records.

Bill Wiesepape and Carlos Perez, GIS Department, GEC Inc, Baton Rouge, LA 70806, billw@gecinc.com. GIS
Support of Long Term Disaster Recovery from Hurricanes Katrina, Rita, Gustav, and Ike

Long term disaster recovery is primarily concerned with the recovery of communities especially hard hit by disaster.
Based on this definition, GIS becomes a useful tool to determine if the success of the long term recovery process. During
a 30 month contract with FEMA Region 6 Baton Rouge Transitional Recovery Office (TRO), the authors were full time
members of the TRO Geospatial Intelligence Unit (GIU). This involved production of map and graphic representations for
planning, decision making, and to determine the success of the disaster recovery operations.
FEMA long term recovery focuses on the program areas of Individual Assistance, Public Assistance (assistance to state
and local government), and Mitigation. These program areas are responsible for the rebuilding process which begins once
the disaster response activities are complete. Effectively communicating information about the status of these programs
geographically, with sufficient detail was a challenge that incorporated a variety of solutions from digital dashboards and
automated data conversion all the way manual quality control and data entry. Through this process lessons were learned,
processes were developed, and problems were identified that defined the effectiveness of GIS to the application of this
particular long term recovery effort. In addition the will include best practices for the effective management of GIS to
long term recovery in general.

                                       Poster Presentation Abstracts
Mohammad J. Anar, Environmental and Conservation Science Program, North Dakota State University, P. O. Box
6050, Fargo, ND 58108, Buddhika D. Madurapperuma, Environmental and Conservation Science Program, North
Dakota State University, P. O. Box 6050, Fargo, ND 58108 and Peter G. Oduor, Department of Geosciences, North
Dakota State University, P. O. Box 6050, Fargo, ND 58108, Mohammad.Anar@my.ndsu.edu. Surface hydrological
modelling for identifying infiltration zones in Devils Lake watershed, North Dakota

Devils Lake is a closed-basin lake, characterized by large fluctuations in water levels in response to climatic variability.
Historic flooding revealed that the runoff from agricultural lands caused a nutrient spike due to circulation of saline water
from the inundated areas. In this scenario, identification of infiltration zones is crucial to (a) water resource management,
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and (b) addressing secondary problems for example, water quality. Considering the spatial characteristic of land use at
watershed scale, the development of an integrated approach that can simulate land use changes and their effects on
infiltration process at the watershed level is also important. This study presents a GIS-based hydrological modelling to
identify the infiltration zones and to map groundwater recharge and discharge areas within the drainage basin, which
covers 9,938 km2 of the Devils Lake basin. The comparative analysis results of the drainage network were derived from
digital elevation models (DEMs) by using Arc Hydrology® 9.0 and HEC-GeoHMS® 5.0 in an ArcMap-ArcInfo® 9.3
environment. The drainage area was extracted from surveyed topographical maps.

Nicole Bart and David Delene, Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of North Dakota, Nicole.Bart@und.edu.
The use of Geographical Information Systems to Interpret Research Aircraft Measurements
Authors:

The University of North Dakota (UND) Citation Research Aircraft (tail number N555D5) made three flights during July
2011 as part of an instrument development project for Goodrich Corporation. Each flight consisted of collecting cloud
measurements in and around areas of precipitation. The cloud measurements were made with numerous instruments
including a Cloud Droplet Probe (measures droplet size distribution from 2 – 50 µm), King Hot Wire Probe (measures
liquid water content), Nevzorov Probe (measures total and liquid water content), 2-Dimentional Cloud Imaging Probe
(images particles from 30-800 µm in 32 channels) and Cloud Imaging Probe (images particles from 30-800 µm in 64
channels). In addition to in-situ airborne measurements, the clouds were sampled by multiple satellite sensors and the
precipitation was sampled by two ground radars. Radars provide area coverage data for each flight at approximately five
minute resolution which provides a context for the in-situ aircraft measurements.

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are effective in visual representing research aircraft flight paths and correlating
measurements with the precipitation events. Software such as the Integrated Data Viewer (IDV) and Google Earth make
it possible to correlate each area of aircraft measurements to the overall precipitation system. IDV is used to create a kmz
formatted radar data file. The aircraft’s position information is put into a kml formatted flight track file. Google Earth is
used to overlay the flight track (kml file) on the radar imagine (kmz file).

Eric E. Castle and Michael D. Knudson, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND 58202, Eric.castle@und.edu.
Combining LiDAR and Stormwater Infrastructure to Delineate Sub-neighborhood Scale Watersheds

A critical component of decentralized stormwater management is a detailed understanding of urban watersheds. Light
Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) is a tool that is becoming more available for widespread use. Due to the high degree of
accuracy there is potential to combine city stormwater infrastructure with LiDAR derived topographic data to quickly
delineate urbanized watersheds. The accuracy and feasibility of being able to rapidly delineate and evaluate urbanized
watersheds would be a powerful tool for stormwater managers. A preliminary study performed on the University of
Minnesota Crookston campus illustrates the potential of this approach (Figure 1). 1m LiDAR data was combined with
campus land use and stormwater infrastructure data and processed using the ArcHydro toolset in ArcInfo. The resulting
datasets are sub-neighborhood scale catchments starting at localized discharge points and outlet to catchbasins (when
present). Preliminary analysis reveals a few discrepancies in the derived catchments, however the feasibility and potential
accuracy at which these sub-neighborhood catchments can be delineated warrants additional study and consideration.

Dipesh Das, Department of Civil Engineering, University of North Dakota, dipesh_buet@yahoo.com. Watershed
Delineation and Area Calculation: Devils Lake Area

This project is about the watershed delineation and the calculation of areas for the Devils Lake sub-basin. In this study the
watershed of the devils lake was delineated using the 10m X 10m DEM data from USGS. The watershed was delineated
by following several steps using the’ Spatial Analyst Tools’ and an Extension of the ArcGIS named ‘Arc-Hydro’. The
area of the watershed was then calculated using the ‘Spatial Statistics Tools’. The area was then compared to the area of
the Devils Lake sub-basin from USGS. The Area derived from this study was 3778 sq. miles while the area from USGS
was 3810 sq. miles. Also three contour maps were drawn for elevations 1458 ft, 1454 ft and 1447 ft. 1454 ft is the recent
elevation of Devils Lake. With these contour maps the present, past and the probable future scenario of the Devils Lake
were shown. According to these contour maps the future risk of flooding was analyzed and the area that can be affected
by the flood was predicted.

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From this project it was concluded that the DEM data used for the project was good enough to delineate the watershed and
calculate the watershed area fairly close to the actual value. Higher resolution data will provide more accurate results and
the future prediction based on these results will be more appropriate.

Christopher DeHaan, Transportation and Logistics Program, North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND 58102,
Christopher.dehaan@my.ndsu.edu. Transporting Water for Oil Production in Western North Dakota

The supply of water is critical to communities, industrial businesses and natural functions. With the increase in oil activity
in western North Dakota, there has been an increased demand in the amount of water required. Due to hydraulic
fracturing, the process of acquiring the oil, large amounts of water is necessary for production. In the past, water wells
were sufficient in supplying the oil wells, but with the increase in the amount of wells there is a necessity for larger water
sources. The water demand in the area also comes from drinking water for communities, agriculture, and other energy
needs. These demands need to be met as well, so the capacity of the water resources has to be determined. GIS
(Geographic Information Systems) is used to locate the water resources, oil wells, and map the travel routes of the water.
This is done to determine the optimal route for the movement of water from source to oil well to disposal site.

Matthew J. Dinger and Gregory S. Vandeberg, Department of Geography, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks,
ND 58202, Matthew.Dinger@und.edu. Identifying Locations of Highly Eroded Areas using GIS Terrain Analysis,
Devils Lake, ND

The Devils Lake basin, located in northeastern North Dakota, has been under the influence of a continued wet cycle since
the early 1990’s. As a result of this wet cycle, water levels within Devils Lake and surrounding water bodies have risen
almost 30 feet since 1993. There is a high potential to negatively impact the surface water quality of the region due to this
flooding and the high concentration of agricultural land cover being inundated. Mauvais and Calio Coulees are two
tributaries in the basin, and are prime study sites due to their proximity to numerous crop lands as well as nutrient
management areas from several Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations (CAFOs). Areas of potential runoff can convey
pollutants such as sediments, nutrients, pathogens and trace elements to nearby waterways. Terrain analysis was
conducted using a 3-meter Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) derived Digital Elevation Model (DEM) of Mauvais
and Calio Coulees to evaluate soil erosion potential adjacent to these tributaries. The analysis used slope (S), flow
accumulation (FA), and stream power index (SPI). Threshold values applied to the SPI layer resulted in the identification
of areas of potential agricultural runoff. The results of the terrain analysis were verified in the field. We expect that this
terrain model will accurately Identify areas of high erosion and runoff potential within the study area. Finally, the
findings may be useful in locating and implementing best management practices (BMPs) to aid in the reduction of
pollutants entering Mauvais and Calio Coulees.

David Enns, Map It Out Inc., Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, R2H 2P6, david@mapitout.com. After The Ark is Parked:
The Role of GIS Technologies in Community Flood Recovery

GIS technologies used in flood situations typically focus on flood prevention with the identification and prediction of
vulnerable areas and the use of that information to create temporary protection with dykes, sandbags, tubes, or other water
barriers.

But moving forward GIS technologies can also play a significant role in community flood recovery efforts after the flood
protection activities have ended.

Remnants of intrusive and often hastily created flood barriers are an impediment to the return to productivity for many
flood-threatened or flood-damaged communities. A quick restoration of public assets to pre-flood standards is critical for
the economic well-being of every flood-impacted community.

GIS technologies can play a critical role in community flood restoration in the following ways: Define pre-flood asset
status and location to provide an accurate guideline for post-flood repair, restoration, or replacement activities; Accelerate
the administrative component by automating work order generation and tracking, etc. of public asset repair, restoration, or
replacement; Facilitate the sharing of GIS information between individuals within the community and local government in
real-time; Easily integrate the public asset restoration schedules and activities of multiple internal departments and
external community groups; Reduce the time to gather data and prepare reports necessary for flood-relief funding
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applications. David Enns explores these GIS flood recovery opportunities using the 9,000 person Rural Municipality of
East St. Paul 2011 flood recovery efforts as a back drop.

Damon Grabow, Regional Weather Information Center, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND 58202,
dgrabow@rwic.und.edu. Hydrologic Sensitivity Analysis Using LiDAR

The Devils Lake watershed covers approximately 3780 sq. mi. in northeastern North Dakota. The area is speckled by
potholes and small lakes, which at various levels flow from one to another ultimately reaching the west end of Devils
Lake through Big Coulee or Channel A. However, when the climatic pattern shifted in the late 1970’s there was a 10 to
15 year lapse in water rise on the main lake. This encompassed the lag time of the watershed to fill its many potholes and
begin the transport of water into the main body of Devils Lake. This research will investigate one of the small sub-basin
of the Devils Lake watershed and its impact on the local environment, the Lake Laretta/McHugh Slough sub-basin near
Michigan, ND.
The investigation of the Lake Laretta/McHugh Slough sub-basin will focus on the development of a hydrologic sensitivity
analysis concerning surface water drainage issues affecting the city of Michigan, ND, the Lake Laretta/McHugh Slough
water body, and the Forest River basin and the proposed mitigation plan. This project will utilize high resolution LiDAR
elevation data to test the hydrologic sensitivity to elevation data resolution ranging from 1-m to 30-m. A combination of
ArcHydro and HEC-HMS will be used to analyze the surface water characteristics within the Lake Laretta/McHugh
Slough and Forest River sub-basins and model outputs are to be compared to USGS gauge data from the Forest River site
at Fordville, ND. If the test is positive it would present a great advancement in making hydrologic and water quality
assessments for areas with flat terrains.

Hasibul Hasan, Department of Civil Engineering, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND 58202,
hasibul.hasan@my.und.edu. Cost Effective Method for Identification of Highway Noise Abatement Location

Elevated noise levels due to vehicular traffic are cause of grave concern in residential areas. They can significantly reduce
property values. Most of the highway noise literature has been focused in predicting noise levels, estimating cost of
installing noise barriers, and assessing effectiveness of noise barriers in reducing the amount of noise. The Federal
Highway Administration’s traffic noise model (TNM) is typically used to estimate noise levels due to vehicular traffic in
the vicinity of residential properties. One key problem in highway noise analysis that has received limited attention is to
automatically identify highway segments along which installation of noise barriers may be warranted due to elevated
noise levels. This can be made possible by integrating the geographic information system’s (GIS’s) spatial modeling
capability and the TNM methodology. In this project, a GIS-based model for identifying highway segments for noise
barrier installation was developed that uses TNM for noise level prediction. The method can detect highway segments
where installation of noise barriers may be warranted. In addition, the method also calculates effective length of noise
barriers to be installed. A study was done on Maricopa, AZ for twenty three square miles area. The proposed model also
worked with highway alignment optimization models by identifying segments with unacceptable noise levels of 93 dBA
from 200 ft from I-10 in a residential area. It is not a common practice to use TNM model on existing road as the noise
data could measured from field data collection. But in this model, effort was made to save field trip cost and identify the
noise abatement location from a remote point. Several enhancements to the model remain to be worked on in the future.

Greg C. Liknes, David E. Haugen, Andy J. Lister, Susan J. Crocker, Barry T. Wilson, Patrick D. Miles, and Dacia
M. Meneguzzo, USDA Forest Service, St. Paul, MN 55108, gliknes@fs.fed.us. Forest Resource Information for
Geospatial Analyses

Since the discovery of emerald ash borer in Minnesota, numerous news reports have cited statistics on the number and
volume of ash trees in the state. Have you ever wondered how those numbers were derived? Would you like to generate
similar statistics for your area of interest? The Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program of the USDA Forest Service
has been collecting information on forest resources since the 1930’s. FIA gathers data across all 50 states on both public
and private lands. Estimates with associated precision (confidence values) can be generated for a suite of forest attributes
from data collected on a network of thousands of plots across the country. In addition to standard FIA data and tools for
reporting information on forest resources, we highlight data from trees in nonforest areas as well, such as information on
ash trees collected in North Dakota as part of a project called the Great Plains Initiative. We present a variety of resources,
including maps, geospatial datasets, on-line tools, and published reports, that decision-makers and land managers can use
to help assess what’s at risk.
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Hasin Shahad Munna and Dr. Yeo Howe Lim, Dept. of Civil Engineering, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks,
ND 58202, hasin.munna@my.und.edu. Improvements in Watershed Modeling using LIDAR Data

The research was focused to provide a comparative measure in modeling the Mauvais Sub-basin of the Devils Lake by
using LIDAR data and 30m DEM data from USGS. As a first step the 30m DEM data was processed to delineate the
watershed boundary. After that LIDAR data was used for the same purpose and significant improvements were observed.
Identification and delineation of a watershed boundary and calculation of its sub-basin areas are important steps in
modeling streams and lakes. It provides a better understanding of the basin, describes the impact area and defines the flow
direction and stream link based on the elevation and slope of surrounding areas. Steps followed in accomplishing the task
include using the following tools in chronological order to process the raster data. The tools are: Fill, Flow Direction,
Flow Accumulation, Stream Definition, Stream Links, Catchment Grid Delineation, Catchment Polygon Processing,
Watershed Delineation and Area Calculation. Most of these tools were available in ARC-GIS and some of them were
obtained as extensions from ARC-Hydro tools. While delineating the watershed, accuracy in defining the Stream network
and stream link largely depends on the quality of Raster Data. LIDAR data having a better accuracy in elevation
estimation provided better results in modeling the watershed. In developing a hydrologic model of the Devils Lake, proper
identification of the sub-basins, calculation of the slopes and estimating the stream lengths are very important steps and
LIDAR data was very helpful in creating a more precise model.

Philipp Nagel and Fei Yuan, Department of Geography, Minnesota State University, Mankato, 56001 and Brad Cook,
Department of Biological Sciences, Minnesota State University, Mankato, 56001, philipp.nagel@mnsu.edu. Extracting
High-resolution Land Use and Land Cover Maps Using an Integrated Method of Object-Oriented Classification,
Python Scripting, and Spatial Modeling

Traditional, pixel-based digital image classification approaches are well established and have been widely used to extract
Land Use/ Land Cover (LULC) data from remote sensing images. However, it is still a challenging task to extract accurate
LULC maps automatically from high-resolution images due to relative low spectral variation, shadow problem, and the
complexity of different landscapes in high-resolution imagery. In this study, an innovative method was developed by
integrating an object-oriented classifier with python scripting and spatial modeling tools. To provide more accurate LULC
and wetland data for the development of a regional wetland classification system and assessment of wetland functions, we
processed multiple GIS datasets, including 1-m color digital orthophoto, wetland inventory maps, digital elevation models
and road maps using the developed method. Results demonstrate the proposed method allows for the integration of
various geospatial data to produce accurate LULC maps, especially when classifying different vegetation types and
wetlands, which are typically hard to differentiate. It was also found the proposed techniques are beneficial when dealing
with large datasets and study areas, as they can be combined in GIS scripts and spatial models that allow batch processing.

Tom Koehler, GIS Technical Division Manager, Applied Data Consultants, Inc. Eau Claire, WI 54703,
mpietz@adc4gis.com. Plat Book, Map Book and Atlas Production

Applied Data Consultants, Inc. (ADC) works closely with County Land Information Departments, Departments of Natural
Resources and the County 4-H Committees to compile all of the necessary spatial files and current owner information,
ensuring the accuracy of the land information in their plat books, map books and emergency service atlases.

ArcMap, with the latest MapLogic Layout Manager technology, is used to set up the digital layouts for the projects.
MapLogic allows for dynamic tags and indexing, facing page layouts and macros for automatically placing advertisement
files, which increases efficiencies. The final books are comprised of full color ownership/road map pages, miscellaneous
pages and maps, index pages or other requested pages for the project.

Jessica Shahan, Brett Goodwin, Department of Biology, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND 58202 and Brad
Rundquist, Department of Geography, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND 58202,
jessica.shahan@email.und.edu.
Identifying landscape-level patterns in grassland songbird community richness and diversity

Increasing amounts of habitat loss and fragmentation have contributed to significant declines in prairie songbird
populations. Much work has been done to quantify how remnant prairie quality is influencing these bird communities, but
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previous work on landscape-level effects has been inconclusive. This study seeks to identify what land uses and habitats
present in the landscape have significant influences on species richness and community diversity. Bird counts were
conducted on 29 remnant prairies in North Dakota, South Dakota, and Minnesota in 2010 and 2011. This data was used
to calculate Margalef’s richness and Shannon diversity indices for each site, looking at both total species assemblage and
species functional groups. Landscape characteristics were quantified using digitized NAIP imagery in ArcGIS. For each
field site, a 4 km buffer was digitized starting at the boundaries of the prairie and included all habitat or land use types
present, with special attention being paid to the different types of grasslands present. This landscape data will be used in
regression analysis to determine the relationship between richness and diversity and multiple landscape indices.
Preliminary analysis has shown that patch area is not a strong indicator of either richness or diversity, which may be
indicative of landscape features that are playing a significant role in the variation seen across the study sites. With this
information, it would be possible to target current prairies in need of additional songbird management efforts or identify
remnant prairies that may be well suited for conserving healthy songbird communities.

Sumadhur Shakya, Upper Great Plains Transportation Institute, North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND-58102, and
William W. Wilson, Bruce Dahl, Department of Agribusiness and Applied Economics, North Dakota State University,
Fargo, ND-58102. Sumadhur.Shakya@my.ndsu.edu. Market Structure Of Grain Elevators In Mid-West Region

Market structure of grain elevators in ‘Midwest’ region of United States is calculated for certain ‘Base Elevators’ for Corn
and Soybean. Market Structure by firms within 75 miles of Base Elevators is calculated in terms of N (Number of firms),
CR4 (market share of top four firms) and Herfindahl based on shipping and storage capacity of elevators by firms. The
grain elevators considered are those that are serviced by Burlington Northern SantaFe (BNSF), Union Pacific (UP), and
Canadian Pacific (CP). Market Structure refers to the number and distribution of firms in a market. For the purpose of this
project, shipping capacity and storage capacity are treated as measure of productivity for firms within 75 miles region of
market.

Herfindahl conveys more information than N-firm concentration ratio as N-firm ratio is invariant to changes in size of the
largest firms in market. Though N-firm ratio gives us general information, however, if the relative size of largest firms is
an important determinant of conduct and performance, as economic theory suggests, then Herfindahl is likely to be more
informative. Lower ranges of Herfindahl indicate there is good competition and a value equal to or more than 1800
indicates monopoly by one or more firm in the market.

Denyse K. Sturges, Chester Fritz Library, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND 58202,
denyse.sturges@library.und.edu

Using GIS to discern patterns in a social sciences dissertation: An Example
Are job advertisements for academic library directors the same across the United States or is there a regional or state-wide
difference? Does a pattern emerge over time? This poster geo-locates a single aspect of the results from a larger
dissertation study, covering the years 1974, 1984, 1994, and 2004. GIS will be used to discover patterns not immediately
apparent in the data.

                                              Workshop Abstracts
Jim Castagneri, US Census Bureau, Denver, CO 80235, james.d.castagneri@census.gov
Analyzing Census and American Community Survey Data in GIS

This 2-part session will explore Census geography basics, political versus statistical geography, TIGER/Line shapefiles as
the source for analysis. We will discuss selecting the proper data, the sources of Census and ACS Data, and preprocessing
issues.

The second half will feature demonstrations of live census data in ArcGIS. We’ll explore joining census data within GIS,
conducting proximity analysis using block-level population counts, and thematic map representation of census variables.




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Kyle Heideman, GIS Consultant, Pro-West & Associates, Inc., Walker, MN 56484, kheideman@prowestgis.com.Taking
ArcGIS to the Field

ArcGIS Desktop 10 includes a complimentary ArcGIS Mobile license allowing users to take mapping capabilities to the
field. With this license users have access to a read-to-deploy mobile solution for viewing maps, collecting data, and
planning work tasks.
This workshop will demonstrate how ArcGIS Desktop users can take advantage of their ArcGIS Mobile license. ArcGIS
Mobile will also be compared to ArcPad, including when either software is more appropriate to meet your mobile
needs. The complete ArcGIS Mobile project creation process will also be demonstrated, including data considerations
(operational and base), use of Project Center, and deployment of the project and data to a mobile device.

In addition the session will include an overview of ArcGIS Mobile can be integrated with ArcGIS Server for larger scale
deployments. This workshop is intended for ArcGIS users with mobile GIS needs and would like to learn more
about available mobile GIS solutions.

Adam R. Jonasson, Information Technology GIS Services, City of Grand Forks, Grand Forks, ND 58201,
ajonasson@grandforksgov.com. Combining CAD and GIS in an SQL Spatial Geodatabase

This presentation will look at combining CAD and GIS data and the use of SQL Spatial as a geodatabase. The combining
of CAD and GIS data is a constant struggle for both design professionals and GIS professionals. To help with this
struggle, the City implemented a new SQL Spatial Server and worked to convert all of their DWGs and SHPs to
standardized SQL tables. This talk will look at the process we used to transition our data, as well as the methods we
currently use to update and maintain our data on a daily basis. Topics will include converting data, working in an SQL
environment, using SQL in CAD design, editing data, and exporting data for use in other GIS applications. Processes and
procedures for data collection, GIS entry, exporting to CAD files, and editing data in a web environment will be
explained. In addition, costs and benefits to this implementation will be discussed.

Jeremiah Steele, HIFLD to the Regions Midwest Region Information Exchange Broker, steele_jeremiah@bah.com.
Homeland Infrastructure Foundation Level Data Working Group (HIFLD WG)

The HIFLD WG currently has more than 3,900 contributing partners across the Infrastructure Protection (IP), Homeland
Defense/Homeland Security (HD/HLS), and Emergency Preparedness, Response and Recovery (EPR&R) mission areas
that are concurrently working toward common ‘best of breed’ processes, improved Homeland Security Infrastructure
Program (HSIP) datasets, other infrastructure data and related technologies. The HIFLD to the Regions (HTTR) effort is
advancing the success of the national level HIFLD Working Group by deploying a similar capability into the DHS
Protective Security Advisor (PSA) Areas. HTTR’s focus is to support State and Local priorities and issues to extend
awareness and reach of federal IP resources, enhance regional geospatial collaboration and information sharing activities,
and strengthen Federal, State, Local and Private Sector Partnerships.

The HIFLD WG was established in February 2002 to identify, share, and protect geospatial infrastructure data and
information used for visualization and analysis. The HIFLD WG is chartered and co-sponsored by the Office of the
Assistant Secretary of Defense for Homeland Defense and Americas Security Affairs; DHS Office of Infrastructure
Protection; National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency Office of the Americas, and the Unites States Geological Survey
Program Office.

Topics will include an overview of the HIFLD WG, HTTR, updates on the Homeland Security Infrastructure Program
(HSIP) Gold and Freedom datasets, the Homeland Security Information Network (HSIN) and other information sharing
capabilities and geospatial resources being made available to homeland security and emergency management mission
partners for the protection of our nation’s key resources and critical infrastructure.

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https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/NCJYCXY. Thank you.

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