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					PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY
College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics


Department Chair                                              Concurrent and/or Summer Enrollment in Another
Kwang Y. Shen                                                 College
                                                                  Students who wish to take course work in a community or
Department Office
                                                              another college to meet curricular requirements while en-
PH3-207
                                                              rolled as undergraduates in the College of Natural Sciences
Telephone/FAX                                                 and Mathematics must petition the appropriate department
(562) 985-4924/(562) 985-7924                                 for prior approval to enroll in specific courses. This policy
Faculty                                                       applies to concurrent enrollment or summer enrollment. Uni-
                                                              versity policy must also be complied with. See “Concurrent
Professors                                                    Enrollment” and “Transfer of Undergraduate Credit” in this
M. Zahur Anwar                                                Catalog. Courses not receiving prior approval will not be ac-
R. Dean Ayers                                                 cepted for credit by the department.
Lowell J. Eliason
                                                              Facilitated Enrollment into Classes
Simon George
                                                                  All entering students who declare a major in a degree pro-
Paul Hintzen
                                                              gram offered by this Department must participate in the Col-
Chi-Yu Hu                                                     lege of Natural Sciences and Mathematics’ Science Safari to
Patrick F. Kenealy                                            Success (for first-time freshmen) or EONS (Enrollment and
Lawrence S. Lerner                                            Orientation in the Natural Sciences and Mathematics for
Alfred F. Leung                                               transfer students) Program. These programs are held in
Keung P. Luke                                                 June-July for those starting in the Fall Semester and in Janu-
Jack H. Munsee                                                ary for those starting in the Spring Semester. Department
S. Rajpoot                                                    advisors will be available to provide an overview of the stu-
Sema’an I. Salem                                              dents’ chosen baccalaureate degree program, to assist with
                                                              academic advisement, to provide information on the many
Bruce L. Scott
                                                              career opportunities available, and to aid students in enroll-
Kwang Y. Shen
                                                              ing in classes. Contact the Student Access to Science Cen-
Edwin L. Woollett
                                                              ter (FO5-109) or Department Office for additional information.
Associate Professors
Mark W. Gross
                                                              Bachelor of Science in Physics (code 3-7668)
Z. Hlousek                                                        The major in physics for the bachelor of science degree is
Jing Liu                                                      offered for the student seeking the doctoral degree and the
                                                              position of professional physicist in the traditional sense, the
Assistant Professors                                          student seeking a position in an industrial laboratory, and the
Xia Qiu                                                       student seeking a career in teaching physics. This major pro-
Department Secretary                                          gram has been designed with the conviction that a student
Irene Howard                                                  must first of all be a physicist and must have a program
                                                              which penetrates the fundamental conceptual bases of phys-
                                                              ical phenomena, cultivates skill in the design of experiments
Students desiring information should contact the Department
                                                              and their practical execution and stimulates interest in the
Office for referral to one of the faculty advisors.
                                                              many means used to interpret the physical world. A minimum
Undergraduate Advisor                                         of 124 units is required.
Lowell J. Eliason
                                                              Requirements
Graduate Advisor                                                 Lower Division: PHYS 151, 152, 154, 155; MATH 122, 123,
Alfred F. Leung                                               224; CHEM 111A, 111B; BIOL 200 or 211A.
                                                                 Upper Division: ENGL 317; MATH 370A or 364A; MATH
                                                              370B or 461; 34 units of upper division physics including
                                                              PHYS 310, 340A, 340B, 350, 360, 380, 422, 450, and one
                                                              laboratory course chosen from PHYS 330, 403, 476, 480, and
                                                              486. The remaining (6 to 8) units are to be chosen from any
                                                              upper division physics courses except PHYS 400I.
                                                              Grade Requirements
                                                                Physics majors must have a "C" average in the major.
                                                              Physics students must achieve a grade of "C" or better in
                                                              each required course in the major.



498 • Physics and Astronomy              • 1997/98 CSULB Catalog
    The following schedule is typical for an upper division ma-     Prerequisites
jor who is a full-time student.                                     1. A bachelor’s degree with a major in physics; or
Junior Year:                                                        2. A bachelor’s degree with at least 24 units of upper division
    Fall: PHYS 310, 360, 380; MATH 370A or 364A; MATH                  physics. (Students deficient in undergraduate preparation
    370B or 461 (it is recommended that MATH 370A or 364A              must take courses to remove these deficiencies with or
    be taken before PHYS 310, if possible).                            without credit toward the degree at the discretion of the
    Spring: PHYS 340A, 350; MATH 370B or 461 (if not taken             department graduate advisor.)
    previously).                                                    Requirements
Senior Year:
                                                                    1. Advancement to Candidacy
    Fall: PHYS 340B, 422, 450.
                                                                       a. Students must fulfill the University requirements for ad-
    Spring: Three upper division physics electives.                    vancement to candidacy and must satisfy the Graduate
Bachelor of Arts in Physics (code 2-7668)                              Committee as to the adequacy of their preparation by pass-
                                                                       ing the Physics Department screening examination. This
    The major in physics for the bachelor of arts degree is            will be done in the first semester in which they are regis-
offered in the spirit of providing a curriculum devoted to “in-        tered for courses acceptable for credit toward the M.S., ex-
terpretation of physics and its reintegration with other parts of      cept in individual cases to be determined by the Graduate
our culture.” A primary purpose is to prepare teachers of              Committee.
physics and physical science for secondary schools.
                                                                       b. A student must have a "B" average or better in six units of
Requirements                                                           physics applicable toward the master’s degree, of which at
    Lower Division: PHYS 151, 152, 154, 155; MATH 122, 123,            least three units are at the graduate level.
224; CHEM 111A, 111B; BIOL 200 or 211A.                             2. Recognizing that effective organization and verbal commu-
    Upper Division: ENGL 317 (may be waived for students                nication of physics are a necessary part of a successful
who achieved a standard score of 24 on the ACT English                  graduate program, the Department of Physics and Astrono-
sub-test or who received an “A” or “B” grade in ENGL 100);              my normally requires that a graduate student serves at least
A minimum of 24 units of courses selected in consultation               one semester as a teaching associate or a graduate
with a major advisor. Work must be completed in each of the             assistant as part of the M.S. program. Exceptions may be
following fields: physics, chemistry, and geology. At least 18          granted by the graduate advisor.
units of this work must be in physics. Candidates for a teach-      Additional Requirements
ing credential must complete at least six units selected from
                                                                    Plan I
GEOL 102, 460, 461.
                                                                        1. A minimum of 30 units of upper division and graduate
Minor in Physics (code 0-7668)                                          courses including PHYS 540A, 540B, 550A, 550B, 560A,
   A minimum of 20 units which must include:                            and 695;
   Lower Division: PHYS 151, 152, 154, 155.                             2. Completion of a written thesis, 6 units of Physics 698, and
   Upper Division: A minimum of nine units which may not                an oral presentation of the thesis research. The members of
include PHYS 360.                                                       the candidate’s thesis committee must approve the thesis
                                                                        before the student may schedule the oral presentation.
Master of Science in Physics (code 6-7668)                                 Note: Students must be advanced to candidacy before
    The Department of Physics and Astronomy offers gradu-                  enrolling in PHYS 698. As early as possible, a graduate
ate study leading to the master of science degree. The M.S.                student should choose a thesis advisor who will help in
degree is available in both a general option and an option in              selecting the student’s thesis committee consisting of at
applied physics. A student may choose the general option                   least three members (including the thesis advisor and at
either with a thesis (Plan I) or, if the department graduate               least one other member of the department).
committee gives permission, with a comprehensive examina-           Plan II
tion (Plan II); the option in applied physics requires a thesis.        1. Permission of the Department Graduate Committee;
Active areas of research are: observational astronomy, ap-
                                                                        2. A minimum of 30 units of upper division and graduate
plied optics, laser spectroscopy, materials research, particle
                                                                        courses including PHYS 510, 540A, 540B, 550A, 550B,
physics, atomic physics, quantum gravity, muon catalyzed
                                                                        560A, and 695;
fusion, intermediate energy physics, acoustics, and con-
densed matter physics.                                                  3. Passing a comprehensive examination.
    Teaching associateships and graduate assistantships are             The remaining required units, not more than 6 of which may
available to students working on the master’s degree.               be in related fields, are to be from courses selected in consul-
                                                                    tation with the graduate advisor.
    Application should be made to the graduate advisor of the
Department of Physics and Astronomy.                                  Option in Applied Physics (code 6-7669)
                                                                        The Option in Applied Physics provides a master’s degree
                                                                    program that emphasizes concepts and techniques particular-
                                                                    ly appropriate for applied physics. It is intended for students
                                                                    having a background in physics, engineering, or a related field.




                                                   1997/98 CSULB Catalog •                Physics and Astronomy • 499
Prerequisites                                                      Physics Courses (PHYS)
1. A bachelor’s degree with a major in physics, or
2. A bachelor’s degree with a major in engineering with
                                                                   Lower Division
    upper division physics substantially equivalent to PHYS        100A,B. General Physics (4,4) F,S
    310, 340AB and 450, as determined by the Department            Prerequisites: Three years of high school mathematics including
    Graduate Advisor, or                                           algebra, geometry, and intermediate algebra (or MATH 010) or
                                                                   the equivalent; a knowledge of basic trigonometry is strongly rec-
3. A bachelor’s degree with upper division physics and             ommended. PHYS 100A is a prerequisite for PHYS 100B. Year
    mathematics courses essentially equivalent to PHYS 310,        course in introductory physics. First semester considers proper-
    340B, 450, and MATH 370A and 370B, as determined by            ties of matter, mechanics, wave motion and heat. Second semes-
                                                                   ter considers electricity, light, and atomic and nuclear physics.
    the Department Graduate Advisor.
                                                                   (Lecture 3 hrs., laboratory 3 hrs.) A course fee may be required.
   Students deficient in undergraduate preparation must            (100A: CAN PHYS 2; 100B: CAN PHYS 4)
take courses to remove these deficiencies as determined by         102. Introduction to Physics (3) F,S
the Department Graduate Advisor.                                   Prerequisite: MATH 117 (which may be taken concurrently) or
                                                                   three-and-one-half years of high school mathematics including
Requirements                                                       two years of algebra, one year of geometry and one-half year of
1. Advancement to Candidacy                                        trigonometry. This course is designed to assist students who
                                                                   need additional preparation before enrolling in PHYS 100A or
    a. Students must fulfill the University requirements for ad-   151. Basic problems and concepts in physics, particularly in me-
    vancement to candidacy and must satisfy the Graduate           chanics. Credit/No Credit grading only. (Lectures, problem ses-
    Committee as to the adequacy of their preparation by           sions 4 hrs.) Course begins in the fourth week of the semester.
    passing the Physics Department screening examination.          104. Survey of General Physics (4) F,S
    This will be done in the first semester in which they are      Prerequisites: Three years of high school mathematics including
    registered for courses acceptable for credit toward the        algebra, geometry, and intermediate algebra (or MATH 010) or
                                                                   the equivalent; a knowledge of basic trigonometry is strongly rec-
    M.S., except in individual cases to be determined by the       ommended. Designed to acquaint the student with the more im-
    Graduate Committee.                                            portant aspects of elementary physics. Emphasis on
    b. A student must have a B average or better in six units      physiological physics, color and sound. Recommended for art,
                                                                   music and physical education majors. (Lecture 3 hrs., laboratory
    of physics applicable toward the master’s degree, of
                                                                   3 hrs.). A course fee may be required.
    which at least three units are at the graduate level.
                                                                   151. Mechanics and Heat (4) F,S
2. Recognizing that effective organization and verbal              Prerequisite: MATH 122. Kinematics, Newton’s Laws, rotational
    communication of physics are a necessary part of a             motion, fluid statics, laws of thermodynamics. (Lecture 3 hrs.,
    successful graduate program, the Department of Physics         laboratory-recitation 3 hrs.) A course fee may be required.
    and Astronomy normally requires that a graduate student        152. Electricity and Magnetism (4) F,S
    serve at least one semester as a teaching associate or a       Prerequisites: PHYS 151, MATH 123. Mechanical waves, Cou-
    graduate assistant as part of the M.S. program. Excep-         lomb’s law, electrostatics, electric circuits, introductory electron-
                                                                   ics, magnetic fields, induction and Maxwell’s equations. (Lecture
    tions may be granted by the graduate advisor.                  3 hrs., laboratory 3 hrs.) A course fee may be required.
Additional Requirements                                            154. Modern Physics and Light (3) F,S
                                                                   Prerequisites: PHYS 152, MATH 224. Relativity, photoelectric ef-
   Thirty units of upper division and graduate courses as
                                                                   fect; quantum theory, Bohr model of the atom, wave mechanics,
described below.                                                   geometrical optics, interference, diffraction and polarization. Not
1. PHYS 540A, 550A, 560A, 569, and 695.                            open to students with credit in PHYS 153. (Lecture 3 hrs.)
2. Two of the following courses or combinations of courses:        155. Laboratory on Light and Modern Physics (1) F,S
    PHYS 502/503, 575/576, 580, and 586.                           Prerequisite: PHYS 154 which may be taken concurrently. Experi-
                                                                   mental work in geometrical and physical optics and atomic and
3. Completion of a written thesis, 6 units of Physics 698, and     nuclear physics. Not open to students with credit in PHYS 153.
    an oral presentation of the thesis research. The members       PHYS 154 and 155 together are equivalent to PHYS 153. (Labora-
    of the candidate’s thesis committee must approve the           tory 3 hrs.) A course fee may be required.
    thesis before the student may schedule the oral presenta-
    tion.                                                          Upper Division
   Note: Students must be advanced to candidacy before             310. Mechanics I (3) F
   enrolling in Physics 698. As early as possible, a graduate      Prerequisites: PHYS 151, MATH 370A or 364A (may be taken
   student should choose a thesis advisor who will help in         concurrently). Kinematics and dynamics of mass points and sys-
                                                                   tems of particles. Conservation laws. Harmonic motion. Central
   selecting the student’s thesis committee consisting of at
                                                                   force problem. Noninertial frames of reference. Lagrangian and
   least three members (including the thesis advisor and at        Hamiltonian formulation of the laws of mechanics. (Lecture 3
   least one other member of the department).                      hrs.)
4. Courses selected in consultation with the Department            311. Mechanics II (3) S, Even Years
    Graduate Advisor and/or thesis advisor to complete the         Prerequisite: PHYS 310. Dynamics of rigid body, constraints, iner-
    remaining 2 to 4 units.                                        tia tensor, gyroscopic motion, deformable media: waves on
                                                                   strings and in fluids, variational methods and non-linear mechan-
                                                                   ics. (Lecture 3 hrs.)
                                                                   330. Experimental Optics and Spectroscopy (3) S
                                                                   Prerequisite: PHYS 154, 155. Interference, diffraction, polariza-
                                                                   tion and elementary spectroscopy. (Lecture 2 hrs, laboratory 3
                                                                   hrs.) A course fee may be required.



500 • Physics and Astronomy                  • 1997/98 CSULB Catalog
340A. Electricity and Magnetism I (3) S                                   434./534. Astrophysics (3) F, Even Years
Prerequisites: PHYS 152 and 310, MATH 370A or 364A. Vector                Prerequisite: Senior standing in physics or consent of instructor.
calculus, electrostatics, and magnetostatics. Formulation of Max-         (Undergraduates register in PHYS 434; graduates register in
well’s equations in vector analytic form. (Lecture-discussion 3 hrs.)     PHYS 534.) Review of observational data of astronomy, elementa-
340B. Electricity and Magnetism II (3) F                                  ry theory of stellar structure, model stellar calculation and simple
                                                                          stellar systems. (Lecture 3 hrs.)
Prerequisite: PHYS 340A. Special relativity. Applications of Max-
well’s equations: Plane electromagnetic waves, guided waves,              444./544. Plasma Physics (3) S, Odd Years
radiation, interaction of electromagnetic waves and matter.               Prerequisites: PHYS 340A. (Undergraduates register in PHYS
(Lecture-discussion 3 hrs.)                                               444; graduates register in PHYS 544.) Characteristic behavior of
350. Modern Physics (3) S                                                 high temperature plasma. Particle trajectories, two-fluid and hy-
                                                                          dromagnetic models, waves, instabilities and transport process-
Prerequisites: PHYS 310, MATH 370A or 364A. Physical phenom-
                                                                          es. Applications to astrophysical, geophysical and laboratory
ena and models leading to the development of quantum mechan-
                                                                          plasmas. (Lecture 3 hrs.)
ics. Schroedinger equation, one-dimensional quantum mechanical
problems, uncertainty principle, one-electron atoms, elementary           450. Quantum Physics I (3) F
applications of quantum mechanics. (Lecture-discussion 3 hrs.)            Prerequisites: PHYS 310, 340A, 350. Schroedinger equation,
360. Computers in Physics (3) F                                           atomic physics, harmonic oscillator, scattering, perturbation theo-
                                                                          ry, Heisenberg and Dirac representations, spin, symmetries (an-
Prerequisites: PHYS 152, MATH 370A or 364A (may be taken con-
                                                                          gular momentum, time reversal, and parity), applications.
currently). Introduction to the use of computers in physics. The PC
                                                                          (Lecture-discussion 3 hrs.)
and DOS, fundamentals of programming, introduction to numerical
analysis and computer graphics. Use of selected types of com-             *451. Quantum Physics II (3) S
mercially available programs such as spreadsheets and symbolic            Prerequisite: PHYS 450. Measurement processes, atomic phys-
analysis programs. (Lecture-discussion 3 hrs.)                            ics, identical particles, quantum statistics, numerical methods,
370. Statistical Thermodynamics (3) S                                     many-body systems, density matrix, applications.
                                                                          (Lecture-discussion 3 hrs.)
Prerequisites: CHEM 111B, PHYS154, MATH 224, and one
upper-division chemistry or physics course. Principles of statisti-       454./555. Elementary Particle Physics (3) S, Even Years
cal mechanics and thermodynamics with applications to chemical            Prerequisite: PHYS 450. (Undergraduates register in PHYS 454;
equilibrium and kinetics, spectroscopy, solid state phenomena,            graduates register in PHYS 555.) Particle detectors and accelera-
and problems of biological interest. (Same course as CHEM 370.)           tors; ionization and radiation energy loss; invariance principles,
(Lecture 3 hrs.)                                                          conservation laws, particle properties, elementary scattering the-
380. Fundamentals of Electronics (4) F                                    ory; weak, electromagnetic and strong interactions; particle mod-
                                                                          els. (Lecture-discussion 3 hrs.)
Prerequisite: PHYS 152. Network analysis and complex imped-
ance, transistor circuits, operational amplifiers, active filters and     470./569. Introduction to Solid State Physics (3) S
oscillators, digital electronics, analog-digital interfacing, micropro-   Prerequisite: PHYS 450. (Undergraduates register in PHYS 470;
cessors. (Lecture 3 hrs., laboratory 3 hrs.) A course fee may be          graduates register in PHYS 569.) Study of the properties of solids
required.                                                                 from a quantum theoretical viewpoint. Topics include lattice vibra-
400I. History of Western Scientific Thought (3) F,S                       tions, elastic constants, and thermal, electric and magnetic prop-
                                                                          erties. (Lecture 3 hrs.)
Prerequisites: ENGL 100 and upper division status. An interdisci-
plinary introduction to the history of science for both scientists and    475./575. Modern Optics (3) F
non-scientists. Evolution of the scientists’ views of the means and       Prerequisite: PHYS 340A. (Undergraduates register in PHYS 475;
ends of their own activities; the ways in which science is affected       graduates register in PHYS 575.) Propagation of electromagnetic
by and affects contemporary cultures. Same as HIST 400I. (Lec-            waves, optical resonators, laser spectroscopy and operation,
ture 3 hrs.)                                                              optical phase conjugation, nonlinear optics and selected applica-
402./502. Fourier Methods in Physics (3) F                                tion. (Lecture 3 hrs.)
Prerequisites: PHYS 310, MATH 370B or 461. (Undergraduates                476./576. Modern Optics Laboratory (1) F
register in PHYS 402; graduates register in PHYS 502.) Fourier            Prerequisites: PHYS 475/575 which may be taken concurrently.
transforms in time and space, convolution, generalized functions,         (Undergraduates register in PHYS 476; graduates register in
impulse response and transfer function. Application of Fourier            PHYS 576.) Selected experiments illustrating principles and tech-
techniques to problems in classical acoustics and optics: oscilla-        niques of current interest in electro-optics and laser physics. Ap-
tors, directional radiators, holography and imaging in general.           plications include optical methods in communications, atomic
(Lecture 3 hrs.)                                                          spectroscopy, and nonlinear optics. Traditional grading only.
403./503. Fourier Physics Laboratory (1) F                                (Laboratory 3 hrs.) A course fee may be required.
Prerequisite: PHYS 402 which may be taken concurrently. (Under-           480./580. Computer Interfacing in Experimental Physic (3) S
graduates register in PHYS 403; graduates register in PHYS 503.)          Prerequisite: PHYS 380 or consent of instructor. (Undergradu-
Selected experiments in acoustics and optics illustrating Fourier         ates register in PHYS 480; graduates register in PHYS 580.) In-
techniques in wave physics. Detailed study of the discrete Fourier        troduction to modern data acquisition and analysis methods
transform and its application to experimental measurements and            using computer-based equipment and high level software. Se-
calculations. (Laboratory 3 hrs.) A course fee may be required.           lected physics experiments are performed with standard person-
410./515. Relativity (3) F, Odd Years                                     al computers, research-quality data acquisition hardware, and
                                                                          programmable instruments. The use of the computer as a tool in
Prerequisites: PHYS 340A and either MATH 370B or 461; or per-
                                                                          the execution and interpretation of physics experiments is em-
mission of the instructor. (Undergraduates register in PHYS 410;
                                                                          phasized. (Lecture 2 hrs., laboratory 3 hrs.) A course fee may
graduates register in PHYS 515.) The Lorentz transformations,
                                                                          be required.
4-vectors, tensors, special relativistic kinematics, differential ge-
ometry, general relativity, applications. (Lecture-discussion 3 hrs.)     486./586. Experimental Physics — Radiation (3) S, Odd
422./522. Thermal Physics (3) F                                           Years
Prerequisites: PHYS 310, 350. (Undergraduates register in PHYS            Prerequisites: Consent of instructor. (Undergraduates register in
422; graduates register in PHYS 522.) Entropy and temperature,            PHYS 486; graduates register in PHYS 586.) Interaction of gam-
Boltzmann distribution and Helmholtz free energy, thermal radia-          ma rays with matter. X-ray techniques. Charged Particle range
tion, chemical potential, Gibbs distribution, ideal gas, Fermi and        and energy loss. Radiation detectors. Neutron production and
Bose gases, heat and work, Gibbs free energy and chemical reac-           detection. (Lecture 2 hrs., laboratory- demonstration and/or spe-
tions, phase transformations and kinetic theory.                          cial project 3 hrs.) A course fee may be required.
(Lecture-discussion 3 hrs.)



                                                        1997/98 CSULB Catalog •                  Physics and Astronomy • 501
490./590. Special Topics in Physics (3) F,S
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. (Undergraduates register in          Physical Science Courses (PHSC)
PHYS 490; graduates register in PHYS 590.) Topics of interest in
physics selected from such areas as atomic and nuclear physics,
                                                                          Lower Division
astrophysics, physics of materials, low temperature physics,              112. Introduction to the Physical Sciences (3) F,S
acoustics and theoretical physics. Both undergraduate and grad-           Prerequisites: Three years of high school mathematics including
uate students may take the course for a maximum of 6 units of             algebra, geometry, and intermediate algebra (or MATH 010) or
credit. (Lecture 3 hrs.) A course fee may be required.                    the equivalent. Selected processes which illustrate some of the
496. Special Problems in Physics (1-3) F,S                                basic principles used by scientists to interpret modern ideas of
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor and senior standing. Prob-           matter and energy in the physical universe. Students with a full
lems in physics. Problems selected by instructor for considered           year course in high school physics or chemistry should elect
and mature analysis. A written and 10-minute oral report are re-          some other lower division course in chemistry, geology or phys-
quired. May be repeated for credit to a max of 4 units. A course          ics. Not open for credit to majors in any of the physical sciences.
fee may be required.                                                      (Lecture 2 hrs., laboratory 3 hrs.) A course fee may be required.

                                                                          Upper Division
Astronomy Courses (ASTR)
                                                                          331. Light, Lasers and the Visual Image (3) F
Lower Division                                                            Nonmathematical course that describes light, its behavior and
                                                                          applications. Emphasis on image formation, optical instruments,
100. Astronomy (3) F,S                                                    science of color, lasers, holography and analysis of light for ele-
Prerequisites: Three years of high school mathematics including           ments, planets and stars. Colorful demonstrations using lasers
algebra, geometry, and intermediate algebra (or MATH 010) or              and holograms including kinetic art. Recommended for art and
the equivalent. Introductory course in astronomy. The earth moon          other non-science majors. (Lecture-demonstration 3 hrs.)
system and the planets, the stars and their constitution. Survey of
the methods of astronomical observation. (Lecture 3 hrs.)
100L. Introductory Astronomy Laboratory (1) F
Prerequisites: Three years of high school mathematics including           Physics (PHYS)
algebra, geometry, and intermediate algebra (or MATH 010) or
the equivalent; and ASTR 100 which may be taken concurrently.             Graduate Division
Astronomical coordinates, star maps, magnitude, spectral classi-
fication, ages of stars, distance to star clusters. Traditional grad-     500. Research Methods (1) F,S
ing only. Not open to students with credit in ASTR 101.                   Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Directed study of the literature
(Laboratory 3 hrs.) A course fee may be required.                         about research methods in physics. May be repeated once but
                                                                          only one unit may be applied to the requirements for the Master
101. Astronomy II (3) F,S                                                 of Science in Physics.
Prerequisite: ASTR 100. Deep sky objects will be discussed in
lecture and studied by direct observation from images available           502./402. Fourier Methods in Physics (3) F
on the Internet. Students will learn to use image processing soft-        Prerequisites: PHYS 310, MATH 370B or 461. (Undergraduates
ware. Through computer simulations and direct observation, stu-           register in PHYS 402; graduates register in PHYS 502.) Fourier
dents will become familiar with major stars and constellations and        transforms in time and space, convolution, generalized functions,
will learn to use celestial coordinates to locate objects of interest.    impulse response and transfer function. Application of Fourier
The course will normally include one or more weekend or evening           techniques to problems in classical acoustics and optics: oscilla-
field trips to local dark-sky observing sites. (Lecture 2 hrs., labo-     tors, directional radiators, holography and imaging in general.
ratory 3 hrs.) A course fee may be required.                              (Lecture 3 hrs.)
200. Introduction to Astronomy and Astrophysics (3) F,S                   503./403. Fourier Physics Laboratory (1) F
Prerequisite: MATH 101 (may be taken concurrently). Newton’s              Prerequisite: PHYS 502 which may be taken concurrently. (Under-
Laws and gravitation, the earth and the solar system, atomic radi-        graduates register in PHYS 403; graduates register in PHYS 503.)
ation, spectra of stars, stellar population, stellar clusters, the gal-   Selected experiments in acoustics and optics illustrating Fourier
axy and cosmology. (Lecture-discussion 3 hrs.)                            techniques in wave physics. Detailed study of the discrete Fouri-
                                                                          er transform and its application to experimental measurements
                                                                          and calculations. (Laboratory 3 hrs.) A course fee may be re-
Upper Division                                                            quired.
370I. Extraterrestrial Environments (3) F,S                               510. Graduate Mechanics (4) F
Prerequisites: A course in the life or physical sciences with lab;        Prerequisite: PHYS 310. Variational principles, Lagrange’s equa-
two years of high school algebra, ENGL 100 and upper division             tions, Hamilton’s equations, canonical transformations,
status. Analysis of our own solar system and nearby stars with a          Hamilton-Jacobi theory, relativistic mechanics and small oscilla-
focus on the capacity of various environments to sustain human            tion theory. (Lecture 4 hrs.)
habitation. Review of processes of planetary, biological and stel-        515./410. Relativity (3) F, Odd Years
lar evolution and extrapolation to estimate the prevalence of life        Prerequisites: PHYS 340A and either MATH 370B or 461; or per-
elsewhere in the universe. Critical analysis of available data on         mission of the instructor. (Undergraduates register in PHYS 410;
probable distances, masses and ages of nearest stars to deter-            graduates register in PHYS 515.) The Lorentz transformations,
mine spatial distribution of those most likely to have Earth-like         4-vectors, tensors, special relativistic kinematics, differential ge-
planets. (Lecture 3 hrs.)                                                 ometry, general relativity, applications. (Lecture-discussion 3
                                                                          hrs.)
                                                                          522./422. Thermal Physics (3) F
                                                                          Prerequisites: PHYS 310, 350. (Undergraduates register in PHYS
                                                                          422; graduates register in PHYS 522.) Entropy and temperature,
                                                                          Boltzmann distribution and Helmholtz free energy, thermal radia-
                                                                          tion, chemical potential, Gibbs distribution, ideal gas, Fermi and
                                                                          Bose gases, heat and work, Gibbs free energy and chemical re-
                                                                          actions, phase transformations and kinetic theory.
                                                                          (Lecture-discussion 3 hrs.)




502 • Physics and Astronomy                       • 1997/98 CSULB Catalog
534./434. Astrophysics (3) F, Even Years                                 cal phase conjugation, nonlinear optics and selected applica-
Prerequisite: Graduate standing in physics or consent of instructor.     tions. (Lecture 3 hrs.)
(Undergraduates register in PHYS 434; graduates register in PHYS         576./476. Modern Optics Laboratory (1) F
534.) Review of observational data of astronomy, elementary theo-        Prerequisite: PHYS 475/575 which may be taken concurrently.
ry of stellar structure, model stellar calculation and simple stellar    (Undergraduates register in PHYS 476; graduates register in
systems. (Lecture 3 hrs.)                                                PHYS 576.) Selected experiments illustrating principles and tech-
540A. Graduate Electricity and Magnetism and                             niques of current interest in electro-optics and laser physics. Ap-
Electrodynamics I (3) S                                                  plications include optical methods in communications, atomic
Prerequisite: PHYS 340B. Boundary-value problems, applications           spectroscopy, and nonlinear optics. Traditional grading only.
of special functions to electro/magnetostatics, Green’s function         (Laboratory 3 hrs.) A course fee may be required.
techniques, multipole expansion of the electrostatic field, dielectric   580./480. Computer Interfacing in Experimental Physics (3)
media, Maxwell’s equations, electromagnetic waves. (Lecture 3            S
hrs.)                                                                    Prerequisite: PHYS 380 or consent of instructor. (Undergradu-
540B. Graduate Electricity and Magnetism and                             ates enroll in PHYS 480; graduates enroll in PHYS 580.) Introduc-
Electrodynamics II (3) F                                                 tion to modern data acquisition and analysis methods using
Prerequisites: PHYS 540A. Covariant formalism, simple radiating          computer-based equipment and high level software. Selected
systems, radiation by moving charges, and selected topics in             physics experiments are performed with standard personal com-
electrodynamics chosen from the following: wave guides, magne-           puters, research-quality data acquisition hardware, and program-
tohydrodynamics, thermodynamics and electrodynamics of contin-           mable instruments. The use of the computer as a tool in aiding
uous media, and radiation reaction. (Lecture 3 hrs.)                     the execution and interpretation of physics experiments is em-
                                                                         phasized. (Lecture 2 hrs., laboratory 3 hrs.) A course fee may
544./444. Plasma Physics (3) S, Odd Years                                be required.
Prerequisites: PHYS 340A. (Undergraduates register in PHYS 444;
graduates register in PHYS 544.) Characteristic behavior of high         586./486. Experimental Physics-Radiation (3) S, Odd Years
temperature plasma. Particle trajectories, two-fluid and hydromag-       Prerequisites: Consent of instructor. (Undergraduates register in
netic models, waves, instabilities and transport processes. Appli-       PHYS 486; graduates register in PHYS 586.) Interaction of gam-
cations to astrophysical, geophysical and laboratory plasmas.            ma rays with matter. X-ray techniques. Charged Particle range
(Lecture 3 hrs.)                                                         and energy loss. Radiation detectors. Neutron production and
                                                                         detection. (Lecture 2 hrs., laboratory- demonstration and/or spe-
550A. Quantum Mechanics I (3) F                                          cial project 3 hrs.) A course fee may be required.
Prerequisite: PHYS 450. Mathematical and postulational basis of
quantum mechanics, one-dimensional problems, two-level sys-              590./490. Special Topics in Physics (3) F,S
tems, angular momentum, central potentials, time independent             Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. (Undergraduates register in
and time dependent perturbation theory. (Lecture 3 hrs.)                 PHYS 490; graduates register in PHYS 590.) Topics of interest in
                                                                         physics selected for intensive development. Topics to be select-
550B. Quantum Mechanics II (3) S                                         ed from such areas as atomic and nuclear physics, astrophysics,
Prerequisite: PHYS 550A. Scattering, rotation group and irreduc-         physics of materials, applied optics and laser spectroscopy, low
ible tensor operations, identical particles, semi-classical radiation    temperature physics, acoustics and theoretical physics. Both
theory, atoms, path integral formalism, and other selected topics.       undergraduate and graduate students may take the course for a
(Lecture 3 hrs.)                                                         maximum of 6 units of credit. (Lecture 3 hrs.) A course fee may
554. Nuclear Physics (3) F                                               be required.
Prerequisite: PHYS 550A. Deuteron problem, nucleon-nucleon po-           599. Quantum Field Theory (3) F
tential, shell model, nuclear models, nuclear reactions, elementary      Prerequisites: PHYS 550B or permission of instructor. Selected
particles, weak interactions, strong interactions. (Lecture 3 hrs.)      topics to be chosen from: Many-particle systems and field theo-
555./454. Elementary Particle Physics (3) S, Even Years                  ry; interactions, bound states, and the S-matrix; gauge theories
Prerequisite: PHYS 450. (Undergraduates register in PHYS 454;            and Q.E.D.; path-integral picture. Selected applications from
graduates register in PHYS 555.) Particle detectors and accelera-        condensed matter physics, electro-weak interactions, Q.C.D.,
tors; ionization and radiation energy loss; invariance principles,       lattice gauge theory, conformal field theory, string theory. (Lec-
conservation laws, particle properties, elementary scattering theo-      ture 3 hrs.)
ry; weak, electromagnetic and strong interactions; particle models.      691. Directed Study (1) F,S,SS
(Lecture-discussion 3 hrs.)                                              Intensive study of advanced topics in physics. May be repeated
560A,B. Methods of Mathematical Physics (4,3) F,S                        once for credit.
Prerequisites: MATH 370A,B or equivalent. Linear vector spaces,          694. Seminar in Special Topics (1) F,S
eigen-value problem, functions of a complex variable, special            Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Study of research papers and
functions, properties and methods of solving partial differential        research methods in selected topics. If demand for more than
equations of physics, integral equations, tensor analysis and            one subject exists, multiple sections may be given in any one
group theory. (Lecture 4,3 hrs.)                                         semester. May be repeated; only one unit of credit may be ap-
569./470. Introduction to Solid State Physics (3) S                      plied toward requirements for the master’s degree. (Seminar 1 hr.)
Prerequisite: PHYS 450. (Undergraduates register in PHYS 470;            695. Colloquium (1) F,S
graduates register in PHYS 569.) Study of the properties of solids       Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Weekly meetings for presenta-
from a quantum theoretical viewpoint. Topics include lattice vibra-      tion and discussion of current research in physics even though
tions, elastic constants, and thermal, electric and magnetic prop-       only 1 unit is for the MS degree. All graduate students are ex-
erties. (Lecture 3 hrs.)                                                 pected to attend each semester they are enrolled in the Universi-
570. Solid State Physics (3) F                                           ty. Credit/No Credit grading only. (Seminar 1 hr.)
Prerequisite: PHYS 450. The modern theory of solids from the             697. Directed Research (1-3) F,S,SS
standpoint of quantum mechanics. Binding in solids, energy               Theoretical and experimental problems in physics requiring inten-
bands, electrical thermal and magnetic properties, imperfections,        sive analysis. A course fee may be required.
and semiconductors. (Lecture 3 hrs.)
                                                                         698. Thesis (1-6) F,S,SS
575./475. Modern Optics (3) F                                            Planning, preparation, and completion of an acceptable thesis in
Prerequisite: PHYS 340A. (Undergraduates register in PHYS 475;           partial fulfillment of the requirements for the master’s degree. A
graduates register in PHYS 575.) Propagation of electromagnetic          half-hour seminar presenting and defending the results of the
waves, optical resonators, laser spectroscopy and operation, opti-       thesis is required. Credit to be obtained only upon formal accep-
                                                                         tance of thesis. A course fee may be required.



                                                       1997/98 CSULB Catalog •                  Physics and Astronomy • 503

				
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