Your Federal Quarterly Tax Payments are due April 15th Get Help Now >>

Information Technology by J4nqtLd

VIEWS: 29 PAGES: 28

									    Information Technology

     Practical Assessment Task
                                    Grade 10
                                    1/1/2012




Inspired by Prof Donald Cook and the NTT
Grade 10 PAT 2012                                                                     Learner Guide




                                  WHAT IS THE PAT?
The PAT is a software development project in which you will have an opportunity to
demonstrate your programming skills. You will also be required to demonstrate your ability
to use software design tools and techniques which you have studied during the year to
produce quality outputs in the form of:

       A description of the scenario (See Annexure A)

       A report where you discuss the research done regarding the project (See Annexure B)

       User stories (See Annexure C)

       Acceptance tests (See Annexure C)

       Detailed descriptions of scenes and list of features (See Annexure D)

       A Scratch program, fully documented

       Project notes

The PAT will be done in three phases (parts) at a time to be arranged by your teacher.

Each PAT must be accompanied by a declaration of authenticity (See Annexure G).

Since the PAT counts 25% of your final mark for IT, it is vitally important that you strive to
produce work of a high standard.


                                              Topic
Develop and write a Scratch program (with suitable sub scripts) for an adventure game. The
game should follow a story/clue ‘thread’ that could be a single puzzle or lead to another
puzzle. It should include obstacles or hazards as well as artefacts and clues.

Puzzles or clues should be based on basic Language and Mathematics skills, such as
calculations, word mazes, riddles, simple equations, compass reading, telling the time or
reading a map's scale.

The adventure game should not be predictable, i.e. when the user plays it for a second time, it should
provide different clues, values or need different calculations, etc. e.g. by randomising numbers.

See Annexure F for an example.




                                                                                            Page | 1
Grade 10 PAT 2012                                                                      Learner Guide


                                           Overview

                                              PHASE 1

The purpose of phase 1 is to

       Briefly describe your project in general terms.
       Do some research to gather facts about the nature of the program you are producing.
       Type up a report, based on your research.
       Write the user story and acceptance tests.
Note:
The user is the target audience, user of the program, player of the game (or you in the case of a
simulation), etc.
The user story is told by the user and formulates in a sentence or two, using everyday language, what
he/she wants to be able to do with the program.
An acceptance test provides the criteria against which the outcome of the story can be tested.


                                              PHASE 2

The purpose of phase 2 is to:

     Clarify the user story and provide additional notes to help to concisely explain what the user
      wants.
     Provide detailed descriptions of the scenes, sprites and backgrounds and the flow of the
      program as well as the processing that will take place.
     Design the GUI(s).


                                              PHASE 3

The purpose of phase 3 is to:

     Write the scripts (code) to implement the planning and design done in phase 1 and phase 2
      and to complete the program.
     Clarify sections of the code by adding comments.
     Write the project notes for the program.
     Demonstrate your program and answer questions about the program and the code during a
      debriefing session.


                                     GLOSSARY OF TERMS

A description of terms is provided in Annexure E.


                                                                                             Page | 2
Grade 10 PAT 2012                                                                      Learner Guide

                                           ASSESSMENT

The PAT will be assessed as follows:

                                       Phase             Mark            %
                        Phase 1                         35             ±20
                        Phase 2                         44             ±25
                        Phase 3 –      Programming      52             ±30
                                       Complexity Level 42             ±25
                        Total:                          173            100

For the assessment criteria, see Annexure H.

                                               NOTES

As always, programming assignments and projects should be done on your own. You may ask other
learners in the class questions, but you may not share code with anyone in the class. You may not
copy existing projects that you find elsewhere, including the Scratch website, and present it as your
own. You may look at the behaviour of existing Scratch projects for inspiration, but you should
develop all of your code as a completely new project and not modify, re-mix, or build from anyone
else's project.

Your teacher is very happy to give you suggestions on how to implement your ideas and will try to
guide you to a reasonable implementation. If you have bugs in your code (i.e. it isn't behaving like you
expect), he/she is happy to take a look and see if he/she can see the problem. But, again, don't wait
until the last minute to do your project if you are hoping for any advice!

Ask peers to give feedback on your project during development. This could include feedback on the
code and structure, appearance of the project or the game play. Let your peer tell you what he/she
likes and doesn't like about the project, what they find confusing, and any bugs or problems they
discover.

When a peer requests you to comment on his/her project, please be polite and constructive, and give
feedback that is specific to this particular project.




You should have completed and submitted this project before you start your end
of year examinations.
Not submitting your PAT will mean that your marks will be incomplete and will
affect your results and promotion to the next grade.




                                                                                              Page | 3
Grade 10 PAT 2012                                                                        Learner Guide

                                         Requirements
The project should have at least an opening scene, closing scene and three other scenes (five in
total).
The game should have at least three tasks. For each task the player/hunter should receive:

     A clue (such as word mazes and simple equations, compass reading, telling the time, learning
      to read a map's scale, calculations/manipulations to be done, etc.).
     Artefacts (such as maps, compass, pick, hammer, etc.), you can come back and swop artefacts,
      but you will loose points

These could help the player/hunter to move to a specific area on the stage and/or lead to number(s),
words, phrases, riddles, etc. which the player/hunter will use as further clues or to decipher another
clue that could help him/her to proceed to the next task or gain some points.

You need to

     Design a scenario/story/clue ‘thread’ that could be a single puzzle or lead to another puzzle.
      Eventually the thread will lead the player/hunter to the treasure/victory/achieve a goal.
     The adventure game should require the player/hunter to:
              o   Use clues and/or artefacts
              o   Do some calculations/manipulations or solve problems to find more clues or answers
                  to be able to move to the next task or level.
     The adventure game should enable the player/hunter to:
              o   See his/her score during the play/hunt (The game must track the number of points
                  the user has achieved in the adventure game. The number of points should be
                  tracked with a variable and displayed to the user).
              o   Gain points, e.g. for correct answers, performing certain actions, solving a problem in
                  a specific time frame, etc.
              o   Lose points, e.g. when provinding a wrong answer, asking for and receiving help/tips,
                  performing incorrect actions, swopping artefacts, etc.
Further requirements:

     The adventure game should not be predictable, i.e. when the user plays it for a second time, it
      should provide different clues, values or need different calculations, etc. e.g. by randomising
      numbers.
     The adventure game must have instructions for the user. The instructions can be simple and
      always showing on the stage or more complex and require the user to click on a box or type a
      letter to see the instructions. The instructions should be complete enough that someone can
      understand how to play your game without you telling them how or without them having to
      examine the code.
     At the end of the game, you must give a different message to the user depending upon how
      many points they obtained or whether they have found the treasure or achieved a certain


                                                                                                Page | 4
Grade 10 PAT 2012                                                                       Learner Guide

     level. For example, you could classify the user as (Beginner, Intermediate, or Advanced)
     depending on if the acquired 0-5, 6-10, or 11 or more points or for completing the game in a
     specific time. Of course, your categories will be different (and hopefully more interesting!)
    Code must be documented so that others can understand how it works. You will find
     documenting your own code useful. It is very easy to forget how code operates, even when
     you are the one who originally designed it! Because documentation is so important, your
     project grade will be partially based on the quality of your documentation.

     Documenting the behaviour of your code has three components:

     Use good naming conventions
     All of your sprites (and their costumes) should have descriptive names. The name of a sprite
     can be changed in the text box above the tabs for scripts, costumes, and sounds.

     All of your variables should have descriptive names. Variables which are accessed across
     multiple different scripts or sprites should be named with the convention "First Letters
     Capitalized". Local variables which are not used outside of one script should be in all
     "lowercase".

     All of you messages (for broadcasts and receives) should have descriptive names as well. For a
     message X, to help show which sprite sends it and which receives it, it can be useful to name
     the message "Sender : X : Receiver" (where Sender and Receiver are the names of those
     sprites, respectively). As a shortcut, if a message is both sent and received within a single
     sprite, you can omit "Sender" and "Receiver". If a message is sent by multiple sprites (or
     received by multiple sprites), you don't have to list all sprites; instead you can just say "Many".
     For example, if sprite1 sends the message "Game Over" to multiple sprites, you should name
     that message "Sprite1: Game Over: Many".

     Write Comments
     Each script that changes the value of variables that are accessed in other scripts should
     describe its usage. The comment should be connected to the script. The comment should
     describe every input variable and the assumptions that are made about those variables. The
     Comment should describe every output variable and how they will be set and what different
     values mean. (You don't need to make a comment for scripts that don't access global variables,
     unless you want to!)

     Write project Notes
     Every Scratch project has project notes associated with it. These notes should describe how
     one can use this project (i.e., the basic rules for playing the game and how to interact with the
     program). The notes should also describe any known bugs or problems. Project notes can be
     written from the "File" pull-down menu.




                                                                                               Page | 5
Grade 10 PAT 2012                                                                       Learner Guide


                               Instructions for Phase 1
You are expected to research other games so you have a good idea about how you expect things to
unfold and give a broad description of your game.

Use the template in Annexure A, report guidelines in Annexure B and the template in Annexure C.

Plan by writing user stories and acceptance tests for each scene you intend to use.

You should consult with your classmates and your teacher to ensure that your PAT is of a high
standard.

                                          DEFINE THE TASK

Write a brief description (±150 words) in your own words to describe the intention of the
task/project (PAT). It should describe what you will do so that the program satisfies the parameters of
the PAT specification.

The purpose is to get clarity on what is expected from the specification. It represents step 1
in problem solving “Understand the problem”.

The first step is to write an overall description of what the game is like and explain what must be
done.

Write as though you were creating the cover of the game box that you will use to package the game
in. You should therefore think about what is attractive in the game and why people would want to
buy it.

The description must be in "broad strokes" that give the overall picture but not the details.

                                            DO RESEARCH

Now you have to fill in some of the detail for yourself.

The research stage is where you gather facts about the nature of the game you are producing. There
are many game types or genre. As an example, the computer game Half-Life belongs to the 'first-
person shooter' genre.

Your research should help you clarify the nature of the genre you are going to use, provide some
useful examples that can guide you and should provide a clear understanding of why the particular
genre is popular.

The outcome of the research is a report (±400 - 600 words). The report should be written in clear
unambiguous language. The format should be as follows: (See Annexure B for the anatomy)
     Introduction
     Body (discussion)
     Conclusion

                                                                                                Page | 6
Grade 10 PAT 2012                                                                        Learner Guide

                                    WRITE THE USER STORIES

The idea is to give a blow by blow account of what is happening in each scene.

Use the template provided (Annexure A) to help you remember all of the details you need to capture.

User stories refer to the underlying real world problem that the program/system must solve and tell
the designer/programmer what the user wants.

The aim is to specify requirements, feature by feature (function by function) and to figure out the
things that the program/system needs to do/provide.

It defines (in a single short paragraph for each feature) what functionality must be built into the
system. It specifies WHAT is needed (not HOW).

In these "stories" you need to write like a newspaper reporter.

The user story should take the form of:
      As a … (Who: role or actor)
      I want … (what: capability or feature do they require)
      so that … (why: is it of value or benefit).

For example:
      As a player I want the game to start when I press a [play] button so that there is no confusion
      as to what I must do.
You will notice this example speaks to both functionality and usability.

                                    WRITE ACCEPTANCE TESTS

Use the user stories to write acceptance tests.

You need to write test cases (confirmations) that are created from the user stories and represent
some expected result from the system. Ultimately you need to test the outcome or goal of the story
against these cases.

The aim of the acceptance tests is to:

     Verify that the goal of the user story is achieved, so the programmer will know when, what
      the user wanted is achieved.
     Tell the user how the goal/functionality is going to be confirmed, so the user will know when
      the task/unit is complete and can be marked as complete
     Tell the programmer/designer how he/she will know that a user story is correctly implemented,
      to ensure the software is designed to pass the user’s criteria;
     Ensure every program runs although with only the implemented functions.
     Help to identify scenarios that users, analysts and/or designers may not have thought
      of (identifies incomplete user stories or spikes)

                                                                                                Page | 7
Grade 10 PAT 2012                                                                        Learner Guide

The idea is to create a short statement about a test that can be conducted to show that the program
works in accordance with the requirement of the user story. You will see that this process drives (in
reverse) the quality of the user story.

It helps to ensure that requirements are broken into small, manageable pieces of functionality, i.e.
individual features that can be implemented as a single task.

If the story is too complex and does not focus on one idea, then the acceptance test is too difficult to
write. So if you have these difficulties, revisit the user story and fix it (sometimes you need to replace
one (1) story with two (2) less complicated ones).

                                               HAND IN

Use the template in Annexure A and hand in:

     The description of the scenario (±150 words)
     User stories and acceptance tests for each scene
     The report (±400 - 600 words)




                                                                                                Page | 8
Grade 10 PAT 2012                                                                          Learner Guide



                                Instructions for Phase 2
This is where you plan the detail by writing scene by scene descriptions. It should provide clarity on
what the user wants and what the program should do and provide.

This is achieved by participative design (conversations between user and designer/programmer) and
captured as additional notes that provide. Use the templates in Annexure D.

                                        DESCRIBE EACH SCENE

The aim is to finalise the user stories to provide the developer with a priority list of features to
implement and to scope the project.

The idea is to provide substance to the user story, in particular the GUI. Start by drawing a plan of the
terrain where the game will unfold.

     Provide a detailed description for each scene in terms of
            o    a rough diagram/sketch
            o    navigation, actions and interactions
            o    what the user will see, hear and do
            o    input-processing-output
            o    messages that it will broadcast or receive
            o    which sprites will be used
     Provide a detailed description for each sprite in terms of
            o    a rough diagram/sketch
            o    variables associated with it
            o    processing associated with it
            o    responsibilities and functions
            o    messages that it will broadcast or receive.
     Provide the background/stage specifications for each background/stage in terms of
            o    responsibilities and functions
            o    what it must provide
            o    messages that it will broadcast or receive.

                                                  HAND IN

Use the templates in Annexure D and hand in:

     A consolidated template (combined template for each scene and sprites, etc. used in the
      scene) - Annexure D, Template 1
     GUI mock ups



                                                                                                  Page | 9
Grade 10 PAT 2012                                                                        Learner Guide

                               Instructions for Phase 3
This is where you implement your planning and design phases and write project notes to describe
how one can use the program.

After completing your project, you will also demonstrate the program and answer questions about
your program, the process and the code.

                                        WRITE THE SCRIPTS

Use the planning documents of phase 1 and phase 2 to:

     Create the scenes, stage/backgrounds and the sprites
     Write the scripts for each

Use good programming techniques and structure:

The program should use a useful number of hat blocks to give good structure to the program and
provide good readability. More when I receive blocks than broadcast blocks speaks to reuse of code
and programming competence.

Use effective algorithms and sound defensive programming techniques to produce a robust program.

Document the code using the comments facility so that any person will be able to interpret the
program and understand what individual pieces of code do.

                                   WRITE THE PROJECT NOTES

Use the project notes facility of Scratch to write project notes to describe how to use the project, i.e.
the basic rules for playing the game and how to interact with the program.

The note should also describe any known bugs or problems.

                                               HAND IN

Hand in:

     The completed Scratch project including the comments and project notes.
     The declaration of authenticity (See Annexure G)


                                             DEBRIEFING

Demonstrate the program for evaluation and debriefing.

Guidelines for the demonstration of the project:

     The teacher will schedule dates and times for demonstrations. About 15 minutes per project
      will be allowed.


                                                                                               Page | 10
Grade 10 PAT 2012                                                                   Learner Guide

    You should hand in all the documentation before the demonstration takes place – at least one
     week in advance.
    The demonstrations must be done electronically on the computer.
    You must execute your computer program and show all the features of the program to the
     teacher for evaluation.
    The teacher can require you to execute test procedures to make sure that the entire program is
     working correctly.
    The teacher can use the mark sheet for Phase 3 as a guideline and allocate marks accordingly,
     during the demonstration.
    As part of the demonstration, the teacher will identify random pieces of programming code in
     the project and ask you to explain the purpose and working of the randomly selected code.
     This is done to ensure that you did the coding yourself. A similar type of procedure will be
     followed during moderation. If you cannot explain the code used in the project, no marks can
     be awarded for the project.
    You must hand in the electronic copy of the project that was demonstrated. The teacher will
     use this copy to allocate any outstanding marks in order to finalise the mark.


                                          GOOD LUCK!




                                                                                         Page | 11
                                                                                                                                                  ANNEXURE A
Template for Scratch PAT Phase 1
SCENARIO (Description of task )




Evidence of Investigation Attached:   Report:
[Check List]                          Title page                 Summary                    TOC                        Intro
                                      Body                       Conclusion                 References                 Appendix

Short Description                     User Stories: (Who-What-Why)                                   Acceptance Tests:
(may change in phase 2)               As a … ( users role ) I want … ( capability or feature required) Based on User Stories-How do we show that the user story is
                                      so that I can … (value or benefit) – finalised in phase 2        correctly implemented (may be updated in phase 2)

Scene 1


Scene 2


Scene 3


…

Scene n
Grade 10 PAT 2012                                                                 Annexure B

An Anatomy of a Report
This document informs you of the specific requirements of the report.
If you follow these guidelines you will be assured of a successful report. You are expected to
use a style sheet so that your report looks neat as well as correctly structured. See column 1
below for formatting suggestions. (You can generate a table of contents automatically if you
use formatting as outlined in column 1).

                                   report title
           TITLE PAGE              your name and grade
                                   submission date
 <title>
                                   overview of the report’s essential information and
 SUMMARY                           recommendations
 <heading>
 TABLE OF CONTENTS                 list of numbered sections in report
 <table of contents>               and
                                   their page numbers
                                   terms of reference,
 INTRODUCTION                      the scenario and
                                   outline of report’s structure
 <heading 1>
                                   headings and sub-headings which reflect the contents of each
 BODY                              section.
                                   Includes information important ideas about the topic,
 Headings                          and
 <heading 1>                       discussion of programs that are relevant to the scenario.

 Sub-headings
 <heading 2>

                                   states the conclusions that can be drawn from the information
 CONCLUSION                        found,
                                   makes recommendations about the direction the learner will
 <heading 1>
                                   follow in the project

                                   list of reference material consulted during research for report
 REFERENCE LIST                    use the Simplified Harvard style/APA style
 <heading 1>
                                   pictures and information that support your research but is not
 APPENDIX                          essential to your explanation.
 <heading 1>




                                                                                     Page | 13
Grade 10 PAT 2012                                                                                                         Annexure C
Template 1: Combined Template for Scratch PAT Phase 2 (to be completed for each scene).
     Project Name:                                                                   Scene
      Background:                                                               Description
Diagram Illustration (Use stick figures, arrows for motion)         What the user will see:

                                                                        What the user will
                                                                                    hear:
                                                                    What the user will do:

                                                                   Navigation         Previous:            Next:             Branch to:

                                                                   Processing (Algorithms)




Sprite Name          Responsibilities              Collaborators   Broadcast                  Listen [When I receive]   Variables
1.

2.

…

Conversations/Updated acceptance tests:




                                                                                                                              Page | 14
Grade 10 PAT 2012                                                                                                        Annexure D
Template 2: Scene Template (to be completed for each scene).
   Project Name:                                                                 Scene
Diagram Illustration (Use stick figures, arrows for motion)    Navigation
                                                               Previous:                 Next:                      Branches:



                                                               Narration:         What the user will see (read), hear and do




Conversations:                                                 Sprites used: (complete a sprite template for each one)




Comments:
E.g. scoping, etc.




                                                                                                                           Page | 15
Grade 10 PAT 2012                                                                                    Annexure D
Template 3: Sprite Template (to be completed for each sprite).
   Project Name:                                                      Sprite Name:
          Scene:                                                 Processing: (algorithm)
Sprite diagram




Responsibilities collaborators: (What and Who – not How)         Broadcast – When_I_Receive




Reporting (Input and Output)                                     Variables (Name and type of data)




Conversations:




                                                                                                       Page | 16
Grade 10 PAT 2012                                                                                                                                           Annexure E
Gr 10 PAT Glossary of Terms
       Term                      What is it                                      What it does (artefact)                                 Why it is necessary

Task           A brief description in the learner’s own         Defines the task for the learner, explains what must be    To get clarity on what is expected from the
Description    words to describes the intention of the          done.                                                      specification. Step 1. in problem solving
(Scenario)     task/project (PAT). What the learner will do     (Single paragraph)                                         “Understand the problem”.
               so that the program satisfies the parameters
               of the PAT specification.

User           The target audience, user of the program,        Provides insight into the design requirements in terms     To establish a level of user expertise to guide
               player of the game, the learner in the case of   of user knowledge, age, computer skills, religion,         design decisions
               a simulation, etc.                               culture, languages, sex, etc
                                                                (See demographics)

Demographics   Studies of a population based on factors         Provides insight into the user in terms of user economic   For example, to better understand potential
               such as age, race, sex, economic status, level   status, level of education, income level etc.              users and customers.
               of education, income level and employment,       For example South Africa has 50 million people of          A company that sells high-end RVs would
               among others.                                    diverse origins, cultures, languages, and religions.       want to know roughly how many people will
               http://www.investopedia.com/terms/d/dem                                                                     be able to afford their product.
               ographics.asp#ixzz1iake0f2h

User Story     A brief story told by the user that formulates   Tells the designer/programmer what the user wants.         To specify requirements feature by feature.
               in a sentence or two, in everyday language,      It defines what functionality must be built into the       (function by function)
               what he/she wants to be able to do with the      system. Specifies WHAT is needed (not HOW)                 To figure out the things that the
               program.                                                                                                    program/system needs to do/provide
                                                                (Single short paragraph for each feature)
               The underlying real world problem that the                                                                  To ensure that requirements are broken into
                                                                Example:
               program/system must solve.                                                                                  small, manageable pieces of functionality, i.e.
                                                                As a … (Who role or actor or user)
               (Normally written by the intended user but                                                                  individual features that can be implemented
               for practical reasons in the case of the PAT,    I want … ( What capability or feature do they need)        as a single task.
               by the learner).                                 so that … (Why is it of value or benefit)




                                                                                                                                                                   Page | 17
Grade 10 PAT 2012                                                                                                                                              Annexure E
Participative     Conversation between user and                   Discussions with users that provides the                   To clarify what the user wants and what the
Design Phase      designer/programmer captured as additional      designer/programmer with more detailed information         program/system must do and provide
(Conversations)   notes;                                          of WHAT the user wants and WHAT the program is             It gives clarity as to why a feature is useful;
                  recordings;                                     meant to do.
                                                                                                                             it can influence how a feature should
                  photographs;                                    Helps the designer/programmer to determine a list of       function;
                                                                  types of users, features and functionalities.
                  diagrams;                                                                                                  it can give you ideas for other useful features
                                                                  It serves to give substance to the user story, in          that support the user’s goals.
                  or anything that helps to concisely explain
                                                                  particular the GUI and does not represent a full
                  what the user wants.                                                                                       It provides first hand insight into the users’
                                                                  specification.
                                                                                                                             preference for the GUI.
                                                                  (Paper prototypes, UI-diagrams, GUI mock ups as
                                                                                                                             The finalised user stories:
                                                                  power point presentations.)
                                                                                                                             Provide the developer with priority list of
                                                                  See: PaperPrototyping_ParticipativeDesign.pdf
                                                                                                                             features to implement.
                                                                  in the resource folder
                                                                                                                             A “To-Do” list of “User Stories” that scopes
                                                                                                                             the project in order of importance of the
                                                                                                                             feature.

Acceptance        Test cases that are created from user stories   Verifies that the goal of the user story is achieved.      So the programmer will know when, what the
tests             and represent some expected result from                                                                    user wanted is achieved;
                                                                  Tells the user how the goal/functionality is going to be
(Confirmations)   the system.                                     confirmed                                                  So the user will know when the task/unit is
                  Ultimately they provide the criteria against    Tells the programmer/designer how he/she will know         complete and can be marked as complete;
                  which the outcome or goal of the story can      that a user story is correctly implemented.                To ensure the software is designed to pass the
                  be tested.                                                                                                 users criteria;
                                                                  This should ensure every program runs although with
                                                                  only the implemented functions.                            Helps to identify scenarios that users, analysts
                                                                  (Table of tests: Story, Description of test, Pass/Fail)    and/or designers may not have thought of
                                                                                                                             (Identifies incomplete user stories or Spikes).




                                                                                                                                                                       Page | 18
Grade 10 PAT 2012                                                                          Annexure F


                                            Example

Dino Adventure Game
(This description loosely based on BBC computer game “Dinosaurs”.)

Aim: Use Scratch to design a game to help the archaeologist find the dinosaurs’ egg.

Description / Scenario:
The game starts in the Archaeologists office where the learner is presented with a map and
information about dinosaurs that lived in the area. There are a number of hazards (such as rivers and
mountains) to cross. Different artefacts are around to help you cross the hazards. There are clues
around that suggest the presence of a dinosaur’s nest in the vicinity. There is a library in which you
can look-up facts that pertain to dinosaurs. The municipality offices are also available to get detailed
maps about the area. You can only go to certain areas if you have the necessary artefacts in your
possession such as maps, compass, pick, hammer etc.

(Prof Donald Cook)




                                                                                              Page | 19
Grade 10 PAT 2012                                                            Annexure G

                                  HOËRSKOOL
                                     MyShool
                                 HIGH SCHOOL



                      PLAGIARISM DECLARATION


   1. I know that plagiarism is wrong. Plagiarism is to use another’s work and
      pretend that it is one’s own.



   2. I have used the Harvard convention for citation and referencing. Each
      contribution to, and quotation in, this report/project from the work(s) of other
      people has been attributed, and has been cited and referenced.



   3. This report/project is my own work, I have not allowed, and will not allow,
      anyone to copy my work with the intention of passing it off as his or her own
      work.



   4. I acknowledge that copying someone else’s assignment or report, or part of it,
      is wrong, and further unequivocally declare that this is my own work.




Learner: _______________________________




Signature: ______________________________




                                                                                Page | 20
Grade 10 PAT 2012                                                                   Assessment Tools                                                                                  Annexure H

Phase 1:                                         Learner Name:
Scenario                                 3                                       2                                          1                                         0
                     The task is clearly stated and           The task is clearly stated and              The statement is vague, leaving the      No statement / statement is
Scenario             described in the learner’s own words described in the learner’s own words reader unsure of what the purpose of inadequate or does not make sense
(Short description   Outlines the aspects that should be      Outlines the aspects that should be         the program will be.                                                               3
±150 words)          covered. Clear statement of the          covered. With minor shortcomings
                     purpose and audience
Investigation                        4                              3                                   2                                1                                0
                     Evidence of an extensive        Evidence of a well-structured Evidence of a structured               Some evidence of an              No evidence of any
                     well-structured investigation   investigation                      investigation but with gaps       investigation                    investigation provided or no
                     Investigation clearly and       Relevant and most key              that hinder full understanding Vague                               key areas defined or no
                     comprehensively                 aspects covered.                   Limited relevance or too little Shows little understanding of report
                     defines/explains all key                                           aspects covered                   key areas
Report
                     areas pertaining to the topic,                                                                                                                                          4
Key areas
                     e.g. different genres, nature
                     of genre or intended game,
                     popularity of genre,
                     examples, specific aspects
                     or needs, e.g. formulas, etc.
                     Excellent conclusion drawn      Good conclusion                    Acceptable conclusion             Weak conclusion                  Not drawn from the
                     from information/               One aspect not drawn from          Not always drawn form             Little relevance to              information/investigation or
                     investigation                   information/investigation          information/investigation or      information/ investigation or    provides no direction for the
Report               Provides excellent, clear       Provides good, clear               provides only some direction provides limited direction for        project or no conclusion or
Conclusion           direction for the project       direction                          for the project                   the project                      no report                         4
                     Shows good insight and          Shows insight into most of         Shows some insight in some
                     understanding into all key      the key areas of the topic         of the key areas
                     areas of the topic
                     Well-structured report.         Good structure.                    Acceptable structure              Weak structure                   No report
                     Provides, e.g. relevant         No screen shot, printout, etc. Two aspects as outlined in            More than two aspects as
Report
                     screen shot, printout, etc.     or any not relevant                report anatomy omitted            outlined in report anatomy                                         4
Structure
                     Includes all aspects as         One aspect as outlined in                                            omitted
                     outlined in report anatomy      report anatomy omitted
                     All references (at least three) All references included but        Some (two) references             Limited (only one)               No references included
References           included using Harvard/APA      not using Harvard/APA style        included                          references included                                                4
                     style




                                                                                                                                                                                           Page | 21
Grade 10 PAT 2012                                                                   Assessment Tools                                                                         Annexure H

User Stories                      4                                 3                                2                              1                            0
Role, activity,    All stories have role, activity   Most stories have role,          Some stories have role,        No role activity & values     No user stories
value              & values expressed                activity & values expressed      activity & values expressed    expressed                                                      4
(who, what, why)
                   For each feature, the stories     For most features, the           For some features, the         No clarity on what the        No requirements
                   clearly specify what the          stories clearly specify what     stories clearly specify what   system needs to do or
Requirements                                                                                                                                                                        4
                   system needs to do/provide        the system needs to              the system needs to            provide
                                                     do/provide                       do/provide
Acceptance Tests                 4                                  3                                2                              1                             0
                   Appropriate test cases            Test cases defined for all       Test cases defined for most    Test cases defined for some   Tests not defined for any of
                   defined for each user story       user stories but not             user stories or not            user stories or not           the user stories or totally
Test cases                                                                                                                                                                          4
                                                     appropriate in one or two        appropriate in one or two      appropriate in most cases     inappropriate
                                                     cases                            cases
                   All stories can be developed,     Most stories can be              Some stories can be            Stories cannot be             No stories
Independence
                   tested on their own and do        developed, tested on their       developed, tested on their     developed, tested on their
(Stories are                                                                                                                                                                        4
                   not depend on others              own and do not depend on         own and do not depend on       own and depend on other
atomic)
                                                     others                           others                         stories
                                                                                                                                                                         Total 35




                                                                                                                                                                                  Page | 22
Grade 10 PAT 2012                                                                            Assessment Tools                                                                              Annexure H

Phase 2:                                       Learner name:
                                          3                                                   2                                       1                                     0
                       Gives clarity as to why a feature is                Mostly gives clarity as to why a        Gives some clarity as to why a        Gives no clarity and no attempt to
                       useful;                                             feature is useful;                      feature is useful;                    substantiate the conversations.
Participative design
                       Substantiated by paper prototypes or                Substantiated by paper prototypes       Little substantiated by paper         No additional notes.                      3
(Conversations)
                       UI diagrams.                                        or UI diagrams. Some additional         prototypes or UI diagrams. Few
                       Excellent additional notes                          notes.                                  additional notes. .
Acceptance tests       All acceptance tests refined/updated                Most acceptance tests updated           Some acceptance tests updated         None of the acceptance tests
updated                where necessary.                                                                                                                  updated.                                  3
                       All diagrams final i.e. PD material                 Most diagrams final i.e. PD material    Some diagrams final i.e. PD           Diagrams not final i.e. PD or material
Final GUI design                                                                                                                                                                                   3
                       fleshed out.                                        fleshed out                             material fleshed out.                 not fleshed out.
                       All GUI mock ups complete as power                  Most GUI mock ups complete as           Some GUI mock ups complete as         GUI mock ups not made as power
Final GUI design                                                           power point presentations or as         power point presentations or as       point presentations or as paper
(Format)               point presentations or as
                                                   PaperPrototyping_Pa
                                                   rticipativeDesign.pdf
                                                                           paper prototypes.                       paper prototypes                      prototypes.                               3
                       paper prototypes.
Templates completed
Scene descriptions                   4                                         3                               2                                1                                0
                       1 Template for each scene                  1 Template for each scene)      1 Template for each scene       Some scenes do not have a       Most scenes do not have a
Scene descriptions     All complete in all respects               Most complete in all            Most complete in most           template or most not            template or all not complete
(completeness)                                                    respects                        respects                        complete in all respects        in all respects or no            4
                                                                                                                                                                  templates
Scene descriptions     User story is clarified for                User story is clarified for     User story is clarified for     User story clarified for only   User story not clarified for
(user story)           each scene                                 most scenes                     some scenes                     one scene                       any scenes                       4
Sprite descriptions                   4                                          3                               2                               1                               0
                       Complete for all sprites                   Complete for all sprites        Complete for most sprites       Complete for most sprites or    Not complete for any sprites
Responsibilities       covering all responsibilities              covers most responsibilities    covering all responsibilities   covers only some                or covers only some              4
                                                                                                                                  responsibilities for most       responsibilities for few only
                       Complete for all sprites                   Complete for all sprites        Complete for most sprites       Complete for most sprites or    Not complete for any sprites
Variables              covering all variables                     covering most variables         covering all variables          covers only some variables      or covers only some              4
                                                                                                                                  for most sprites                variables for few sprites only
                       Complete for all sprites                   Complete for all sprites        Complete for most sprites       Complete for most sprites or    Not complete for any sprites
Processing             covering all processing                    covering most processing        covering all processing         covers only some                or covers only some              4
                                                                                                                                  processing for most sprites     processing for few only
                       Complete for all scenes                    Complete for all scenes         Complete for most scenes        Complete for some scenes        Not complete for any
                       covering all interactions e.g.             covering most interactions,     covering some interactions,     covering some interactions,     scenes, does not cover all
Actions and
                       IPO; messages broadcast or                 e.g. IPO; messages              e.g. IPO; messages              e.g. IPO; messages              interactions, e.g. IPO;          4
interactions
                       received etc.                              broadcast or received etc.      broadcast or received etc.      broadcast or received etc.      messages broadcast or
                                                                                                                                                                  received etc.

                                                                                                                                                                                              Page | 23
Grade 10 PAT 2012                                                                  Assessment Tools                                                                               Annexure H

Stage/Background                         4                               3                               2                              1                               0
                          For all stage/backgrounds,     For most                        For some                        For some                        For most
                          covers all of the following:   stage/backgrounds, covers       stage/backgrounds, covers       stage/backgrounds one of        stage/backgrounds, any of
                          responsibilities;              all of the following:           all of the following:           the following not covered:      the following not covered:
                          function that they must        responsibilities;               responsibilities;               responsibilities;               responsibilities;
Specifications                                                                                                                                                                              4
                          provide;                       function that they must         function that they must         function that they must         function that they must
                          messages broadcast or          provide;                        provide;                        provide;                        provide;
                          received, etc.                 messages broadcast or           messages broadcast or           messages broadcast or           messages broadcast or
                                                         received, etc.                  received, etc.                  received, etc.                  received etc.
General                                 4                                3                               2                              1                               0
                          Good design for the            Covers most of the design       Covers some of the design       Does not cover the design       Does not cover the design
Appropriate for phase 1
                          established criteria. Meets    for the established criteria.   for the established criteria.   for the established criteria.   for the established criteria or
output
                          the requirements of the user   Meets most of the               Meets some of the               Meets very few of the           meets no requirements of           4
(meet established
                          stories/analysis               requirements of the user        requirements of the user        requirements of the user        the user stories
criteria)
                                                         stories/analysis                stories                         stories
                                                                                                                                                                             Total         44




                                                                                                                                                                                     Page | 24
Grade 10 PAT 2012                                                                   Assessment Tools                                                                             Annexure H

Phase 3:                                        Learner name:
Acceptance tests                      4                              3                               2                             1                                0
Does the program      Well exceeds requirements       Exceeds requirements            Slightly exceeds                Meets minimum                   Does not meet minimum
meet the              Comprehensive program, all      Less comprehensive              requirements                    requirements                    requirements
requirements?         elements function as            all elements function as        some program elements           Basic program                   Less than basic                  4
                      specified. Shows deep           specified. Shows insight in     function as specified. Shows    Basic scope                     Limited scope
                      insight in all aspects          most aspects                    insight in on or two aspects
Sophistication                        4                              3                               2                              1                               0
                      All solution algorithms used    Appropriate solution            Most solution algorithms        Mostly inadequate solution      Totally inadequate solution
                      in solving the problem are      algorithms used and effective   used are appropriate and        algorithms or not effective.    algorithms. Solution not
Algorithms
                      appropriate and effective,      with one or two showing         effective with most showing                                     effective.
What does it do?
                      e.g. nested if_else-statement   minor shortcomings.             minor shortcomings.                                                                              4
How well does it do
                      used effectively instead of
it?
                      multiple if-statements.
                      Enhance the project
                      Used appropriate and most       Appropriate and most            Inappropriate or ineffective    Inappropriate or ineffective    Totally inappropriate of
                      effective control blocks to     effective use of control        use of control blocks in some   use of control blocks in most   ineffective
Control blocks                                                                                                                                                                         4
                      solve the problem in all        blocks in most instances        instances                       instances
                      instances
                      Ratio of looks and sensing      Reasonable use of block         Low block variety leading to    Many hats few blocks            No interactivity
Interactivity         blocks shows good               variety leading to              interactivity.                                                                                   4
                      interactivity                   interactivity.
                      Most appropriate, effective     Appropriate and effective       Appropriate and effective       Some strategies could have      Mostly inappropriate or not
                      input strategies (e.g.          with minor shortcomings         with minor shortcomings         been more                       effective
                      keyboard, mouse, sliders)       used in all instances, e.g.     used in most instances, e.g.    appropriate/effective
Input                 used in all instances, e.g.     keyboard, mouse, sliders.       keyboard, mouse, sliders                                                                         4
                      keyboard not used when
                      slider would be more
                      appropriate or effective.
                      In all cases:                   In most cases:                  In some cases                   Many logical errors             Many logical errors.
                      Most appropriate display,       Most appropriate display,       Appropriate display with        Difficult to read output        Almost all the results are
                      well formatted/readable/        well formatted/readable         minor shortcomings              Many results incorrect          incorrect/few of the required
                      understandable, e.g. spacing    No logical errors.              Minor logical errors.                                           results are delivered
Output                when phrases & variable         Results of processing are       Some of the results are not                                                                      4
                      output are concatenated.        correct.                        correct.
                      No logical errors.
                      All the results of processing
                      are correct.

                                                                                                                                                                                    Page | 25
Grade 10 PAT 2012                                                              Assessment Tools                                                                           Annexure H

                    Every effort made to produce   Good use of defensive           Reasonable degree of error     Minimal amount of error         No attempt
                    a robust program using         programming where               checking with a few obvious    checking or defensive
Defensive
                    sound defensive                necessary but there are         bugs still present             programming visible                                             4
programming
                    programming techniques         minor aspects that could be
                    where necessary.               improved on
Interface aspects                   4                           3                                2                              1                               0
                    Mostly original (not from      Some original sprites with an   Few original sprites or an     Few sprites only taken from     Only one or two sprites with
                    gallery or gallery sprites     adequate/appropriate            inadequate/inappropriate       gallery and costumes not        no//inappropriate costumes
                    changed/ adapted), well        number of costumes.             number of costumes.            always
                    drawn sprites with an          Very good animations            Good animations smooth         adequate/appropriate.
Sprites                                                                                                                                                                           4
                    adequate/ appropriate          smooth action.                  action.                        Poor or no acceptable
                    number of costumes.                                                                           animations.
                    Excellent animation, smooth
                    action.
                    Appropriate backgrounds        Appropriate backgrounds         Few original backgrounds or    No original backgrounds or      Only one background or
Background                                                                                                                                                                        4
                    Mostly original backgrounds    Some original backgrounds       some not always appropriate    mostly not appropriate          backgrounds not appropriate
Documentation                       4                            3                               2                               1                             0
                    Code clearly annotated to      Code clearly annotated to       Code annotated to explain      Code annotated to explain       No comments
                    explain all necessary parts.   explain most necessary          some necessary parts.          certain parts.
Comments            Explanation shows excellent    parts.                          Explanation shows some         Explanation shows little                                        4
                    insight.                       Explanation shows good          insight.                       insight
                                                   insight.
                    Extensive project notes        Project notes present and of    Project notes present of a     Inadequate project notes        No project notes
                    present and of an excellent    a very good quality             moderate standard              present
Project notes       standard.                                                                                                                                                     4
                    Clearly explains working or
                    the game
Time management                    4                             3                               2                              1                               0
                    All deadlines met – all 3      Met all 3 deadlines but some    Met 2 deadlines or submitted   Met at least one deadline or    Did not meet deadlines.
                    phases and all the required    of the work was not done.       on time but some of the work   submitted on time but some      Submitted most work late or     4
                    work were done.                                                was not done.                  of the work was not done.       was not done.
Debriefing                         4                             3                               2                              1                               0
                    Explained all selected code    Explained selected code with    Unable to explain some of      Unable to explain most of the   Unable to explain any
Explain selected
                    clearly and with confidence    minor shortcomings              the selected code adequately   selected code, lacks insight    selected code, no insight       4
code
                    Shows excellent insight.       Shows insight                   Shows some insight
                                                                                                                                                                     Total:      52



                                                                                                                                                                              Page | 26
Grade 10 PAT 2012                                                                   Assessment Tools                                                                            Annexure H
This table determines the complexity level of the program to discriminate between different levels of programs. Tick all features that are present in the program.
Only one tick per line is allowed. Greyed blocks cannot be ticked. At the bottom, multiply the number of ticks in each of the columns by the number at the top of the column.
Phase 3:                                         Learner name:
Complexity level                              Complex (3)                                                Adequate (2)                                                 Limited (1)                     
Algorithms              Non-trivial algorithms                                           More advanced Grade 10 type                              Trivial algorithms
User defined            Multi Nested loop constructs                                     Double Nested loops                                      Single Loops
                        Multi Nested conditional constructs                              Double Nested conditionals                               Single conditionals
                        Multiple conditions using relational and Boolean                 Max of two conditions using relational and Boolean       Only single conditions using relational and Boolean
                        operators                                                        operators                                                operators
                        Simulations using external input/output (sensor board) or        None                                                     None
                        robotics or external device, e.g. bar code scanner
                        Complex, e.g. Fibonacci, factorial function or outside           Standard, several operations, within grade 10            Simple, one operation, covered in grade 10 e.g.
Standard                Grade 10 curriculum, e.g. sorting a list                         curriculum e.g. finding smallest item of more than       finding smallest of two values, even or odd
                                                                                         2 values, LCM
                        Non-trivial graphs/maps                                          Standard graphs/maps                                     None
                        Non-trivial drawings/movement/animations                         Standard drawings/movement/animation                     None
Utilising sophisticated features of programming language
Data structures         Parallel lists                                                   Standard – lists (no parallel lists)                     No lists
                        Concept of ‘stored data’ – populating lists ‘at run time’        No ‘stored’ data                                         No ‘stored’ data
                        (program activation) to ‘store’ data for later use
                        Use local and global variables appropriately and                 Use local and global variables but not always            Limited number of variables
Scope of variables
                        effectively – enhances program                                   appropriately                                            Local only
                        Sensor board/Robotic/External device input/output                None                                                     None
Complexity of non-computing
Manipulating math      Involving mathematics beyond Grade 10-level                       Grade 10 mathematics level                               Simple mathematical calculations, e.g. addition,
processes:                                                                                                                                        subtraction, multiplication and division
Manipulating           Combine multiple built-in string methods to do complex            Standard – Combine at least two string methods           Simple – only use one string method
string/text processes: manipulations
Modular aspects (Threads/Reuse of code)
                       Re-use of code – Good use of When_I_receive blocks                Good use of When_I_receive blocks, but not more          Used – inappropriate ratio – much less
                       than broadcasts                                                   than the broadcasts – reasonable ratio                   When_I_receive blocks
                                                            Number of ticks                                           Number of ticks                                             Number of ticks
                                                          Multiply ticks by 3                                       Multiply ticks by 2                                         Multiply ticks by 1
                                                                           Total                                                    Total                                                      Total
Column1 + Column 2 + Column 3 (Maximum: 42)                                                                                                                                                Total:


                                                                                                                                                                                               Page | 27

								
To top