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					            MARS ATMOSPHERE AND VOLATILE EVOLUTIO N (MAVEN)
                    EDUCATION AND PUBLIC OUTREACH IMPLEMENTATION PLAN




                                  Revised May 25, 2011




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Prepared by:

_________________________________________________                _____________________
       Stephanie Renfrow, MAVEN E/PO Lead                        Date

_________________________________________________                _____________________
       Laura Peticolas, MAVEN E/PO Co-Lead                       Date



Approval:
                                                                 _____________________
_________________________________________________                Date
       Doug McCuistion, NASA Mars Exploration Program Director

_________________________________________________                _____________________
       Stephanie Stockman, NASA HQ SMD E/PO Lead                 Date

_________________________________________________                _____________________
       Bruce Jakosky, Principal Investigator, MAVEN              Date

Concurrence:

_________________________________________________                _____________________
       Lisa May, Program Executive, Mars Exploration Program     Date

_________________________________________________                _____________________
       Mary Mellott, MAVEN Program Scientist                     Date

_________________________________________________                _____________________
       Daniella Scalice , Planetary Science Division E/PO Lead   Date

_________________________________________________                _____________________
Peter Doms, MAVEN Mission Manager                                Date

_________________________________________________                _____________________
Michelle Viotti, Manager, NASA Mars Public Engagement            Date




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CONTENTS
Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) ........................................................................................ i
Education and Public Outreach Implementation Plan .................................................................................. i
1 Overview ....................................................................................................................................................................5
    1.1 MAVEN Mission ................................................................................................................................................5
    1.2 MAVEN Education and Public Outreach (E/PO) Program ................................................................................5
    1.3 E/PO Program Overview ....................................................................................................................................6
         1.3.2 Operating Principles ....................................................................................................................................6
         1.3.3 Leveraging Mars Exploration Public Engagement Plan ..............................................................................7
         1.3.4 E/PO Timeline............................................................................................................................................10
2 Formal Education: Teacher Professional Development and Curriculum Development ...........................................17
    2.1      MAVEN Educator Ambassador Program .....................................................................................................17
         2.1.2        Audience need .....................................................................................................................................17
         2.1.3         Program Detail ....................................................................................................................................18
         2.1.4        Evaluation ............................................................................................................................................21
    2.2      Space Science Teachers Summit ...................................................................................................................24
         2.2.1        Audience Need .....................................................................................................................................24
         2.2.2        Program Detail .....................................................................................................................................25
         2.2.3        Evaluation ............................................................................................................................................28
    2.3      “Red Planet: Read, Write, Explore!” Science-in-Literacy rogram ..............................................................29
         2.3.1        Audience Need .....................................................................................................................................29
         2.3.2        Program Detail .....................................................................................................................................29
         2.3.3        Evaluation ............................................................................................................................................33
3 Informal Education ...................................................................................................................................................35
    3.1.          Science On a Sphere .................................................................................................................................35
         3.1.1        Audience Need .....................................................................................................................................36
         3.1.2        Program Detail .....................................................................................................................................36
         3.1.3        Evaluation ............................................................................................................................................41
    3.2      Imagine Mars through Native Eyes ...............................................................................................................42
         3.2.1        Audience Need .....................................................................................................................................42
         3.2.2        Program Detail .....................................................................................................................................43
         3.2.3        Evaluation ............................................................................................................................................46
    3.3      “Girls Go to Mars!” Girl Scouts Badge Kit Program ....................................................................................48
         3.3.1        Audience Need .....................................................................................................................................48


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         3.3.2        Program Detail .....................................................................................................................................48
         3.3.3        Evaluation ............................................................................................................................................51
4. Public Outreach .......................................................................................................................................................53
    4.1.          Online outreach ........................................................................................................................................53
         4.1.1        Audience Need .....................................................................................................................................53
         4.1.2        Program Detail .....................................................................................................................................53
         4.1.3        Evaluation ............................................................................................................................................60
    4.2      New Media Practitioner Professional Development Workshops ..................................................................61
         4.2.1        Audience Need .....................................................................................................................................61
         4.2.2        Program Detail .....................................................................................................................................61
         4.2.3        Evaluation ............................................................................................................................................64
5 Management .............................................................................................................................................................65
    5.1 Partners .............................................................................................................................................................66
6 Budget.......................................................................................................................................................................68
Appendices ..................................................................................................................................................................69
    APPENDIX B. ABBREVIATIONS AND ACRONYMS .....................................................................................................71
    APPENDIX C. MAVEN PAO/EPO GUIDELINES .........................................................................................................73
Pictures: .......................................................................................................................................................................75




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1 OVERVIEW

1.1 MAVEN MISSION
The Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN Mission (MAVEN), set to launch in fall 2013, will explore the
planet’s upper atmosphere, ionosphere, and interactions with the Sun and solar wind. Scientists will use MAVEN
data to determine the role that loss of volatile compounds, such as CO 2, N2, and H2O, from the Mars atmosphere to
space has played through time. This will give insight into the history of Mars atmosphere and climate, liquid water,
and planetary habitability.

MAVEN will carry three instrument suites. The Particles and Fields Package, built by the University of California at
Berkeley (UCB) with support from the University of Colorado/Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics
(LASP) and the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), contains six instruments that will characterize the solar wind
and the ionosphere of the planet. The remote sensing package, built by CU/LASP, will determine global
characteristics of the upper atmosphere and ionosphere. The neutral gas and ion mass spectrometer, provided by
GSFC, will measure the composition and isotopes of neutrals and ions. Lockheed Martin, based in Littleton,
Colorado, will provide the MAVEN spacecraft as well as mission operations for the mission. NASA’s Jet
Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) will navigate the spacecraft. LASP will provide science operations and data packaging.

1.2 MAVEN EDUCATION AND PUBLIC OUTREACH (E/PO) PROGRAM
Since the MAVEN Mission E/PO description in the Concept Study Report (CSR), there have been changes in the
program and its budget. Stephanie Renfrow was hired as the new E/PO Lead at LASP and for MAVEN. Dr. Laura
Peticolas has joined the E/PO management as Deputy Lead from the UCB Space Sciences Laboratory. The external
Evaluation group is now Cornerstone Evaluation Associates LLC, (CEA) of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Mars Scout 2006 AO (Announcement of Opportunity1) guidelines required funding to be between 0.25 and 0.50 %
of the PI budget (i.e., without launch vehicle). For the MAVEN PI budget of $353M identified in the CSR (in FY06
dollars), this corresponds to $0.882M–$1.765M in FY06 dollars (~$1.1M – $2.2M in RY dollars). The CSR
included the E/PO program at 0.45 % of the PI budget, $1.56M in FY06 dollars ($1.91M in RY dollars). Cost
increases in the MAVEN project as a whole necessitated reductions in scope during Phase B to stay within budget.
Funding for E/PO was reduced to contribute to solving the problem. Reduction by ~$700K to 0.27% of the PI
budget, left us with an E/PO budget of $1.17M in RY dollars for FY10-FY16. In summer 2010, we submitted a
Final Plan within this $1.17M in RY dollars.

At confirmation review, we were brought into compliance with the new SMD E/PO Policy stating that missions
spend at least 1% of cost minus launch vehicle on E/PO. This new budget allowed us to expand our E/PO plans in
order to effectively educate America’s public about MAVEN science and share its discoveries with a variety of
audiences. The augmented budget is $4.43M in RY dollars for FY11-FY16.

This Plan is in alignment with the MAVEN mission plan, the MAP a g e | 5VEN public affairs plan, and the Mars
Exploration Program Public Engagement Plan. It also aligns with the NASA Strategic Plan and the NASA




1
    Please see Appendix B for acronyms that appear throughout the document.



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Education Framework, as well as governing project requirements (NPR 7120.5, SMD Management Handbook,
SPD-18) and other SMD E/PO guidance.

An overview of our new planned program follows.

1.3 E/PO PROGRAM OVERVIEW
MAVEN’s E/PO goal is to engage multiple audiences in the quest to understand Mars' long term climate change,
providing personal and professional connections to the history of water and space weather on Mars.

Objectives supporting this goal include:

       Formal Education—Provide sustained professional development to educators with core science and
        engineering concepts, curriculum, and experiences related to the MAVEN mission and underrepresented
        audiences.
       Informal Education—Equip informal educators to engage underrepresented audiences with MAVEN-
        related science, engineering, and discoveries
       Public Outreach— Inspire the public with the MAVEN mission and discoveries through social
        networking, the Internet, and community outreach.



                                                MAVEN’s E/PO program will capitalize on people’s fascination
                                                 with Mars to engage them in the science and excitement of
                                                  MAVEN. Participants will explore MAVEN science,
                                                    engineering, and data through the lens of habitability:
                                                     atmosphere, sun as driver, solar wind. We will develop an
                                                      understanding of Mars and its atmosphere through time and
                                                      through comparison with Earth. The MAVEN E/PO
                                                     Program will deepen teacher, student, and public
                                                     understanding of planetary habitability.




Our teams have demonstrated success in increasing teacher and student understanding of space science. We will
leverage existing LASP, SSL, Goddard, SETI and SMD Education programs, incorporating themes of planetary
habitability as well as MAVEN science and discoveries.

1.3.2 OPERATING PRINCIPLES
The MAVEN E/PO program is built upon the following operating principles:

       Involve MAVEN scientists and engineers

       Respond to partner and customer needs

       Leverage MEPPE and NASA SMD E/PO programs

       Reach out to under-represented audiences through new and existing relationships

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         Include robust external evaluation

These principles undergird all objectives, rather than being objectives in and of themselves, because they are critical
components of all activities and inseparable from the successful implementation of the MAVEN E/PO Program.
They are aligned with SMD’s Operating Principles, seen in Table 1.a.

TABLE 1.A MAVEN AND SMD OPERATING PRINCIPLES
SMD Operating Principle                          MAVEN Operating Principles
Content                                          Involve MAVEN scientists and engineers
Relevance (formerly Customer Focus)              Respond to partner and customer needs
Partnerships/Sustainability                      Leverage MEPPE and NASA SMD E/PO programs; build
                                                 partnerships
Diversity & Continuity (formerly Pipeline)       Reach out to under-represented audiences through new and existing
                                                 partnerships
Evaluation                                       Include a robust evaluation


1.3.3 LEVERAGING MARS EXPLORATION PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT PLAN
In recent years, NASA recognized the importance of Mars Exploration, and undertook to develop the Mars
Exploration Program Public Engagement (MEPPE) Plan. This is a twenty-year plan to link public engagement with
the long-term goals of the Mars Exploration Program. The Plan develops “a two-part vision that will guide the
implementation of all activities,” as listed below:

         Sharing the Adventure: real opportunities will be created for the public not only to follow along, but also to
          participate directly and interactively in Mars exploration

         Making Mars a Real Place: providing the public with direct and “virtual” experiences with the red planet in
          a way that transforms Mars from a series of returned images to something that is as psychologically real as
          someone’s backyardi

For greater leverage, efficiency, and impact, the Mars Exploration Program ensures that Scout and instrument-led
E/PO aligns with the Mars Public Engagement Plan. Smaller E/PO Projects are encouraged to leverage the
infrastructural investment of the ongoing program, while the Program can take advantage of new ideas and resources
from Scout- and instrument-led E/PO. The intended outcome is a greater return on investment than either could
achieve alone, and greater value to citizens.

MAVEN’s discoveries, content, and people will bring new ideas and content to the existing MEPPE. MAVEN E/PO
leverages and expands existing Mars education resources to include the nuances of MAVEN science. We will
provide content on the yet-to-be explored Martian upper atmosphere, as well as contribute to the MEPPE areas
“what we’ve learned about Mars so far” and “what we still want to know.” Importantly, just as it will to the Mars
science portfolio, MAVEN will help fill a gap in current Mars Public Engagement resources, activities, and
information related to the Martian atmosphere. MAVEN E/PO further leverages and expands existing Mars
Exploration Program Public Engagement (MEPPE) resources and focuses on underrepresented and nontraditional
outreach audiences. In addition, we will bring a new audience to the Imagine Mars program through our “Imagine
Mars through Native Eyes” program. We will work closely with MEPPE on this program.




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TABLE 1.3.3.A ALIGNMENT WITH MEPPE
Activity       Thread            MAVEN E/PO
Crosscutting   Management        MAVEN E/PO team will report activities to MEPPE for inclusion in HQ reports.
                                 MEPPE will ensure that MAVEN E/PO is highlighted for its accomplishments.
               Community         We will make MAVEN scientists and engineers aware of opportunities to provide
               Input             feedback to SMD/Mars E/PO, including MAVEN E/PO. MEPPE will relate cross-
                                 Mars mission feedback and experience back to MAVEN.
               Visualizations    Goddard’s PAO and SVS teams will provide new visualizations of Mars current and
                                 past atmosphere. MAVEN will also work with MEPPE to provide scientific input
                                 into visualizations that MEPPE provides to the MAVEN E/PO team.
               Speaker           MAVEN speaker materials will be made available in electronic format detailing the
               Support           science and engineering behind the mission to support public talks. We will
                                 identify MAVEN team members willing to do public talks. MAVEN will also make
                                 use of MEPPE’s speaker materials distribution systems.
Formal         Nationwide        The MAVEN E/PO team will provide educator professional development on
Education      Workshops         “Project Spectra!” and “Exploring Magnetism” curricular materials. Workshops will
                                 be held for educators teaching underserved student populations and delivered
                                 through local, regional, and national conferences, as well as to NASA Nationwide.
                                 MAVEN will also utilize the MEPPE distance learning network to provide
                                 professional development to teachers. MEPPE will include
                                 MAVEN educational materials in its ongoing nationwide workshops and
                                 distribution to partner networks to ensure the widest reach possible, as well as
                                 include them in Mars education web pages.
Informal       Networks      &   Use of, and connection to, NASA Nationwide, which includes NASA Nationwide of
Education      Alliances         JPL and NASA Museum Alliance. MAVEN will provide Mars visualizations,
                                 presentation scripts on Mars’ planetary habitability, and guides for Mars
                                 Magnetospheric model development leveraged from “Seeing the Invisible”
                                 Science on a Sphere projects. MEPPE will ensure the resource is included in Mars
                                 materials made available through the Mars Museum Visualization Alliance (the
                                 precursor to, and now a subgroup of, the NASA Museum Alliance). MAVEN will
                                 develop and provide lessons to MEPPE on engaging Native American audiences
                                 with the Imagine Mars with Native Eyes program, including expanding the MEPPE
                                 networks to these communities. MEPPE will provide to the Imagine Mars with
                                 Native Eyes program training on the Imagine Mars program and support the
                                 partnership through regular communications about Imagine Mars. MAVEN will tie
                                 the Girl Scouts connections with MEPPE when appropriate.
               Docents       &   Training via NASA Nationwide and informal educators through the Museum
               Curator           Alliance. Also will provide visualizations via PAO of GSFC. MEPPE will support by
               Training          providing distance-learning PD opportunities, as well as dissemination of
                                 materials. MAVEN’s SOS program training docents will also make these docents
                                 aware of MEPPE resources. MEPPE will help recruit for the MAVEN SOS training
                                 program.
Public         Internet          Connection to/from MAVEN social media and website from/to JPL MEP website.
Information    Initiatives       Develop a section on the Martian atmosphere with visualizations developed by
& Outreach                       MEPPE.
               Media             MAVEN Public Affairs lead will be in charge of coordinating support for
               Support           professional journalists.
               Initiatives




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S UPPORT FROM MEPPE
As a part of our program, we have worked with MEPPE to determine a few specific ways in which MEPPE can help
support the MAVEN E/PO efforts. In order for the MEPPE office to plan for this specific support, we have been
asked to provide a list of items for the MEPPE office to incorporate in their future plans. Below is a timeline of the
support that MAVEN E/PO anticipates needing from MEPPE. The three items that may take some significant
support have been underlined.

FY12-FY16:           1. Provide support on evaluation of Imagine Mars with Native Eyes program
                        where overlaps in evaluation of MEPPE Imagine Mars program
                     2. Help advertise website, tweets, facebook page, YouTube, Picassa/Flickr,
                         iTunesU, and Blog
Apr-Dec, 2012:          Advertise crowdsourcing efforts
Oct-Dec, 2012:          Meet in Berkeley for 2 days to train IEI and UCB on Imagine Mars program
Jan-Mar, 2013:          Help recruit teachers to MAVEN Educator Ambassadors
Apr-Dec, 2013:          Provide support in interfacing with NASA KFC for launch activities
                     1. Help recruit Science on a Sphere docents for MAVEN E/PO training at launch
                     2. Advertise tweetup efforts with MEPPE followers
                     3. Advertise crowdsourcing efforts
Jul-Sep 2014:           Provide support for efforts to highlight MAVEN orbit insertion
FY15:                   Help recruit Science on a Sphere docents for MAVEN E/PO virtual trainings
Oct-Dec, 2015:       1. Help recruit teachers to MAVEN Educator Ambassadors
                     2. Advertise tweetup efforts with MEPPE followers
FY16:                   Help disseminate MAVEN programs and science discoveries




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          1.3.4 E/PO TIMELINE
          The following timeline shows timing of key activities within the MAVEN E/PO Program.

                                        FY 2011             FY 2012              FY 2013              FY 2014              FY 2015              FY 2016
                                        1   2     3    4    1    2    3     4    1    2    3     4    1    2    3    4     1    2    3    4     1    2    3
                                        Oct- Jan- Apr- July- Oct- Jan- Apr- July- Oct- Jan- Apr- July- Oct- Jan- Apr- July- Oct- Jan- Apr- July- Oct- Jan- Apr
                                        Dec Mar June Sept Dec Mar June Sept Dec Mar June Sept Dec Mar June Sept Dec Mar June Sept Dec Mar
I. Key Mission Events incorporation
into E/PO
   A.   Launch Nov.-Dec. 2013
   B.   Mars Orbit Insertion 9/16/14
   C.   Detailed measurements of
        upper atmosphere,
        ionosphere, planetary corona,
        solar wind, solar EUV, SEPs
   D.   Deep dip campaigns
   E.   MAVEN climate history
        scientific discoveries
II. Overarching: Management
and Evaluation
   A.   Maintain regular
        communications with PI,
        oversee and integrate EPO
        program and partners,
        coordinate with planetary
        E/PO Community, interface
        with PAO, provide content to
        NASA Nationwide, share
        Goddard vis
   B.   Report to MAVEN team,
        NASA
        ( MSR, 533, Nuggets, OEPM,
        Buckets)
   C.   CDR, Implementation Plans
   D.   Interface with NASA KSFC
        E/PO at launch
   E.   Orbital insertion activities
        embedded in programs
   F.   Present E/PO opportunities to
        MAVEN team
   G.   Coordinate evaluation with
        Cornerstone Eval. Assoc.




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                                             FY 2011              FY 2012             FY 2013              FY 2014              FY 2015              FY 2016
                                             1   2     3    4     1   2     3    4    1    2    3    4     1    2    3    4     1    2    3    4     1    2    3
                                             Oct- Jan- Apr- July- Oct- Jan- Apr- July- Oct- Jan- Apr- July- Oct- Jan- Apr- July- Oct- Jan- Apr- July- Oct- Jan- Apr
                                             Dec Mar June Sept Dec Mar June Sept Dec Mar June Sept Dec Mar June Sept Dec Mar June Sept Dec Mar
III. Formal Education
    A. Mars Educator Ambassador
         Program
      1. Create new Project Spectra!
           lessons
        a. Paid teacher advisor
        b. MESA-St. Vrain/Casa de la
              Esperanza teacher PD
        c. MESA-St. Vrain/Casa de la
              Esperanza piloting
        d. Develop interactive
              incorporating data and
              discoveries
      2. Update Exploring Magnetism
           lessons
      3. Ambassador Workshops
             a. Cohort I Workshop in
                 Berkeley
             b. Cohort II Workshop in
                 Boulder
             4. Tier 2 Teacher Workshops
             a. Cohort I Ambassadors
                 train “Tier 2” teachers.
                 UCB provides
                 Ambassadors materials,
                 weekly communication,
                 review of Tier 2 workshop
                 presentations, social
                 networking opportunities
             b. Cohort II Ambassadors
                 train “Tier 2” teachers.
                 LASP provides
                 Ambassadors materials,
                 weekly communication,
                 review of Tier 2 workshop
                 presentations, social
                 networking opportunities




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B.        Space Science Teachers Summit
     1.     Three days of week-long
            Summit will focus on MAVEN-
            related science and materials;
            link Summit teachers to
            MAVEN social networking.
            Location: LASP, Colorado
C.        Red Planet: Read, Write,
          Explore!
     1.     Needs Assessment and
            development of curricula with
            paid elementary school
            teacher advisor; translation of
            curricula into Spanish.
     2.     Half-day workshopin Boulder
            for Casa de la Esperanza and
            MESA-St. Vrain teachers;
            teachers pilot program,
            provide feedback. Include
            mission updates and
            discoveries.
     3.     Three national teacher
            professional development and
            one Colorado teacher
            professional development with
            CLACE
     4.     One Colorado teacher
            professional development with
            CLACE. Include mission
            updates and discoveries.




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                                               FY 2011              FY 2012             FY 2013              FY 2014              FY 2015              FY 2016
                                               1   2     3    4     1   2     3    4    1    2    3    4     1    2    3    4     1    2    3    4     1    2    3
                                               Oct- Jan- Apr- July- Oct- Jan- Apr- July- Oct- Jan- Apr- July- Oct- Jan- Apr- July- Oct- Jan- Apr- July- Oct- Jan- Apr
                                               Dec Mar June Sept Dec Mar June Sept Dec Mar June Sept Dec Mar June Sept Dec Mar June Sept Dec Mar
IV. Informal Education
     A. Science on a Sphere Network
        1. Analyze and incorporate
             needs assessments, develop
             playlist and scripts (Berkeley)
        2. Train beta test partners;
             refine script. Link informal
             educators to MAVEN social
             networking. (Goddard/LPI)
        3. 2-day training of SOS network
             to build on launch. Remote
             professional development for
             SOS network members. Link
             informal educators to
             MAVEN social networking.
             Incorporate MAVEN content
             into ongoing programs at
             GSFC. (Goddard/LPI)
        4. Remote professional
             development for SOS
             network members on new
             content and science.
             Incorporate MAVEN content
             into ongoing programs at
             GSFC. (Goddard/LPI)
        5. Adaptation of informal
             education script to include
             new science results and data
             visualizations. (Berkeley)
     B. Imagine Mars through Native
          Eyes
      1. Investigate Native knowledge
           of Mars within Navajo,
           Cherokee, Native Hawaiian
           communities.
      2. Identify Native communities
           interested in developing IMNE
           programs and build durable
           relationship
      3. Determine how to engage
           Native communities through
           MAVEN’s launch and arrival at
           Mars. Link to social networking
      4. Host launch program




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 5.   Pilot curriculum. Host face-to-
      face and distance learning
      workshops . Link to MAVEN
      social networking.
 6.   Host face-to-face and distance
      learning workshops on
      curriculum.
 7.   Submit curriculum through
      NASA SMD E/PO product
      review.
 8.   Support sustaining activities at
      a subset of sites. Include
      mission updates and
      discoveries.
 9.   Disseminate curriculum.
C.    Girl Scouts
 1.   Survey Mars E/PO materials;
      hold focus group with Girl
      Scout leaders and MAVEN
      scientist to assess needs and
      identify key elements of
      project. Draft/revise “Girls Go
      To Mars” activities and GSA
      leader training class. Conduct
      alpha test with local/regional
      GSA leaders and girls in
      California.
 2.   Pilot kit and training; revise
      following formative evaluation.
      Disseminate kit and training
      locally and regionally; test
      nationally. Include mission
      updates. Link Girl Scouts
      leaders to MAVEN social
      networking.
 3.   Complete final revisions.
      Continue dissemination.
      Expand reach via online
      downloads, Solar System
      Ambassadors, science centers,
      museums. Include mission
      updates and discoveries.




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                                           FY 2011              FY 2012             FY 2013              FY 2014              FY 2015              FY 2016
                                           1   2     3    4     1   2     3    4    1    2    3    4     1    2    3    4     1    2    3    4     1    2    3
                                           Oct- Jan- Apr- July- Oct- Jan- Apr- July- Oct- Jan- Apr- July- Oct- Jan- Apr- July- Oct- Jan- Apr- July- Oct- Jan- Apr
                                           Dec Mar June Sept Dec Mar June Sept Dec Mar June Sept Dec Mar June Sept Dec Mar June Sept Dec Mar
V. Public Outreach
A. Website and Social Media
     1. MAVEN website at LASP
        Redesign LASP MAVEN hub site;
         Develop Mars timeline or
         similar interactive for web;
         Develop web editorial calendar
        Launch regular blog series
        Develop content to fulfill
         editorial calendar
    2.   Facebook (MAVEN)
    a.   Continue Facebook content at
         1 post/day, including PI blog
    b.   Tie Facebook content to
         complement website
    c.   Coordinate Events w/TweetUps
    d.   Maintain and fulfill FB edcal;
         Reward public to increase
         followers
    e.   Facebook posts at 2-3/day;
    f.   Facebook at 1 post/day
    3.   Twitter (MAVEN2Mars)
    a.   Increase Tweets to 5/day; Build
         followers, establish community
    b.   Maintain Tweets at 7-10/day
    c.   Maintain Tweets at 3-5/day
    d.   Maintain Tweets at 1-2/day
    4.   TweetUps
    a.   Identify followers for TweetUp
    b.   Host L-6 mos science virtual
         TweetUp event (webcast)
    c.   Select 12 followers to attend
         launch TweetUp
    d.   Host L-30 days launch virtual
         TweetUp event (webcast)
    e.   Host launch TweetUp event
    f.   Host science-data virtual
         TweetUp (via webcast)
    g.   Select followers for data
         wrap-up TweetUp event @LASP
    h.   Host data wrap-up TweetUp in
         person at LASP
    5.   Picassa/Flickr
    a.   Establish photo hosting site;
         build content library


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     b. Continue to build library
     c. House visual scientific data
     6. YouTube
     a. Establish video hosting site;
        establish connections with
        existing clients/partners
     b. Build content library (scientist
        interviews, TweetUp, launch
        videos, and data-related
        videos/interviews
     7. iTunesU
     a. Establish iTunes U user account
     b. Populate site
     c. Add data products
     8. Blog
     a. Design/launch mission blog;
        Provide general mission
        overview and connections to
        social media; set up RSS
     b. Populate blog with multimedia
        content; Incorporate Facebook PI
        blog into existing posts
     c. Build library; Encourage mission
        members to contribute;
        Monitor blog content/
        permissions
     9. Crowdsourcing
     a. MAVEN tagline
     b. One or more monitored online
        Q&A sessions with MAVEN
        scientists/engineers
     c. Contest to attend launch
        TweetUp
     d. Girls Go to Mars patch
B.   Media Support initiatives
     1. Pre-launch workshop
     2. Data discovery workshop




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2 FORMAL EDUCATION: TEACHER PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND
CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT
A recent report underscores the importance of prioritizing STEM education. One of the central challenges of our
nation is “ensuring an adequate supply of well-prepared and highly effective STEM teachers.” The NSB considers
this supply of excellent teachers as foundational to constructing a strong, coordinated STEM education system
(NSB, 2007).2

NASA’s Office of Education and SMD E/PO Programs have long recognized the importance of teacher professional
development. LASP and CSE@SSL personnel have years of experience in presenting quality teacher professional
development workshops. Over the past several years, approximately 400 teachers per year have attended workshops
presented by LASP and CSE@SSL, reaching thousands of students in their home states.

2.1 MAVEN EDUCATOR AMBASSADOR PROGRAM
2.1.2 AUDIENCE NEED
Our program will provide teacher professional development on magnetism and spectroscopy, topics which are
fundamental to space science and for which MAVEN can provide inspiring real-world examples. As part of the
THEMIS mission, Dr. Peticolas presented teacher professional development workshops on Exploring Magnetism.
An evaluation of these programs showed that:

       •    Teachers who participated in professional development workshops and presented the Exploring Magnetism
            guides in their classroom reported that on average, students responded with interest as evidenced by a mean
            rating of 3.8 on a 5 point scale (with 1=bored/extremely disinterested and 5=enthusiastic/extremely
            interested.
       •    57% of teachers reporting that active participation in real science sparked interest as students felt a vital
            connection to the THEMIS mission
       •    The Exploring Magnetism Guides and instructor’s enthusiasm inspired students
       •    Teachers reported science course enrollment increases

In a survey of 100 educators E2.xploring Magnetism guides, 90 Educators answering “yes” to the question: “Have
you used or would you consider using any of the Exploring Magnetism lesson guides?” We interpret this as a real
need for educators to have magnetism curriculum.

Our program includes explorations of data through LASP’s successful Project Spectra. Project Spectra provides
facilitated access to authentic data. According to a report by the National Science Digital Library (NSDL 2002)3,
using data in the classroom:




2
 National Science Board, National Action Plan for Addressing the Critical Needs of the U.S. Science, Technology, Engineering,
and Mathematics Education System, (Arlington, VA 2007), 1.

3
    National Science Digital Library, Using Data in Undergraduate Science Classrooms, (Northfield, MN, 2002), 4.




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• Empowers and motivates students

• Creates a real-world context for scientific exploration

• Harnesses excitement about the scientific process

• Empowers students to pose and answer their own questions

2.1.3     PROGRAM DETAIL
The MAVEN Educator Ambassador (MEA) program recruits, selects, trains, and supports teacher-trainers. As
shown in Table 2.1.1.a, our MEA program provides 1) two weeklong workshops, one in summer of 2013 and one in
the summer of 2015, and 2) follow-on support for the teachers as they present hour-long to daylong workshops to
additional educators in the following year of their cohort. We provide professional develop for two cohorts of thirty
Ambassadors each; those sixty teachers will then extend the program to an additional thirty teachers (called “Tier 2”
teachers) each.

We will assist educators in building a strong foundation of standards-based concepts, primarily on the topics of
magnetism and spectroscopy, in their classrooms. As a result, we envision that teachers and their students will gain
greater understanding of core science concepts, allowing them to better understand and be inspired by the exciting
work of NASA. Students who are engaged and successful in science will be more likely to pursue STEM learning
and career opportunities in the future.

CURRICULA
Four new lessons around spectroscopy of Mars’ atmosphere will be developed within LASP’s “Project Spectra!”
program (see Table 2.1.2.b). Using spectroscopy as its framework, “Project Spectra!” explores information about the
planets in our solar system through hands-on activities and data-rich exercises. “Project Spectra!” helps students to
explore space science by working with authentic data, and it uses problem solving and inquiry to add depth to the
experience. We will develop four “Project Spectra!” lessons specifically designed to contain MAVEN-science-
related topics. Teacher advisors and pilot teachers, provided through partners Casa de la Esperanza and MESA-St.
Vrain, will implement the materials we have developed in their classrooms and provide feedback on their
experiences and perceptions of the lessons. The new lessons will address spectroscopic and geological evidence that
water existed on Mars; Mars will be compared to other solar system bodies.

The magnetism content will be taught from the Exploring Magnetism Guides, incorporating MAVEN science. The
Exploring Magnetism Guides, developed under the FAST, STEREO-IMPACT, and THEMIS missions, lay the
groundwork for in-depth exploration of Mars’ magnetic fields, its role in governing interactions with the solar wind,
and the impact in driving atmospheric loss to space. For example, in “Exploring Magnetism in the Solar Wind,”
students learn about the stream of charged particles emanating from the Sun and its effects on the Solar System.
This guide provides some of the basic physics required to understand Mars’ atmosphere and history. We will also
make connections to planetary habitability.

ADD PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS
In the design of our MEA professional development, we will utilize best practices from the following sources:

        Designing Professional Development for Teachers of Science and Mathematics (Loucks-Horsley, 2003)
        The Architecture of Reform: GEMS and the National Standards (Seaborg, 2000)
        GEMS Leader’s Handbook (Seaborg, 1997)




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NASA PORTFOLIO GOALS ADDRESSED:
NASA’s current educational strategy builds on the agency’s historical education commitment. NASA Education
Strategic Coordination Framework: A Portfolio Approach (2005) identified three major education goals

    1.   Strengthen NASA and the Nation’s future workforce

    2.   Attract and retain students in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) disciplines

    3.   Engage Americans in NASA’s mission

Our MAVEN Educator Ambassador Program contributes toward the NASA E/PO portfolio as follows:

        Attract and retain students in STEM disciplines—The MEA Program addresses the need to create the
         next generation of NASA explorers and to promote a space science literate populace by focusing on
         improving science teaching and learning. Professional development experiences for our teachers will
         support the ultimate goal of helping them attract, retain, engage, and educate students in science,
         technology, engineering, and mathematics.
        Engage Americans in NASA’s mission—We will invite our Ambassadors, Tier 2 Teachers, and all their
         students to participate in the excitement of the MAVEN mission through social media avenues.

The specific objectives to meet these goals and how we will evaluate whether we met the objectives, can be found
below in the Section on the MEA evaluation.

KEY ELEMENTS OF MEA WORKSHOPS
        MAVEN Science and Engineering: The presentation of science content by mission scientists will provide
         teachers with background science. Through direct contact with the Mission P.I., MAVEN scientists and
         engineers, we will strive to create personal ties to the MAVEN mission for the Ambassadors, their students,
         and the additional teachers they reach through Tier 2 workshops. These experiences will be extended
         through social media.
        Best Practices in Teacher Professional Development: The MEA workshops will demonstrate best practices
         in teacher professional development, training educators how to present their own “Tier 2” workshops.
        Training on Reviewed, Standards-Based Resources: Content for the program will be based on a suite of
         reviewed, standards-based educational resources on magnetism and spectroscopy. Content will include
         pedagogical information, scaffolding activities, and hands-on experiments.

NATIONAL STANDARDS ADDRESSED
TABLE 2.1.2C ALIGNMENT OF “EXPLORING MAGNETISM” AND PROJECT SPECTRA LESSONS TO NATIONAL SCIENCE
EDUCATION STANDARDS
Grade 5-8           Physical      Science and        Earth and Space Science                   History and
Content             Science       Technology                                                   Nature of Science
Standard
 Fundamental        Transfer of   Understanding      Earth in the   Structure    Earth’s       Nature of science
Concept             Energy        about Science      Solar          of the       History
Addressed by                      and Technology     System         Earth
Lessons                                                             System




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RECRUITMENT
We will recruit Ambassadors with the following priorities:

        Teachers with a proven track record of providing teacher professional development
        Teachers working with underserved/underrepresented student populations
        Teachers from across the United States

The CSE@SSL team hosts the Heliophysics Educator Ambassador program in partnership with many heliophysics
missions. We have proven success in recruiting teachers for the program. These teacher-trainers have stayed
connected to the program. We recently had 100% response rate to a survey given to our 2009 Cohort of
Heliophysics Ambassadors, who indicated a strong interest in ongoing communication and professional
development with NASA.

CUSTOMER NEEDS FOCUS
Our evaluation team will conduct evaluation at the conclusion of each MEA workshop and will periodically follow
up with the Ambassadors. This evaluation, along with our ongoing communication with the Ambassadors, will
ensure that we meet the needs of the Ambassadors. Our recent review of our Heliophysics Educator Ambassadors
indicated a very high level of satisfaction with the support they had received from our team, and the way the
professional development was tailored to their needs.

KEY TEAM MEMBERS AND CONTRIBUTIONS
CSE@SSL

        Laura Peticolas--Dr. Peticolas will serve as a science instructor at the MEA workshop, as well as facilitate
         input and participation by the MAVEN team. Together with Erin Wood and Kyle Fricke, she will set the
         MEA workshop agenda and learning outcomes.
        Kyle Fricke--Mr. Fricke will shape the professional development agenda for the MEA program, serve as an
         instructor during both workshops, communicate via the MEA listserve, and provide ongoing input and
         support to the MEAs as they conduct workshops.
        Darlene Yan--Ms. Yan will provide logistical support to the MEA workshop in Berkeley. She will also
         provide ongoing support and communication with the first cohort of Ambassadors.

LASP

        Erin Wood--Ms. Wood will shape the professional development agenda for the MEA program, serve as an
         instructor during both workshops, communicate via the MEA listserve, and provide ongoing input and
         support to the MEAs as they conduct workshops. She will also provide ongoing support and
         communication with the second cohort of Ambassadors.




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T IMELINE 1. MAVEN E DUCATOR A MBASSADOR P ROGRAM A CTIVITIES




2.1.4 EVALUATION
Cornerstone Evaluation Associates (CEA) will evaluate the impact of the MEA teacher professional development
workshops and the evidence sought to determine impact, as shown in Tables 2.1.3.a and 2.1.3.b. CEA will also
provide formative feedback for “Project Spectra!” lesson development as shown in table 2.1.3.c. A variety of
methods will be used including knowledge assessments, workshop questionnaires, online follow-up surveys,
telephone interviews and narratives from reports required from participating teachers.

All professional development workshops will also gather data to provide an idea of the reach of our programs—both
in terms of numbers of people and products disseminated but also demographics of people involved and
psychographic data, as shown in Table 2.1.3.d.




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TABLE 2.1.3.A MEA TIER 1 WORKSHOPS—IMPACT AND EVIDENCE
Impact         Impact/Audience Objectives           Evidence
Categories
Awareness,      Educators are aware of             Knowledge Aseessment (KA)—Majority shows gains in knowledge
Knowledge,       MAVEN Mission                      Workshop Questionnaire (WQ)—Majority reports confidence/competence
Under-          Educators understand the           in new knowledge and anticipates comfort using new knowledge to
standing         connection of MAVEN science        conduct training workshops about light in a practical, real-world way; open-
                 engineering to fundamental         ended queries reveal areas of concern with regard to knowledge and
                 physical science concepts          content use.
                Educators understand the           Follow-Up Survey Online (F-US)—Majority indicates that knowledge was
                 connection between                 sufficient to conduct workshop; open-ended question reveals any problems
                 magnetism and habitability         concerning insufficient knowledge, difficulties/highlights in conveying the
                When educators teach light         concepts presented or contextualizing information in practical, real-world
                 science, they put it in the        way.
                 context of planetary
                 exploration using ‘Project
                 Spectra!’
                Educators put information
                 about light, magnetism,
                 habitability in context in a way
                 that demonstrates its practical
                 use in the real world
Engagement,    Educators perceive themselves        WQ—Majority reports an increased interest in MAVEN/STEM-related
Interest       as more interested, engaged and      content; describes ways they intend to pursue interests personally and
               effective in teaching STEM           professionally, including inspiring fellow teachers. Some report intention to
               content to other teachers after      conduct multiple workshops, implement MAVEN content in classroom.
               participating in the workshop        F-US—Majority reports conducting required workshop, sharing MAVEN-
                                                    related materials/resources with colleagues and others, reading regular
                                                    MAVEN newsletters, having increased interest in related
                                                    topics/science/future activities. Some report conducting additional
                                                    workshops, participating in webinars, connecting with MAVEN team and
                                                    other MEAs, applying to participate in other NASA-related or STEM-based
                                                    projects.
Behavior       Educators teach standards-           WQ—Majority indicates feeling prepared and confident to conduct Tier 2
               based MAVEN curriculum/data          workshops, to incorporate standards-based MAVEN curriculum/data into
               to other teachers                    discussion. Open-ended queries indicate types of support needed,
                                                    concerns.
               Educators feel supported and         F-US—Closed-ended questions concerning demographics and logistics of
               prepared to conduct a MAVEN-         workshop, adequacy of training, level of confidence/preparedness and
               based workshop for other             support, success in incorporating standards-based approach, perceived
               teachers                             reactions of Tier 2 teacher to presentation. Open-ended queries probe for
                                                    highlights/challenges experienced with Tier 2 training session.
                                                    R—Open-ended query about how they incorporated standards-based
                                                    MAVEN curriculum/data into Tier 2 workshop presentations.
Skills         Educators use inquiry-based          F-US—Majority indicates using inquiry-based methods and confidence in
               pedagogical methods that they        their skills in using these techniques in their Tier 2 presentations. Majority
               learned through modeling in the      provides indicators that they have learned new, inquiry-based skills and
               workshops in teaching other          used existing skills to enhance STEM-related capacities. Some report using
               teachers                             inquiry-based methods for teaching MAVEN-related content in their
                                                    classrooms.
                                                    Required Reports from MEAs (R)—Open-ended query about how MEAs
                                                    used inquiry-based strategies in Tier 2 workshop presentations.




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T ABLE 2.1.3. B MEA T IER 2 W ORKSHOPS —I MPACT AND E VIDENCE
Impact         Impact/Audience Objectives Evidence
Categories
Awareness       Educators are aware of          WQ—Majority reports confidence/competence in new awareness of the
                 MAVEN Mission                   MAVEN mission and anticipates comfort exposing students to new
                Educators understand the        concepts about light in a practical, real-world way; open-ended queries
                 connection of MAVEN science     reveal areas of uncertainty with regard to understanding.
                 engineering to fundamental
                 physical science concepts
Engagement,    Educators anticipate using        WQ—Majority reports an increased interest in MAVEN/STEM-related
Interest       lessons modeled at the            content; describes ways they intend to pursue interests personally and
               workshop they attended with       professionally, including inspiring students and informally sharing with
               their students                    colleagues. Some report intention to incorporate MAVEN into their basic
                                                 curriculum as well as use as a supplemental resource and to share MAVEN
                                                 with colleagues in more formal venues such as workshops.


T ABLE 2.1.3 C . “P ROJECT S PECTRA !” C URRICULUM E VALUATION —F ORMATIVE F EEDBACK D ETAILS
Activity           Evaluation Objective                     Formative Feedback
“Project         To improve four “Project Spectra!” lessons   Interviews (I)—Through telephone interviews*, implementers
Spectra!”        specifically designed to contain MAVEN-      (N=4) will be asked to discuss such aspects as: the strengths
Curriculum       related topics. This will be done by         and weaknesses of the lessons, difficulties and positive
Testing          enlisting workshop participants from the     experiences when implementing lessons, whether instruction
                 “Project Spectra!” professional              followed the teaching plan verbatim or how teachers may
                 development workshops with Casa and          have deviated from the prescribed plan, what aspects of the
                 MESA teachers (N=4). They will implement     lessons they would change and how, creative alternative
                 “Project Spectra!” lessons in their          approaches they would take to teaching these lessons, are
                 afterschool classrooms. Subsequently,        lessons at an appropriate level for students, did teachers share
                 they will provide feedback on their          lessons with colleagues. These data are content analyzed and
                 experiences, perceptions of the lessons,     discussed with client in a timely manner in order to provide
                 and the impact of these lessons on their     ‘feedback’ for final revisions/changes to the curriculum before
                 students                                     submitting to NASA for approval.
* The primary thrust of the in-depth interviews is to understand teachers’ perceptions of and experiences with the
“Project Spectra!” lessons. However, these interviews also provide an ideal opportunity for gaining teachers’
perceptions of the impact of these lessons on their students. Discussing with teachers how students responded to the
lessons will help determine the extent to which they believe the lessons are achieving the following “Project
Spectra!” student objectives:

    •    Student knowledge—students understand the connection between atmospheric properties and habitability;
         students put light science in context of planetary exploration using “Project Spectra!”; students can
         contextualize information about light science in a way that demonstrates its practical use in the real world
    •    Student engagement—students are empowered and motivated by using authentic data in the classroom
    •    Student behavior—students pose and answer their own questions with regard to spectroscopy and Mars
    •    Student skills—students build and use a spectrograph; students use actual Mission data




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T ABLE 2.1.3. D . F ORMAL T EACHER P ROFESSIONAL D EVELOPMENT W ORKSHOPS —
P ARTICIPANT A CCOUNTABILITY I NFORMATION
Outputs                                            Demographics                           Psychographic Data
 # of workshops conducted                         Teacher—Grade level, subject            Motivation for attending
 # of participants                                taught, # of years in                    workshops
 # of materials/products distributed              profession                              Prior knowledge of workshop
 # of anticipated/actual students who will be     School—Setting (rural, urban,            content
   exposed to project ideas/materials              suburban), Title I                      Interest in topics presented
 # of anticipated/actual colleagues who will      Student—% free-reduced
   be exposed to project ideas/materials           lunches, underrepresented in
                                                   science, underserved

2.2      SPACE SCIENCE TEACHERS SUMMIT
2.2.1 AUDIENCE NEED
According to survey results from previous LASP work with teachers, teachers feel a strong need to expand their
students’ background in STEM topics to increase the opportunities that their students will have to participate in the
large space industry sector of our state economy. Colorado is the third-largest aerospace economy in the United
States (Colorado Space Coalition, 2010). 4 With such a large potential job base, teachers are well aware of the
importance of inspiring the next generation of aerospace engineers and space science project scientists.

Educators’ instincts are borne out by State of Colorado data. The Colorado Department of Education (CDE) has
identified the need for improved science education standards, as science proficiency is crucial to Colorado’s
economy. In 2009, 55% of all Colorado students scored below proficiency level on the Colorado Student
Assessment Program test for science. 5 In comparing CSAP results from 2009 to 2010: “ In grade eight, the percent
of proficient and advanced students decreased from 49 to 48 percent, and in grade 10, the percent of
proficient and advanced students decreased from 50 to 47 percent.” (CDE, 2010).6 The CDE stated that
students across grades are scoring lower than expected, regardless of race, ethnicity, gender, or poverty level.

LASP’s Space Science Teacher Summit (Summit) is a week-long professional development workshop for middle
school teachers on a relatively broad range of space science topics. From evaluation results from previous Summits,
Educators’ indicate that the Summit fills the above-mentioned needs of secondary teachers in providing science and
hands-on data to secondary teachers. In 2010, LASP did not need to advertise the Summit to fill its participant slots
as there was already a robust wait-list of educators wanting to attend – having found out about the program from
colleagues who had attended the Summit in previous years. Clearly the Summit has developed an excellent




4
 CSC briefs congressional delegation on space priorities (2010). Retrieved May 24, 2011 from
http://www.spacecolorado.org/news/csc-briefs-congressional-delegation-on-space-priorities.html

5
 Colorado Department of Education: CSAP Summary Data 2009, Science Grade 5, 8, and 10. Accessed April 29, 2010 from:
http://www.cde.state.co.us/cdeassess/documents/csap/csap_summary.html#2009
6
  Colorado Department of Education. 2010 CSAP State Summary Results: Science Grade 5, 8, and 10. Accessed May 24, 2010
from: http://www.cde.state.co.us/cdeassess/documents/csap/csap_summary.html#2010



24 | P a g e
reputation for meeting teacher’s needs and wants and we anticipate our MAVEN contributions to the Summit in
future years will continue the trend.

2.2.2 PROGRAM DETAIL
The Space Science Teachers Summit has been a successful model for middle school teacher professional
development at LASP beginning in the summer of 2008. MAVEN science will be brought into the annual Summit
for two summers (see Table 2.2.1.a) and will draw from materials prepared for the Educator Ambassadors Program.

The Summit is a weeklong professional development program for middle and high school teachers to bring the
excitement of space science and exploration to students. The Summit reaches approximately thirty teachers per year
with innovative space science education materials that emphasize state and national science and math standards,
assessment tools, use of data in the classroom, and best practices. Topics rotate annually to utilize new materials, as
well as focus on “hot topics” in space science; during the two years of support from MAVEN, the Summit will focus
on MAVEN-related topics during three days of the week-long workshop.

The Summit will include both LASP- and NASA-developed education materials, including the LASP engineering
program “Project Spectra!” and other materials developed or adapted for MAVEN.

NASA PORTFOLIO GOALS ADDRESSED:
   Strengthen NASA and the Nation’s future workforce--The Summit targets educators who engage
    underserved populations, namely rural and urban areas of the state of CO.
   Attract and retain students in STEM disciplines--Teachers who are able to communicate the excitement of
    STEM to their students help attract and retain students in STEM disciplines; the Summit is the perfect vehicle to
    disseminate space science and NASA mission information to teachers, increasing their comfort and capability in
    STEM.

The specific objectives to meet these goals and how we will evaluate whether we met the objectives, can be found
below in the Section on the Summit evaluation.

SAMPLE SUMMIT OUTLINE FOR MAVEN-RELATED CONTENT
Below is a sample content outline of the types of content we might cover in the Summit, based on the 2010 Space
Science Teachers Summit. For the three days of MAVEN content in spring 2013 and 2014, we will tailor MAVEN-
related content from Exploring Magnetism and “Project Spectra!”, as well as other NASA-approved curricula
related to science and engineering topics that MAVEN will explore. We use a jigsaw model when presenting
material to teachers: the teachers conduct small group activities, reconvening as a class to present the activity to the
group. This model gives broad exposure to numerous activities from a suite of lessons.

Scientist lectures:

   Mars planetary overview (MAVEN scientist)
   MAVEN mission (MAVEN scientist)
   Past explorations of Mars and the surprises uncovered (MAVEN scientist)
   Engineering for extreme environments (MAVEN engineer)
   Spectroscopy and mission science (MAVEN E/PO team member, Erin Wood)

Activities:

   Kinesthetic astronomy (Cherlynn Morrow)
   “Science on a Sphere” presentation on the Sun-Earth connection (Fiske Planetarium)
   Selected activities from Voyages Through Time Curriculum (SETI Institute)


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   Selected activities from the Astronomical Society of the Pacific (TBD)
   Selected activities from “Exploring Magnetism” (MAVEN E/PO team member, Erin Wood)
   Selected activities from “Project Spectra!” (MAVEN E/PO team member, Erin Wood)
   Selected activities from New Horizons (TBD)
   Selected activities from the Mars Education Program (TBD)

NATIONAL STANDARDS ADDRESSED
Professional Development Standards: The Summit address National Science Education Standards (NSES) outlined
for professional development of:

   Integration of knowledge about science with knowledge about learning, pedagogy, students
   The development of the understanding and ability for lifelong learning

The Summit utilizes lessons that conform to NSES and American Association for the Advancement of Science
(AAAS) 2061 science benchmarks. Because topics rotate annually, these will vary per year. Middle school standards
addressed in a typical year include the following.

National Science Education Standards:

5th-8th grade

   Science as Inquiry, Content Standard A—Think critically and logically to make the relationships between
    evidence and explanations
   Physical Science, Content Standard B—Transfer of energy
   Earth and Space Science, Content Standard D—Energy in the Solar System
   Science and Technology, Content Standard E—Understandings about science and technology
   History and Nature of Science, Content Standard G—Science as a human endeavor

RECRUITMENT
Colorado’s student population is 35% non-white. Twenty-five percent of Colorado’s students identify themselves as
Hispanic, 6% as black, and 1% as Native American. Because we recruit teachers from around the state, the Summit
reaches a diverse group of young people and educators, including a large number of English language learners.

We have recruited previous attendees of the Space Science Teachers Summit from districts that engage underserved
populations; we intend to follow the same plan for the Middle School Teacher Summit. We advertise heavily in rural
districts and in districts serving a large percentage of free-and-reduced-lunch students. Because we generally have
more applicants than available space, we give preference to teachers who:

        serve underserved populations;
        teach a high percentage of free-and-reduced-lunch students;
        come from urban or rural districts;
        have demonstrated a need for improved programming in their school or district; and
        have described personal teaching goals that align with the Summit offerings.

Also of note is our ongoing relationship with the MESA (Mathematics, Engineering, and Science Association)
program, which has served as a recruitment vehicle for the Summit. This Colorado-based program is dedicated to
providing science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) activities and career promotion to grade
school students traditionally underrepresented in these careers. Primarily an after school program, MESA
emphasizes hands-on, data-driven programs and projects that are relevant to current issues. We anticipate continuing
our ongoing relationship with MESA, particularly in support of recruiting a diverse elementary educator audience


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that reaches underserved students. Colorado MESA teachers can expect to receive at least 15% of the slots offered
out of the thirty teachers who will attend the Summit each year.

Providing lodging, food, a stipend, and professional graduate credit to the teachers speaks to our commitment to
include teachers who might not otherwise be financially disposed to attend a weeklong professional development
opportunity such as this one. We will also offer assistance in finding childcare for teachers if necessary.

CUSTOMER NEEDS FOCUS
The Space Science Teachers Summit has provided teachers with a rigorous, engaging program in the space sciences
for the past three years. By the program’s completion this summer, we will have engaged more than 92 secondary
school teachers across thirty-two school districts in the State of Colorado. Through our contact with these teachers
and workshop evaluation, we strive to meet the needs of the teachers.

KEY TEAM MEMBERS AND CONTRIBUTIONS
Below is a breakdown of individual personnel and their duties by institution.

LASP

   Stephanie Renfrow—Manage the Space Science Teachers Summit implementation and integration with
    MAVEN EPO programming (MEA program, “Project Spectra!”)
   Erin Wood—Summit implementation; lesson plans and materials development and reuse/repurpose of SSL’s
    Exploring Magnetism and LASP “Project Spectra!” curricula
   Tom Mason—Support for Summit implementation and linking teachers to social media efforts
   TBD—A student assistant will help with Summit implementation

CSE@SSL

   Dr.Laura Peticolas—provide input to the Space Science Summit based on teaching Exploring Magnetism
    workshops.

T IMELINE 2. S PACE S CIENCE S UMMIT A CTIVITIES




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2.2.3 EVALUATION
Cornerstone Evaluation will conduct an evaluation of the Summit as shown in Table 2.2.2.a. The focus of the
evaluation is to determine whether the program has met its impact and audience objectives using knowledge
assessments, end-of-workshop evaluations, and online follow-up surveys.

TABLE 2.2.2.A SPACE SCIENCE TEACHERS SUMMIT WORKSHOPS—IMPACT AND EVIDENCE
Impact         Impact/Audience Objectives               Evidence
Categories
Awareness,      Educators experience increased         KA—Use MEA assessment for Summit workshops
Knowledge,       comfort in teaching astronomy          WQ—Majority reports understanding the lecture and lessons
Under-          Educators experience increased         presented, having gained information on scientific process and knowing
standing         interest in astronomy                  where to gain more information. Majority also reports having
                Educators know more about              confidence/competence in new astronomy knowledge and anticipates
                 astronomy                              comfort using new knowledge to teach students about light, magnetism
                Educators put the information          and habitability in a practical, real-world way; open-ended queries
                 about light, magnetism, and            reveal areas of concern with regard to knowledge and content use.
                 habitability in context in a way       F-US—Majority indicates that knowledge was sufficient to implement
                 that demonstrates its practical        hands-on activities in their classrooms; open-ended question reveals
                 use in the real world                  any challenges concerning insufficient knowledge, difficulties/highlights
                Educators are aware of MAVEN           in incorporating information from workshop into light
                 Mission. Educators understand          science/astronomy or contextualizing information in practical, real-
                 the connection of MAVEN science        world way.
                 to fundamental physical science
                 concepts
Engagement,    Educators perceive themselves as         WQ—Majority reports an increased interest in astronomy and
Interest       more interested, engaged and             MAVEN/STEM-related content; describes ways they intend to pursue
               effective in teaching STEM content       interests personally and professionally, including inspiring students by
               to students after participating in the   implementing MAVEN-related astronomy in classroom. Some report
               workshop                                 intention to share materials/resources with colleagues and participate
                                                        in other STEM-based workshops.
                                                        F-US—Majority reports having increased interest in related
                                                        topics/science/future activities. Some report actually sharing MAVEN-
                                                        related materials/resources with colleagues, connecting with other
                                                        Summit teachers, applying to participate in other NASA-related or
                                                        STEM-based workshops.
Behavior       Educators teach standards-based          WQ—Majority reports intentions to incorporate standards-based
               MAVEN and MAVEN-related STEM             MAVEN/STEM-related content into their classroom instruction. Open-
               content to students                      ended queries indicate types of support needed, concerns.
                                                        F-US—Closed-ended questions concerning level/depth of
                                                        implementation effort, time spent implementing, search for additional
                                                        resources, adequacy of preparation vis-à-vis Summit workshop, level of
                                                        confidence/preparedness and support, perceptions of success in
                                                        incorporating standards-based approach, perceived reactions of
                                                        students to materials/ideas. Open-ended queries probe for
                                                        highlights/challenges experienced with implementation experience.
Skills         Educators use inquiry-based              WQ—Majority reports intentions to use inquiry-based methods learned
               pedagogical methods that they            in workshop when implementing MAVEN science in classes.
               learned through modeling in the          F-US—Majority indicates using inquiry-based methods and confidence
               workshops in their teaching              in their skills in using these techniques in student instruction. Majority
                                                        provides indicators that they have learned new, inquiry-based skills and
                                                        used existing skills to enhance STEM-related capacities.




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2.3      “RED PLANET: READ, WRITE, EXPLORE!” SCIENCE-IN-LITERACY ROGRAM
2.3.1 AUDIENCE NEED
There has been a recent movement to improve literacy skills across the nation. Nationally, that translated to
increased classroom contact hours in reading and writing at the expense of other curricula, including science.
According to a 2007 Education Policy study (McMurrer, 20077), the average elementary school student spends only
178 minutes a week studying science, while spending over 500 minutes per week on literacy skills.

In Colorado, 55% of all Colorado students scored below proficiency level on the Colorado Student Assessment
Program’s (CSAP) test for science in 2009. According to the CDE, students across the board are scoring lower than
expected, regardless of race, ethnicity, gender, or poverty level. Improving and expanding teacher training and
developing content that is easy to implement is one way to enhance science education in Colorado and nationally.
Crucial to the advancement of science education in Colorado is improved teacher training and continuing education
opportunities.

The general consensus among elementary school teachers we interact with is that they have been pressured to teach
literacy at the expense of science. Programs that give teachers an opportunity to teach literacy while having students
explore an inherently fascinating science topic are a successful way to get science back in the classroom.

The Education Policy study (McMurrer, 2007) indicated that the average elementary school student spends 178
minutes a week studying science and 500 minutes per week on literacy skills. Programs that combine science and
literacy provide opportunities for elementary school teachers to teach science while not needing to sacrifice literacy
time.

2.3.2 PROGRAM DETAIL
“Red Planet: Read, Write, Explore,” is a standards-based science-in-literacy program that will combine literacy, art,
and creative expression. This type of curricula gives teachers the flexibility to integrate the program into a typical
class day and increase the number of science contact hours per school week. The Red Planet program will be
formulated after the popular LASP program Dancing Lights, which is a literacy-based program about the aurora.

To ensure that the needs of our target audience are considered during development of the lessons, an elementary
school teacher will serve as a paid advisor on the project. The teacher will assist with lesson and workshop
development. The advisor will be drawn from a pool of collaborators who engage underserved populations, thus
ensuring that we are considering the needs of underserved students.

Field-testing of the new lessons will include summer piloting by two of our partners, MESA-St. Vrain and Casa de
la Esperanza; we will support them with teacher professional development on the curricula in FY 12, 13, and 14. We
will continuously improve the lessons based on partner feedback. At the same time, their participation will enable
us to reach teachers who serve a high number of underserved and underrepresented students.




7
 McMurrer, Jennifer. (2007). Choices, Changes, and Challenges: Curriculum and Instruction in the NCLB Era.
Center on Education Policy. Retrieved May 25, 2011 from http://www.cep dc.org/index.cfm?fuseaction=document.show
DocumentByID&nodeID=1&DocumentID=212




29 | P a g e
An exciting aspect of the Red Planet program will be our efforts to extend the reach of the program beyond
Colorado and our local partners to a national audience. To do so, we will hire CLACE to translate the lessons into
Spanish and assist in recruiting English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) teachers, Spanish language teachers, and
teachers in bilingual schools for national workshops.

NASA PORTFOLIO GOALS ADDRESSED
        Strengthen NASA and the Nation’s future workforce--”Red Planet: Read, Write, Explore!” targets
         educators who engage underrepresented populations, namely Hispanic populations both in Colorado and
         nationally.
        Attract and retain students in STEM disciplines--Teachers who are able to communicate the excitement
         of STEM to their students from an early age help attract and retain students in STEM disciplines. ”Red
         Planet: Read, Write, Explore!” allows elementary school teachers to learn how to incorporate science into
         their more heavily emphasized literacy curriculum, exposing younger students to the excitement of science.

The specific objectives to meet these goals and how we will evaluate whether we met the objectives, can be found
below in the Section on the Red Planet evaluation.

“RED PLANET: READ, WRITE, EXPLORE!” CONTENT OUTLINE
The program will include four science and literacy lessons, and one culminating lesson developed around MAVEN
science. The lessons will include:

1.   A timeline activity where students first read about Mars’ history, and then individually illustrate different times
     during that history. As a class, students will place their drawings along a clothesline in order of time. Each
     student will defend why his or her illustration belongs where they have placed it, and will revise misconceptions
     based upon peer-to-peer feedback. At the end of the activity, the timeline will be in order on the clothesline,
     and will illustrate a complete historic picture of Mars. Areas where scientists are unsure of the timeline will be
     discussed, and MAVEN’s ability to fill in the gaps in the timeline will be highlighted.
2.   A lesson where students explore concepts of astrobiology and write and create artwork that will explain
     imaginary types of life they expect could live on Mars at a time period chosen from activity 1. Students may
     come to the conclusion that life could not exist at their chosen time. Students will learn how MAVEN will help
     establish whether Mars could have been habitable in the past.
3.   A human habitability lesson where students view images and read about Mars’ climate and atmosphere,
     geology, and geography. Students will then create writing and artwork about a human-occupied Mars and what
     people would need to survive on a long-term basis.
4.   An activity where students predict the future of Mars and create a Mars travel brochure.
5.   A culminating activity where students create a storybook based on the history of Mars, MAVEN, habitability,
     and the possible future colonization of the planet.

NATIONAL SCIENCE EDUCATION STANDARDS
Earth and Space Science

    Objects in the Sky (K-4):
     Students will learn how Mars’ atmosphere and sun have interacted over time.
    Changes in Earth and Sky (K-4):
     Students will learn about the history of Mars and how it has changed over time while drawing parallels with
     Earth’s history.

History and Nature of Science

    Science as a Human Endeavor (K-4):


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    Students will learn how Mars’ history is important for understanding our own, and how MAVEN scientists seek
    to understand how Mars and Earth may have been similar in the past. Students will understand how humans
    might live on Mars in the future and how understanding the climate will be critical for humans to successfully
    exist.

RECRUITMENT
Twenty-five percent of Colorado’s students identify themselves as Hispanic. Our ongoing relationship with the
Mathematics, Engineering, and Science Association in St-Vrain Valley (MESA-St. Vrain), will help serve as a
means to test “Red Planet: Read, Write, Explore!” with Hispanic audiences. MESA-St. Vrain is dedicated to
providing science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) activities and career promotion to grade
school students traditionally underrepresented in these careers. Primarily an after school and summer program,
MESA emphasizes hands-on, data-driven programs and projects that are relevant to current issues. Similarly, our
relationship with Casa de la Esperanza will also serve to help us pilot the program for Hispanic audiences; Casa de
la Esperanza reaches migrant workers in their summer programming. Teachers from both organizations will be paid
for their time in learning, piloting, and providing feedback for the program.

CLACE, our third partner in the effort, will help us recruit and lead English as a Second Language, Spanish as a
Second Language, and bilingual school teachers, at national and local professional development workshops that will
teach “Red Planet: Read, Write, Explore!” . The focus of the workshops will be those who reach underserved and
underrepresented Hispanic audiences. Our effort to teach the workshops nationally speaks to our commitment to
extend the program to teachers who might not otherwise be able to travel to Colorado to attend.

CUSTOMER NEEDS FOCUS
“Red Planet: Read, Write, Explore!” will use our successful experiences with an existing science-in-literacy
program as its springboard.

The LASP Dancing Lights program began as a NASA-supported E/PO program in 2008, as part of an elementary
school addition to our existing space weather programming. In fall of 2009, the program extended its reach beyond
Colorado as a national program. It is now an approved NASA E/PO product. LASP initiated the Dancing Lights
program in response to a national movement to improve literacy skills. Nationally, this movement translated into
increased classroom contact hours in reading and writing at the expense of other curricula, including science.
According to a 2007 Center on Education Policy study (McMurrer, 2007 8), the average elementary school student
spends only 178 minutes per week studying science, while spending over 500 minutes per week on literacy skills.
Like Dancing Lights before it, the “Red Planet: Read, Write, Explore” program will be a standards-based program
combining literacy, art, and creative expression into a science framework; teachers will have the flexibility to
integrate the program into a typical class day and increase science contact hours per school week.




8
 McMurrer, Jennifer. 2007. Choices, Changes, and Challenges: Curriculum and Instruction in the NCLB Era.
Center on Education Policy. http://www.cep dc.org/index.cfm?fuseaction=document.show
DocumentByID&nodeID=1&DocumentID=212




31 | P a g e
Dancing Lights has been popular with English as a Second Language (ESL) teachers, despite the fact that the
curriculum is available only in English and is hence less flexible than it could be. We have taken into account the
needs of ESL teachers for the “Red Planet: Read, Write, Explore” program; through translated curriculum and
workshops targeted at the needs of these and other Spanish-speaking teachers (Spanish as a Second Language and
bilingual school teachers), we seek to grow our impact even further.

LASP currently works to promote LASP and NASA education programs with science coordinators and teachers in
school districts across the state, as well as the successful MESA-St. Vrain after school program. “Red Planet: Read,
Write, Explore!” extends and enhances those relationships, offering a renewed opportunity for participation in LASP
education and professional development programs.

KEY TEAM MEMBERS AND CONTRIBUTIONS
Below is a breakdown of individual personnel and their duties by institution.

LASP

   Stephanie Renfrow—Manage the implementation and integration of “Red Planet: Read, Write, Explore!” with
    MAVEN EPO programming; manage partners
   Erin Wood—Program development and implementation; lesson plans and materials development; lead
    workshops; interface with Casa de la Esperanza and MESA-St. Vrain teachers
   Tom Mason—Support implementation; linking teachers to social media efforts
   Undergraduate assistant TBD—Assist with implementation

CLACE

   Marina LaGrave—Lead translation, workshop recruitment, and Spanish-language workshop support (3 national
    workshops and one local in FYs 2013, 2014, and 2015; one local in FY 2016)
   Additional CLACE staff TBD—Assist with above

Casa de la Esperanza

   Carlota Loya-Hernandez—Recruit/assign two teachers per workshop to attend half-day teacher professional
    development workshops in spring FYs 2013, 2014, and 2015, and pilot the program in their classrooms; assist
    with locating and selecting a teacher advisor
   Elementary school teachers, two TBD—see above

MESA-St. Vrain

   Karen Hunter—Recruit/assign two teachers per workshop to attend half-day teacher professional development
    workshops in spring FYs 2013, 2014, and 2015, and pilot the program in their classrooms; assist with locating
    and selecting a teacher advisor
   Elementary school teachers, two TBD—see above




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T IMELINE 3. R ED P LANET A CTIVITIES




2.3.3 EVALUATION
Cornerstone Evaluation will conduct an impact evaluation of the “Red Planet: Read, Write, Explore!” workshops
and provide formative feedback for curriculum development as shown in Tables 2.3.2.a and b. Again a variety of
methods will be used including: interviews, knowledge assessments , end-of-workshop evaluations , and online
follow-up surveys . Evaluation instruments will be translated into Spanish, as needed.

TABLE 2.3.2.A “RED PLANET : READ, WRITE, EXPLORE !” CURRICULA EVALUATION—FORMATIVE FEEDBACK DETAILS
Activity          Evaluation Objective        Formative Feedback
Red Planet:       To develop “Red Planet:     I—Through telephone interviews*, implementers (N=4) will be asked to discuss
Read, Write,      Read, Write, Explore”       such aspects as: the strengths and weaknesses of the lessons, difficulties and
Explore!          curricula. We are           positive experiences when implementing lessons, whether instruction followed
Curriculum        funding Casa and MESA       the teaching plan verbatim or how teachers may have deviated from the
Testing           teachers to pilot the       prescribed plan, what aspects of the lessons they would change and how,
                  lessons in their            creative alternative approaches they would take to teaching these lessons, are
                  classrooms and provide      lessons at an appropriate level for students, did teachers share lessons with
                  feedback on their           colleagues. These data are content analyzed and discussed with client in a timely
                  experiences and             manner in order to provide ‘feedback’ for final revisions/changes to the
                  perceptions of the          curriculum before submitting to NASA for approval Teachers team teach the
                  lessons and the impact      program, therefore, they will be interviewed in pairs.
                  of these lessons on their
                  students
*The primary thrust of the in-depth interviews is to understand teachers’ perceptions of and experiences with the “Red Planet:
Read, Write, Explore” lessons. However, these interviews also provide an ideal opportunity for gaining teachers’ perceptions of
the impact of these lessons on their students. Discussing with teachers how students responded to the lessons will help
determine the extent to which they believe the lessons are achieving “Red Planet: Read, Write, Explore” student objectives.




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TABLE 2.3.2.B “RED PLANET : READ, WRITE, EXPLORE !” WORKSHOPS—IMPACT AND EVIDENCE
Impact          Impact/Audience Objectives        Evidence
Categories
Awareness,         Educators are aware of        KA—Use MEA assessments for “Red Planet: Read, Write, Explore”
Knowledge,          MAVEN mission, its            workshops
Understanding       objectives, and science       WQ—Majority reports understanding the lecture and lessons presented,
                   Educators understand          having gained information on scientific process and where to go for more
                    the connection between        information. Majority also reports having confidence/competence in new
                    magnetism and                 astronomy knowledge and anticipates comfort using new knowledge to
                    habitability;                 teach students about light, magnetism, and habitability in a practical, real-
                    atmosphere and                world way that is cross-cut into art/literacy; they report understanding how
                    planetary history of          to use art/literacy to bring science education to their students. Open-
                    Mars; and the analog          ended queries reveal areas of concern with regard to knowledge, content
                    between Earth and             use and art/literacy/science integration.
                    Mars                          Majority perceives that students gained science knowledge—use more
                   Knowledge that                science vocabulary, writings about science more clear, science writing
                    educators can use             improved, visual/art representations of science themes more accurate.
                    art/literacy to cross-cut     F-US—For ½-day workshop participants only. Majority indicates that
                    into science education        knowledge was sufficient to implement hands-on activities in their
                    for their students            afterschool classrooms; open-ended queries reveal any challenges
                   Educators feel confident      concerning insufficient knowledge, difficulties/highlights in incorporating
                    in the knowledge              science/astronomy information from workshop into writing/art instruction
                    gained during the             or contextualizing information in practical, real-world way
                    workshop
Interest,       Educators anticipate sharing      WQ—Majority reports an increased interest in inspiring students by
Engagement      content with students             teaching them astronomy concepts through art/literacy. Some report
                                                  increased interest in astronomy and MAVEN/STEM-related content;
                                                  intentions to pursue these interests both professionally and personally;
                                                  intentions to share materials/resources with colleagues and intentions to
                                                  participate in other STEM-based workshops/opportunities.
                                                  FU-S—½-day only. Majority reports having maintained interest in and
                                                  enthusiasm for astronomy topics after teaching concepts to their students.
                                                  Some report having sought additional resources via the Internet, shared
                                                  materials/resources with colleagues, connecting with other “Red Planet:
                                                  Read, Write, Explore” teachers at other afterschool sites, seeking other
                                                  STEM-based opportunities.
                                                  Some teachers indicate that their students liked the lessons and expressed
                                                  a desire to take more science courses in the future.
Behavior        Educators teach standards-        WQ—Majority reports intentions to incorporate standards-based
                based MAVEN                       MAVEN/STEM-related content into their afterschool arts/literacy
                curriculum/data to their          instruction. Open-ended queries indicate types of support needed,
                students                          concerns.
                                                  F-US—½-day workshop only. Closed-ended questions concerning
                                                  level/depth of implementation effort, time spent implementing, search for
                                                  additional resources, adequacy of preparation vis-à-vis “Red Planet: Read,
                                                  Write, Explore” workshop, level of confidence/preparedness and support,
                                                  perceptions of success in incorporating standards-based approach,
                                                  perceived reactions of students to materials/ideas. Open-ended queries
                                                  probe for highlights/challenges experienced with implementation
                                                  experience.
Skills          Educators feel that they have     WQ—Majority reports feeling that they have the capability to use MAVEN-
                the ability to use science, art   science, art and literacy in combination in their teaching in afterschool
                and literacy in combination       classrooms.
                in their teaching.                F-US—½-day workshop only. Majority reports confidence in their skills to
                                                  integrate MAVEN-science, art and music in their instruction in afterschool
                                                  settings. Some provide evidence that they have developed new strategies
                                                  for bringing MAVEN-science and science in general into the arts/literacy
                                                  program.


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3 INFORMAL EDUCATION
A growing body of research suggests that free-choice learning experiences in childhood through adulthood have a
strong influence on the level of interest in science as well as scientific literacy. The Harvard Family Research
Project states, “The dominant assumption behind much current educational policy and practice is that school is the
only place where and when children learn. This assumption is wrong. Forty years of steadily accumulating research
shows that out-of-school or “complementary learning” opportunities are major predictors of children’s development,
learning, and educational achievement.” 9

Research by Robert H. Tai and associates (2006)10, utilizing data from the National Educational Longitudinal Study
(NELS), found that attitudes toward science careers, formed primarily during out-of-school time in early
adolescence, appeared to be the single most important factor in determining children’s future career choices in
science.

The MAVEN E/PO Program includes a substantial investment in informal education. MAVEN E/PO seeks to reach
informal education audiences throughout the United States. Ours is a three-pronged strategy: 1) development of a
Science on a Sphere program at science centers nationwide, 2) using the existing national Imagine Mars program as
a springboard for a new program, Imagine Mars through Native Eyes, 3) creating a Girl Scouts Technical Badge
program called “Girls go to Mars!”

3.1.        SCIENCE ON A SPHERE

The great challenge for MAVEN E/PO is to communicate the subtle and complex nature of MAVEN science to the
public and to K-12 audiences. The Science On a Sphere globes provide an effective means of communication.
Science On a Sphere (SOS)® is a room sized, global display system that uses computers and video projectors to
display planetary data onto a six foot diameter suspended sphere, analogous to a giant animated globe. The Sphere is
used to explain complex processes in a way that is simultaneously intuitive and captivating. 11

The Institute for Learning Innovation (ILI) recently released a Summative Evaluation of Science On a Sphere. ILI
sought to investigate the impact of the Sphere on audiences in various sites nationwide. The final sample included
data from 16 SOS sites. Key overall findings about the Sphere were:

           Visitors felt they learned new information.
           The Sphere supports understanding of complex processes and phenomena.
           Visitors feel seeing information on the Sphere is more realistic and provides more perspective.
           Facilitation correlates with learning.




9
 Harvard Family Research Project. 2007. Findings from HFRP’s study of predictors of participation in out-of-school time
activities: Retrieved May 24, 2011 from:
http://www.hfrp.org/content/download/1072/48575/file/findings_predictor_OSTfactsheet.pdf

10
     Tai, R.H., Liu, C.Q., Maltese, A.V., Fan, X. (May 26, 2006). Planning Early for Careers in Science, 312, 1144.
11
     Science on a Sphere. Retrieved May 24, 2011 from: http://sos.noaa.gov/



35 | P a g e
The Sphere offers both facilitated and non-facilitated experiences, however, facilitation correlated with visitors’
perception of learning as well as with specific learning outcomes. The report recommends expanding facilitated
programming in conjunction with the Sphere.

The MAVEN E/PO Program chose the Sphere as a medium in order to a) leverage existing Mars content the team
has developed and b) the sphere is uniquely suited to teach the processes of MAVEN science. Our MAVEN E/PO
Program will develop a facilitated SOS program to communicate Mars science to audiences nationwide.

3.1.1 AUDIENCE NEED
Over the past decade, NASA has recognized the role that science centers play in presenting and interpreting space
science. Science centers work directly with students through school outreach programs and field trips, reaching an
estimated 39 million school children every year. It is estimated that more than 60 percent of the adult public in the
United States goes to science centers at least once a year. 12

Between the 2009 and 2011 network meetings, the SOS network has grown by 50%. To date, there are a total of 60
installations of SOS technology in informal learning institutions. NOAA expects the SOS Network growth rate to
continue in the foreseeable future, with an additional 30 installations to be completed by their next network meeting
in 2013 (2011 SOS Network Meeting). While many institutions develop content for use with their SOS, overall
content development for SOS has not kept pace with the installation rate. Breakout sessions on developing content
for the sphere at the past two SOS Network meetings has revealed that within the content being developed for SOS,
the overwhelming majority (greater than 90%) focuses on Earth science (2008, 2009 SOS Network reports). Yet,
we know that institutions with SOS present planetary content on a regular basis. An informal poll with SOS
Network members revealed that at least 60% of SOS network members present planetary content on their spheres
(Hsu, personal comm.). This presents an excellent opportunity for the MAVEN E/PO team to fill a void in
programming for the SOS Network. In turn, the Network will enable Mars science and discoveries to be experienced
by audiences nationwide.

3.1.2 PROGRAM DETAIL
As a starting point, we will build upon a NASA ROSES supplemental program at the Space Sciences Laboratory
called, “Seeing the Invisible.” This SOS project has produced three different shows. The first show, aimed at an
elementary school audience, compares the atmospheres of Earth, Venus, and Mars. The second show, developed for
middle school understanding, compares the magnetic fields of the three planets. A third show is being developed for
high school students. Finally, hand-held models, used in conjunction with the SOS shows, allow the public to better
understand magnetic fields of the Earth and Mars.

As part of the MAVEN E/PO Program, our primary activities include:

     •   Modifying and continuing to update graphics, scripts, and animation playlists for docent-led ”Seeing the
         Invisible” presentations (FY12-15). Modifications will include new MAVEN science results as they
         become available.




12
  Falk, J. H., & Dierking, L. D. (2002). Lessons Without Limit: How free-choice learning is transforming education. Walnut
Creek, CA: AltaMira Press.



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    •    Providing professional development for museum practitioners with SOS installations around the nation in
         conjunction with an SOS Network meeting, Association for Science-Technology Centers (ASTC) meeting,
         and remote mechanisms in FY13-15.

    •    Presenting the evaluation results of the MAVEN SOS program at an ASTC meeting.

MAVEN mission and science, along with evaluation results of “Seeing the Invisible,” will be used to modify and
update the scripts and playlists for docent-led presentations about Mars and MAVEN in comparison with Earth and
Venus. We will also leverage efforts currently underway at Denver Museum of Nature and Science as they are
tasked with developing a comparative planetology – climate content module for SOS. The new MAVEN SOS script
and playlist, called “Invisible Mars,” will be tailored for use with a general public audience. Beta test partners from
the SOS Network will be recruited and trained remotely on “Invisible Mars.” Their feedback will be incorporated
into the script and playlist before it is released to the rest of the SOS Network prior to MAVEN launch. We will
offer a two-day, in-person professional development workshop to Network members on “Invisible Mars” in 2013. In
addition to being trained on the script and playlist, participants will also receive in-depth training on MAVEN
content and associated hands-on activities for use with their audiences, and to further their understanding of the
“Invisible Mars” content. The hand-held models will also be incorporated into the training. As new scientific
discoveries are made, we will update the script and graphics, as well as give science updates to SOS Network
members through quarterly professional development. We anticipate that over the course of the MAVEN lifetime,
SOS Network members will show ”Invisible Mars” to thousands of families and members of the public at their
institutions. See Table 3.1.1.a for an overview of activities.

NASA PORTFOLIO GOALS ADDRESSED
• Strengthen NASA and the Nation’s future workforce— Visually beautiful experiences such as those of Science
On a Sphere can stir children's interest in science. Research shows that attitudes toward science careers, formed
primarily during free-choice learning experiences, is the single most important factor in determining future career
choices.

• Engage Americans in NASA’s mission—The MAVEN E/PO team will build upon the existing Science On a
Sphere Network of presenters. These educators extend the reach of NASA Mars research, missions, and discoveries
into institutions throughout the country. These institutions are also a source for adults in those communities to learn
about new discoveries in science.

The specific objectives to meet these goals and how we will evaluate whether we met the objectives, can be found
below in the Section on the SOS evaluation.

SAMPLE SCIENCE ON A SPHERE SCRIPT
Goldilocks and the Three Planets

(Introduce the presentation as a mystery – Why is Earth’s atmosphere different?)

1. Earth’s atmosphere
         - What is an atmosphere?
                  air – [Blue Marble]
         - What happens in an atmosphere?
                  clouds, weather, storms – [GrayIR hurricane animation]
         - Why is Earth’s atmosphere important for us, life?
                  it is the air we and all animals breathe




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2. Different planets have different atmospheres
         - Focus on Venus, Earth, and Mars (“Earth-like” planets)
         - A. Venus: – [Venus clouds animation]
                  Thickness:          about 100 times thicker than Earth’s atmosphere
                                      can’t see the surface of Venus
                  Temperature:        480°C, 900°F – [Venus radar brightness]
                  Can you breathe there? No! Its atmosphere is poisonous (called carbon dioxide)
                  Can water exist at the surface? No! It’s too hot.
         - B. Mars: – [Mars surface with atmosphere inset or Mars atmosphere]
                  Thickness:          about 100 times thinner
                                      about the same as 20 miles up in Earth’s atmosphere
                                      (much higher than airplanes)
                                      can see the surface of Mars through the atmosphere
                  Temperature:        -60°C, -80°F (varies from -200°F to 80°F)
                  Can you breathe there? No! Its atmosphere is poisonous
                  Can water exist at the surface? No! It’s too cold.
                                                           But it used to…has river channels – [Red Planet]
         -C. Earth: – [Blue Marble]
                  Thickness:          can see surface and thick clouds – between Venus and Mars
                  Temperature:        15°C, 60°F (between -130°F and 140°F) – [925_temp animation]
                  Can you breath there? Yes!
                  Can water exist at the surface? Yes! – [Blue Marble]
                  Earth is just right, not too hot, not too cold. – Just like Goldilocks

3. Why are the atmospheres different?
        - You guess!
        - They started the same – mostly poisonous, thick atmosphere
        -. What happened? – [X-Ray Sun]
                 A. Venus:         Started with mostly poisonous gases
                                   Too close to the Sun. Too hot
                                   All the water left/boiled away from the planet
                                   No water left
                                   Atmosphere is still mostly poisonous gas
                 B. Mars: Started with mostly poisonous gases
                                   Too far from the Sun. Too cold
                                   All the water is ice
                                   Atmosphere is still mostly poisonous gas
                 C. Earth:         Started with mostly poisonous gases
                                   Just right location
                                   Water is liquid – has oceans
                                   The poisonous gases went into the oceans
                                   (Just like a spoonful of sugar dissolves in water, so does CO 2)
                                   That poison was put into rocks
                                   Without water, Earth’s atmosphere would still be poisonous
                                   Now, the atmosphere is just right

4.       Demonstration of Magnetic Fields on Mars with sphere and wires




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RECRUITMENT

We will utilize the SOS Network to recruit and train museums to present “Invisible Mars” to their audiences. There
are currently 60 institutions in the Network with SOS installations, with 90 installations expected by 2013. Network
members meet regularly to present new SOS programs and to discuss best practices for using this medium.

Our goal is to identify sites willing to serve as beta test partners early in FY13. Remote professional development
will be conducted for our beta test partners. Once beta testing is complete and the results have been incorporated
into “Invisible Mars,” we will conduct a 2-day training of the larger SOS Network in person prior to launch. This
training will take place either at Cape Canaveral or in association with a Network meeting should one be scheduled
around the same time. In addition, we will conduct quarterly professional development for SOS network members
in FY14-16. The quarterly professional development trainings will focus on new MAVEN science results and
changes to the “Invisible Mars” script and playlist that reflect the new results.

KEY TEAM MEMBERS AND CONTRIBUTIONS
Below is a breakdown of individual personnel and their duties by institution.

Lunar Planetary Institute

        Brooke Hsu and Andrea Jones—Ms. Hsu and Ms. Jones will develop a script for use in informal education
         settings called “Invisible Mars” for the Science On a Sphere (SOS) Network using MAVEN science
         content. They will also deliver professional development for SOS Network members prior to MAVEN
         launch in 2013, and conduct remote professional development to SOS Network members in FY14 and
         FY15. Hsu and Jones will work with MAVEN Project Management to incorporate EPO into visualizations
         that will be produced, and will present the MAVEN SOS products at SOS Network and Association for
         Science-Technology Centers meetings. Through her EPO experience with LRO, team member Hsu has
         been working with the SOS Network since 2007. She has attended the past two SOS Network meetings
         and has conducted informal polls with Network members about their use of the Sphere.

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

        Lora Bleacher—Dr. Bleacher will assist Hsu and Jones in the development of “Invisible Mars” and in
         providing professional development to SOS Network members. Ms. Bleacher will also lead the
         incorporation of MAVEN content and E/PO materials into ongoing E/PO programs and events at Goddard,
         including but not limited to educator professional development workshops and large public outreach
         events.

CSE@SSL

        Nancy Ali—Ms. Ali will manage the Berkeley Science On a Sphere effort in FY12 and FY16.
        Kyle Fricke—Mr. Fricke will provide input into the Science On a Sphere playlist and scripts based on his
         “Seeing the Invisible” work.
        Igor Ruderman—Mr. Ruderman will provide technical support for the Science On a Sphere team.
        Karin Hauck—Ms. Hauck will provide graphics support for the Science On a Sphere effort.




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T IMELINE 4. S CIENCE O N A S PHERE A CTIVITIES




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3.1.3 EVALUATION
Cornerstone Evaluation will conduct evaluation of the MAVEN SOS effort as shown in Table 3.1.2.a.

TABLE 3.1.2.A SCIENCE ON A SPHERE—IMPACT AND EVIDENCE
Impact         Impact/Audience Objectives         Evidence
Categories
Awareness,        Informal educators will        Knowledge Assessment—Use version of MAVEN Educator Ambassador pre-
Knowledge,         experience increased           post knowledge assessment for informal educator training. Make sure that
Under-             comfort in teaching            assessment covers all areas delineated in objectives.
standing           MAVEN-related content.         Workshop Questionnaire—Majority reports understanding the information
                  Informal educators             presented in the professional development workshop and having knowledge
                   understand key aspects of      about where to gain additional information about MAVEN and Mars-related
                   the MAVEN mission, the         science. Majority also reports having confidence/competence in new
                   current state of the           knowledge and anticipates being comfortable in using new knowledge to
                   atmosphere and surface of      deliver SOS content to visitors in museum and science center settings; open-
                   Mars, how Mars may have        ended queries reveal areas of concern with regard to SOS content as well as
                   differed in its past from      their knowledge about Mars and MAVEN
                   today and that the solar       Online Follow-Up Survey—Educators: Majority indicates that their
                   wind is responsible for        knowledge was sufficient to deliver SOS content to visitors; majority
                   changing the atmosphere        indicates that they were comfortable with the SOS scripts and playlists and
                   of Mars over time.             felt competent in presenting them; some report enriching knowledge by
                  Informal educators will        having done further research/reading of MAVEN and Mars-related topics via
                   know that the size of Mars     the web, social media, written materials, etc.; open-ended questions reveal
                   was a key factor in its loss   any challenges concerning insufficient knowledge and difficulties/highlights
                   of atmosphere through          in understanding content. Educator perceptions of visitors: Majority of
                   time.                          educators reports that visitors understand SOS presentation based on
                                                  educators’ perceptions of audience questions and feedback.
                                                  Visitor Survey: Short predominantly quantitative survey of visitors’
                                                  responses to SOS presentation. Majority indicates understanding of
                                                  information presented.
Engagement,       Informal educators will        WQ—Majority reports an increased interest in MAVEN and Mars science-
Interest,          have an engaging               related content as a result of having participated in the workshop; describes
                   experience learning about      ways they intend to pursue interests including learning/researching more
                   MAVEN content during the       information on their own and inspiring visitors by presenting SOS
                   workshop.                      scripts/playlists. Majority reports intention to share
                  Informal educators will        materials/resources/ideas with their institution colleagues and participate in
                   express increased interest     additional STEM-related PD.
                   in MAVEN-related content.      F-US—Educators: Majority reports that their own interest/engagement in
                  Informal educators             MAVEN and Mars science-related topics has continued/increased. Majority
                   perceive themselves as         reports having increased interest in related topics/science/future activities.
                   more engaged and               Some demonstrate interest and engagement by sharing SOS materials with
                   effective in delivering        other institutions within the SOS Network, connecting with other informal
                   MAVEN content using SOS.       educators and PD participants, applying to participate in additional science-
                  Informal educators             based webinars/workshops offered through the partnership between NASA
                   perceive their audiences as    and NOAA. Some express interest/engagement through involvement with
                   engaged in the SOS             social media opportunities related to MAVEN and Mars science (Facebook,
                   presentations.                 Twitter), following MAVEN mission updates and discoveries; staying on top
                                                  of changes in scripts/playlists based on updates and discoveries.
                                                  Perceptions of visitors: Majority reports that audience appeared to enjoy
                                                  the SOS presentation. Some provide anecdotal evidence of participant
                                                  enjoyment/engagement.
                                                  VS: Majority indicates enjoyment of SOS presentation and increased
                                                  interest in MAVEN and Mars science-related topics.
Behavior       Informal educators deliver the     WQ—Majority reports intentions to present SOS scripts to visitors. Majority
               MAVEN-related SOS content to       reports feeling adequately prepared to deliver SOS content. Open-ended
               their patrons.                     queries indicate types of support needed, concerns in conducting
                                                  presentation. Majority intends to actually participate in additional



41 | P a g e
                                                       opportunities to learn more about MAVEN and Mars-related science such as
                                                       follow-up PD.
                                                       Tracking—Cornerstone relies on GSFC/SSL team to provide rosters and
                                                       contact information for informal educators involved in SOS presentations
                                                       and administer and return Qs from workshops.
                                                       F-US—Educators: Closed-ended questions concerning # presentations
                                                       delivered, # of participants, time spent facilitating, search for additional
                                                       resources, adequacy of preparation, level of confidence/preparedness and
                                                       support, perceptions of success in leading program, perceived reactions of
                                                       participants to activities/ideas. Open-ended queries probe for
                                                       highlights/challenges experienced in delivering SOS presentations.
                                                       Perceptions of visitors:
                                                       VS: Majority indicates intention to continue involvement with MAVEN and Mars-
                                                       related topics by visiting web site, joining Facebook or Twitter, returning to
                                                       museum/science center.
Skill             Informal educators experience        F-US—Majority of informal educators indicates through rating scales and
                  the ability to take images with a    anecdotal evidence that they use strategies learned in training and possibly
                  lot of scientific information and    developed on their own to translate large amount of SOS information into
                  translate it for public audiences.   understandable presentations for ‘lay’ visitors. Majority expresses
                                                       confidence in their skills to successfully use these techniques with visitors.



3.2 IMAGINE MARS THROUGH NATIVE EYES
3.2.1 AUDIENCE NEED
Underrepresentation of American Indian/Alaska Natives and Native Hawaiian/other Pacific Islanders in STEM-
related fields is chronic (NSF 2000).13 Young people in indigenous communities throughout the U.S. continue to
struggle with the balancing act of growing up between indigenous and non-indigenous discourses of culture and
participation. (Faircloth/Tippeconnic 2010).14

The research also indicates that economically and otherwise disadvantaged children are less likely than their more
advantaged peers to have access to these opportunities. This inequity substantially undermines their learning and
chances for school success.”




13
 National Science Foundation. Women, Minorities, and Persons With Disabilities in Science and Engineering: 2000. Arlington,
VA, 2000 (NSF 00-327).

14
     Faircloth, Susan C., & Tippeconnic, III, John W. (2010). The Dropout/Graduation

Rate Crisis Among American Indian and Alaska Native Students: Failure to Respond

Places the Future of Native Peoples at Risk. Los Angeles, CA: The Civil Rights

Project/Proyecto Derechos Civiles at UCLA; www.civilrightsproject.ucla.edu.



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The 2009 NRC report “Learning Science in Informal Environments,” found that not only do free-choice science
learning experiences jump-start a child’s long-term interest in science topics, they also can significantly improve
science understanding among populations typically underrepresented in science. 15

3.2.2 PROGRAM DETAIL
The Indigenous Education Institution, in collaboration with UC Berkeley and JPL, will train educators who teach
and run afterschool and museum programs with Native American Youth, in a NASA Mars program called “Imagine
Mars through Native Eyes.” Through the five-step Imagine Mars program, educators will develop programs with
Native Youth to examine MAVEN science together with knowledge from Cherokee, Navajo, and Hawaiian cultures
of navigation and planets in the context of community and habitability. These steps include:

       1.   Reflect: Students reflect on their home community – the people, careers, natural and human made
            resources ‐ in an effort to understand what makes a community not only survive, but thrive.
       2.   Discover: Students discover the challenging environmental conditions Mars presents to a human
            community and work with scientists and engineers to uncover possible solutions.
       3.   Imagine: Students combine what they learned in the “reflect” and “discover” steps and propose ideas for a
            plausible and successful community on Mars.
       4.   Create: Students create a representation of their Martian community or of some aspect of the community.
       5.   Share: Students use technology and communication skills to present their solution to a community     on rs.
Imagine Mars is a national science and arts education initiative in which students design and share a futuristic Mars
community for 100 people. Students explore their home community and decide what cultural, scientific and artistic
elements are important to a community's success. They discover the extreme Martian environment and imagine what
life might be like on the red planet. Finally, they create a project that artistically reflects their knowledge of Mars,
understanding of community, and hopes for the future. These projects have varied from performances, to murals, to
classroom literacy projects, to developing a 3D model of their envisioned community. Students share their finished
project by posting it in the online gallery.




15 5
  National Research Council. (2009). Learning Science in Informal Environments: People, Places, and Pursuits. Committee on
Learning Science in Informal Environments. P. Bell, B. Lewenstein, A.W. Shouse, and M.A. Feder (Eds.). Board on Science
Education, Center for Education, Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. Washington, DC: The National
Academies Press.



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SAMPLE PROGRAM




“Imagine Mars through Native Eyes” programs will be developed in Native communities throughout the U.S. These
programs may take place in science centers, classrooms, afterschool programs, art centers, and community centers.
Indigenous Education Institute staff—Dr. David Begay, Dr. Nancy Maryboy, and Ashley Teren—will research and
share indigenous knowledge about Mars, and facilitate programs within Native communities. The NASA mission
team will share Mars research and scientific discoveries. See Table 3.2.1.a for an overview of activities.

NASA PORTFOLIO GOALS ADDRESSED
Strengthen NASA and the Nation’s future workforce—Research shows that attitudes toward science careers,
formed primarily during free-choice learning experiences, is the single most important factor in determining future
career choices.

• Engage Americans in NASA’s mission—The MAVEN E/PO team will build upon strong relationships between
IEI and Native communities. Our program will help Native American youth understand and value Western and
Native ways of knowing.

The specific objectives to meet these goals and how we will evaluate whether we met the objectives, can be found
below in the Section on the Imagine Mars with Native Eyes evaluation.

RECRUITMENT
Indigenous Education Institute has sustained relationships with Navajo, Cherokee, Native Hawaiian, and urban
Native American communities. IEI will seek partners in these communities who have the interest and capacity to
develop “Imagine Mars through Native Eyes” programs.

Key Team Members

CSE@SSL

        Dr. Laura Peticolas will oversee the Imagine Mars through Native Eyes program, providing scientific input
         and facilitation, participating in IMNE workshops, and reporting on the progress of the program.


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        Igor Ruderman will provide technical support.

Indigenous Education Institute:

        Dr. Nancy Maryboy and Dr. David Begay will investigate Native knowledge of Mars within Navajo,
         Cherokee, Hawaiian, and urban Native communities. They will identify communities interested in
         developing programs around the “Imagine Mars through Native Eyes” theme and will work to build a
         durable relationship with the IMNE communities. They will develop an Imagine Mars curriculum and pilot
         test it in the communities. They will engage Native communities through MAVEN’s launch and arrival at
         Mars.
        Ashley Teren will provide pedagogical expertise for the development of the Imagine Mars Curriculum.
        Kalepa Baybayan will provide ties to Native Hawaiian communities and knowledge of navigation
         practices.




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T IMELINE 5. I MAGINE M ARS THROUGH N ATIVE E YES A CTIVITIES




3.2.3 EVALUATION
Cornerstone Evaluation will conduct an evaluation of the Imagine Mars through Native Eyes program as shown in
Tables 3.2.2.a and b.

TABLE 3.2.2.A IMAGINE MARS THROUGH NATIVE EYES PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT —IMPACT AND EVIDENCE
Impact         Impact/Audience Objectives    Evidence
Categories
Awareness,     Informal educators            Knowledge Assessment—Use version of MAVEN Educator Ambassador pre-
Knowledge,     demonstrate that they have    post knowledge assessment for informal educator training
Under-         the scientific knowledge of   Workshop Questionnaire—Majority reports understanding the Native Eyes
standing       MAVEN, Mars science and       program well enough to present it to middle school participants in afterschool
               connections with scientists   or museum settings; majority indicates having gained knowledge of MAVEN
               and local Native knowledge    and Mars science as well as having developed an understanding of the
               holders needed in order to    connections between MAVEN scientists and local Native knowledge holders;
               lead Native Eyes              majority indicates having knowledge about where to gain additional
               programs/events               information about MAVEN and Mars science as well as Native
                                             culture/knowledge. Majority also reports having confidence/competence in
                                             new knowledge and anticipates being comfortable in using new knowledge to
                                             lead programs/events for middle school Native youth in afterschool/museum
                                             settings; open-ended queries reveal areas of concern with regard to MAVEN


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                                                knowledge and content, connections between scientists and knowledge
                                                holders and implementation of Native Eyes program
                                                Online Follow-Up Survey—Majority indicates that their knowledge was
                                                sufficient to lead Native Eyes program for participants in afterschool/museum
                                                settings; majority indicates that they were comfortable with the materials and
                                                felt competent in presenting it; some report enriching knowledge by linking to
                                                knowledge holders and MAVEN scientists/engineers and discoveries; open-
                                                ended questions reveal any challenges concerning insufficient knowledge and
                                                difficulties/highlights in understanding and making connections between
                                                scientists and knowledge holders
Attitude,         Informal educators           WQ—Majority reports an increased interest in MAVEN and Mars science-
Engagement,        perceive themselves as       related content as well as ways to connect scientists and Native knowledge
Interest,          more effective in            holders; describes ways they intend to pursue interests, including inspiring
                   engaging participants in     participants by leading programs/events in afterschool/museum settings.
                   MAVEN, Mars science          Some report intention to share materials/resources/ideas with other informal
                   and their local              educators and participate in additional STEM-related workshops, webinars,
                   indigenous knowledge         social media opportunities, NASA projects, etc.
                   related to Mars,             F-US—Trainers: Majority reports that their own interest/engagement in
                   exploration, science and     MAVEN and Mars science-related topics has continued/increased. Some
                   community                    demonstrate interest and engagement by sharing their materials and ideas
                  Informal         educators   with colleagues, joining various social media opportunities related to MAVEN
                   report that participants     and Mars-related science (Facebook, Twitter), taking advantage of digital links
                   continue        to     be    to scientists and Native knowledge holders; following MAVEN Mission updates
                   interested in Mars and       and discoveries; staying on top of changes in curriculum based on updates and
                   their native knowledge       discoveries. Perceptions of student impact: Majority reports feeling
                   outside the project          competent/effective in conveying this interest and enthusiasm to participants
                                                at informal events. Some provide anecdotal evidence of participant interest as
                                                well as evidence of participant interest/engagement outside the program.
Behavior       Informal educators lead          WQ—Majority reports intentions to introduce middle school participants to
               Native Eyes programs and         Native Eyes programming at events in afterschool and museum settings.
               events in afterschool and        Open-ended queries indicate types of support needed, concerns in facilitating
               museum settings                  activities.
                                                Tracking—Cornerstone relies on JPL team to provide rosters and contact
                                                information for informal educators involved in Native Eyes program and
                                                administer and return Qs.
                                                F-US—Closed-ended questions concerning # of events held, # of participants,
                                                time spent facilitating, search for additional resources, adequacy of
                                                preparation, level of confidence/preparedness and support, perceptions of
                                                success in leading program, perceived reactions of participants to
                                                activities/ideas.     Open-ended queries probe for highlights/challenges
                                                experienced in leading Native Eyes program.
Usability         Informal educators           F-US—Majority of informal educators indicates through rating scales and
                   report satisfaction that     anecdotal evidence that the science content and the 5-step Imagine Mars
                   the science content is       approach is both relevant to participants and effective for use in their
                   relevant and effective       communities—accurate, comprehensive, timely, accessible and adoptable.
                   for use in their
                   community
                  Informal educators
                   report that the process is
                   relevant and effective
                   for use in their
                   community




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3.3 “GIRLS GO TO MARS!” GIRL SCOUTS BADGE KIT PROGRAM
3.3.1 AUDIENCE NEED
Girl Scouts of the USA (GSUSA) has worked with NASA for more than 15 years to promote interest and
engagement in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM). With a shared common goal to enable more
youth and adults to embrace the value of STEM, NASA signed a Memorandum of Understanding with GSUSA in
January 2005: “According to interviewees, the Space Act Agreement between NASA and the Girl Scouts has
strengthened Astro Camp’s relationship with the Scouts” (NASA 2010). 16 Strengthening this comprehensive
partnership has provided adult development training opportunities, materials development, career exposure, research
sharing, mentors, community outreach exhibits, summer internships for girls, field trips relating to earth and solar
exploration. Currently, more than one-third of Girl Scout councils have attended one or more trainings by NASA
science experts. These councils have engaged over 100,000 girls in NASA missions, research and centers across the
United States and international locations.

Between 1999 and 2006 there were over 120 planned NASA events with Girl Scouts councils. A national train-the-
trainer workshop reached 35 Girl Scouts core trainers located across 29 states reaching 56,258 girls as of February
2009. Participants in these workshops reported that the workshops helped overcome some of their “science phobia.”
One participant noted, “I dreaded coming (I’m not a space person.) But I loved it” (Brackett, A., Petrosino, A. and
Henderson, S.’s needs assessment, as cited in NASA 2010).

“Girls go to Mars” targets an underrepresented audience: girls, The program will build on existing Girl Scout
science, math and technology projects by focusing on the theme of Mars exploration and the science of MAVEN.
This new addition to the Girl Scouts arsenal will enhance Girl Scout programs designed to increase girls' and adults'
understanding of and interest in solar system exploration in general, and Mars specifically. The program will also
provide opportunities for girls to discover diverse career options.

3.3.2 PROGRAM DETAIL
The “Girls Go to Mars!” program will develop a kit that teaches Girl Scouts about MAVEN-related Mars science;
when Girl Scouts finish the kit activities and requirements, they will have fulfilled the requirements for a new
Technical Badge. The program also includes training for troup leaders via workshops and webinars.

Run by the SETI Institute, “Girls Go to Mars!” Program will be an adult Girl Scout leader training class and set of
activities/materials that support Girl Scout Patch and Badge projects related to science, technology and space
exploration. These materials will be developed in collaboration with the entire MAVEN EPO team to minimize cost
and to make multi-venue use of curriculum, print, and media products created for the MAVEN Mission as well as
other existing educational materials developed by the Mars EPO Program at Jet Propulsion Laboratories and their
subcontractors such as Arizona State University. By including or adapting existing and new materials, this E/PO
project will leverage successful products into an easy-to-use kit of materials that supports Girl Scouts and their
leaders. The kit will be comprised of a downloadable set of instructions with a list of materials required to conduct
the project. The local troop is responsible for assembling the materials; it is not a physical kit distributed by the




16
  National Aeronautics and Space Administration. (2010). A Descriptive Analysis of NASA’s Informal Education Program
Portfolio. Retrieved May 24, 2011 from: http://www.nasa.gov/pdf/511273main_2010_InformalEvaluation.pdf



48 | P a g e
SETI Institute to troops across the nation. A “Girls Go to Mars!” patch will be designed for this project, possibly as
a crowdsourcing activity (see Section 4).

There are national and regional training sessions for Girls Scout Leaders across the US. This program will provide
training at selected events to disseminate “Girls Go to Mars.” The final kits will be distributed via these training
sessions where individual leaders, and GSA Council Leaders will learn how to use the materials and lead activities
for Girl Scouts.

The class and activities will be alpha tested locally with the Girl Scout Councils of Santa Clara, San Mateo, or
Alameda Counties, and then beta tested more widely. Revisions based upon field testing will be incorporated, and
the final products will be published as kits with elements available via the Internet, as well. See Table 3.3.1.a for an
overview of activities.

NASA PORTFOLIO GOALS ADDRESSED:
        Strengthen NASA and the Nation’s future workforce--Girls go to Mars” targets informal educators who
         engage a primary underrepresented population, namely girls.
        Attract and retain students in STEM disciplines--“Girls go to Mars” introduces girls to STEM careers in
         an engaging and authentic way.

The specific objectives to meet these goals and how we will evaluate whether we met the objectives, can be found
below in the Section on the Girls Go to Mars evaluation.

“GIRLS GO TO MARS” ANTICIPATED CONTENT AND APPROACH
“Girls go to Mars” content will be drawn from MAVEN science and discoveries. Girl Scout award programs
balance learning new information (content), doing hands-on experiments/activities, learning about technology,
exploring career pathways, and conducting a service project.

MAVEN science objectives focus on the Martian atmosphere. MAVEN experiments aim to understand the state of
the Martian atmosphere, the interaction of the Martian atmosphere with solar wind, the escape of neutral gases and
ions to space, and the ratios of isotopes in the atmosphere of Mars in order to understand the history of Mars. These
are sophisticated and complex concepts. Understanding the atmosphere of Mars will rely upon an overall
understanding of the planet, and comparisons with Earth and its atmosphere. The content of “Girls Go To Mars” will
include basics on both planets to support these comparisons, and to allow the Girl Scouts to better understand the
science MAVEN is designed to accomplish. Information on careers of selected scientists, engineers and educators
involved with MAVEN will be included to offer insights into career pathways. Recommendations for service
projects will be described, for example, participation in community events like Space Day, and shared with
participants.

The science and technology of MAVEN are sophisticated. Therefore, the “Girls Go To Mars” project will be aimed
at girls in middle and high school. These are the Cadette, Senior, and Ambassador level Girl Scouts. The activities
will support girls in learning about science, technology and space exploration careers. These materials will be
developed in collaboration with the MAVEN science and EPO team to minimize cost and to make multi-venue use
of curriculum, print and media products. We will also review existing educational materials developed by the Mars
EPO Program at Jet Propulsion Laboratories and Arizona State University. By adapting existing materials, this EPO
project will leverage successful products into an easy-to-use “kit” of materials that supports Girl Scouts and their
leaders by providing the activities necessary to complete the requirements for a “Girls Go To Mars” patch, which is
the insignia the Girl Scouts are awarded upon completion of projects. A “Girls Go to Mars” “Interest Project Patch”
is the Girl Scout language that describes all awards for Cadettes, Seniors,and Ambassadors. The Girls Go To Mars
project patch will be designed and distributed as a part of this project; the design could be created and selected by
Girl Scouts as a crowdsourcing “contest” via the Internet as a part of the larger MAVEN EPO program.


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NATIONAL STANDARDS
For “Girls Go To Mars” to find wide use, it must comply with the GSUSA requirements for patches. The materials
will also reflect the National Science Education Standards (NSES), even though this is an informal education
project. The reason for NSES alignment is that it has been found that materials that are aligned are more useful in
both formal and informal education venues such as science centers and museums.

RECRUITMENT
The Girl Scout Leader training to support use of “Girls Go To Mars” will be developed as an on-line program as the
regional Girls Scout leadership has advised us that this is becoming the preferred mode of training. Girl Scout
Leaders are busy people, and by offering asynchronous training, more people can adopt the “Girls Go To Mars”
project for their troops. The proposed EPO program will conduct workshops and staff an exhibit at the 2014 Girl
Scout National Convention to disseminate “Girls Go to Mars.” Ultimately, the dissemination of the “Girls Go To
Mars” “kits” will be electronic to allow for the widest dissemination of the “kits.” “The GSUSA has a well-
developed          STEM-related         website          that      disseminates        materials        electronically:
http://www.girlscouts.org/program/program_opportunities/science/. In addition to the MAVEN website, we aim to
have “Girls Go to Mars” as a part permanent part of the GSUSA STEM-related website. Girls Go To Mars” patches
will be the only physical product that will be distributed upon request as Scouts complete the patch requirements.

Total estimated dissemination is ~20 troops per state with ~10 girls per troop, or ~1,000 troop leaders and ~10,000
Girl Scouts.

KEY TEAM MEMBERS AND CONTRIBUTIONS
Below is a breakdown of individual personnel and their duties by institution.

SETI Institute

   Edna DeVore—Lead project management for the “Girls go to Mars” program; interface with MAVEN EPO
    leads and assist with reporting and other requirements as needed
   Pamela Harman—Develop badge kit content; implement program
   Student Assistant TBD—Assist with implementation

LASP

   Stephanie Renfrow—Interface with SETI Institute personnel; lead integration and leveraging of “Girls go to
    Mars” with larger MAVEN EPO programming

CSE@SSL

   Laura Peticolas—Assist in interfacing with SETI Institute personnel; support integration and leveraging of
    “Girls go to Mars” with larger MAVEN EPO programming




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T IMELINE 6: G IRLS G O TO M ARS A CTIVITIES




3.3.3 EVALUATION
Cornerstone Evaluation will conduct evaluation of the “Girls Go to Mars!” program as shown in Table 3.3.2.a. The
focus of the evaluation is to determine whether the program has met its impact and audience objectives through
knowledge assessment, end-of-workshop evaluations , and online follow-up surveys .




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TABLE 3.3.2.A WORKSHOPS FOR GIRLS GO TO MARS!—IMPACT AND EVIDENCE
Impact         Impact/Audience Objectives       Evidence
Categories
Awareness,      Girls Scout leaders            KA—Use MEA assessment for ‘Girls Go to Mars’ workshops
Knowledge,       experience increased           WQ—Majority reports understanding the activities presented in the webinar,
Under-           comfort in teaching            having gained information on scientific process and knowing where to gain
standing         planetary science              more information. Majority also reports having confidence/competence in new
                Girls Scout leaders            astronomy knowledge and anticipates comfort using new knowledge to lead
                 experience increased           troops in doing ‘Girls Go to Mars’ activities that introduce them to practical,
                 interest in planetary          real-world applications of light, magnetism and habitability: open-ended
                 science                        queries reveal areas of concern with regard to knowledge and content use.
                Girls Scout leaders know       F-US—Majority indicates that their knowledge was sufficient to facilitate Girl
                 more about astronomy           Scout troops in completing the hands-on activities for the ‘Girls Go to Mars’
                Girls Scout leaders use the    badge; open-ended questions reveal any challenges concerning insufficient
                 information about light,       knowledge, difficulties/highlights in incorporating information from webinar
                 magnetism, and                 into hand-on activities for Girl Scout troops or contextualizing information in
                 habitability in context in a   practical, real-world way.
                 way that demonstrates its
                 practical use in the real
                 world
                Girls Scout leaders are
                 aware of MAVEN Mission.
                 Educators understand the
                 connection of MAVEN
                 science to fundamental
                 physical science concepts
Engagement,    Girls Scout leaders perceive     WQ—Majority reports an increased interest in astronomy and MAVEN/STEM-
Interest       themselves as more               related content; describes ways they intend to pursue interests, including
               interested, engaged and          inspiring Girl Scouts by facilitating troops in doing hands-on, MAVEN-related
               effective in leading “Girls Go   astronomy activities that lead to ‘Girls Go to Mars’ badge. Some report
               To Mars” activities that         intention to share materials/resources with other troop leaders and participate
               include STEM content             in additional STEM-related webinars.
                                                F-US—Majority reports having increased interest in related
                                                topics/science/future activities. Some report actually sharing ‘Girls Go to Mars’
                                                materials with other troop leaders, connecting with other webinar participants,
                                                applying to participate in additional science-based webinars/workshops offered
                                                through the partnership between NASA and GSUSA.
Behavior       Girls Scout leaders facilitate   WQ—Majority reports intentions to introduce to their troops standards-based
               troops in completing the         MAVEN/STEM-related ‘Girls Go to Mars’ activities. Open-ended queries indicate
               “Girls Go To Mars” badge         types of support needed, concerns in facilitating activities.
               including standards-based        T—Rely on GSA Councils to log ‘Girls Go to Mars’ badges earned.
               MAVEN and MAVEN-related          F-US—Closed-ended questions concerning time spent facilitating, search for
               STEM content learning for        additional resources, adequacy of preparation vis-à-vis webinar, level of
               Girl Scouts                      confidence/preparedness and support, perceptions of success in facilitating
                                                standards-based activities, perceived reactions of Girl Scouts to activities/ideas,
                                                approximate number of Girl Scouts earning ‘Girls Go to Mars’ badges. Open-
                                                ended queries probe for highlights/challenges experienced in facilitating GGM
                                                activities.
Skills         Girls Scout leaders use          WQ—Majority reports intentions to use strategies learned in the webinar when
               strategies that they learned     introducing GGM activities to their troops.
               through online training to       F-US—Majority indicates using strategies learned in training and having
               facilitate “Girls Go to Mars”    confidence in their skills to use these techniques with their troops. Some
               badge activities                 provide feedback about new strategies/methods they used that worked better
                                                for them than what they learned in training.




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4. PUBLIC OUTREACH
The central focus of our outreach efforts is to engage the general public in and raise public awareness of the overall
concepts that are the foundation of the MAVEN mission. Two central programs fall under outreach: 1) Online
efforts via our website and social media, and 2) Professional development for practitioners of New Media. These
efforts reflect our goal of engaging multiple audiences in the quest to understand Mars’ long term climate change.

4.1.     ONLINE OUTREACH
4.1.1 AUDIENCE NEED
Recent publications indicate public desire for science information: “although the rate of civic scientific literacy in
the US is only now approaching 20 percent, there is a strong and continuing public belief in the value of scientific
research for economic prosperity and for the quality of life” (Miller, 2004) 17; and “about one person in five is
interested in finding out more about scientific developments” 18 (Creating connections: museums and the public
understanding of current research). Online outreach is aimed at filling this need.

Online outreach using social media in conjunction with websites is a relatively new addition to the EPO suite of
tools. While few missions have undertaken broad social media campaigns tied to EPO—rather than PAO—we do
know that the impact of social media can be quite extensive. For example, a recent report from ThinkTank.com
ranked NASA the number one public sector organization for “Digital IQ”: “NASA has pioneered efforts on every
platform…. Its technology-rich site attracts over three million unique visitors per month, and the organization boasts
more than 600,000 Twitter followers and 150,000 Facebook fans, confirming the power of strong content. NASA
has more than 15.7 million views on its NASA Television YouTube channel and over 31 million across all of its
channels.”19

In terms of NASA’s use of social media for missions, the Solar Dynamics Observatory has achieved great success
through its pioneering use of online technologies. A year after launch, NASA SDO mission statistics reveal a strong
impact on the general public: 6,839 Twitter followers; 7,910 Facebook fans; 1,303,874 Total YouTube upload
views; and 11,512 YouTube channel subscribers.

4.1.2 PROGRAM DETAIL
MAVEN online outreach centers on the use of a central hub website in conjunction with a closely planned and
executed social media campaign. Two central ideals guide our online outreach: creating pathways for two-way
interaction between our audience and the mission/mission experts, and integration where possible with our
traditional Education & Public Outreach efforts.




17
 Miller, J. (2004), Public Understanding of, and Attitudes toward, Scientific Research: What We Know and What We Need to
Know, Public Understanding of Science July 2004 13: 273-294, doi:10.1177/0963662504044908

18
  Chittendon, D., G. Farmelo and B. Lewenstein. (2004), Creating Connections: Museums and the Public Understanding of
Current Research, New York, NY: AltaMira Press.
19
  Galloway, S., Guthrie, D., (2010), L2 Digital IQ Index: Public Sector, L2ThinkTank.com, Retrieved on 5/24/2011 from:
http://l2thinktank.com/publicsectordigitaliq/publicsectordigitaliq_f.pdf



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NASA PORTFOLIO GOALS ADDRESSED:
   Engage Americans in NASA’s mission--MAVEN online activities—through our website and social media
    efforts—will engage students, educators, families, and the general public in the excitement of MAVEN science
    and engineering, providing personal and professional connections to the history of water and space weather on
    Mars.

The specific objectives to meet these goals and how we will evaluate whether we met the objectives, can be found
below in the Section on the online outreach evaluation.

ONLINE OUTREACH ANTICIPATED CONTENT AND APPROACH
MAVEN Website

The MAVEN website at LASP will act as the central “hub” for education and outreach content for MAVEN. NASA
headquarters and many partnering institutions across the MAVEN mission will host their own MAVEN-related
websites and web pages; our MAVEN hub site will serve as a place for the various efforts to connect—sharing
content across sites and taking advantage of the “viral” nature of the online environment. The idea will be to help
encourage the duplication of content, rather than the duplication of effort, across the MAVEN sites.

Social Media Efforts

Social media is a broad term for web-based platforms that offer an effective way to communicate news, opinions
and ideas to specific audiences and large populations. They allow interaction with users by encouraging
participation in a collaborative fashion and can be useful tools for soliciting input and developing community-based
designs.

Social media is constantly changing and includes podcasts, blogs, wikis, message boards, social bookmarking
websites (digg, del.icio.us), social networking sites (Facebook, Foursquare, Gowalla), social media networks
(Twitter) and content sharing websites (YouTube, Picasa, Flickr). These forums connect technical and non-technical
users, and offer powerful tools to educate and create interactions among the public about the status and science of
space missions.

The suite of social media tools chosen for MAVEN are widely used and provide features that will allow the
MAVEN team to disseminate a variety of content quickly and seamlessly. Many of these have become standard
tools for use in space mission outreach projects and are expected components. Some of these tools are relatively new
in outreach efforts. All of these tools will bring greater exposure to the mission and will help to raise the public
profile of the mission’s goals. See Table 4.1.1.a for an overview of activities.

All social media planning must be flexible over the life of the mission because of the rate of change in social media
tools and their usage. The team may choose to employ additional social media tools during the MAVEN mission to
take advantage of new technologies and features. The following tools represent the main methods of integrating
social media into the MAVEN E/PO effort:

    •    MAVEN Website—The website will act as a hub for distributing and linking all social media and other
         content for a variety of audiences. Because LASP can provide an institution-neutral website and develop a
         MAVEN-specific look and feel across the site, it will be housed on a LASP server. Other institution sites
         can mirror content, and we will encourage duplication of content because it broadens the distribution of
         news and information about the mission. We will work closely with webmasters at other institutions to
         provide and cross-post content throughout the mission. The MAVEN website will enable social media



54 | P a g e
           optimization by making content transportable (between platforms and applications) and promoting
           interactivity amongst mission followers and interest groups via social plug-ins.
       •   Facebook—LASP currently maintains an active Facebook presence for MAVEN (MAVEN2Mars). This
           tool will allow the MAVEN team to interact with interested members of the general public. It will also act
           as an additional distribution point for video, web-based and photographic content. It is particularly helpful
           because it has a “push” mechanism, which directly posts MAVEN content to followers’ own pages. We
           will also grow our presence on Facebook through the use of other social media tools like Twitter and by
           promoting interactivity with the MAVEN website. MAVEN EPO will expand our use of Twitter as the
           mission progresses to build communities of interested laypersons and reach different demographics than
           users of Facebook.
       •   Twitter—MAVEN currently has an active Twitter account (MAVEN2Mars). Twitter has received
           significant attention at NASA, particularly in the use of TweetUps: pre-publicized events that are reported
           real-time via tweets by in-person participants. ThinkTank.com20 released a glowing report on NASA’s use
           of TweetUps: “…NASA has used Tweetups to provide “golden ticket” experiences for a select few. The
           initial Tweetup was open to the first 100 to sign up; all the slots were gone within the first minute of
           launching the application. The process is now done by lottery. Thousands apply for only 100 to 150 slots.
           Despite having to pay their own way, people from 38 states and 10 countries have attended. Participants
           receive NASA swag, are given behind the scenes tours, hear guest speakers, meet astronauts, connect with
           fellow NASA Tweeps, and even view shuttle launches from vantage points not open to the public. Armed
           with wi-fi , they tweet their experiences throughout the day, post on blogs and Facebook, create videos, and
           upload images to Flickr. People not in attendance, including those not on Twitter, are able to follow the
           action in the NASA Buzzroom, a social media conversation collector. By engaging with the public, NASA
           reinforces the idea that this is their space program and builds evangelists who can spread word of their
           work and mission.”

MAVEN EPO also intends to use expenses-paid TweetUps throughout the mission: a launch-day TweetUp and a
science-data-release TweetUp—so that teachers, students, members of the media and the general public may engage
with mission scientists and engineers. A total of twenty-four mission followers, students, and/or teachers will be
invited (or selected via a Crowdsourcing activity) to the in-person TweetUp events, with lodging provided and a
stipend to cover travel and other expenses. See “Crowdsourcing” and “Recruitment” below for more information.

       •   Picasa/Flickr—Web-based photo sharing is a great way to engage the public visually. Photo sharing also
           offers the MAVEN team a central resource, in addition to the website, for storing images of all kinds,
           including scientific data and graphics. In another effort to increase collaboration and interactivity, the photo
           sharing hub for MAVEN will be linked to video content (YouTube), the website, the MAVEN blog,
           Facebook and Twitter.
       •   YouTube—The MAVEN video sharing site (MAVEN2Mars) will allow for a location to specifically post
           video content and create a community around this particular outreach strategy. Through generating
           subscribers and channel “friends,” as well as encouraging comments and feedback, we will further generate
           interest in MAVEN in another interactive, community-based forum. As with other social media tools, user
           analytics are easily tracked with YouTube.




20
     “L2 Digital IQ INDEX: Public Sector.” 2010. L2 2010 L2ThinkTank.com



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    •    iTunes U—Accessible through Apple’s iTunes, iTunes U provides a venue for those in higher education to
         distribute content specifically to an educational audience. Users will be able to download specific
         individual items (video, audio, data products, etc.) or they can subscribe to download all MAVEN-related
         content as it becomes available directly into their personal libraries. iTunes U incorporates screen reader
         and spoken feedback technologies and provides a unique opportunity for physically disabled audiences to
         access educational content in the environment in which they are most comfortable.
    •    Crowdsourcing—This tactic is already widely used for space missions in the form of naming space
         hardware, photographing specific subjects, selecting music for shuttle astronauts and “Face in Space”
         efforts. Contests for naming the Mars rovers succeeded in raising awareness about the program. Other
         Crowdsourcing opportunities exist that could drive awareness and interaction around the mission, which
         could be done via the website. Crowdsourcing tools offer a unique way to involve educators and students in
         the mission for classroom projects and in competing to raise awareness of the mission in their communities
         or in their social networks. Software (IdeaScale, Innocentive) will be employed that empowers the
         MAVEN community to drive innovation around the crowdsourcing tactic, collecting ideas and allowing
         members to vote for the best ones. This technique could be used to allow the MAVEN community to vote
         on students, teachers, and members of the general public to participate in the expenses-paid launch
         Tweetup event in November 2013; to suggest a mission tag line; to name the mission spacecraft; or to
         design the “Girls Go to Mars” badge.
    •    MAVEN Education Forum—We will create a forum that will enable teachers, students and informal
         educators (such as those in NASA’s Museum Alliance) to share questions, ideas and feedback related to
         their involvement in the program, use of Mars-related curricula in their programs and to generate ideas
         about what can be done to help implement projects in the future. The forum can serve as a venue through
         which we can solicit participation in crowdsourcing activities and encourage users to communicate via a
         variety of social media tools.
    •    Blog—The MAVEN blog (maven2mars.blogspot.com) may serve a similar function as the education
         forum: generating interest from the educational community; and providing an additional, interactive,
         search-engine-linked tool for members of the public to directly engage scientists and E/PO members in
         discussions about the mission. The blog also provides a unique, easy-to-manage hub for connecting social
         media resources and providing rich, multi-media content. An RSS (Really Simple Syndication) feed
         contains headlines, summaries, and links to full content and will instantly send notification to subscribers,
         who will know when content is updated and when important mission-related news is released to the public.
    •    Connection with JPL Mars website—We will work with JPL-MEPPE to share web content, especially in
         areas where gaps in MEPPE content and science knowledge can be supported through MAVEN E/PO and
         the MAVEN science team. For example, the “Be a Martian” website has public forums and events where
         the public can ask questions about Mars. MAVEN scientists will be invited to assist in providing answers
         to questions related to Mars’ atmosphere, magnetic fields, and habitability as appropriate.
    •    Google Analytics—This data tracking tool will be incorporated into the MAVEN website and will allow
         for real-time analysis of user activity and will provide valuable insight into the effectiveness of a variety of
         social media outreach efforts. Other social media analytical tools will be utilized and analyzed frequently to
         determine the continued usefulness of each resource as the mission progresses.
    •    New Technologies—Given the pace of current technological advance and adoption of new communication
         tools, it is inevitable that we will adopt new methods for collaborating with our audiences and for
         connecting with new members. Part of being involved in a social media campaign is remaining connected
         and flexible, so that this process can meet the goals of the project and enhance the overall vision for the
         mission-at-large.




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RECRUITMENT
Recruiting for online programming will primarily be through the use of tools embedded in each social media
platform, which are generally used to spread content “virally” throughout a given network. For example, generating
fans on Facebook or re-tweeting of our Twitter feed will help us recruit new participants. Online programming will
also be introduced in our in-person teacher professional development and media professional development
workshops, so as to encourage “virtual” participation of our traditional EPO communities.

For the in-person expenses-paid Tweetup events, recruiting will focus on integration with our other EPO
programming—while also selecting participants based on their ability to spread the word about MAVEN through
their social networks. For example, we might fill five of the twelve launch Tweetup event slots based on the number
of followers/fans that participants reach; five based on their ties to other MAVEN programming—for example, one
from Native populations, one from Girl Scouts, a student/teacher pair from the MAVEN Educator Ambassador
program, and a Hispanic community member; and two from a Crowdsourcing nominations or essay contest (see
description above).

KEY TEAM MEMBERS AND CONTRIBUTIONS
Below is a breakdown of individual personnel and their duties by institution.

LASP

   Stephanie Renfrow—Manage the implementation and integration of MAVEN online outreach, including
    overseeing the redesign of the MAVEN website
   Tom Mason—Lead online outreach implementation, including website updates, TweetUps, and Crowdsourcing
    events
   Ransom Christofferson—Support website design, development, and updates




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             T IMELINE 7: W EBSITE AND S OCIAL N ETWORKING A CTIVITIES
                                                    FY 2011              FY 2012              FY 2013              FY 2014              FY 2015          FY 2016
                                                1    2    3     4    1    2    3    4     1    2    3    4     1    2    3    4     1   2     3    4    1    2    3
                                               Oct- Jan- Apr- July- Oct- Jan- Apr- July- Oct- Jan- Apr- July- Oct- Jan- Apr- July- Oct- Jan- Apr- July- Oct- Jan- Apr
                                               Dec Mar June Sept Dec Mar June Sept Dec Mar June Sept Dec Mar June Sept Dec Mar June Sept Dec Mar
I. Key Mission Events incorporation into E/PO
    F. Launch November-December 2013
    G. Mars Orbit Insertion September 16,
          2014
    H. Detailed measurements of upper
          atmosphere, ionosphere, planetary
          corona, solar wind, solar EUV,
    I. SEPs
    J. Deep dip campaigns
    K. MAVEN climate history scientific
          discoveries
V. Public Outreach
Website and Social Media
10. MAVEN website at LASP
a. Redesign and launch LASP MAVEN hub site;
      Develop Mars timeline or similar
       interactive for web; Develop web editorial
      calendar
b. Launch regular blog series
c. Develop content to fulfill editorial calendar
      11. Facebook (MAVEN)
g. Continue Facebook content at 1 post/day,
      including PI blog
h. Tie Facebook content to complement
      website
i.    Coordinate Events w/TweetUps
j.    Maintain and fulfill FB edcal; Reward
       public to increase followers
k. Facebook posts at 2-3/day;
l.    Facebook at 1 post/day
d. Twitter (MAVEN2Mars)
e. Increase Tweets to 5/day; Build followers,
      establish community
f. Maintain Tweets at 7-10/day
g. Maintain Tweets at 3-5/day
h. Maintain Tweets at 1-2/day
e. TweetUps
i.    Identify followers for TweetUp
j.    Host L-6 mos science virtual TweetUp event
      (webcast)
k. Select 12 followers to attend launch
      TweetUp
l.    Host L-30 days launch virtual TweetUp
      event (webcast)


             58 | P a g e
m. Host launch TweetUp event
n. Host science-data virtual TweetUp
         (via webcast)
o. Select 12 followers for data wrap-up
   TweetUp event in person at LASP
p. Host data wrap-up TweetUp in person at
   LASP
f. Picassa/Flickr
d. Establish photo hosting site; build content
   library
e. Continue to build library
f. House some scientific data (visual)
g. YouTube
c. Establish video hosting site; establish
   connections with existing clients/partners
d. Build content library (scientist interviews,
   TweetUp, launch videos, and data-related
   videos/interviews
h. iTunesU
d. Establish iTunes U user account
e. Populate site
f. Update library and add data products
i. Blog
d. Design/launch mission blog; Provide general
   mission overview and connections to social
   media; set up RSS
e. Populate blog with multimedia content;
   Incorporate Facebook PI blog into existing
   posts
f. Build library; Encourage mission community
   members to join as contributors; Monitor
   blog content/ permissions as needed
j. Crowdsourcing
e. Identify       Crowdsourcing      resources;
   Crowdsourcing activity (MAVEN tagline)
f.  Crowdsourcing activity (one or more
   monitored online Q&A sessions with
   MAVEN scientists/engineers)
g. Crowdsourcing activity (contest for
   nominations to attend launch in person
   at TweetUp)
h. Potential Crowdsourcing activity around
   Girls Go to Mars patch




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4.1.3 EVALUATION
Cornerstone Evaluation will conduct an evaluation of MAVEN’s online efforts as shown in Tables 4.1.2.a and b.
The focus of the evaluation is to determine whether the program has met its impact and audience objectives through
the use of online metrics and built-in evaluation tools as listed below.

TABLE 4.1.2.A WEBSITE AND SOCIAL MEDIA—IMPACT AND EVIDENCE
Impact             Impact/Audience                Evidence
Categories         Objectives
Awareness          Visitors are more aware        Log # individuals exposed to online information about the mission—# video
                   of MAVEN, Mars science,        downloads on website and iTunes, # page hits on website, # twitter followers,
                   and NASA missions in           # Facebook fans
                   general
Engagement,        Users of website/social        Log and content analyze follower comments indicating interest/engagement
Interest           media are engaged and              Facebook—Impact of your post within Facebook community—#
                   interested in the MAVEN             individuals viewing particular posts; # individuals re-posting particular
                   mission                             posts, i.e., ripple effect—participation that your post creates within the
                                                       entire Facebook network
                                                      Twitter—twitteranalyzer.com analytics provide comprehensive data on
                                                       impact/effects that particular tweets are having on community; also
                                                       wefollow.com is another twitter analytic that provides basic metrics like #
                                                       of followers for a particular person with a specific ‘tag’ and the overall
                                                       effect on community with that ‘tag’
                                                      Participation in Q&A sessions
                                                      Formspring.com—use for general interim check-ins on our progress or
                                                       gauging level of participant involvement with Mission among a wide
                                                       swath of participants; short one or two question questionnaire
                                                      SurveyMonkey.com—use with more targeted users who are already
                                                       invested/deeply engaged as shown in their participation in tweet-
                                                       ups/crowdsourcing; lengthier survey
Behavior           Users of website/social            Social media—Friending, #fans, #re-postings, #of tweets that are re-
                   media will help us create           tweeted, level of participation in crowdsourcing/tweet-up events (shows
                   a community of                      interaction with the mission as a 2-way or more exchange)
                   interaction around                 Website—Use Google analytics to determine #visitors, duration of stays,
                   MAVEN                               dates of visits as connected to particular releases



TABLE 4.1.2.B TWEETUPS—PARTICIPANT ACCOUNTABILITY INFORMATION
Outputs                                             Demographics                             Psychographic Data
 # of TweetUps conducted                           Professional role—Job description,        Motivation for attending
 # of participants                                 area of expertise, # of years in           TweetUp
 # of materials/products distributed               profession                                Prior knowledge of content
 # of anticipated followers—readers/recipients     Community served—rural, urban,            Grasp of science in general and
  of articles, tweets, blogs written                suburban                                   MAVEN/Mars specifically
 # of anticipated/actual colleagues/fellow new     Readers/followers—estimated %             Perceived skill level as journalist,
  media practitioners who will be exposed to        underserved and underrepresented           new media practitioner, if
  project ideas/materials                           in science (women and non-                 applicable
                                                    white/non-Asian males,                    Interest in topics presented
                                                    underserved), low SES




60 | P a g e
4.2 NEW MEDIA PRACTITIONER PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT WORKSHOPS
4.2.1 AUDIENCE NEED
According to the 2011 State of the News Media report from Pew Research Center (Pew Research Center, 2011)21, of
the ~56,000 stories the report tallied in 2010, only 1.7% pertained to Science and Technology. By reaching out to
those who are telling the public about science, we can improve their understanding and coverage.

Along with the shift from traditional news outlets to online news dissemination, the media industry is seeing a
change in the journalism profession. “Some also worry that with lower pay, more demands for speed, less training,
and more volunteer work, there is a general devaluing and even what scholar Robert Picard has called a “de-
skilling” of the profession.” (Pew News Media, 2011). One of the prime areas of impact that the MAVEN media
workshops will have is to create the opportunity for formal and informal interactions between participants and
scientists. Our goal is to broaden and deepen understanding of MAVEN-related science and “the way science
works” among those who reach the public via online/traditional media—whether or not they have a professional
knowledge base in science.

4.2.2 PROGRAM DETAIL
The New Media Practitioner Professional Development workshops will focus on introducing New Media
practitioners and traditional journalists to the science of MAVEN and to the scientific process itself.

LASP OCO has a history of successful professional development for traditional journalists in print and broadcast
media. We seek to shift that focus on traditional journalists to include practitioners of New Media. Our target
practitioners are thus not necessarily the standard science journalists employed by or freelancing for news outlets
such as CNN or the Denver Post. Instead, workshop attendees will be selected for their successful use of New
Media—blogs, Twitter, Facebook, podcasts, video, online communities, etc.—in informing the general public about
science and, in particular, space science. Many of our attendees may have no formal training in either journalism or
science but are reading large numbers of audiences with their writings.

The idea of workshops for New Media practitioners dovetails nicely with a major new thrust of the University of
Colorado at Boulder (CU-Boulder), home institution of LASP. In 2006, CU-Boulder created the Alliance for
Technology, Learning and Society (ATLAS), a cutting-edge initiative in education, research, creative work, and
outreach in which information and communication technology is the enabling force. Additionally, the Chancellor
recently announced that the traditional School of Journalism is under study to be realigned as an interdisciplinary
academic program of information, communication, and technology. It is anticipated that the program would cater
heavily to the needs of today’s new breed of communications specialists—those who leverage New Media to tell the
stories the public hears. As part of our workshop for New Media, we would solicit applications from CU-Boulder
students to serve as program interns.




21




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NASA PORTFOLIO GOALS ADDRESSED:
Engage Americans in NASA’s mission

   The MAVEN New Media Practitioner Professional Development Workshops will engage journalists and New
    Media practitioners in the excitement of MAVEN, increasing Americans’ science and technology literacy
    through exposure to more accurate and exciting stories about mission science and engineering.

The specific objectives to meet these goals and how we will evaluate whether we met the objectives, can be found
below in the Section on the Media Professional Workshop evaluation.

WORKSHOP ANTICIPATED CONTENT AND APPROACH
The first workshop, to be held just before launch, will focus on bringing New Media practitioners to LASP to
engage in a discussion about MAVEN-related science, Mars, and the scientific process itself. The workshop will
include exposure to the PI and other MAVEN experts, both through lectures and free discussion time. The second
workshop will be held in FY 2015 to capitalize on data discovery. Although similar in format—with exposure to
MAVEN experts—the focus will be on the data and discoveries returned to date from the mission. A sample outline
of the pre-launch workshop is below.

Friday evening

   Welcome and dinner with scientists/engineers

Saturday

   Introductions and logistics
   Morning Session (9:00-12:30): Mars 101
    o Half-hour talks by Mars scientists provide an overview of current Martian atmosphere, geology, interaction
         with solar wind
    o Q&A with panel of scientists
   Afternoon Session (1:30-5:30): Martian history
    o Half-hour talks by Mars scientists discuss what we know about how Mars has changed through time
    o Panel discussion followed by Q&A

Sunday

   Morning Session (8:30-12:30)
    o Panel discussion followed by Q&A: Life on Mars?
    o Tour of LASP, with a focus on MAVEN as an example of a NASA mission (how science missions go from
       science concept/need to execution, MAVEN instrument builds)Afternoon Session (1:30 on)
    o Optional individual interviews with scientists and engineers




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RECRUITMENT
The landscape of journalism has changed significantly in recent years, with increasing numbers of Americans
getting their news online. According to 2011 State of the News Media, “In 2010 every news platform saw audiences
either stall or decline—except for the web. […] For the first time, too, more people said they got news from the web
than newspapers” (Pew News Media, 2011) 22 . Recruitment for the MAVEN media workshop will reflect that
change. We will focus on recruiting attendees not necessarily from major newspapers or news outlets, but from
current “hot spots” on the web—heavily followed science bloggers, Twitter aficionados, online-only news outlets,
etc. The preference will be for those who have extensive national reach, rather than their journalistic credentials,
employers, or educational experience.

Key team members and contributions

Below is a breakdown of individual personnel and their duties by institution.

LASP

    Stephanie Renfrow—Manage the implementation of the New Media Practitioner Professional Development
     Workshops; participate in on-the-ground curriculum development, implementation, and recruitment
    Erin Wood—Implement workshop, recruit participants
    Undergraduate student, TBD—Support workshop implementation
    Ransom Christofferson—Design web interface and post content as needed

T IMELINE 8. M EDIA W ORKSHOP A CTIVITIES




22
  Pew Research Center’s Project for Excellence in Journalism (2011), The State of the News Media: An Annual
Report on American Journalism, Retrieved on 5/24/2011 from: http://stateofthemedia.org/



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4.2.3 EVALUATION
Cornerstone Evaluation will conduct an evaluation of the New Media practitioner workshop as shown in Tables
4.2.2.a and b. The focus of the evaluation is to determine whether the program has met its impact and audience
objectives through knowledge assessment, end-of-workshop evaluations, and online follow-up surveys.

TABLE 4.2.2.A MEDIA PROFESSIONALS WORKSHOP—IMPACT AND EVIDENCE
Impact            Impact/Audience               Evidence
Categories        Objectives
Awareness,        Media professionals have      KA—Majority shows gains in understanding about MAVEN/Mars science; gaps
understanding,    increased                     in knowledge revealed by pre-post assessment
knowledge         knowledge/understanding       WQ—Majority indicates confidence/competence in new knowledge of Mars
                  of MAVEN science              science; majority anticipates comfort using new knowledge to ‘pitch’ and write
                                                a MAVEN/Mars-related piece for publication; open-ended queries reveal
                                                potential insufficiencies with regard to knowledge/understanding of content
                                                and concerns about content use
                                                F-US—Majority indicates that knowledge/understanding of Mars science was
                                                sufficient for ‘pitching’ and writing a piece for publication; open-ended queries
                                                reveal any insufficiencies in knowledge and difficulties/highlights in conveying
                                                ideas via printed material or contextualizing information in practical, real-world
                                                way
Engagement,       Media participants show       WQ—Majority reports increased interest in MAVEN/Mars science content;
Interest          engagement and interest       describes ways they intend to pursue interests personally and professionally;
                  in MAVEN                      intentions to do further research in area of Mars science
                                                F-US—Majority reports that they have continued to have an
                                                interest/engagement in Mars science—read additional articles; done further
                                                research, enhanced confidence in pitching/writing about Mars science
Behavior          Media professionals write     WQ—Majority indicates feeling confident in moving forward to write an article
                  articles on MAVEN or on       based on what they learned in workshop, reports intentions to create a written
                  Mars science in general       piece on MAVEN specifically or Mars science in general and expresses
                                                enthusiasm in becoming part of the social media community via Facebook,
                  Media professionals           Twitter, etc.
                  become part of the social     F-US—Majority reports that attending workshop improved ability to pitch/write
                  media community               about MAVEN/Mars science and science in general, that they did produce an
                                                article and that they did become more deeply involved in the social media
                                                community.
                                                We will track all articles coming out of workshop and assistance that media
                                                professionals are giving us with regard to crowdsourcing, blogging, tweet-ups



TABLE 4.2.2.B MEDIA PROFESSIONALS WORKSHOP—PARTICIPANT ACCOUNTABILITY INFORMATION
Outputs                                     Demographics                                     Psychographic Data
 # of workshops conducted                  Journalists/new media practitioners—Job           Motivation for attending
 # of participants                         description, area of expertise, # of years in      workshop
 # of materials/products distributed       profession                                        Prior knowledge of workshop
 # of anticipated followers—               Community served—rural, urban, suburban            content
  readers/recipients of articles, tweets,   Readers/followers—estimated %                     Grasp of science in general and
  blogs written                             underserved and underrepresented in                MAVEN/Mars specifically
 # of anticipated/actual                   science (women and non-white/non-Asian            Perceived skill level as journalist,
  colleagues/fellow new media               males, underserved), low SES                       new media practitioner
  practitioners who will be exposed to                                                        Interest in topics presented
  project ideas/materials




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5 MANAGEMENT
MAVEN PI Bruce Jakosky has delegated day-to-day oversight and implementation of MAVEN E/PO to Stephanie
Renfrow as Lead and Laura Peticolas as Deputy Lead. Stephanie Renfrow as Lead has the overall responsibility for
managing the E/PO programs; working with the MAVEN PI and science team members; coordinating with MEPPE;
and overseeing the E/PO evaluation partner, CEA. Laura Peticolas, as Deputy Lead of the MAVEN E/PO effort, will
support these efforts and work closely with Renfrow on the management, specifically heading up the management of
the programs coming out of CSE@SSL.

The MAVEN E/PO Lead reports directly to Jakosky; Peticolas reports directly to Renfrow. While Renfrow will be
responsible for oversight of all E/PO activities and for ensuring all products meet NASA SMD requirements and
NRC NSES, both Ms. Renfrow and Dr. Peticolas will work closely to carry out the day-to-day work for the E/PO
program. Specific management tasks include:

    •    Interface with PI, engage scientists and engineers in E/PO
    •    Managing implementation of the programs
    •    Managing CEA evaluation efforts
    •    Report to NASA (“nuggets,” OEPM, “buckets”)
    •    Financial and programmatic reporting to NASA, including subcontracts
    •    Attend annual Planetary Forum Retreat
    •    Attend monthly Forum teleconferences
    •    Updating Forum website
    •    Manage partnerships
    •    Attend science team meetings/teleconferences
    •    Tie into MEPPE, NASA Nationwide, etc.
    •    Provide support to ROSES EPOESS grants w/ Mars content
    •    Interface with PAO at Launch, PDR, CDR, Implementation plans
    •    Attend AGU and present on MAVEN E/PO activities and evaluation results
    •    Facilitate IRB applications for Cornerstone Evaluation Associates

LASP (Stephanie Renfrow, lead) and Berkeley (Laura Peticolas, deputy lead) will manage MAVEN programming
together. This allows us to cover for each other during absences, as well as dividing partner oversight and other
duties for more effective time management. The graphic below illustrates reporting structure.




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5.1 PARTNERS
One of the most important strategies in Education and Public Outreach at NASA is ensuring a vibrant partnership
with institutions involved in education and working with particular targeted audiences. Our partners help us to
sustain our efforts, make our interactions with audiences impactful and effective, and allow for efficiency in
allowing the institutions with a particular expertise to draw on that expertise in sharing the MAVEN science/story.
We highlight our partners, their expertise and their role in the education and public outreach plan.

Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP)

The LASP Office of Communication and Outreach (OCO) is viewed nationally and statewide as a high-quality
developer and purveyor of space and earth K-12 science education. OCO has a strong focus on professional
development for educators and for journalists; curriculum and lessons around LASP-related science; and other
educational programs. Among OCO’s most successful programs are standards-based lessons within “Project
Spectra!”; Dancing Lights elementary school curriculum; and the annual Space Science Teachers Summit, a
weeklong professional development workshop for secondary school teachers.

Over the last several years, LASP’s E/PO program has been:

        Among the top five largest university-based E/PO programs

        A top recipient of non-mission E/PO funding within SMD

        Seen as a leader in planetary and heliophysics education, with a reputation for delivering high-quality
         innovative products that other programs and missions can use

        Seen as a leader in providing teacher professional development programs; the annual Colorado Space
         Science Teachers Summit, begun in 2008, attracts large audiences of teachers and increased requests for
         programming




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Center for Science Education @ Space Sciences Laboratory (CSE@SSL)

For the past fifteen years, the Center for Science Education at the Space Sciences Laboratory (CSE@SSL) has led
the way in the development of innovative products and programs sharing the story and science of NASA’s scientific
explorations. CSE@SSL has long-standing partnerships with educational organizations of national effectiveness that
impact learners of all ages. CSE is an experienced provider of quality space mission educational programs and has
been leading NASA’s FAST, RHESSI, STEREO-IMPACT, THEMIS, ARTEMIS, and WISE Mission E/PO
programs. Through an extensive national network, CSE@SSL leverages the unique expertise of science education
specialists and other relevant partners bringing science discoveries to a wide audience.

Cornerstone Evaluation Associates LLC (CEA)

Cornerstone Evaluation Associates (CEA) LLC is a Pittsburgh-based research firm specializing in educational
research and program evaluation. CEA conducts evaluations on a wide variety of topics including formal and free-
choice education, NASA E/PO, and professional development and training. Moreover, CEA conducts museum,
planetarium and science center research as well as website usability studies. Over the past decade, Cornerstone has
been named lead evaluator for both mission and non-mission E/PO efforts. These include partnering with
SSL/Berkeley on E/PO projects like THEMIS (2003-09), WISE (2004-12), Heliophysics Educator Ambassadors
(2010-12), ELISA (2008-10) and Stardust@home (2006). E/PO collaborations with GSFC include GEMS (2013-
15), Astro-E2 (2004), Suzaku (2011) and Beyond Einstein Teachers Academy (2007-08). Cornerstone has just
completed for the Space Telescope Science Institute a comprehensive evaluation of the last ten years of E/PO efforts
related to the Hubble Space Telescope. In addition to these large projects, Cornerstone has conducted more than a
dozen evaluations for EPOESS, ROSES and IDEAS grants as well as carried out a variety of web site usability
studies. The majority of these STEM-based educational studies focus on the professional development of teachers
of underserved and underrepresented students at the middle- and high-school level.

MAVEN Scientist and Engineer Involvement

We are planning the involvement of experts from the MAVEN team. At the winter MAVEN PSG meeting, we
invited scientists and engineers to sign up for the level of participation that interests them; please see Backup Slides
for the draft signup sheet. We also are pursuing experts who were not in attendance at the PSG so that we can pull in
as many people as possible.

We have a list of preliminary advisors for several of our programs, as well as a list of scientists and engineers
interested in the following.

               Ongoing advisory capacity (periodic telecons for length of mission)
               Participation in activities reaching public audiences (outreach events, professional development
                activities, public talks, social media)
               Including MAVEN content in classes




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6 BUDGET




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APPENDICES
APPENDIX A. KEY MAVEN and E/PO STAFF


MAVEN Key Personnel          Contact Name        Email                                              Phone
Principal Investigator       Bruce Jakosky       Bruce.Jakosky@lasp.colorado.edu                    303-492-8004
(LASP)
Project Scientist            Joseph              Joseph.M.Grebowsky@nasa.gov                        301-286-6853
(GSFC)                       Grebowsky
Project Manager (GSFC)       David Mitchell      david.f.mitchell@nasa.gov                          301-286-0415
E/PO Lead (LASP)             Stephanie           Stephanie.Renfrow@lasp.colorado.edu                303-735-5814
                             Renfrow
E/PO Co-Lead (UCB)           Laura Peticolas     laura@ssl.berkeley.edu                             510-643-6295
Education coordinator        Erin Wood           Erin.wood@lasp.colorado.edu                        303-735-0962
(LASP)
E/PO Manager (UCB)           Karen Meyer         karena@ssl.berkeley.edu                            510-642-4185
Cornerstone Evaluation       Alison Walker       awalker@cornereval.com                             412-734-5220
Associates, LLC
(subcontract)


MAVEN E/PO Team Select Biographies

Bruce Jakosky, PI
Bruce Jakosky is committed to E/PO at all levels. He regularly gives public talks, organizes public symposia, writes
for the scientifically literate and the general public, and interacts with representatives of the media. He currently is
writing a “PI Blog” on a biweekly basis for the MAVEN Facebook page, and has been instrumental in developing
the MAVEN E/PO plan and ensuring that it has appropriate interfaces with the PAO plan. He has direct supervisory
oversight of LASP E/PO as Associate Director for Science of LASP (with oversight responsibility for the LASP
Office of Communications and Outreach) and of MAVEN E/PO (with the E/PO lead, Stephanie Renfrow, reporting
directly to him within MAVEN).

Stephanie Renfrow, Lead (~30% time)
Stephanie Renfrow leads the Office of Communications and Outreach (OCO) at the Laboratory for Atmospheric and
Space Physics (LASP) at the University of Colorado at Boulder. Renfrow balances the OCO portfolio of formal
education, informal education, and public outreach activities, as well as managing OCO budgets, agency rE/POrting,
collaborative activities, evaluation planning, and product review submission. As head of LASP E/PO, Renfrow
collaborates with science/technology experts to design E/PO products, activities, and events aligned with appropriate
objectives and timelines. Renfrow’s past experience includes E/PO and communications work for the National Snow
and Ice Data Center; the Division for Continuing Education and Professional Studies at the University of Colorado
at Boulder; the National Renewable Energy Laboratory; and the education organization Success for All Foundation.
She earned her Master’s degree in Science Writing at the Johns Hopkins University and her Bachelor’s degree in
English at Middlebury College. Ms. Renfrow will be leading MAVEN E/PO with Dr. Peticolas of Berkeley as Co-
Lead.

Laura Peticolas, Deputy Lead (~18% time)
As lead E/PO for the THEMIS, ARTEMIS, Wind, and STEREO/IMPACT missions, Dr. Laura Peticolas leverages
E/PO efforts from multiple NASA missions. She has years of experience working with mission E/POs and was an
integral part of THEMIS (E/PO Co-Lead) during the THEMIS PDR and CDR with Dr. Nahide Craig as E/PO Lead.



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Her current research involves understanding the energy deposition of electrons in upper atmospheres due to the solar
wind or plasmasphere interaction with the upper atmospheres of Earth and planetary bodies (such as Mars and Io).
As a NASA mission E/PO lead, she creates high school and junior college lessons, in collaboration with teachers
and the E/PO team. She also organizes and teaches at professional development workshops. Dr. Peticolas’
experience with SEGway’s rich heritage of NASA mission E/PO programs, space science lessons/activities, and
science and education networks will help inform the MAVEN E/PO Program. As Deputy Lead, Dr. Peticolas will be
supporting Stephanie Renfrow, MAVEN Lead, within the context of the broader NASA SMD Education Program.
Dr. Peticolas holds a Ph.D. in Physics, University of Alaska, Fairbanks.

Allyson Walker, Evaluator, President of Cornerstone Evaluation Associates LLC
Dr. Walker’s career as an evaluator has spanned three decades including ten years as an Associate and Acting
Director of the Pittsburgh Public Schools’ Research Division and the past fifteen years running Cornerstone, a
certified Woman-Owned Business Enterprise. Dr. Walker is a member of the National Association of Women
Business Owners, the American Evaluation Association, the Ohio Program Evaluators’ Group, and the Pittsburgh
Technology Council.

Karen Meyer, E/PO Manager CSE@SSL (~8% time
Karen Meyer served as the Sun-Earth Connection Education Forum (SECEF) Manager for fifteen years. As manager
for SECEF at UC Berkeley, Ms. Meyer helped to define the vision and scope of work for the Forum since its
inception. In addition to managing the Forum, she served as Project Manager for the first version of the Space
Science Education Resource Directory, an on-line resource tool that serves the needs of K-12 educators. Prior to her
work with SECEF, she managed science education projects for NASA’s Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer mission. Ms.
Meyer will serve as project manager for the MAVEN E/PO effort at Berkeley. She will assist Dr. Peticolas with
reporting, tracking the budget and schedule, and coordinating with partners. She will help facilitate the IEI
subaward through SPO, as well as communicating with UCB E/PO partners. She will coordinate submission of
evaluation protocols through UC Berkeley’s IRB with MAVEN’s external evaluator, Cornerstone Evaluation
Associates.

Tom Mason, Education and Public Outreach Specialist
Tom Mason assists in the implementation of ongoing E/PO programming for the LASP Office of Communications
& Outreach. He specializes in supporting social media programming for the laboratory, as well as various programs
and missions; in particular, he has helped grow our social media efforts surrounding MAVEN. Prior to joining
LASP in 2011, Mason developed curriculum for the 4-H program at the University of Hawaii at Manoa; he
specialized in science and technology projects. Mason holds an MA in Science Education from the University of
Colorado Boulder and a BS in Psychology from Washington and Lee University.

Erin Wood, Educational Coordinator LASP (~18% time)
Erin Wood assists in developing and implementing E/PO programs at LASP. She has contributed to the
development of LASP E/PO’s “Project Spectra!” and the NASA-funded Dancing Lights science-in-literacy
program. She also helped create the Space Science Teacher’s Summit, a week-long professional development
opportunity for educators. Wood specializes in developing and supporting teacher workshops in conjunction with
various on-campus and off-campus partners. She has an MS in aerospace engineering and a BA in Physics from the
University of Colorado Boulder, as well as an MS in educational psychology from the University of Colorado at
Denver.




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APPENDIX B. ABBREVIATIONS AND ACRONYMS

AAPT           American Association of Physics Teachers

AGU            American Geophysical Union

AO             Announcement of Opportunity

ARTEMIS        Africa Real Time Environmental Monitoring Information System

CEA            Cornerstone Evaluations Association

CSE@SSL        Center for Science Education at Space Sciences Laboratory

CSR            Concept Study Report

CSTA           California Science teachers Association

CU             University of Colorado

E/PO           Education and Public Outreach

FAST           Fast Auroral SnapshoT

FY             Fiscal year

GSFC           Goddard Space Flight Center

IRB            Internal Review Board

HQ             Headquarters

JPL            Jet Propulsion Laboratory

KSC            Kennedy Space Center

LASP           Laboratory for Atmospheric Space Physics

MAVEN          Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN

MEP            Mars Exploration Program

MEPPE          Mars Exploration Program Public Engagement

NASA           National Aeronautics and Space Administration

NN             NASA Nationwide

NSDC           National Science Digital Library

NSES           National Science Education Standards



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NSTA            National Science Teacher Association

OCO             Office of Communications and Outreach at LASP

OEPM            Office of Education Performance Measurement

PAO             Public Affairs Office

PD              Professional Development

PDR             Preliminary Design Review

ROSES           Research Opportunities in the Space and Earth Sciences

SDO             Solar Dynamics Observatory

SECEF           Sun Earth Connection Education Forum

SEPOF           Science Education and Public Outreach Forum

SMD             Science Mission Directorate

SSL             Space Sciences Laboratory

STEM            Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics

STEREO-IMPACT   Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory

SVS             Science Visualization Studio

THEMIS          Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms

UCB             University of California at Berkeley

WISE            Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer




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APPENDIX C. MAVEN PAO/EPO GUIDELINES
July 20, 2010

The MAVEN PAO and EPO teams understand that there is crossover between their roles in spreading the word
about MAVEN. Below is an informal review of the potential gray areas between PAO/EPO and how we will handle
them as the mission proceeds.

HARD NEWS
All release of hard news about MAVEN will be issued by NASA. The MAVEN PAO lead at GSFC will coordinate
with headquarters to determine when and how breaking news will be reviewed and disseminated.

WEBSITES
MAVEN PAO is in charge of the nasa.gov/maven website. The NASA mission site will focus on information such
as mission overview, launch, multimedia, overview of the spacecraft and instruments, resources for journalists, and
the first release of all hard news related to MAVEN.

        This site is the mission website for all hard news dissemination and background information on the project
         for media. Coordination of content posting will be as follows:
             o Content will be shared with MAVEN partners for use on partner websites
             o Web features, videos, and press releases will be reviewed by the appropriate personnel at LASP,
                   GSFC and HQ.

The MAVEN website at LASP, maven.lasp.colorado.edu, will act as the central site for education and outreach
content for MAVEN. The MAVEN education and outreach hub site will focus on education and outreach to the
general public: learning resources; links to other MAVEN sites and materials; cross-referencing with MEP and other
appropriate sites; notification of outreach events; links to/reposts of our social media efforts, including the PI blog;
reposting information from our partners’ sites; soft news features that have undergone appropriate reviews; etc.

        The site will cross-link to all MAVEN-related websites, including nasa.gov/maven and websites hosted at
         JPL, Lockheed Martin, Goddard, and UC-Berkeley. Coordination of content posting will be as follows:
             o Content generator will email content to all parties before posting, as a courtesy.
             o An example:
                        LASP EPO develops a “Q&A with the mission PI.”
                        Stephanie Renfrow, EPO co-lead/LASP PAO contact, emails the file FYI to Dave
                           Mitchell, MAVEN project manager; Nancy Neal Jones, MAVEN PAO lead; Dwayne
                           Brown, PAO SMD; Gary Napier, PAO contact for Lockheed Martin; Guy Webster, PAO
                           contact for JPL; Bob Sanders, PAO contact for UC-Berkeley.
                        Individuals respond if they have questions or concerns.
                        After a ~24- to 48-hour courtesy period, LASP posts it to MAVEN hub website; others
                           are encouraged to post it to their sites, as well.
        We will schedule group tagups as necessary to further coordinate MAVEN content as launch approaches.

SOCIAL MEDIA
LASP EPO is the lead for MAVEN social media; we currently post to Facebook at
http://www.facebook.com/pages/Mars-Atmosphere-and-Volatile-EvolutioN-Mission/164355242867 and to twitter at
https://twitter.com/MAVEN2Mars.

There will be no required PAO review for daily social media postings on Facebook and Twitter. Courtesy
notification will be negotiated by type of content/medium on a case by case basis.


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Absolutely no hard news should be disseminated via social media unless under the guidance of the MAVEN PAO
lead. See the “MAVEN Mission Social Media Rules of the Road” file for further information on restrictions of
content to be posted via social media.

Given the strength and nature of social media, we welcome MAVEN-related postings by our partners. For example,
GSFC PAO will repost/point to MAVEN news and content to the GSFC Facebook and Twitter accounts. GSFC will
also use social media to give a heads-up of new MAVEN videos, new web features, milestones met, etc.

We recommend that to stay on top of each other’s social media postings, institution contacts should “friend” and
otherwise connect accounts via social media platforms (currently Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube). We encourage
reposting and sharing each other’s content; through strong networking, we can all help spread the word about the
mission.

FUTURE PLANNING
This working document does not currently address all potential gray areas that may become apparent over the life of
the mission. Gray areas not covered at present, such as journalist E/PO workshops, will be dealt with on a case-by-
case basis as they come up.




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PICTURES:

TEACHERS MAP MAGNETIC FIELD LINES AS PART OF [PROJECT NAME?]. (COURTESY XXX)




MIDDLE SCHOOL TEACHERS BUILD AND TEST THEIR SPECTROSCOPES DURING A “PROJECT SPECTRA!” WORKSHOP. (COURTESY XXX)




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SCIENCE ON A SPHERE: AN AUDIENCE VIEWS A SCIENCE ON A SPHERE PRESENTATION AT [MUSEUM LOCATION?/DATE?]. (COURTESY XXX)




CLACE: HISPANIC PARENTS AND CHILDREN EXPLORE AND DISCUSS SCIENCE CONCEPTS TOGETHER. (COURTESY XXX)




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GIRL SCOUTS: GIRL SCOUTS PRESENT WHAT THEY LEARNED ABOUT MERCURY DURING A PROJECT SIMILAR TO THE MAVEN “GIRLS GO TO MARS”
PROGRAM. (COURTESY XXX)




FACEBOOK: THE MAVEN FACEBOOK PAGE CURRENTLY HAS 580 FANS ENJOYING OUR FREQUENT POSTS. (COURTESY XXX)




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DANCING LIGHTS: ELEMENTARY SCHOOL STUDENTS ENJOY EXPLORING SCIENCE CONCEPTS VIA SCIENCE-IN-LITERACY PROGRAMMING. (COURTESY XXX)




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SCIENTIST COLLABORATORS




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