FY 20082009 - CLARK COUNTY

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FY 20082009 - CLARK COUNTY Powered By Docstoc
					                CLARK County

  OUTSIDE AGENCY GRANT
          APPLICANT MANUAL

       Fiscal Year 2008/2009
GUIDELINES, SERVICE INITIATIVES and
           APPLICATION




         BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
      Rory Reid, Chairman Chip Maxfield, Vice Chairman
      Susan Brager     Tom Collins     Chris Giunchigliani
            Lawrence Weekly       Bruce L. Woodbury
              Virginia Valentine, County Manager
                                 Clark County Outside Agency Grant
                                 (OAG) Applicant Manual


                             County Program Year - FY 2008/2009


                                          TABLE OF CONTENTS

   I. Introduction / Purpose of OAG Funds ............................................ 1

  II. Pre-Qualification Criteria ................................................................. 3

 III. Special Conditions ........................................................................... 5

IV. Service Initiatives for FY2008/2009 OAG ........................................ 9

  V. Application Instructions ................................................................ 19

 VI. Glossary .......................................................................................... 31

VII. Application ..................................................................................... 39


APPENDICES: County and Regional Strategic Plans

    A. Clark County Department of Juvenile Justice Vision, Goals, Objectives and
       Directions for 2007 & 2008

    B. Clark County Department of Family Services - Foster Care Plan (Safe
       Futures)

    C. Clark County Performance Management Core Services, Outcomes and
       Performance Indicators

    D. Clark County Strategic Plan
                           Clark County Outside Agency Grant (OAG) Introduction

                           County Program Year - FY 2008/2009

                           _______________________________________________________

Clark County is one of the fastest-growing areas in the country, with more than 5,000 people
moving here each month. Recognizing that the needs of this rapidly growing community often
exceed the government’s ability to respond, Clark County makes funding available each year to
private and public non-profit agencies and the small cities and townships located within the
County to provide services of substantial benefit to the residents of Clark County. These
Outside Agency Grants are made available through the Community Resources Management
Division of the Finance Department. The Community Resources Management Division (CRMD)
strives to serve our community partners whose service requirements may fall outside the normal
purview of County government.

Generally, the Outside Agency Grants are intended to supplement services provided directly by
the County, or to provide services needed by the community in lieu of the need for the County to
establish such programs. Total funding available for such grants may vary significantly from
year to year, depending on the County’s financial condition. Past County grant recipients
should not expect or rely on continued County support, as this is a limited, discretionary source
of funding that fluctuates in response to other County obligations. The Board of County
Commissioners reserves the right to make these grants based on whatever factors the
governing body deems appropriate.

In Fiscal Year 2007/2008, Clark County began to encourage project proposals that
address specific Service Initiatives identified by County Departments (see page 7).
Applications for projects not specifically fulfilling any of the Service Initiatives will still be
accepted. However, applications addressing one or more of these Service Initiatives may
receive priority consideration over other, more general projects.

Applicants for Fiscal Year 2008/2009 grant funding must complete the attached forms and
submit them to Mr. Douglas R. Bell, Manager, Community Resources Management Division of
the Clark County Finance Department, 500 South Grand Central Parkway, Box 551212, Las
Vegas, Nevada, 89155. Application deadline is 3:00 p.m. Thursday, February 14, 2008.
The application must be complete in all respects, including requested attachments, in order to
be considered. Technical Assistance is available by contacting Shawna Brody in the
Community Resources Management Division at (702) 455-5025.

Before commencing, applicants are strongly urged to review the accompanying Pre-
Qualification Criteria, which outlines certain criteria relating to eligible applicants, funding
requests, and other conditions and requirements applied to these funds.
    PRE-QUALIFICATION CRITERIA APPLICABLE TO CLARK COUNTY OUTSIDE
                       AGENCY GRANT APPLICANTS

           (Do not submit an application if you can not meet all of the Criteria)

Eligible Applicants
    1. Units of local government or other governmental entities
    2. Private nonprofit organizations with 501(c)3 tax exempt status under the IRS
       Code. No IRS Pending Status will be accepted. Furthermore, nonprofit
       organizations:
          a. Must have had the nonprofit 501(c)3 status for at least one (1) full year, or
             have one (1) full year of operating experience under another eligible non-
             profit;
          b. Must be certified to do business in the State of Nevada, and have a
             Business License with the jurisdiction in which they operate;
          c. Must have a volunteer Board of Directors of not less than five (5)
             unrelated members which meets at least quarterly; and
          d. Must have an adequate financial management system, including
             appropriate internal controls, budget controls, accounting controls,
             property controls, and procurement standards which avoid conflicts of
             interest.
    3. Consideration may be given to agencies proposing projects of unique
       significance, such as those that address a unique need or population, including
       newly-formed organizations.

VIII.    Fiscal Management and Accountability

    1. County grants are disbursed as reimbursement only; grant funds are paid to
       grant recipients based on actual expenditures. The agency must first expend its
       own funds on the “activities” approved in the Resolution to Grant funds, and then
       submit appropriate documentation as a Request for Reimbursement.
          a) Appropriate documentation includes a copy of the canceled check, a copy
             of the receipt or invoice detailing what was purchased or paid for, and
             limited information on client beneficiary, if expenditure was on behalf of
             client, and time sheets showing hours devoted to the project.
    2. Recipient agencies must have:
          a) Adequate accounting records that provide reliable, complete and up-to-
             date information about sources and uses of funds, including retention of
             “source documentation” (receipts, invoices, canceled checks, vouchers,
             etc.) for all financial transactions
          b) Adequate internal controls that warrant against misuse of funds or
             unallowable expenditures;
          c) Bank account in the name of the agency; and
          d) All checks made payable to any Board Member or the Executive Director
             (reimbursements, mileage, payroll, etc.) must be signed by two authorized
             persons.
   3. While County funds may be used to support year-end recognition events for
      volunteers and/or clients, County funds will not reimburse expenses related to
      fundraising activities, meals provided to staff, nor any alcoholic beverages.

Conflicts of Interest Prohibited
In all financial transactions concerning the project and these County funds, conflicts of
interest – including the appearance of any conflict – are to be avoided.
   1. The general rule is that no person who is an employee, agent, consultant,
      member of the Board of Directors or Advisory Board, or officer who exercises any
      functions or responsibilities with respect to expending Agency funds or who are
      in a position to participate in a decision making process with regard to such
      activities, may obtain a financial interest or benefit from a County-funded activity
      or have a financial interest in any contract, subcontract, or agreement with
      respect to this County-funded project.
   2. To avoid the appearance of any conflict of interest, this prohibition extends to
      immediate family (by blood or marriage) members of any of the aforementioned
      persons.
            SPECIAL CONDITIONS APPLICABLE TO CLARK COUNTY
                    OUTSIDE AGENCY GRANT PROJECTS



Special Conditions and Requirements of the Application Process

   1. The award of any grant is based on community need and County priorities, as
      identified by the Board of County Commissioners. This is true also for any
      proposed projects that seek to address an identified Service Initiative, as listed
      on page 7.
   2. This application process provides a uniform method and process for the open
      and competitive recruitment and consideration for funding support by the Board
      of County Commissioners. Any costs incurred by the Applicant prior to the July
      1st commencement date of an executed resolution to grant funds to the Agency
      will not be paid from County funds.

   3. The County specifically reserves the right to vary the provisions set forth herein
      any time prior to the execution of a resolution to grant the funds, where such
      variance is deemed to be in the best interest of Clark County and the population
      served.

   4. The County reserves the right to contact any individual, agency, or grantee listed
      in the application or others who may have experience or knowledge of the
      Applicant's performance relevant to the proposed activities.

   5. Applicants shall not, under penalty of law, offer or provide gratuities, favors or
      anything of monetary value to any employee of Clark County or to any member
      of the Board of County Commissioners, for the purpose of influencing applicant
      selection and funding.

   6. The County reserves the right to conduct a review of records, systems, and
      procedures of any entity selected for funding.            Misrepresentation of the
      Applicant's ability to perform as stated in the application may result in
      cancellation of any resolution for awarded funds. Any such commitment may be
      withheld if issues of contract or questions of non-compliance, or questioned or
      disallowed costs exist, until such issues are satisfactorily resolved.

   7. If selected for funding negotiations, the applicant may be required to prepare and
      submit additional information upon which the Scope of Services and Approved
      Budget will be based. The ultimate result of reaching terms agreeable to both
      parties will be the execution of a resolution to grant funds to your organization for
      the project.
8. Any funding awarded in connection with this application process can be used to
   reimburse project expenses incurred between July 1 of this year and June 30 of
   next year, unless a written extension signed by the Manager of the Community
   Resources Management Division has been received. Applicant agencies will
   expend the funds first, and submit copies of canceled checks, receipts and other
   supporting documentation for reimbursement from the County.

9. If during the course of the application process it comes to the attention of County
   staff that the organization or its principals owe outstanding monies to the County,
   the applicant will be given the opportunity to remedy the situation in order for
   their application to move forward. Failure to remedy such indebtedness may
   result in application disqualification.

10. Submission of an application shall constitute acknowledgement and acceptance
    of all terms and conditions of the Application Process.


                                A FINAL NOTE

   Projects addressing County needs and objectives delineated in the Service
    Initiatives, or as noted in one or more of the Strategic Plans (attached as
    Appendices) may be considered a higher priority than projects of general
    interest.

   Applicants should be aware that, if funded, they will be expected to comply with
    the following:

       o Submit Program Progress Reports at least quarterly, noting progress
         towards goals and objectives, as outlined in the Resolution to commit the
         funds, and also to report on the number of clients served;
       o Obtain and maintain any and all federal, state, and local licenses
         (including business licenses), and permits (including professional
         certifications, as necessary) to operate the Project.
       o If recipient uses a vehicle in providing the services, the Recipient shall
         carry or provide Comprehensive Automobile Liability Insurance covering
         bodily injury and property damage, with minimum coverages as follows:
                       Bodily Injuries: $1,000,000 each person;
                                        $1,000,000 each occurrence
                       Property Damage: $1,000,000 each person;
                                            $1,000,000 each occurrence;
       o Carry or provide Comprehensive Fire and Hazard Insurance covering the
         full replacement costs of the Program
o Carry or provide Comprehensive Liability Insurance, including professional
  malpractice insurance where appropriate.
o Avoid all activities or appearances of conflict of interest, namely: no
  officer, agent, consultant, or employee of Recipient may use her/his
  position to secure or grant any unwarranted privilege, preference,
  exemption, or advantage for her/himself, any member of her/his
  household, any business in which s/he has a financial interest. This
  prohibition particularly applies to the awarding or execution of any
  contract, subcontract, or agreement with respect thereto, or the proceeds
  thereof, either for her/himself or for those whom s/he has family or
  business ties, during her/his tenure or for one year thereafter, for any work
  to be performed pursuant to this Project.
o Recipient shall record all costs of the Program by budget line items,
  supported by adequate source documentation (including checks, payrolls,
  time records, invoices, contracts, vouchers, orders, and other accounting
  documents evidencing the propriety of all costs) in a ledger separate from
  all other revenue sources.
o Recipient shall make these financial records available to County staff for
  audit whenever requested.
            FY 2008 - 2009
        SERVICE INITIATIVES
IDENTIFIED BY COUNTY DEPARTMENTS
                              FY 2008 - 2009
                          SERVICE INITIATIVES
                  IDENTIFIED BY COUNTY DEPARTMENTS


Clark County is one of the fastest-growing areas in the country, with more than 5,000
people moving here each month. This growth is largely fueled by a healthy economy
with a low unemployment rate and lower cost of living than many other states, resulting
in a high in-migration of both the working poor and retirees or near-retirees.

This in-migration from other depressed areas in the United States has presented
diverse challenges to the social services and community development infrastructure of
the valley. As with other ‘Boomtowns’ across the nation, Southern Nevada is attracting
the poor with plenty of work, but is unable to control the rising housing costs in
comparison to household incomes. Similarly, Southern Nevada has not been able to
respond rapidly enough to the social service needs of these new residents, which
include individuals, families and children with mental, physical or social challenges,
retirees or near-retirees with fixed incomes and social needs, and disabled individuals
with physical and emotional needs.

In an effort to address the deficiencies in social service programming, Clark County will
focus its Outside Agency Grants process on meeting these needs.                  Each year,
beginning in fiscal year 2007/2008, Clark County will encourage project proposals that
address specific Service Initiatives identified by County Departments. These Service
Initiatives seek to fill gaps in services to Clark County’s most vulnerable populations and
to complement services provided by County Departments. In addition, any project
receiving Clark County’s Outside Agency Grant funds is expected to give priority
attention to referrals for service for County-identified clients over the general population.
Failure to give this priority may result in grant cancellation.


 Applications for Outside Agency Grant (OAG) funding that address one or
  more of these Service Initiatives may receive priority consideration over
  other, more general projects. Projects proposing to address a Service
     Initiative that implements an evidence-based model will be given
                            preferential attention.
                                Fiscal Year 2008 – 2009
                                        Service Initiatives


Important Narrative Instructions: In all cases, project proposals should define the current
level of service provided by the Agency, and delineate the additional service slots / beds that will
be added should Clark County OAG funding be awarded. If additional service slots / beds are
not proposed, please explain why OAG support is necessary (e.g., loss of funding source
threatens continuation of services). Under no circumstances shall County funds be used to
supplant existing public funding nor supplement existing services at current levels.

Also, in all cases, project proposals should explain how individuals or families referred by
County Departments will be given priority service placement over the general population.

Additionally, in all cases, if your project implements a “Best Practices Model”, please state so
and provide a summary of the evidence-based research that has found this model to be an
effective approach or intervention.



Services for Families:

      Family and child visitation centers

       The Clark County Department of Family Services (DFS) seeks community-based
       agencies that can provide staff and space to support developmentally-appropriate
       visitation between parents and children in DFS custody residing in out-of-home care.
       DFS is especially interested in organizations that can support visits of up to four hours in
       length and that can support parent and child interaction suitable to a child’s age and the
       goals of the parent’s case plan. Staff is needed who can provide (as needed) parents
       coaching with various aspects of childcare and development.


      Parent aides to work with families served by DFS

       Families served by DFS often have stress related to aspects of child rearing. In-home
       parent aides are needed to work with families to assist with parents’ child care and
       development needs.


      Inpatient drug treatment for women that permits mothers and children to live
       together in the treatment setting

       Many DFS clients require treatment for substance abuse issues. When inpatient treatment
       is necessary, mothers are often separated from their children. DFS seeks additional
       inpatient treatment facilities that can permit mothers and children to remain together
       during the inpatient part of the drug rehabilitation program. (Project proposals should
       address the current level of inpatient beds offered by Agency and the number of beds that
       will be added with Clark County OAG funding).

      Nursing/support services to drug addicted mothers during and after pregnancy and
       delivery

       Mothers of drug-exposed children often require support once the child is released from
       the hospital. Without this support, the child may enter Child Haven or foster care. In-
       home visiting nurses and other supports could permit mother and child to remain together
       and enable continued bonding and attachment between mother and child.

      Community based intermediary medical facilities to care for the post-hospital needs
       for higher acuity babies and children.

       Some children in DFS custody currently remain in hospitals beyond the point at which
       hospital care is medically necessary because their acuity level may still be too high for
       transition to Child Haven, or a foster or relative home. In these instances, short term
       pediatric nursing care could serve as an interim solution for these medically needy
       children. (Project proposals should address the current level of beds offered by Agency
       and the number of beds that will be added with Clark County OAG funding).

      Visiting nurses for birth and foster parents caring for medically needy children

       Many medically needy children could either remain in their own homes or be cared for in
       relative or foster family placements with the support of visiting nurses whose periodic
       visitation would enable parents and caregivers to learn to meet the child’s medical needs.



Services for Youth:

      Support services that keep high-risk youth engaged in mainstream activities and
       services

       Youth who are identified as high-risk due to substance abuse, delinquency, teen
       pregnancy, school drop-out, and/or violent behaviors are often not engaged in
       mainstream activities and services, particularly education. Projects that target this
       population and provide support to keep youth enrolled in and regularly attending school,
       vocational training, or GED preparation classes with assistance in job placement are
       needed to divert these youth from Juvenile Justice or Family Service involvement.

      Support services that are gender-specific for adolescent females at-risk for out-of-
       home placement; or in which the youth is returning to the home and community
       following out-of-home placement.
    Research has demonstrated that gender-specific services are necessary to achieve positive
    outcomes, particularly with adolescent females. The need for gender-relevant girls’
    programs that facilitate pro-social behavior, build resiliency, develop positive
    connections, address sensitive issues such as body image, sexuality, drugs, alcohol and
    tobacco use, and that improve the girls’ decision-making skills are needed to intercede
    with girls exhibiting risk factors for involvement in the Juvenile Justice System.
    Preference will be provided to projects implementing evidence-based models.

   Wrap-around services for children, youth and their families suffering mental health
    problems and substance abuse in targeted zip code areas.

    The Department of Juvenile Justice Services (DJJS) has identified 19 zip codes
    where over 70% of youth offenders lived at the time of their offense: 89015,
    89030, 89031, 89032, 89101, 89102, 89103, 89104, 89106, 89107, 89108,
    889109, 89110, 89115, 889119, 89121, 889123, 89147, and 89156. Wrap Around
    Services are needed to provide comprehensive, home-based mental health
    treatment, substance abuse treatment and monitoring, as well as case management
    services for families and youth in these neighborhoods, particularly those in
    which the child is at-risk for out-of-home placement; or in which the child is
    returning to the home and community following out-of-home placement.
    Preference will be provided to projects implementing evidence-based models.
    Services for families for whom stressors are negatively impacting child and
    family functioning are also needed.

    For further information, consult the DJJS 2005 Statistical Report, available at
    http://www.co.clark.nv.us/jjs/geninfo/statistics.htm.

   Step-down or transitional services for youth exiting acute psychiatric facilities, to
    include increasing access to partial hospitalization or day programs

    In Clark County, a gap exists between acute psychiatric care and community-based
    treatment foster care. Intermediary levels of care are needed to step down youth exiting
    acute care. Preference will be provided to projects implementing evidence-based models.

   On-call crisis mental health services for young adults who are in independent living
    settings or on independent living contracts, as an adjunct to other clinical services,
    which the youth may be accessing

    Many youth exiting care continue to experience behavioral health needs that were or are
    being served after transitioning from care. The availability of on-call crisis services could
    prevent brief episodes of institutionalization.

   Transitional Living supports for youth to assist them in preparing for Independent
    Living
      Youth transitioning from foster care to an independent living status require community-
      based housing and related supports in order to become self-sufficient adults in the
      community. (Project proposals should address the current level of beds offered by
      Agency and the number of beds that will be added with Clark County OAG funding).

     Mentoring services to youth transitioning from DFS foster care to independent
      living

      Considerable research shows that a “key individual” in a youth’s life often aids resilience.
      Many youth are exiting care at age 18 without strong family support or adult life
      experience. Adult mentors can provide an ongoing support to these youth and better
      ensure successful transitions.

     Continuing case management services for youth who have exited DFS foster care at
      the age of 18

      Up to the age of 18, a DFS case manager and either a relative caregiver or a foster family
      supports youth in DFS custody. These youth frequently have continuing needs for
      community services once they have “aged out”. Post-18 case management services would
      continue to link youth to services and other needed supports as well as ensure the youth
      masters critical life skills.



Services for Low-Income Households:

     Affordable Housing and Preventing Housing Instability and Homelessness

      Projects that expand the number and availability of housing units affordable to very low-
      income households of all sizes are needed to prevent homelessness, housing instability,
      family disintegration, and developmental and educational delays for children. (Project
      proposals using agency-sponsored housing should address the current level of units
      offered by Agency and the number of units that will be added with Clark County OAG
      funding).


     Transportation Assistance for a Low-Income Person’s First Month of Work or
      Other Places Critical to Returning to Stability and Self-Sufficiency

      Oftentimes, transportation is the primary barrier to a low-income individual or family to
      regain stability. Projects that assist individuals with transportation to/from employment,
      interviews for employment, doctor appointments, or service agencies for application or
      case management appointments are needed for individuals with documented need.

     Increase access to substance abuse treatment, recovery supports, and harm-
      reduction programs
       The misuse of drugs and alcohol is a serious social and health problem. Streets, homes,
       and schools are all affected by alcohol- and other drug-related violence and public health
       risks. Research demonstrates that substance use is related to: early childhood injuries,
       abuse or neglect, domestic violence, youth violence, poor socialization experiences, lack
       of economic or educational opportunities, and community disorganization. More
       treatment support is needed, both in-patient and out-patient, at a reduced rate to intervene
       in the problem behaviors that threaten intervention by law enforcement and/or Child
       Protective Services.

       Harm reduction services such as methadone maintenance, needle exchange, or removing
       homeless substance abusers from the streets and other public places are aimed at reducing
       the spread of HIV/AIDS, Hepatitis C, as well as overdose deaths among drug users.
       Harm reduction seeks to ensure individuals are fully informed and are provided the
       means to make safer choices.

       (Project proposals should address the current level of services/clients served by Agency
       and the number of services/clients that will be added with Clark County OAG funding.
       Preference will be provided to projects implementing evidence-based models).

      Mental Health Programming

       The prevalence rate of serious mental illness in Nevada is estimated to be approximately
       5.4% of the total population. Services providing in-home medication management, life
       skills education, and mental health supports as well as service coordination with Southern
       Nevada Adult Mental Health Services are needed to better serve this vulnerable
       population.

       (Project proposals should address the current level of services/clients served by Agency
       and the number of services/clients that will be added with Clark County OAG funding).


Services for the Homeless:

      The HELP HOPE HOME Regional Plan to End Homelessness

       On January 17, 2008, the Southern Nevada Regional Planning Coalition will adopt the
       Implementation Schedule of the HELP HOPE HOME Regional Plan to End
       Homelessness. The Implementation Schedule identifies over 90 Action Steps to be
       implemented in the next ten years to end homelessness in Southern Nevada. Consult the
       website at www.helphopehome.org to review the latest Regional Plans and
       Implementation Schedule.

       Any project proposals that seek to serve homeless individuals or families must clearly
       address one or more of the Action Steps delineated in the Implementation Plan, which is
       organized into three focus areas of: Planning, Prevention & Services, and Housing. Each
      focus area identifies key Action Steps, time frames, proposed partners, community
      impact, and funding requirements. (Project proposals should address the current level of
      services/clients served by Agency and the number of services/clients that will be added
      with Clark County OAG funding).


Services benefiting Community-Wide:
     Capacity Building and Skills Training for Nonprofit Human Service Providers

      Thirty-Eight percent of Southern Nevada’s nonprofit organizations provide human
      services, seeking to improve the community’s low-income and disadvantaged residents.
      These agencies need training in Nonprofit Management, Strategic Planning, Program
      Management, Program Evaluation, and Case Management skills for front-line workers,
      including integrating technology into day-to-day operations.

     System / Organizational Capacity Building for the Social Service Safety Net

      In 2003, there were 1,104 nonprofit organizations in Nevada, including 822 in Southern
      Nevada, with an average length of service of 17 years. Nevada ranks near the bottom of
      all states for charitable giving relative to wealth on several indices of charitable giving.
      The financial resources of Nevada’s nonprofit sector are concentrated in its hospitals and
      universities. Though hospitals and universities comprise 2% of all nonprofits in Nevada,
      they reported 44% of all revenues and 34% of all assets. Human service groups that
      received at least one-third of their revenue from private donors had significantly larger
      operating margins than other human service organizations, regardless of the age of the
      agency, its size, type or location. Projects seeking to improve human service provider’s
      capacity and ultimately those that increase human service providers’ non-governmental
      financial resources are needed to foster nonprofit agency’s self-sufficiency.
APPLICATION INSTRUCTIONS
By submitting an application, the applicant accepts all terms, conditions and requirements contained in this
Applicant Manual. The guidelines, definitions and limitations detailed in these instructions shall be
considered binding on all activities once funded, although they may not be explicitly added to the resolution
to grant the funds.

    2008/2009 CLARK COUNTY OUTSIDE AGENCY GRANTS
       APPLICATION INSTRUCTIONS AND GUIDELINES

GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS
To be eligible for funding, a project must provide services and assistance that provide a substantial benefit
to Clark County residents. Projects that provide a substantial benefit are programs or services needed by
disadvantaged citizens to increase their self-sufficiency and personal independence. Generally, these
OAG grants are intended to supplement services provided directly by the County, or are funded in lieu of
the need for the County to establish such programs.

In all cases, project proposals should define the current level of service provided by the Agency, and
delineate the additional service slots / beds that will be added should Clark County OAG funding be
awarded. If additional service slots / beds are not proposed, please explain why OAG support is necessary
(e.g., loss of funding source threatens continuation of services). Under no circumstances shall County
funds be used to supplant existing public funding nor supplement existing services at current
levels. Also, in all cases, project proposals should explain how individuals or families referred by County
Departments will be given priority service placement over the general population.

In general, please complete all questions, noting “Not Applicable” if a question does not apply to your
project. Allow the form to expand, or re-type questions into a new file and answer completely before listing
the next question, so that attachments with partial answers are not used. For ease of review, please
answer questions in the order they are presented, and never answer a question by stating “see attached”.

Applications should be typed in a font size of 11 or larger, and should not exceed twenty-five (25) pages.
Place page numbers in the bottom, left. You must submit one hard-copy original of the application by the
deadline date; e-mailing or faxing a copy by deadline date is acceptable, so long as a hard copy is received
by the close of business on the following day.

The application is available in Word format for download from the internet. You may also request a copy on
floppy disc from the Community Resources Management Division’s front desk staff. You are encouraged to
use the electronic form and complete the application via computer; the resulting application will be neater,
cleaner and easier for the Review Team to read. You can also delete empty spaces and answer spaces for
questions that do no apply to your project.

Item #1: APPLICANT and CONTACT PERSON
Please list the legal name and address of the Agency, and its chief executive officer (Executive Director,
President, CEO, whatever the title may be) and the telephone and fax numbers of the Agency’s main
administrative offices. Also please list the name, title, mailing address and e-mail address of the Contact
Person who will be working with County staff through the year.
Item #2: PROJECT INFORMATION
     Name and location(s) of Project or Service that funds will be used for.
     Total Amount of Request for this Project.
     If your Agency or Organization is submitting more than one project for funding, please list the
        priority of this application in relation to the others.
     Indicate where the project is located, detailing which township or incorporated City, if applicable. If
        project has several locations, select the jurisdiction in which the majority of clients are served. For
        assistance in determining if a project is located in urban Unincorporated Clark County versus a
        township or an Incorporated City, you may access several GIS maps that may be of assistance on
        the Clark County webpage: www.accessclarkcounty.com (Assessor Records and Maps will note
        City/Unincorporated Town; and/or GIS Management Office Maps will display city/township
        boundaries on a color coded map; FrontBoy maps also note City/Township/Unincorp, as
        applicable).

Project Type
Please check the box next to the project type that best describes the activities of your project:
     Life Safety / Emergency Condition: projects categorized into this type address conditions of hazards
        to human life and/or conditions that are of a (potentially) catastrophic nature, such as a natural or
        human-made hazard that negatively affects our community or environment.
     Economic Development / Job Creation: projects that diversify the economy of Southern Nevada;
        projects or services that encourage business development or relocation, creating new employment
        positions paying “livable” wages.
     Public Facility Capital Grant: the acquisition, construction, rehabilitation, or renovation of a facility for
        use by the general public, a specific target population, or for administration of a government
        function for the public benefit.
     Public Services / Social Services Program: projects and services concerned with offering solutions to
        social problems, their causes, and their human impacts. Public/Social Service projects may work
        with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and/or communities as a whole, and are
        committed to extending social justice and human rights.
     Basic Needs distribution: projects distributing goods and items that meet the physiological needs
        such as hunger, thirst, bodily comforts, etc. associated with the lowest level of human need on
        Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs.
     Community Celebration: includes parades, concerts, and other social gatherings intended primarily
        for celebration and recreation, to which all citizens are invited. Nominal entry fees or other
        participant costs are acceptable.
     Cultural / Arts Program: projects that provide information, programs, services, funding and technical
        assistance to artists and art lovers in Southern Nevada, including providing resources to schools;
        projects that promote the appreciation of the cultural and ethnic heritages of Southern Nevada’s
        residents, and/or bring exposure to local or regional art.
     Other: if your project does not easily “fit” into any of the above categories, please specify what type of
        service your project will provide to the citizens of Clark County.

Target Population
     Senior Citizens: are persons 60 years of age and older. They may include single individuals living
        alone, two-person households, seniors raising grandchildren, seniors living with adult children, or
      seniors living in other arrangements (among others); the services, however, are designed to assist
      the senior citizen to live a better quality of life.
  Youth: are persons 17 years of age and younger (services may continue through the youth’s 19 th
      birthday to ensure continuity of quality care). Priority will be given to projects targeting children and
      youth involved in the Foster Care system and/or Juvenile Justice system. The children and youth
      may be living in a variety of situations, the services, however, are designed to assist the youth
      learn a skill, improve academically, make healthier choices, and to live a better quality of life.
  Veterans: are persons who have served in the U.S. Armed Forces, and may be eligible for services
      or income supports provided by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs.
  Disabled: persons living with a disability, as defined in any of the four definitions:
               o defined in section 223 of the Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. 423); or
               o having a physical, mental, or emotional impairment that (a) is expected to be of long-
                    continued and indefinite duration; (b) substantially impedes an individual’s ability to live
                    independently; and (c) is of such a nature that such a disability could be improved by
                    more suitable housing conditions; or
               o A developmental disability as defined in section 102 of the Developmental Disabilities
                    Assistance and Bill of Rights Act (42 U.S.C. 15002); or
               o The disease of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) or any conditions arising
                    from the etiological agent for AIDS.
 Homeless: are persons (individuals, families, or unaccompanied youth) who lack a fixed, regular,
     and adequate nighttime residence, and includes those who sleep in one of the places described
     below:
          o in places not meant for human habitation (such as cars, parks, sidewalks, and abandoned
               buildings); or
          o in an Emergency or Transitional Shelter program (for homeless persons who originally
               came from the streets or emergency shelters); or
          o is being evicted within a week from a private dwelling unit and no subsequent residence
               has been identified and the person lacks the resources and support networks needed to
               obtain housing without assistance; or
          o is being discharged within a week from an institution in which the person has been a
               resident for more than 30 consecutive days and no subsequent residence has been
               identified and s/he lacks the resources and support networks needed to obtain housing.
  Families: households made up of two (2) or more individuals related by blood or marriage, and may
      include multiple generation households. Services provided are designed to assist the family as a
      whole, addressing basic-needs, personal life skills, parenting, child rearing, or other issues
      necessary for family self-reliance.
  Low-Income Households: individuals and families with total household annual incomes at or below
      80% of Area Median Income, as defined by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban
      Development (currently, a one-person household’s monthly income cannot exceed $2,758; a 2-
      person household’s monthly income cannot exceed $3,153; a 3-person household is limited to
      $3,545 and 4-person cannot exceed $3,941 per month).
  Community-wide: use this category if there are no limitations on participation, and the service is
      intended to benefit any individual or family in the community without regard to income or other
      criteria, or to benefit the community as a whole.
Item #3: PROJECT SUMMARY
In one or two paragraphs that do not exceed 200 words, please summarize your project, noting the
services provided, target population, and its benefits to Clark County residents. This paragraph will be
used to prepare the summary statement for the Board of County Commissioners, so please ensure it is
descriptive of your goal, intended participants, and use of funds. If County funding will not result in an
increase in services provided, but are intended only to supplement or supplant funding that has been lost or
reduced, be sure to explain the circumstances requiring County support to continue services at existing
levels.

Note: it is often beneficial to complete the rest of the application first, then summarize the
highlights of the grant application here.

           Examples:
         “Agency” requests funds to support two Child Abuse Prevention professionals and related costs to offer
         child abuse prevention education and outreach throughout Clark County, including rural communities, to
         parents, care givers, and professionals who work with children. An estimated 1,200 professional caregivers
         will be educated, including 200 SafeKey providers. Providing the community with free or low-cost education
         and awareness efforts is key to changing child abuse statistics and to promoting a safe and healthy
         environment for all children.
      Or
         This project targets 4th grade students in low-income/high-risk elementary schools in the CCSD, and
         includes four visits by museum-trained docents to the classroom and four visits of the students to the
         museum during the school year. The proposed lessons are consistent with CCSD’s Curriculum Essential
         Framework, and prepares the students in advance for what they will see at the Museum, providing
         interdisciplinary projects that reinforce the principles of art and language. County funding is requested to
         support this project in one school; other funding will be pursued for the other 3 schools currently
         participating in this project.

    Or

         “Agency” requests $XYZ in County funding to support the Family Health Care Center which provides family
         planning, pre- and post-natal care, primary medical care, immunizations, and screening and application
         assistance for public health assistance programs such as Medicaid, Clark County Social Services’ Medical
         Card, and the Nevada Check-Up insurance program. This project will no longer receive $XYZ in Title XX
         funding from the State Department of Health and Human Services due to federal and state budget cuts.
         The County OAG funds will be used to continue the screening and application assistance for public services
         and health assistance programs at their current levels.


Item #4:     PROJECT DESCRIPTION
Important Narrative Instructions: In all cases, project proposals should define the current
level of service provided by the Agency, and delineate the additional service slots / beds that will
be added should Clark County OAG funding be awarded. If additional service slots / beds are
not proposed, please explain why OAG support is necessary (e.g., loss of funding source
threatens continuation of services). Under no circumstances shall County funds be used to
supplant existing public funding nor supplement existing services at current levels. Also,
in all cases, project proposals should explain how individuals or families referred by County
Departments will be given priority service placement over the general population.
Please describe the project for which you are requesting funds, specifically addressing each of the five
questions listed. As appropriate, discuss how the budget line-item for which you are requesting County
support will address the overall project goals and the goals of a County or Regional planning body (allow
these questions to expand so that full answers are provided before the next question is addressed).
        (1) Briefly (ten sentences or less) describe your project and its intended outcomes. Then, discuss
            the activity for which you are requesting funds (i.e., the budget line-item(s) County funds will
            support), and how this funding will support the goals of the project. If this is anticipated to be a
            one-time operating request, please explain the circumstances that leads to the financial need
            now, and how you expect future years’ operations to be secured (note: Capital expenses are
            assumed to be a one-time request, unless otherwise noted).
        (2) Describe the project’s services, the method of providing those services, and the
            appropriateness of said method.
                   Example:
                a) Life Skills Training/Parenting and Respite Care; In-home case management and skills instruction; Real-life
                   lessons for target population in an environment in which they are comfortable.
                b) Educating businesses of economic opportunities in Southern Nevada and advocating for their needs;
                   advertisements in trade publications, person-to-person meetings, conferences, and networking; building
                   trusting relationships.
                c) After-school recreation and other alternatives to gang violence; transportation to Rec Center from middle-
                   and high-schools; removes barriers to participation in healthy after-school activities.
                d) Community and national pride; cultural festival or event that promotes multiculturalism.
            If the application is for a capital grant, please explain the status of project funding, site control,
            and entitlements affecting the project. Please also discuss how the operating costs of the
            facility will be paid for once opened.
        (3) All proposed projects should be able to identify how its activities, goals and outcomes support
            a County activity, goal or desired outcome. Incorporated into this Applicant Manual is a list of
            Service Initiatives sought by County Departments to better serve participants in County
            mandated programs. Projects addressing these Service Initiatives may receive priority
            ranking, but are not assured of receiving funding. Also attached for your convenience to this
            Applicant Manual, as Appendices, are the Plans of various Clark County or Regional planning
            bodies, which detail the goals and objectives that Clark County has committed to achieve for
            its citizens in the near future.
            Please detail how your project addresses one or more of the County Service Initiatives
            or meets one or more of the goals or objectives of any one (or more) of the attached
            Plans. Be sure to define the current level of service provided by the project, and
            delineate the additional service slots / beds / capacity that will be added should Clark
            County OAG funding be awarded.
        (4) Please explain how clients/participants are screened for participation in the project, and
            any accommodations that will be offered to clients/participants referred by Clark County
            Departments (e.g., placed at the top of waiting lists; after-hours appointments; in-home
            services, etc.).
        (5) It is acceptable to charge a reasonable fee for services. Paying entrance fees, rent,
            commitment fees, or reimbursing the agency for expenses paid on the client’s behalf, or other
            mechanisms of financial obligation by participants serves multiple functions, including providing
              a revenue source for the agency to become less dependent on grant funds and providing the
              participant with budgeting and financial management experience. For all project types, please
              explain what kind of financial obligations participants or beneficiaries of your project have
              towards receipt of services. For capital requests, please discuss any fees or financial
              obligations future participants will have when participating in services/projects/activities once
              the building is complete. If there are no financial obligations, please explain why.
.

Item #5:      PROJECT’S OUTCOME PERFORMANCE MEASURES
Describe the specific benefits or improvements experienced by the targeted population due to your project.
Complete the chart to describe the most significant outcome(s) the project is expected to accomplish in fiscal year
2008. Copy chart and attach to this section to describe additional outcomes, as needed.
Outcomes: Outcomes are not the products for the agency, but the benefits for the target population. What will be
the benefits for the client? How will this client’s life or situation change, as a result of this project? Why is this project
being done? Examples of outcomes include: having a safe and supervised location for participation in healthy
activities in an at-risk neighborhood; children receiving quality care in a safe environment; improved parenting
function, reducing CPS interventions; intervening in substance abuse and improving family functioning by keeping
mothers and children together during treatment; households prevented from unnecessary homelessness; achieving a
higher grade or reading level due to a tutorial program; etc.
Major Tasks: Outline the major tasks/activities to be conducted by this project to ensure this outcome (e.g.
client outreach; needs assessments; job training; vouchers issued for licensed child care; case
management; life skills classes; completion of construction; begin operations by a qualified provider; etc.)
Outputs: Quantifiable products of the tasks, e.g. # of clients/participants recruited, # of participants/clients
enrolled in mainstream services in the community, # of clients/participants trained, # of participants/children
enrolled in program, etc.
Outcome Measurement: How will you measure the outcome? Will there be some observable difference?
Who will observe the difference, and how will it be reported? Will you perform pre- and post-tests? What
follow-up/tracking will be provided to ensure outcomes are met? How will the project’s impact on
participants be evaluated?

Outcome Example             Describe how participants will benefit and how many are expected to realize this outcome.
Improve family functioning and independence of 100 families with children who are severely
medically disabled by providing in-home and center-based skilled nursing respite care.

Major Tasks Necessary to Realize Outcomes                       Outputs Resulting from Tasks
Receive referrals from CC Family Services                       Intake, needs assessment, eligibility screening
Match family needs to professional or skilled                   Child’s medical needs assessed and addressed
caregiver
Provide 5 – 20 hours of respite care                            Improved parental functioning
Outcome Measurements: Describe evaluation tools, methods, and benchmarks to measure achievements of this outcome.
Family Functioning Survey taken at beginning and end of program year will measure
parental stress and any parenting skills needed or achieved. CC Family Services will provide
report which indicates how many assisted families received further CPS interventions.
Outcome Example           Describe how participants will benefit and how many are expected to realize this outcome.
250 youth in 10 at-risk schools will participate in healthy, educational and positive out-of-
school activities and will demonstrate improvement in one or more of three areas:
academics, personal behavior, and/or participating in a healthy life style.

Major Tasks Necessary to Realize Outcomes                  Outputs Resulting from Tasks
Offer on-site activities before and after school           250 youth will have a safe alternative to the
and during school vacations and holidays                   streets or being home alone
Provide homework assistance and tutoring                   50% of kids will get one-on-one tutoring
Provide effective prevention programs to                   75% of kids will participate in one or more
address issues such as tobacco, alcohol, drug,             group session, skit or other program
teen pregnancy, and gang involvement
Organize sports teams and competitions                     35% of kids will participate
Encourage parent participation by offering                 Family members and neighbors can offer
family activities                                          better support
Outcome Measurements: Describe evaluation tools, methods, and benchmarks to measure achievements of this outcome.
1. Tutors will make copies of student’s Progress Report, as well as solicit teacher input via a
   survey, which will track student performance, class participation, and behavior in class.
2.      Staff will make case notes of each participant’s social skills and overall behavior on a
     weekly basis; surveys will be requested of parents and teachers, where parental consent is
     provided.
3.       Child’s continued participation in the after-school activities for 7 of the 9 months of
     the school year will indicate healthy life style choices.



Item #6: PREVIOUS ACCOMPLISHMENTS AND PROJECT IMPACT
Describe the accomplishments this project (or, if project is new, your agency) has achieved for the past
three years. Include the degree to which objectives were met. Be descriptive of services, and include the
number of clients with “successful outcomes” served by the project in the past three years and a description
of your program’s definition of “successful outcome.” Then, please note total number of persons expected
to be served this fiscal year, and percent attributable to these funds, if distinguishable.


Item #7:         PROJECT SUSTAINABILITY
(a) You must submit a financial plan for ongoing program support, which identifies funding sources
your agency anticipates receiving funding from, as well as those your agency will attempt to
receive funding assistance from. A financial plan for ongoing support will reflect projected income
sources for the next three to five years, identifying sources (e.g., “participant fees”, “fundraising dinner”,
“Christmas Appeals”, “Artwork Sales”, “Thrift Store”, “Sponsorships”, etc.). If you anticipate asking Clark
County for continuation funding in future years, please state so now and explain why (e.g., private
foundations and local businesses do not wish to support these services, as they are perceived to be a
government function; new project will require at least 3 years to stabilize; multi-year federal grant requires
50% local Match; etc.).
If this funding request seeks to replace “lost” or “reduced” funding support from another source, explain the
funding source, circumstances leading to the reduction or loss, and the anticipated consequences to the
project’s services or viability due to the anticipated cuts. Please also address if the “cut” is anticipated to be
of a short-term duration (funding may or will be re-instated in future years) or permanent, and what are the
agency’s plans to seek other, non-governmental funds for the project.
(b) Be sure to list any sources of funding for this project that have already been secured for FY 2008-
2009. You must attach documentation to support the claim of committed funding.
(c) If this funding request will act as Match to another committed fund, please specify source, the amount
of committed funds that require the match, and the minimum match requirement.


Item #8: PAST CLARK COUNTY FUNDING
Please indicate the amount and source of funding this project has received in the last three fiscal years
from Clark County.


Item #9: PROPOSED PROJECT BUDGET
Please indicate the entire cost of the project as well as those portions where these funds will be used to
pay specific costs. Do not include cents; round to nearest dollar. By disclosing the full project cost, you are
accomplishing three things: (1) you are demonstrating a knowledge of the project and services being
provided; (2) you are indicating the amount of funds leveraged by your County request; and, (3) you assist
the County Commissioners to determine allocation amounts. Failure to provide both the full cost of the
project and the requested funds amount may result in your application being pulled from consideration.

BUDGET NOTES: all amounts should be rounded up to the nearest dollar. Fundraising activities may not
be charged against these County funds, nor shall any member of the Board of Directors be paid as staff.
Reimbursement for meals or food provided at meetings will be considered, but under no circumstances
shall the costs for alcoholic beverages be reimbursed. Staff salaries being charged against County funds
must have all proper taxes and deductions subtracted from their checks and appropriately paid to state and
federal agencies; agency staff are not to be considered as consultants or independent contractors. Staff
salaries are to be broken down into two categories: (1) Administrative/Operations salaries and (2) salaries
directly related to client services. All projects receiving funding support from these County funds must
obtain Comprehensive Fire and Hazard Insurance to cover the replacement cost of the project,
Comprehensive Liability Insurance and, where appropriate, professional malpractice insurance, and also
Comprehensive Automobile Liability insurance in the amount of $1,000,000 each incidence if an automobile
is used in performance of the project, and must have a Fidelity Bond on all senior staff. Costs for these
expenditures are eligible for reimbursement from the OAG grant.

It is acceptable to delete the line items that do not apply, thus reducing the space the Proposed Project
Budget takes up. Simply select the “Table” pull-down menu at top, select “Delete – Rows”.

        Please Note: The applicant Agency must expend the funds first, and submit copies of canceled
checks, invoices/receipts, as well as limited client information (if payments were made on behalf of clients)
for reimbursement from Clark County.
Item #10 BUDGET JUSTIFICATION
For each item where a portion of the cost will be paid for with County funds, indicate the method used to
determine the funding request, identifying budget line item, what unit of measurement is used, cost per unit,
number of units and total costs to be charged to this budget. Be sure to include as much detail as possible.
Should the project be recommended for funding at a lower amount than you requested, it is important that
the County have an understanding as to the impact of less funds. Listing the title and percent of salary for
any staff that will be supported with County funds will facilitate future management of the grant and allow
for prompt reimbursement.

Item #11: PROPOSED REVENUE SOURCES
Indicate the proposed revenue sources for this project. Please note, “Agency Contribution” is not an
appropriate answer. You must identify funding streams, such as Annual Fundraising Dinner, Golf
Tournaments, Community Appeals, etc. Please note, the “Total Project Revenues” should equal or exceed
the “Total Project Cost” outlined in Item #9

Leveraged Resources: because government grant sources rarely fully fund any project, leveraging is very
important in the application process. Leveraged Resources consist of firm commitments of funds or goods
and services from another source that will be expended if the project takes place because it receives gap
funding from this local government process. Leveraged Resources also includes other resources –
financial and in-kind – that will be available to support the project’s goals once implemented. This may
include free office space, donated IT support, donations of goods and services for clients that your agency
or the client would otherwise have to pay, or volunteer hours dedicated.

Item #12 PRIVATE NONPROFIT ORGANIZATIONAL INFORMATION
This item should be completed by all organizations seeking funding. Also, please see below regarding
required attachments.

Item #13: AGENCY and PROGRAM MISSION STATEMENT
Please describe your organization’s mission or purpose, and the overall mission or purpose of the
proposed project.

Item #14: FINAL SUPPLEMENTAL QUESTIONS
These questions are posed each year to provide the applicant the opportunity to explain how reduced or
“no” funding would affect the proposed project.


APPLICANT CERTIFICATION
Please have the authorized representative of your Board of Directors sign and date the application.




                                       REQUIRED ATTACHMENTS

Please include the items requested with the application. DO NOT STAPLE. As noted, failure to provide the
requested documentation may be reason to deny the application. Please be advised that should the
application be forwarded for consideration, and recommended for funding, funding will be withheld until all
required attachments are submitted.

For organizations that have not received funds from Clark County in the past three years, you must also
submit a spreadsheet listing the project’s (or organization’s, in the case of a new project) revenue and
expenses for the past three fiscal years. This provides an overall picture of the agency’s financial growth
and stability. Please identify on the sheet what your agency’s fiscal year is, or when does your funding
cycle begin and end (e.g. July – June, January – December, March – February)


                                  PROPER COMPLETION OF APPLICATION

    1. Complete all questions, noting “Not Applicable” if a question does not apply to your project.
       (Exception: questions pertaining to “Construction, Rehabilitation, Renovation, Conversion, etc.” can
       be deleted if they are not applicable)
    2. Allow the form to expand, or re-type questions into a new file and answer completely before listing
       the next question, so that attachments with partial answers are not used. For ease of review,
       please answer questions in the order they are presented, and never answer a question by stating
       “see attached”.
    3. Applications should be typed in a font size of 11 or larger.
    4. Applications should not exceed twenty-five (25) pages (attachments do not count towards page limit).
    5. Place page numbers in the bottom, left.
    6. You must submit:
             a. one hard-copy original (with signature) and one copy of the application,
             b. one set of required attachments
             c. E-mailing (shp@co.clark.nv.us) or faxing (455-5038) a copy by deadline date is acceptable, so long
                as a hard copy is received by the close of business on the following day. You need not fax or
                email the attachments, just ensure they are part of the hard copy submitted by the close of
                business on the following day.
                        CLARK COUNTY OUTSIDE AGENCY GRANT

                              APPLICATION FOR FUNDING

                PROPER SUBMISSION OF THE OAG APPLICATION

Your application must be submitted as follows:

          1. All applications MUST be submitted by the deadline date. Applications
             received late may not be considered in the funding allocation process.

          2. One complete original (application and required attachments) and one
             copy of application must to be provided. DO NOT STAPLE OR BIND.
             Application should be in font size of 11, and should not exceed 25 pages.

          3. The original and one copy of the application plus one copy of all required
             attachments must be submitted in an envelope addressed with the:
                       a. type of grant (OAG Request for Public Service; or, OAG
                          Request for Public Facility, etc.),
                       b. the name of the organization submitting the grant,
                       c. the priority number, if more than one application is being
                          submitted. The priority number must also be reflected on the
                          first page of the application form.

          4. Additional applications submitted must each be submitted in the same
             manner as described above, with the proper priority number reflected on
             the outside of the envelope as well as on the first page of the application
             form.

          5. Deliver applications by 3:00 p.m. Thursday, February 14, 2008 to:

                          Clark County, Community Resources Management Division
                          5th Floor, Clark County Government Center
                          500 So. Grand Central Parkway
                          Las Vegas, NV 89106
                          (702) 455-5025
                          fax: (702) 455-5038
                          e-mail: shp@co.clark.nv.us
                 CLARK COUNTY OUTSIDE AGENCY GRANTS

                       APPLICATION INSTRUCTIONS

PROPER SUBMISSION OF THE OAG APPLICATION
                       Attachment Checklist:

    List    of the organization’s current Board of Directors and Advisory Board
       List, with contact information and identifying any members who are current
       County officials or a member of a current County official’s immediate
       family
      Copy of current non-profit status (IRS Letter)
      Current Corporate Charter showing status in good-standing with the
       Nevada Secretary of State (a print-out from the internet is acceptable)
      A copy of the organization’s Articles of Incorporation, if they have been
       amended in the past five years
      A copy of the organization’s By-Laws, if they have been amended in the
       past five years
      Financial Accounting Submittal, as applicable:
            For agencies that expended more than $500,000 in Federal or
               County funds during the most recently-completed Agency fiscal
               year:
                    The most current single audit (per OMB Circular A-133)
            For agencies that expended between $100,000 and $499,999 in
               Federal or County funds during the most recently-completed
               Agency fiscal year:
                    The most recent audit of financial statements during that
                      reporting period
            For agencies that expended less than $100,000 in Federal or
               County funds during the most recently-completed Agency fiscal
               year:
                    A letter stating that you expended less than $100,000 of
                      Federal or County funds during the reporting period (you
                      must specify the agency’s fiscal year), AND
                    A copy of unaudited financial statements and/or Profit &
                      Loss sheets.

If organization has not received County OAG funds in the past three years:
     A spreadsheet reflecting a three-year funding history (see Application
       Instructions for more details on requirements).
     A Financial Plan for ongoing Program support
     A copy of the organization’s By-Laws
GLOSSARY
                                                      GLOSSARY
  The guidelines and definitions detailed below will govern the activities funded with Clark County’s Outside Agency Grant funds.
   Projects approved for funding are expected to perform each activity as it is defined in this Glossary, although they may not be
                                        explicitly added to the resolution to the grant funds.


Access or any of its derivatives typically refers to the ability of the target population to make use of
services. It refers to time (after-hours or weekends), place (conveniently located, or field-based), and
language of workers.
Actively Link to Community Services describes projects or case workers who go beyond Information &
Referral (I&R) services by assisting clients to make application for services, and insuring that once deemed
eligible, the client is assisted to remain eligible (e.g., provide monitoring of job searches, assist client to
attend required appointments, advocate for client, etc.)
Administrative Costs include the costs associated with accounting for the use of grant funds, preparing
reports for submission to the County, obtaining program audits, and similar costs related to administering
the grant after the award. Agencies wishing to apply for Indirect Costs must submit an approved Indirect
Cost schedule.
Basic Needs means those physiological needs such as hunger, thirst, bodily comforts, etc. associated with
the lowest level of human need on Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs.
Capital Projects are also known as “bricks and mortar” projects, and include activities such as acquisition
(of land or buildings), construction, renovation, or rehabilitation of housing, buildings, or other structures.
All capital projects are subject to a deed restriction which will guarantee the continued use of the facility as
originally intended for certain periods of time, dependent upon the grant amount.
Case Management remains a loosely defined service, but generally includes a majority of the following
functions:
         Outreach and client identification: to attempt to enroll clients not using services
         Assessment: to determine a person’s current and potential strengths, weaknesses and needs
         Planning: to develop a specific, comprehensive, individualized treatment and service plan
         Linkage: to transfer clients to necessary services and treatments provided in the community
         Monitoring: to conduct ongoing evaluation of client progress and needs
         Client Advocacy: to intercede on behalf of a specific client or a class of clients to ensure equity
           and appropriate services
         Direct Service: provision of clinical services or financial assistance to overcome barriers
         Crisis Intervention: assisting clients in crisis to stabilize through direct interventions and
           mobilizing needed supports and services
         System Advocacy: intervening with organizations or larger systems of care in order to promote
           more effective, equitable, and accountable services to a target client or group
         Resource Development: attempting to create additional services or resources to address the
           needs of clients
             Discharge Planning: implementing many of the above functions again to help client plan to
              transition from one type of setting or service program to another.
Child Care Subsidy can be in the form of financial assistance with all or a portion of the costs of the care
of dependent children in a safe environment by a provider of the parent’s choice.
Continuum of Care (CoC) Funding is a collaborative funding approach that helps communities plan for
and provide a full-range of emergency, transitional, and permanent housing and service resources to
address the various needs of homeless persons. The SNRPC Committee on Homelessness, and the
Regional Homeless Coordinator, oversee the CoC collaborative process.
Direct Financial Assistance is the provision of financial assistance, in the form of voucher promise-to-pay
or issuing cash or check, on behalf of a client. Paying a debt owed or fee for services for a client with the
goal of removing a barrier to the client’s stability and self-sufficiency. All such financial assistance shall be
paid to a third party; under no circumstances can County funds be used to provide cash up-front or to
reimburse the client household directly.
Direct Services Costs include expenses related to providing care, services and programs directly to the
target population. Direct Services Costs will include salaries of project staff, professional services
contracted on behalf of clients, any direct financial assistance, all costs associated with providing
Supportive Services to clients and, if easily distinguishable, the operating costs directly related to the
provision of these services (e.g., outreach office rent, utilities, furniture, supplies, etc.).
Disability is either of the four definitions:
         defined in section 223 of the Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. 423); or
         having a physical, mental, or emotional impairment that (a) is expected to be of long-continued
             and indefinite duration; (b) substantially impedes an individual’s ability to live independently;
             and (c) is of such a nature that such a disability could be improved by more suitable housing
             conditions;
         A developmental disability as defined in section 102 of the Developmental Disabilities
             Assistance and Bill of Rights Act (42 U.S.C. 15002);
         The disease of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) or any conditions arising from the
             etiological agent for AIDS.
Discharge Planning includes implementing many of the case management functions specifically to help a
client plan to transition from one type of setting or service program to another.
Emergency Shelter programs are defined as those that have minimal entry criteria, include time limits
(varies by agency – but duration is typically less than 90-120 days), are located in a structure offering
protection from the elements, provide restroom facilities and drinking water, are supervised and offer
appropriate lighting/cooling and proper ventilation. Generally, one hot meal is served, and no fee is
required. Emergency Shelter can include beds, units, temporary spaces, or vouchers to motels that are
available to meet the emergency housing needs of persons and families who would otherwise be living on
the streets. Emergency Shelter does not include the programs and services that meet the definition of
prevention, transitional housing or permanent housing.
Employment Services include education related to job skill development, on the job training, referral, job
placement, sheltered workshop, job coaching/shadowing, employment testing, employment evaluation, as
well as direct financial assistance in obtaining employment-related documentation, licenses, certifications,
or other items necessary for a person to accept employment. Corrective dental and eye care that is
needed to improve a person’s employability may also be considered an eligible expense.
Families are households that are made up of two (2) or more individuals related by blood or marriage, and
may include multiple generation households. Services provided are designed to assist the family as a
whole, addressing basic-needs, personal life skills, parenting, child rearing, or other issues necessary for
family self-reliance and designed to improve the family’s quality of life.
Former Foster Care Youth refers to youth and young adults who exited the foster care system and are
unprepared to live independently and to retain housing stability. These former foster care youth are eligible
for expanded financial assistance and case management funded by the 2003 Nevada State Legislature
(AB94) as administered by the Child Focus, 1771 E. Flamingo Rd, Suite D-241; 893-1627. Services
offered to former foster care youth with Clark County Outside Agency Grant funds must be complementary
to – and not replace – any service available through the AB94 funding.
Grassroots Organization is an organization that is headquartered within Clark County and (1) has a social
service budget of $300,000 or less which does not include salaries and expenses not directly expended in
the provision of social services, or (2) has six or fewer full-time equivalent employees. Local affiliates of
national organizations are not considered “grassroots”.
Greater self-determination refers to increases in the influence that participants have on decisions that
affect their lives. Those increases may result from such actions as involvement in the development of his or
her individual housing and supportive services plan (including developing personal goals), participating in
resident advisory council meetings or other involvement in the development of program rules and
procedures, involvement in program implementation through such activities as employment and volunteer
services, and choice in selecting service providers.
Homeless Person means an individual or family who lacks a fixed, regular, and adequate nighttime
residence, and includes those who sleep in one of the places described below:
             In places not meant for human habitation, such as cars, parks, sidewalks, and abandoned
                buildings; or
             In an emergency shelter; or
             In transitional or supportive housing (for homeless persons who originally came from the
                streets or emergency shelter); or
             Is being evicted within a week from a private dwelling unit and no subsequent residence
                has been identified and the person lacks the resources and support networks needed to
                obtain housing without assistance; or
             Is being discharged within a week from an institution in which the person has been a
                resident for more than 30 consecutive days and no subsequent residence has been
                identified and s/he lacks the resources and support networks needed to obtain housing.
Homeless Management Information System (HMIS) is a computerized data collection tool specifically
designed to capture client-level system-wide information over time on the characteristics and service needs
of men, women, and children experiencing homelessness. It is designed to aggregate client-level data to
generate an unduplicated count of clients served within a community’s system of homeless services. An
HMIS is not a stand-alone, program-specific database. All projects purporting to serve homeless
individuals or families that are funded with Clark County Outside Agency Grant funds must
participate in Southern Nevada’s HMIS system by inputting data on all clients served by County-
funded projects. Agencies may apply to be a user on the Miner-HMIS system by contacting Robert
Herdzik, HMIS Program Coordinator at 335-6005. For more information on the Miner-HMIS system or the
participation requirements, contact the Regional Homeless Coordinator at 455-5722.
HMIS Data Quality Standard refers to a minimal threshold of data accuracy in the HMIS system before
Clark County will reimburse any funds (OAG or ESG). For Fiscal Year 2008/2009 the minimal threshold for
data accuracy is set at 75% accuracy or better. This means that no more than ¼ of the client files created
by your agency in the HMIS system can have inadequate, inaccurate, or incomplete data entered for the
client. To achieve a higher data quality rating, agencies must complete all data fields on all clients entered
into the HMIS system. The data entered into the data fields must be accurate and complete, which is
tested each month by the HMIS Coordinator and reported to the Community Resources Management
Division staff, the Regional Homeless Coordinator and participating agencies.
Housing Search / Placement includes intake and evaluation to determine eligibility for specific housing
programs and providing the means to access housing (such as financial or other resources), assist in
completing housing applications, and advocacy or intervention with landlords or public agencies to facilitate
a client’s application and placement.
Indicators are the measurable elements of the service that tell whether an outcome is occurring. An
indicator can be a direct or indirect measure (proxy) and often a set of indicators is used to measure an
outcome. A key characteristic of an Indicator is that it is measurable, or count-able, and can be compared
to indicators measured or counted earlier or later in a process. Please see HUD CPD Outcomes System
Tab for further details.
Information & Referral (I&R) Services is providing individuals or families with lists of agencies and
contact information for various services or needs. Programs receiving Count OAG funds are expected to
distinguish in their monthly reports between clients receiving case management services and those
receiving only I&R services.
Intensive Case Management describes a more intensive and comprehensive level of case management
as defined above. Intensive case management requires a higher level of commitment of an agency’s and
case worker’s resources and time, and the majority of activities typically occurs with the client in the field.
Leveraging is a written commitment documented on letterhead stationary, signed and dated by an
authorized representative of the partner agency, and must contain the following elements: (a) the type of
contribution (e.g., cash, child care, substance abuse treatment, etc.); (b) the value of the contribution; (c)
the name of the project and its sponsor organization to which the contribution will be given; AND (d) the
date the contribution will be available.
Life Skills are usually taught through education, training and coaching on: hygiene, time management,
parenting, financial literacy, health and wellness, job readiness, job retention, transportation,
communication, cooking and nutrition.
Low-Demand Shelter is a term used to describe shelters (usually short-term Emergency Shelter) that have
few, if any, behavior or conduct requirements. These shelters focus on providing a safe, secure, violence-
free place for homeless individuals to escape the outdoor elements and the uncertainties of life on the
streets or in the desert encampments. Low-demand shelters address the first two levels on Maslow’s
Hierarchy of Needs as a first step to encouraging homeless individuals to aspire to achieve the other levels.
Low-Income Household includes individuals and families with total household annual incomes at or below
80% of Area Median Income, as defined by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development
(currently, a one-person household’s monthly income cannot exceed $2,758; a 2-person household’s
monthly income cannot exceed $3,153; a 3-person household is limited to $3,545; and a 4-person
household cannot exceed $3,941 per month).
Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs lists human needs in this order: Physiological needs (food, water, air);
Safety needs (shelter from cold, rain, snow, katyushas); belongingness needs (friends, family, community);
Esteem needs (a job, appreciation, a title); Self Actualization needs (reaching one's creative potential,
philosophy).
Medical Care includes an assessment, diagnosis, and treatment focused on the health of an individual and
may involve referral, medication, and assistance in obtaining said services. Medical Care requires licensed
personnel (such as APN, MD, or RN).
Mental Health Care includes a crisis intervention, assessment, therapy, and diagnosis focused on the
mental and emotional health of an individual and may involve referral, medication and assistance in
obtaining said services. Mental Health Care requires licensed personnel (such as LCSW, Psychiatrist,
MFT or MD)
Older Homeless Youth refers to young adults aged 18 – 21 years who are unable to return to their homes.
Oftentimes, Older Homeless Youth include Former Foster Care youth as well as other young adults for
whom traditional emergency shelters are not appropriate due to maturity, physical limitations or
developmental delays. This definition is consistent with the U.S. Department of Health and Human
Services program guidelines for serving homeless and runaway youth.
Operating Costs means the costs associated with the day-to-day operation of an agency and program,
and not the costs associated with direct care and support to the target population. Operating costs will
include costs for management (including salaries), maintenance, operation, supplies, rent, repairs, security,
fuel, equipment, insurance, utilities, and furnishings.
Outcomes show how a project benefits the community or people it serves; or, stated another way, how is
the person or community changed as a result of the activity of the project? One chooses an outcome
based on the purpose for the activity; it may help to answer the question “Why would the County fund this
activity?” The Outcome is designed to capture the nature of the change or expected result of the objective
that the project seeks to achieve. It is possible that a particular project activity could be categorized in
different ways, depending upon the intent.
Outreach Services are offered outside the office environment, typically in people’s homes, school settings,
shopping centers, the streets, or other areas where the target population congregates. Services include
information about and transportation to services available in the community that can meet the needs of the
individual. Common examples include weekly visits to another service provider’s site to administer your
services, offering classes or services within a community setting that offers better access to the target
population, Street Outreach, Mobile Units or Law Enforcement responses.
Prevention of Homelessness means activities or programs designed to prevent the incidence of
homelessness. Activities may include, but are not limited to, the following:
          Short-term subsidies to defray rent or utility arrearages for individuals or families that have
           received eviction or utility termination notices;
          Security deposits and first month’s rent to permit a homeless family to move into permanent
           housing, or an at-risk household to move into housing that is affordable to them;
          Mediation programs for landlord-tenant disputes;
          Legal services for the representation of indigent tenants in eviction proceedings;
          Payments to prevent foreclosure on a home; and
          Other innovative programs and activities designed to prevent the incidence of homelessness.
Financial assistance with rent may continue for a period not to exceed three (3) months, provided that the
total of all financial assistance provided the household does not exceed the equivalent of three months of
rent. Under no circumstances may the short-term subsidies of rent or utilities be used to support units or
structures owned by the project sponsor, the grantee, their parent organization, a partnership of which the
sponsor or grantee is a member, or any other related organization.
Private nonprofit organizations eligible to apply for County OAG funds are those that ensure:
    1. no part of the net earnings of which may inure to the benefit of any member, founder, contributor,
        or individual;
    2. that has a voluntary board of not less than five (5) unrelated persons;
    3. that has a functioning accounting system that is operated in accordance with generally accepted
        accounting principles, or has designated an entity that will maintain a functioning accounting
        system for the organization in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles;
    4. that practices nondiscrimination in the provision of assistance; AND
    5. has all required licenses and certifications to do business in the State of Nevada.
Quality means the degree to which services and supports for individuals and populations increase the
likelihood for desired housing and quality of life outcomes and are consistent with current professional
knowledge.
Regional Homeless Coordinator is responsible for implementing the decisions of the Southern Nevada
Regional Planning Coalition’s Committee on Homelessness. Shannon West, the Regional Homeless
Coordinator, is housed at the Pinto Lane office of the Clark County Social Services and can be reached at
455-5722.
Renovation/Rehabilitation/Conversion of Building
    All capital projects are subject to a deed restriction which will guarantee the continued use of the
     facility as originally intended for certain periods of time, dependent upon the grant amount.
      Conversion means a change in the use of a building, where the cost of conversion and any
      rehabilitation costs exceed 75 percent of the value of the building before conversion. If such costs do
      not exceed 75 percent of the value of the building before conversion, they are to be considered
      rehabilitation and the three-year use requirement applies. The conversion of any building to another
      use must meet local government safety and sanitation standards. For projects of 15 or more units
      where rehabilitation costs are 75 percent or more of the replacement cost of the building, that project
      must meet the requirements of 24 CFR 8.23(a) concerning accessibility requirements of Section 504
      of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended.
      Major Rehabilitation means rehabilitation that involves costs in excess of 75 percent of the value of
      the building before rehabilitation. Major rehabilitation must meet local government safety and
      sanitation standards. In addition, for projects of 15 or more units where rehabilitation costs are 75
      percent or more of the replacement cost of the building, that project must meet the requirements of
      24 CFR 8.23(a) concerning accessibility requirements of Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of
      1973, as amended.
      Rehabilitation means labor, materials, tools, and other costs of improving buildings, including repair
      directed toward an accumulation of deferred maintenance; replacement of principal fixtures and
      components of existing buildings; installation of security devices; and improvement through
      alterations or incidental additions to, or enhancement of, existing buildings, including improvements
      to increase the efficient use of energy in buildings, and structural changes necessary to make the
      structure accessible for persons with physical handicaps. Rehabilitation also includes the conversion
      of a building to an emergency shelter for the homeless, where the cost of conversion and any
      rehabilitation costs does not exceed 75 percent of the value of the building before conversion.
      Rehabilitation must meet local government safety and sanitation standards. In addition, for projects
      of 15 or more units where rehabilitation costs are 75 percent or more of the replacement cost of the
      building, that project must meet the accessibility requirements of the Americans With Disabilities Act
      of 1991, or where rehabilitation costs are less than 75 percent of the replacement cost of the
      building, that project must meet the requirements of 24 CFR 8.23(b) concerning accessibility
      requirements of the Americans With Disabilities Act of 1991.
      Renovation means rehabilitation that involves costs of 75 percent or less of the value of the building
      before rehabilitation. Renovations must meet local government safety and sanitary standards. In
      addition, for projects of 15 or more units where rehabilitation costs are less than 75 percent of the
      replacement cost of the building, that project must meet the requirements of 24 CFR 8.23(b)
      concerning accessibility requirements of Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended.
      Value of the Building means the monetary value assigned to a building by an independent real estate
      appraiser, or as otherwise reasonably established by the grantee.
SNRPC, or Southern Nevada Regional Planning Coalition was created by Interlocal Agreement in 1998
and is charged with undertaking regional collaboration efforts in Southern Nevada. The SNRPC’s
Committee on Homelessness (CoH) is tasked with identifying service gaps and priorities for local
homeless services, and provides advice and assistance to the County in its funding decisions.
Self-Sufficiency means many things to many people. Healthy families are interdependent with extended
family members, friends, fellow members of spiritual organizations and cultural and social groups,
neighbors, co-workers, businesses, social and civic organizations, schools, day care programs, health care
providers, and others. There is no universally agreed upon standard of self-sufficiency, nor what elements
need to be accounted for in such a standard. For the purposes of this grant application process, a self-
sufficient individual or family ultimately lives with minimal, if any, public or private assistance.
Senior Citizens per persons 60 years of age and older. They may include single individuals living alone,
two-person households, seniors raising grandchildren, seniors living with adult children, or seniors living in
other arrangements (among others); the services, however, are designed to assist the senior citizen to live
a better quality of life.
Substance Abuse Care includes assessment, evaluation, diagnosis, treatment, aftercare, and may include
medications. Requires licensed personnel (such as CADAC, LADC, LCSW, Psychologist, MFT or MD).
Supportive Services (also known as essential services) address the service needs of low-income, or
disadvantaged persons, such as employment, health, drug abuse, or education. Staff costs associated
with case management or provision of supportive services is considered a supportive service. Supportive
Services expenses are to be listed under Direct Service Costs in the project budget, and may include, but
are not limited to:
          Assistance in obtaining permanent housing
          Assistance in obtaining other Federal, State or local assistance, including but not limited to
          Public assistance such as food stamps, TANF, medical cards, child support enforcement, child
              care subsidies, home energy assistance, etc.
          Employment training and placement programs provided through the Nevada Department of
              Employment, Training and Rehabilitation or the Workforce Investment Act.
          Medical and psychological counseling and supervision
          Employment counseling
          Substance abuse treatment and counseling
          Other services such as child care payments, transportation assistance, job placement or job
              training
Technical Assistance means the facilitating of skills and knowledge in planning, developing, and
administering activities under the County Outside Agency Grant process for entities that may need, but do
not possess, such skills and knowledge.
Transitional Housing / Shelter means any program, the primary purpose of which is to provide temporary
housing (lasting at least three months, but not to exceed 24 months) with supportive services used to
facilitate the movement of homeless individuals and/or families to permanent housing. The supportive
services may be provided by the organization managing the housing, or coordinated by them and provided
by other public or private agencies. The admission process and criteria for transitional housing programs
differ from emergency shelter programs in that transitional housing programs generally assess the
prospective resident’s appropriateness for the program and her/his willingness and capacity to adhere to
program rules. The program rules, in turn, are designed to enhance the resident’s self-sufficiency. Case
management services are provided, as are other direct services designed to remove the obstacles
individuals or families face when attempting to return to self-sufficiency.
Transportation is the method of arriving at a desired destination. For the most part, low-income individuals
and families rely on the Citizens Area Transit public transportation system, but many still own cars. Low-
income clients need a variety of assistance with transportation, including financial assistance (with bus
passes or gas vouchers), repairs, or sometimes accompaniment.
Veterans are persons who have served in the U. S. Armed Forces, and may be eligible for services or
income supports provided by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs.
Victim Service Provider means a nonprofit, nongovernmental organization including rape crisis centers,
battered women’s shelters, domestic violence transitional housing programs, and other programs whose
primary mission is to provide services to victims of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or
stalking. Per the amendment to the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Program authorized in the
Violence Against Women’s Act of 2005, Victim Service Provider(s) are “not to disclose for purposes of a
Homeless Management Information System personally identifying information about any client. The
Secretary [of HUD] may, after public notice and comment, require or ask such [Victim Service Providers
receiving HUD funding] to disclose for purposes of a Homeless Management Information System non-
personally identifying data that has been de-identified, encrypted, or otherwise encoded. Nothing in this
section [VAWA Sec. 605, amending Section 423 of the Stewart B. McKinney Homeless Assistance Act (42
U.S.C. 11383) shall be construed to supersede any provision of any Federal State or local law that provides
greater protection than this paragraph for victims of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or
stalking.”
Weekends typically refers to Saturdays and Sundays – the days most mainstream program services are
not available. There exists a dire need for programs to offer supportive services on weekend days.
Young Adult is synonymous with Older Homeless Youth detailed above, and at times may be used
interchangeably. It refers to a person between the ages of 18 and 24 years.
Youth are persons 17 years of age or younger (services may continue through the youth’s 19 th birthday to
ensure continuity of quality care). Priority will be given to projects targeting children and youth involved in
the Foster Care system and/or Juvenile Justice system. The children and youth may be living in a variety
of situations, the services, however, are designed to assist the youth learn a skill, improve academically,
make healthier choices, and to live a better quality of life.
APPLICATION FOR FY2008/2009 FUNDING
                                    CLARK COUNTY
                                 OUTSIDE AGENCY GRANT
                                      APPLICATION
                                       2008-2009
                        DUE DATE: 3:00 p.m. Thursday, February 14, 2008

Funding requests will be considered from public or private nonprofit organizations incorporated and registered
     to conduct business in the State of Nevada. All nonprofit applicants must currently be organized for
  charitable, educational or religious purposes, as defined by NRS 244.2505 and NRS 372.3261 and must
   already have a letter from the IRS acknowledging that it is organized as a 501(c)3 corporation. Do not
        proceed with application if your organization/agency cannot meet these basic threshold criteria.

 1.    APPLICANT                                        CONTACT PERSON

       Agency Name                                      Name and Title of Contact Person


       Executive Director Name                          Mailing Address


       Address of Administrative Office                 City, Zip Code


       City, State, Zip Code                            Electronic mail (e-mail) address


       Telephone Number                                 Telephone Number


       Fax Number                                       Fax Number

 2.    PROJECT INFORMATION

                                                                                             $
       Project Title                                                                         Amount Requested
                                                                                             Priority:
       Project Location(s)                                                                 (if more than one application is
                                                                                           being submitted by Agency):
       Please indicate if project is located in:
            Unincorporated Clark County: urban or          rural
            A Township of Clark County If so, which:
            Incorporated City If so, which City:
   PROJECT INFORMATION, continued:
   Project Type:                                                         Target Population:
        Life Safety / Emergency Condition                                    Senior Citizens (aged 60+)
        Economic Development / Job Creation                                  Youth (aged 18 and under)
        Public Facility Capital Grant                                        Veterans
        Public Services / Social Services Program                            Disabled
        Basic Needs distribution (food, hygiene, etc.)                       Homeless
        Community Celebration                                                Families
        Cultural / Arts Program                                              Low-income Households/Individuals
        Other:                                                               Community-wide

3. PROJECT SUMMARY (ONE or TWO PARAGRAPHS)
  Please describe in no more than 200 words what you are requesting, who it will serve, and its benefit to Clark
  County residents. This paragraph will be used to prepare the summary statement for the Board of County
  Commissioners, so please ensure it is descriptive of your goal, intended participants, and use of funds.




4. PROJECT DESCRIPTION
  Please allow this form to expand, as necessary, so that attachments with partial answers are not used.
  A. Briefly describe your project and its intended outcomes. Be sure to specifically describe the activity for which
  you are requesting funds and how this request will address the overall project goals. Please note whether the
  proposed grant request is a one-time operating or capital grant request, or if you anticipate asking for future
  operating grants.




  B. Please describe the services provided and delivery method, and the appropriateness of said method. If this is
  a capital request, please explain the status of project funding, site control, and entitlements affecting the project;
  please also discuss how the operating costs of the facility will be paid for once opened.




  C. Specify how this project meets one or more of the Service Initiatives incorporated into this Applicant Manual,
  or one (or more) of the objectives identified in one of the County or Regional Plans attached as appendices to this
  Application Packet. Please also describe whether the proposed service or facility is a lower cost alternative to a
  service currently being provided by a Clark County Department or Agency.




   D. How does the project identify eligible participants/clients? Would clients referred by County Departments
   receive different services or treatment than clients normally served by your organization? (e.g., placed at top of
     waiting list, after-hours appointments, in-home service, etc.)




     E. Please describe any fees or payments required from participants in your Project.




5.   PROJECT OUTCOME PERFORMANCE MEASURES
     All projects supported with County Funds are expected to provide a substantial benefit to the residents of Clark County.
     Using the Table below, describe the most significant outcome(s) this project is expected to accomplish concerning its
     participants for year 2008/2009. Use measurable and specific indicators, which will be used to monitor the project’s
     progress.

Outcome #1                      Describe how participants or the County will benefit.




Major Tasks Necessary to Realize Outcomes                           Outputs Resulting from Tasks




Indicator Measurements: Describe evaluation tools, methods, and benchmarks to measure achievements of this outcome.




Outcome #2                      Describe how participants or the County will benefit.




Major Tasks Necessary to Realize Outcomes                           Outputs Resulting from Tasks




Indicator Measurements: Describe evaluation tools, methods, and benchmarks to measure achievements of this outcome.
6.   PREVIOUS ACCOMPLISHMENTS AND PROJECT IMPACT
     Describe the accomplishments your project has achieved for the past three years, and the degree to which the
     project’s objectives were met. If there were difficulties in achieving the objectives, describe how that will be
     overcome in the future. Finally, estimate the number of clients to be served with this funding request.




     If your application is for Construction, Rehabilitation, Renovation, Conversion or Relocation of a facility,
     please describe your agency’s experience in contracting for construction work or performing construction-
     related activities in-house. Please also describe the anticipated timeline, and when you project to occupy the
     facility, and then estimate the total number of unduplicated individuals that will benefit from the project each
     year, once completed.




7.   PROJECT SUSTAINABILITY
     (a) Please describe your financial plan for ongoing program support. Please explain whether your
     agency will be asking for continuation funding in subsequent years.



     (b) List any other sources of funding you have secured for this project for FY2008/2009 (please attach
     documentation to support the committed funding):



     (c) will the funding requested in this application act as Match to any of the above committed funds?
     If so, please identify source and amount of committed funds that require the match.




8. PAST CLARK COUNTY FUNDING
     Is this a new (first-time) County funding request?         Yes            No, have received funds before

     If this request is for continuation funding, please list the amount, source, and past grant years for which
     your agency has received County funding for this project:
       FY07/08 (current year)                        FY06/07                                FY05/06
$                                       $                                     $
9.       PROPOSED PROJECT BUDGET                              Round up to the nearest dollar

         You may delete any items that do not apply to your project, in                                      Requested
                                                                                        Total Project
          order to condense this table and make it fit onto one page                                        Portion Only
                                                                                          Amount

     RENOVATION/MAJOR REHABILITATION or CONVERSION
Planning Activities                                                                 $                   $
Engineering and Design                                                              $                   $
Land Acquisition                                                                    $                   $
Construction                                                                        $                   $
Rehabilitation Activities                                                           $                   $
Relocation                                                                          $                   $
Other:                                                                              $                   $
            GENERAL ADMINISTRATION / OPERATIONS
Salaries & Fringe related to Administration of Project                              $                   $
Professional Services contracted (audit, bookkeeping, etc.)                         $                   $
Rent / Insurance of facility                                                        $                   $
Furniture/Fixtures and Equipment                                                    $                   $
Computer related (software, hardware, internet, etc.)                               $                   $
Utilities (Power, Gas, Telephone, etc.)                                             $                   $
Maintenance Supplies                                                                $                   $
Office Supplies & Postage                                                           $                   $
Local Travel                                                                        $                   $
Staff Travel Out-of-State                                                           $                   $
Staff Development                                                                   $                   $
Liability Insurance*                                                                $                   $
Fidelity Bond*                                                                      $                   $
Administrative Costs (in-house bookkeeping, accounting, reports)                    $                   $
Other:                                                                              $                   $
Other:                                                                              $                   $

                 DIRECT SERVICES TO COUNTY RESIDENTS
Staff & Fringe necessary to provide services to clients                             $                   $
  Office Space for Direct Service staff or for client use                                      $                              $
  Furniture/Fixtures and Equipment for client/participant space                                $                              $
  Advertising / Marketing (includes brochures, client recruitment, etc.                        $                              $
  Celebrations, Cultural or Recognition Activities                                             $                              $
  Scholarships, Vouchers, or Other purchase of service for clients                             $                              $
  Rental or Utility payments on behalf of participants                                         $                              $
  Food Packages, Hygiene Items, or other basic items to distribute                             $                              $
  Purchase of foodstuffs for on-site meals                                                     $                              $
  Other:                                                                                       $                              $
  Other:                                                                                       $                              $

   INDIRECT COSTS** (for those with a Letter of Assignment only;                               $                              $
            all others use Administrative Costs above)

                                                TOTAL PROJECT COST:                                               $               $
       *Liability Insurance and Fidelity Bonding is required of all recipients and may be paid from grant funds
       **Claims for Indirect Costs must have an accompanying letter of assignment denoting the official indirect cost rate.
REMEMBER: You may delete any items that do not apply to your project, in order to condense this table and make it fit onto one page


  10. BUDGET JUSTIFICATION

  Please justify your budget request. Be sure to explain how each expense is related to the proposed project
  and indicate the method used in determining the request.
            Example: Rental of 25 2-bedroom units @ $950/month x 12 months = $285,000 Total, $95,000 County Funds
                     25 Bus Passes @ $40 = $1,000 Total, $500 County Funds
                     Office space rent: 1,000 sq.ft. @ $1.00/sq.ft x 12 months = $12,000 Total, $9,000 County Funds
                     Office Supplies @ $150/FTE x 6.5 FTE = $975 Total, $975 County Funds




  Please indicate below the total number of staff positions (including titles) that are included under the request for
  “Salaries and Fringes” portions of the Proposed Project Budget.
  ADMINISTRATIVE / OPERATIONAL STAFF                           Amount of Salary
                                                            Requested from OAG                 % of salary
                 Position and # of FTEs                              Fund
                                                                      $
                                                                      $
                                                                      $
DIRECT SERVICES STAFF                                      Amount of Salary
                                                          Requested from OAG     % of salary
              Position and # of FTEs                             Fund
                                                        $
                                                        $
                                                        $


11.     PROPOSED REVENUE SOURCES
A. Clark County Outside Agency Grant Funds ................. $
B. Clark County ESG Funds............................................. $
C. Clark County HOME Funds ......................................... $
D. Other CDBG Funds (City:                    ) ............................ $
E. City of Las Vegas ESG Funds ..................................... $
F. Other HOME Funds (City:                     ) ........................... $
G. City of Las Vegas HOPWA Funds ............................... $
H. Other Federal Funds
                 Source:                                       ............ $
                 Source:                                       ............ $
I. State Funds
                 Source:                                       ............ $
                 Source:                                       ............ $
J. Private Funds (foundation grants, etc.)
                 Source: United Way                            ............ $
                 Source:                                       ............ $
                 Source:                                       ............ $
                 Source:                                       ............ $
K. Other Funding
                 Source: Program / Client Fees                 ............ $
                 Source: Fundraising / Appeals                 ............ $
                 Source:                                       ............ $
                 Source:                                       ............ $
L. Cash Value of Leveraged Resources                ...................... $
         TOTAL PROJECT BUDGET (Anticipated):                             $


Leveraged Resources
Projects receiving in-kind services or materials demonstrate community support and can be more sustainable. To provide an
accurate view of the community’s support for a project, please describe the agency’s leveraged resources, which may include
cash match, donated or in-kind physical match (office space, equipment, etc.) or in-kind goods and services provided by
volunteers.
                                                                                              Annual Project
                          Type                                    Source                        Value in $
           Example: Kitchen Supplies               XYZ Sorority                           $4,500
           Space Rent/Lease                                                               $
           Donated Goods/Materials                                                        $
           Donated Services for Program                                                   $
           Volunteer Staff                         General duties at $10.00/hour          $
           Volunteer Professional Service                                                 $
           Other:                                                                         $
           Other:                                                                         $


This Request is                 % of Total Project Budget
         (Application request divided by Total Project Budget)



12. PRIVATE NONPROFIT ORGANIZATIONAL INFORMATION
       (a) When was your organization established as a non-profit agency? List date of Incorporation in the State of
       Nevada, as well as date By-Laws first adopted, noting any subsequent revisions. (Attach copy of the By-Laws
       and IRS Letter affirming 501(c)(3) status. Reminder: “Pending” IRS status is not acceptable).




       (b) How long has your current Executive Director held this position in your organization?




       (c) Has your agency undergone any grant administration certification effort such as that provided by the
       United Way to their recipient agencies?


       (d) Has your agency ever been required to return federal/state/local funds to the granting agency for any
       reason? Please explain, including any remediation implemented.
13. AGENCY and PROGRAM MISSION STATEMENT
  What is your organization’s mission?



       (a) Describe the type(s) of services currently being provided by the organization, including the number and
       characteristics of clients served.




       PROJECT MISSION STATEMENT
       What is your project’s mission?




       (1) How long has your organization operated this particular program for which you are now requesting funds?




14.     FINAL SUPPLEMENTARY QUESTIONS

      A. Should your agency not receive County funds, how would this affect your program’s
         operation?




      B. Is your agency dependent upon Clark County funds for program survival?
         If yes, how many years do you expect your agency to be reliant on County funding to
         support program operation, should your agency receive funds?




      C. Should your agency not receive full funding, please explain if it would be practical to
         continue program operations; and what would be your service levels at 75% of request,
         50% of request, and 25% of your current request?
                    CERTIFICATION OF CLARK COUNTY AFFILIATION

List the names and positions of members of the Board of Directors, Advisory Board, officers, staff, or members of the
organization who are a County Commissioner, appointed by a County Commissioner, or a County employee. If
none, check the box below that states NONE.
               Name                         Position in Organization                Affiliation with Clark
                                                                                            County

                                 NONE: No affiliation with County employees,
                         Commissioners or persons appointed by the Commissioners


                                  CERTIFICATION OF APPLICATION


The undersigned acknowledges and certifies that the Board of Directors of the applicant organization
endorses this Application for Clark County Outside Agency Grant funds to be submitted to the Clark County
Community Resources Management Division for funding consideration for the fiscal year 2008/2009.

The undersigned further certifies that the organization making this application is 1) non-profit, 2) tax-
exempt, 3) incorporated in the State of Nevada, and has complied with all applicable laws and regulations
pertaining to same.

The undersigned hereby commits the organization to provide the services or project identified in the Project
Description in accordance with this Application for Clark County Outside Agency Grant funds. If this
application is approved and this organization receives funding from Clark County, it is agreed that all
relevant federal, state and local regulations, and other assurances as required by the County will be
adhered to.

The undersigned further certifies that this application and the information contained herein is true and
correct and complete, subject to US Code Title 18.

Please have the authorized representative of your Board of Directors sign and date the application.


__________________________________________________
NAME (print full name)

__________________________________________________
SIGNATURE

__________________________________________________                       ________________________
TITLE                                                                     DATE
  ALL APPLICATIONS ARE DUE BY 3:00 P.M. ON THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2008.

                                       REQUIRED ATTACHMENTS


For all Applicants of FY2008/2009 Clark County Outside Agency Grant funds:
    1. Board of Directors list AND Advisory Board List, including non-agency mailing
       addresses
             a. Identify members of the Board of Directors and/or Advisory Board who are
                current County officials or a member of a current County official’s
                immediate family (first consanguinity).
    2. Proof of nonprofit status, as registered with the Internal Revenue Service, listing
       Tax Identification Number (IRS Letter) (No Pending Status will be accepted)
    3. Current Corporate Charter showing status in good-standing with the Nevada
       Secretary of State
    4. Financial Accounting Assurance: Applicants must submit one of the following
       with their application:
             a. The most current single audit in compliance with OMB Circular A-133
                (applicable to agencies expending $500,000 or more in Federal or County
                funds for that reporting period); OR
             b. A copy of your organization’s most recent audited financial statements for
                expenses of $100,000 up to $499,999; OR
             c. Provide a letter stating that your agency expended less than $100,000 of
                Federal or County funds during the latest reporting period AND a copy of
                your unaudited financial statements and/or Profit & Loss statement sheet.
                The letter should be addressed to Shawna P. Brody, Management Analyst
                II, Clark County Community Resources Management.
If your organization has not received funds from Clark County in the past three years, you must also submit:
    1.       A spreadsheet reflecting a three-year funding history
    2.       A copy of your Articles of Incorporation, and any amendments
    3.       A copy of the organization’s By-Laws

            Failure to comply with any of the above items may be reason to deny the application.

NOTE:
        Please submit only ONE Original and ONE Copy
        Do not staple or otherwise bind
        All attachments must be letter size, and must not be stapled
        Do not include “letters of support” from other agencies, unless these letters denote a value
         (financial) contribution it will provide this project if it is funded (e.g., “Leveraging Letters” are
         acceptable, but do not submit general letters of support)
       COUNTY AND REGIONAL STRATEGIC PLANS

Please refer to Clark County’s website at www.accessclarkcounty.org, or pick up a printed copy
of the Application Packet, for details on County and Regional Strategic Plans.


                               APPENDIX A
                Clark County Department of Juvenile Justice
                       Vision, Goals, Objectives And
                       Directions For 2007 and 2008



                          APPENDIX B
                           Safe Futures:
 Strategies to Improve the Safety, Performance and Well-Being of
Clark County Children and Families at-risk of Child Maltreatment

                             APPENDIX C
           Clark County Performance Management Program
           Core Services, Outcomes & Performance Indicators


                                  APPENDIX D
                         Selections from Clark County’s
                                  Strategic Plan
                              adopted in 2005/2006

				
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