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					Executive Summary
This Self Study represents the work and dedication of many community members and
professionals, as well as faculty, staff, and students, over an eighteen month period. Overall it has
been an incredibly fulfilling adventure that highlighted our many achievements, revealed our
shortcomings, and presented a host of exciting opportunities. We knew well our successes, but
less well our flaws. Without doubt, we are already a better School for having explored the depths
of our programs and resources, exposed our vulnerabilities, and embraced plans to further
advance the vision and mission of the UAB School of Public Health in the months and years
ahead.

Chapter One explores the broadest descriptions of the School highlighting a very robust
institutional environment that is well established, organized, and equipped for the 21st century of
public health education, research, and service. Our planning processes are well integrated into
those of the University, as reflected in the School’s Strategic Plan and annual benchmarks. With
few exceptions those benchmarks are exceeded each year. Moreover, the enrollment benchmarks
have provided excellent guidance for some of our toughest curriculum changes. The shortcomings
of the planning process relate to other dimensions of the School’s activities not captured in the
UAB Scorecard. The Strategic Plan 2003-2010 reviewed intensely in 2007 and discussed in detail
in this chapter addresses these opportunities for improvement with a number of exciting initiatives.

Chapter Two discusses the foundation of the School’s educational enterprise. The transition from
the remarkable Integrated Core Curriculum to a revised, more traditional masters curriculum was
neither smooth nor unanimously applauded. The Integrated Core was occasioned by a loss of part
time and non-traditional students, concerns about subject matter competencies, and faculty
resources. With the revised core, now well into the second year of the transition, we enjoy record
enrollment, an emerging distance education program, and new or reinvigorated dual degree
programs. The interdisciplinary integration remains a work-in-progress, but one that serves as
mentor for the entire biomedical enterprise grappling with the nuances and implementation of
translational education and research. Over the next several years curriculum refinements will
make public health education more widely available than in years past, especially to non-traditional
students.

Chapter Three highlights our research enterprise, perhaps the most productive on the UAB
campus. However, success brings challenges, primarily in the form of maintaining a balance
between teaching, research, and service. Certainly these challenges are not unique to UAB,
although our strong commitment to faculty growth and development demands we avoid burn out.
Our commitment to surrounding communities infuses our service activities, from the highly
successful Public Health Lecture Series to the Community Public Health Certificate program. We
are committed to a strong partnership with the public health workforce and our efforts are
substantial. Giving focus to these many efforts must be a guiding principle in the years ahead to
ensure overall effectiveness.

Finally, Chapter Four examines our faculty, staff, and students. The disparity between the diversity
of our faculty and that of our student body finds voice in this chapter. The loss of African American
faculty further impacts that disparity, although these losses also celebrate the excellence of the
faculty members. In Alabama these issues of racial balance infuse virtually every facet of life from
politics to commerce to education. Rather than ignore these fundamentally important cultural
imperatives we strive to highlight them in an effort to ensure that UAB and the School of Public
Health are a welcome haven for a diverse faculty and student body.

We welcome the kudos and embrace the opportunities provided by our shortcomings.
An electronic copy of the Self-Study Report is available at http://www.uab.edu/publichealth.

University of Alabama at Birmingham
School of Public Health
Office of the Dean
130 Ryals Public Health Building
1665 University Boulevard
Birmingham, Alabama 35294
Phone: 205-934-4993
Fax: 205-975-5484
http://www.uab.edu/publichealth


This Self-Study Report was prepared in response to the Accreditation Criteria provided by
the Council on Education for Public Health (CEPH), the independent accrediting agency
recognized by the US Department of Education to accredit schools of public health.

Council on Education for Public Health
800 Eye Street, NW, Suite 202
Washington, D.C. 20001-3710
Phone: 202-789-1050
Fax: 202-789-1895

The University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) is committed to the
policy that all persons shall have equal access to its programs, facilities
and employment without regard to race, color, religion, national origin,
sex, age, sexual orientation, disability or veteran status.

                                                                                            ii
Table of Contents

Chapter 1: The School of Public Health................................................... 1
1.1 Mission ................................................................................................................... 2
1.2 Evaluation and Planning ......................................................................................... 10
1.3 Institutional Environment ........................................................................................ 14
1.4 Organization and Administration ............................................................................ 20
1.5 Governance ............................................................................................................ 27
1.6 Resources ............................................................................................................... 34

Chapter 2: Instructional Programs ......................................................... 40
2.1 Master of Public Health Degree .............................................................................. 41
2.2 Program Length....................................................................................................... 43
2.3 Public Health Core Knowledge................................................................................ 44
2.4 Practical Skills ......................................................................................................... 47
2.5 Culminating Experience........................................................................................... 49
2.6 Required Competencies .......................................................................................... 51
2.7 Assessment Procedures.......................................................................................... 97
2.8 Other Professional Degrees .................................................................................. 102
2.9 Academic Degrees ................................................................................................ 103
2.10 Doctoral Degrees ................................................................................................ 106
2.11 Joint Degrees ...................................................................................................... 108
2.12 Distance Education or Executive Degree Programs............................................ 112

Chapter 3: Creation, Application and Advancement of Knowledge . 113
3.1 Research .............................................................................................................. 114
3.2 Service ............................................................................................................... 119
3.3 Workforce Development ........................................................................................ 127

Chapter 4: Faculty, Staff and Students ............................................... 136
4.1 Faculty Qualifications ........................................................................................... 137
4.2 Faculty Policies and Procedures ........................................................................... 156
4.3 Faculty and Staff Diversity..................................................................................... 158
4.4 Student Recruitment and Admissions.................................................................... 163
4.5 Student Diversity .................................................................................................. 170
4.6 Advising and Career Counseling ........................................................................... 173




                                                                                                                                    iii
Table of Contents – Tables

Chapter 1: The School Of Public Health ................................................ 1
Table 1.1.c
Strategic Plan Outcome Measures ................................................................................. 6
Figure 1.2.a
School of Public Health Strategic Planning Process .....................................................10
Table 1.2.a
School of Public Health Strategic Planning External Review Committees ...................10
Table 1.2.d
School of Public Health Qualitative Assessment of Mission, Goals, and Objectives ..... 11
Table 1.2.e
Minority Representation................................................................................................. 12
Table 1.3.a
Accrediting Bodies for Academic Health Center Schools .............................................. 15
Figure 1.3.b
UAB School of Public Health Organization Structure ....................................................15
Figure 1.4.b
UAB School of Public Health Organization Chart .......................................................... 20
Table 1.5.d
School of Public Health Faculty and the Committees
on which they Serve 2006-2007 .................................................................................... 32
Table 1.6.b
Sources of Funds and Expenditures by Major Category, Fiscal Years 2003-2007........ 34
Table 1.6.d
Faculty Count by Discipline 2005-2007 ......................................................................... 35
Table 1.6.e
Faculty, Students and Student/Faculty Ratios By Department ...................................... 35
Table 1.6.m(1)
Institutional Expenditures per Full Time Equivalent Student.......................................... 38
Table 1.6.m(2)
Research Expenditures per Full Time Equivalent Faculty ............................................. 39

Chapter 2: Instructional Programs ......................................................... 40
Table 2.1.a
Instructional Matrix ........................................................................................................ 41
Table 2.2.c
Number of Graduates with less than 42 hours by Semester and Hours........................ 43
Table 2.3.a
School Core Requirements ........................................................................................... 44
Table 2.6.a/b
School Wide Core Public Health Competencies and Learning Experiences ................. 52
Table 2.7.a
School Wide Competency Achievement Processes...................................................... 97
Table 2.7.b
Student Outcomes for School Performance 2004-2007 ................................................ 98



                                                                                                                                   iv
Table 2.7.d
Destination of Graduates by Department or Specialty Area for Last 3 years ................ 99
Table 2.7.f
New Graduate Survey 2004-05, and 2006-07 ............................................................. 100
Table 2.7.f (1)
(Employer of New Graduate Survey)........................................................................... 101
Table 2.10.b
PhD and DrPH Degree Data for the Past Three Years ............................................... 106

Chapter 3: Creation, Applications and Advancement of Knowledge 113
Table 3.1.d
School of Public Health Research and Scholarship .................................................... 117
Table 3.2.b
Service Activities by Department and Overall in SOPH............................................... 121
Table 3.2.c
Proposed School Measures of Success of Service Programs..................................... 125
Table 3.3.a
Alabama Department of Public Health Employee Perceptions of Ten Essential
Services: Necessity, Self-efficacy and Training Needs ............................................... 127
Table 3.3.c
School Workforce Development Program Types, Examples, Target Population
and Number of Participants (2005-2007)..................................................................... 132

Chapter 4: Faculty Staff and Students ................................................. 136
Table 4.1.a Primary Faculty Who Support Degree Programs
Faculty Awards and Honors ........................................................................................ 138
Table 4.1.b
Other Faculty Who Support Teaching Programs......................................................... 150
Table 4.1.d
Outcome Measures for Faculty ................................................................................... 153
Table 4.1.d (1)
Faculty Awards and Honors ........................................................................................ 154
Table 4.3.a
Summary Demographic Data for Core and Other Faculty
(December 31, 2007) ................................................................................................. 158
Table 4.3.b
Summary Demographic for Full time Staff................................................................... 158
Table 4.3.f
Affirmative Action Annual Activity Report .................................................................... 161
Table 4.4.d
Applicants, Acceptances, and Enrollments, by
Specialty Area for the Last Three Years...................................................................... 166
Table 4.4e
Qualitative Information on the Number of Students Enrolled in Each Separately
Area Identified In the Instructional Matrix .................................................................... 167



                                                                                                                            v
Table 4.4f
Outcome Measures ..................................................................................................... 169
Table 4.5.c
Demographic s of New Enrollees for each of the last 3 years ..................................... 171
Table 4.5.d
Percentage of Minority Students: New Fall Enrollees.................................................. 171
Table 4.6.c
UAB School of Public Health Graduate Exit Interview Worksheet (2004-05) .............. 174
Table 4.6.c (1)
UAB School of Public Health Exit Interview Worksheet (2005-06) .............................. 175
Table 4.6.c (2)
UAB School of Public Health Exit Interview Worksheet (2006-07) .............................. 175




                                                                                                                             vi
Table of Contents – Appendices

Chapter 1: The School of Public Health

1.2 Evaluation and Planning
           Strategic Plan 2002-2010 ………………………………………...1.2.a
1.3 Institutional Environment
          University Practices Regarding Lines of Accountability............. 1.3.c (1)
          Summary of Economic Rules Committee Discussion on
          Budget Models .......................................................................... 1.3.c (2)
          Applications for University-Wide Interdisciplinary Research
          Centers and new Pilot University-Wide Interdisciplinary
          Research Centers ..................................................................... 1.3.c (3)
          Faculty Handbook and Policies ................................................. 1.3.c (4)
          You and UAB: Handbook for Administrative,
          Professional and Support Personnel ......................................... 1.3.c (5)
          Bylaws of the Faculty Affairs Committee ................................... 1.3.c (6)
1.4 Organization and Administration
          Departments, School of Public Health....................................... 1.4.b
          Interdisciplinary Programs and Centers .................................... 1.4.c (1)
          University Centers and Related Committees in which
          School of Public Health Faculty Participate............................... 1.4.c (2)
          Guidelines for School of Public Health Centers –
          Policy and Management Procedures......................................... 1.4.c (3)
1.5 Governance
          Charter of Faculty Assembly ..................................................... 1.5.a (1)
          Standing Committee.................................................................. 1.5.a (2)
          Budgeting Policy, School of Public Health................................. 1.5.a (3)
          Student Recruitment.................................................................. 1.5.a (4)
          Faculty Recruitment .................................................................. 1.5.a (5)
1.6 Resources
          Laboratory Equipment in Use .................................................... 1.6.h
          Library Resources ..................................................................... 1.6.j

Chapter 2: Instructional Programs
2.4 Practical Skills
         Agencies and Preceptors for Practice Experience .................... 2.4.b
2.6 Required Competencies
          Syllabus Template ................................................................... 2.6.d
2.7 Assessment Procedure
         Graduation Rates ...................................................................... 2.7.b




                                                                                                               vii
Chapter 3: Creation, Application and Advancement of Knowledge
3.0 Research
          Listing of University-Wide Interdisciplinary Research Centers .. 3.1.a
          Current Faculty and Student Research Activities ...................... 3.1.c
3.2 Service
          UAB SOPH Policies that Support Service Activities .................. 3.2.a
          Faculty Service Activities by Department of Overall SOPH....... 3.2.b (1)
          Faculty Service Activities by Department of Overall SOPH....... 3.2.b (2)
          Examples of Student Service Performed by the Public Health
          Student Association................................................................... 3.2.d

Chapter 4: Faculty, Staff and Students
4.2 Faculty Policies and Procedures
          Annual Faculty Performance Evaluation Guidelines.................. 4.2.g
4.4 Student Recruitment and Admissions
          Recruitment Management 2007/2008 ....................................... 4.4.a
4.5 Diversity
          Diversity and Equity Program .................................................... 4.5.a




                                                                                                         viii
Web Sites utilized in the Self Study

Chapter 1:

UAB:                                www.main.uab.edu
SOPH:                               www.soph.uab.edu
UAB Strategic Plan:                 www.uab.edu/strategicplan
UAB Faculty Handbook & Policies: main.uab.edu/sites/provost/facultyresources/facultyhandbook/
You and UAB - A Handbook for Administrative, Professional and Support Personnel:
                                    main.uab.edu/show.asp?durki=43608.
Bylaws of the Faculty Affairs Committee of the School of Public Health:
                                    http://www.soph.uab.edu/resources/faculty
School Centers:                     www.southcentralpartnership.org
                                    www.uab.edu/dsc
                                    www.soph.uab.edu/sparkman
                                    http://www.soph.uab.edu/listerhill
                                    www.soph.uab.edu/CSCH/
Chapter 2:

Course Catalog:                     http://www.soph.uab.edu/students/catalog
Degree Requirements:                http://www.soph.uab.edu/prospective/degreerequirement
Student Handbook:                   http://www.soph.uab.edu/students
Class Schedules:                    http://www.soph.uab.edu/students/schedule
Internships:                        http://www.soph.uab.edu/internships
Registration:                       students.uab.edu/academics/show.asp?durki=4982

Chapter 3:
Office of Grants & Contracts Administration:     main.uab.edu/show.asp?durki=30265
Animal Resources Program:                        main.uab.edu/show.asp?durki=30285
Conflict of Interest Review Board:               main.uab.edu/show.asp?durki=30255
Grants & Contracts Accounting Department:        main.uab.edu/show.asp?durki=5253
Institutional Animal Care & Use Committee:       main.uab.edu/internal/show.asp?durki=34597
Office of Human Research:                        www.uab.edu/ohr
Office of Research Compliance:                   main.uab.edu/show.asp?durki=55742
Office of Sponsored International Programs:      main.uab.edu/show.asp?durki=95133
UAB Research Foundation:                         main.uab.edu/sites/UABRF
Office of Counsel of the University System:      main.uab.edu/show.asp?durki=1966
Institutional Review Board for Human Use:        main.uab.edu/show.asp?durki=30246
Department of Occupational Health & Safety:      www.healthsafe.uab.edu/default.html
UAB Strategic Plan:                              http://main.uab.edu/show.asp?durki=55211

Chapter 4:

UAB Faculty Handbook & Policies: main.uab.edu/sites/provost/facultyresources/facultyhandbook/
University Faculty Development: main.uab.edu/Sites/provost/search/?query=faculty%20development
UAB Office of Human Resources: www.hrm.uab.edu (Records Administration - Race Designations)
Strategic Diversity Plan:        www.uab.edu/equityanddiversity




                                                                                            ix
Resource Room Materials

       CEPH Interim Report
       Policies
                 School of Public Health Student Honor Code
                 School of Public Health Student Handbook
                 Graduate School Student Handbook
                 Policies on Academic Ethics and Conduct, and Nonacademic Conduct
                 Graduate School Policy Concerning Student Participation in Proprietary
                         Research
                 UAB Policy Concerning the Maintenance of High Ethical Standards in
                         Research and Other Scholarly Activities
                 Grievance
                 Conflicts of Interest
                 Conflicts of Commitment
                 Consulting
                 Drug-Free Workplace
                 Faculty and Staff Medical Leave of Absence
                 Personnel Manuals
       Sample Work/Publications from SOPH Research Centers Departments
       Minutes of ALL Committee Meetings
                 Executive Committee
                 Self-Study Committee
                 Faculty Assembly
                 Broadstreet Committee
                 Educational Policy Committee
                 Faculty Affairs Committee
                 Admissions and Graduation Committee
                 Diversity Committee
                 MPH AdHoc Committee
                 DrPH AdHoc Committee
       Record of Written Student Complaints and Grievances (past 3 years)
       Course Syllabi
                 Organized by MPH Core
                 All Syllabi
       Schedules of Courses Offered (and instructors listed) over the past 3 years
       Examples of Student Work
                 Theses
                 Graduate Research Project
                 Placement Reports
       Course Evaluations
       Current Copies of Faculty CV
                 Organized by Department
       Recruitment Materials




                                                                                          x
Abbreviations Used in Self Study

ACHE      Alabama Commission on Higher Education

ADPH      Alabama Department of Public Health

ASPH      Association of Schools of Public Health

A&G       Admissions and Graduation

BST       Biostatistics

ENV       Environmental Health Sciences

EPI       Epidemiology

EPC       Educational Policy Committee

FAC       Faculty Affairs Committee

FAR       Faculty Activity Report

HB        Health Behavior

HCOP      Health Care Organization and Policy

IRB       Institutional Review Board

MCH       Maternal and Child Health

PHSA      Public Health Student Association

RR        Resource Room

SACS      Southern Association of College and Universities

SOPH      School of Public Health

SOPHEC    School of Public Health Executive Committee

UAB       University of Alabama at Birmingham




                                                             xi
                       Chapter 1: The School of Public Health

1.0 The School of Public Health

       1.1     Mission
       1.2     Evaluation and Planning
       1.3     Institutional Environment
       1.4     Organization and Administration
       1.5     Governance
       1.6     Resources

Introduction

The UAB School of Public Health was established in 1978 and became the sixth school in the
academic health center. It stands at the nexus of the health science and the academic schools on
campus, building intramural relationships and collaborations between faculty and students through
educational and research activities. UAB is known for its spirit of collaboration and
entrepreneurialism that encourages scholarship without walls and the School of Public Health
fulfills its vision and mission as an integral part of this rapidly growing, dynamic institution.

Our Strategic Plan 2003-2010 is based on formal planning processes begun in 2001 and 2002 lead
by Vantage and Associates, a local consulting firm. In early 2003 newly appointed UAB President
Carol Garrison initiated an intense university-wide strategic planning process in part in response to
the upcoming Southern Association of Colleges and Universities accreditation visit. Six major
goals were established across campus. These goals formed the basis of the School's current
planning document. Five of the six University goals were very similar to those used by the School
prior to 2003 and thus the School’s goals were aligned with the University's. These goals -
Educational Excellence, Collaborative and Innovative Research Enterprise, Commitment to
Service, Resource Development, and Work Environment - have the specific benchmarks found on
the School of Public Health Scorecard.

UAB's strength rests with an exceptionally collaborative institutional organization and environment
that encourages interdisciplinary and cross disciplinary interactions and partnerships through a
variety of venues. For example, the Academic Programs Council (APC) which consists of the
deans and librarians with the University's senior administrative personnel and lead by the Provost
meets biweekly to discuss a variety of institutional priorities and needs. Ideas and new initiatives
have emerged from the relationships developed through the APC such as the Laboratory for
Global Health Observation, the nation's first remote sensing facility dedicated entirely to health.
This collaborative initiative was developed in less than eight months based on informal discussions
among several deans and the Vice President for Research and Economic Development.

Without doubt the UAB organizational milieu is extremely supportive of the drive at the School of
Public Health for national excellence in education, research, and service.




                                                                                                    1
1.0 The School of Public Health (SOPH)
1.1     Mission. The school shall have a clearly formulated and publicly stated mission with
        supporting goals and objectives. The school shall foster the development of
        professional public health values, concepts and ethical practice.

1.1.a   Mission Statement

The mission of the UAB School of Public Health (SOPH) is to develop, teach and apply knowledge
to promote health and prevent disease. Our vision is a community of outstanding scholars and
professionals leading innovation in public health and recognized for improving the health of the
citizens of Alabama and the world.

1.1.b, 1.1.c   Strategic Goals and Measurable Objectives for 2003 – 2010

This strategic plan for the SOPH is organized around five goals. Each of these goals - Educational
Excellence, Collaborative and Innovative Research Enterprise, Commitment to Service, Resource
Development, and Work Environment - is associated with specific benchmarks established by the
University as a part of the UAB Strategic Plan. The University utilizes a “Scorecard” for each of the
schools to measure achievement and serves as the basis for annual performance review by the
Provost. Complete copies of the materials reviewed by the Provost for the last three years are
available in the Resource Room. [RR] (UAB Strategic Plan:
http://main.uab.edu/show.asp?durki=55211.UAB Scorecard: http://main.uab.edu/show.asp?durki=67160)

The annual review of the strategic plan takes place primarily with the School’s Executive
Committee. Through this review new issues and ideas emerge that are generally addressed
through formal and ad hoc committees. During the past three years several important initiatives
were implemented to address changing internal and external environments, such as the NIH
funding climate and tensions between the teaching and research enterprises. Documents related
to these efforts can be found in the Resource Room. [RR]

Generally missing in this process has been a definitive link between new initiatives and
measurable outcomes. The planning process described in Section 1.2 Evaluation and Planning
highlights the need to establish a clear link between any new initiative and the SOPH Strategic
Plan. Consequently, the Strategic Plan 2003-2010 has several modifications that carefully and
fully link each goal with its objectives related to specific benchmarks (Table 1.1.c). The Scorecard
benchmarks defined by the University are highlighted; all other benchmarks relate to other school-
specific activities.

A number of new activities have been implemented because of this Self Study, including a
communication skills program for masters students, an enhanced faculty development program, an
enhanced staff development program, and plans for the development of the Public Health Policy
Council. Each of these initiatives is described later in detail. Benchmarks for these and other
programs are shown in Table 1.1.c Strategic Plan Outcome Measures.

Finally, the plan that follows is the product of an iterative process. An older version of the Strategic
Plan 2003-2010 can be found in the appendix 1.1.b for comparison. As noted in Section 1.2 a
formal process for annual review with a variety of stakeholders will be in place before the end of
the fiscal year, thus ensuring on-going links between established benchmarks and activities, and
newly emerging initiatives.




                                                                                                       2
                                  UAB School of Public Health
                                       Strategic Plan 2003-2010
                                   Knowledge that Makes a Difference

Vision:       A community of outstanding scholars and professionals leading innovation in public
              health and recognized for improving the health of the citizens of Alabama and the world.

Mission: To develop, teach and apply knowledge to promote health and prevent disease.

We will become the leader in relevant and timely public health strategies through a dynamic and
flexible portfolio of education and research programs that serve to transform the health of the
public in the most efficient and effective ways possible. We will achieve this by meeting
objectives within five goals: Educational Excellence, Collaborative and Innovative Research
Enterprise, Commitment to Service, Resource Development, and Work Environment.

Goal 1: Educational Excellence
We will ensure that all of our graduate programs are exceptional at preparing students to become
leaders in the areas of teaching, conducting research, and providing professional services.

   Objectives to accomplish Educational Excellence

1.1 Attract and retain the most highly qualified students possible (1 - 4) 1
1.2 Demonstrate educational competency of all graduates (5 - 11)
1.3 Demonstrate excellent teaching, mentoring, and advising (12 and 13)
1.4 Provide the faculty with the tools necessary to excel (14 - 16)
1.5 Evaluate all courses for relevance and efficiency (17)

   Indicators of Success

1.1 Attract and retain the most highly qualified students possible
    • Benchmarks
        o Graduate enrollment of 550 by 2010
        o > 25% minority enrollment
        o Average GRE: verbal > 535; quantitative > 660
        o >15 doctoral degrees awarded annually
1.2 Demonstrate educational competency of all graduates
    • Benchmarks
        o >85% masters students demonstrate mastery of public health competencies
        o >50% of masters students participate in the Communication Skills Program
        o >80% of MPH students very satisfied/satisfied with quality of internship experience
        o >80 very satisfied/satisfied with IHGS Program
        o >80% of masters students graduate within two years
        o 100% of test takers pass National Board of Public Health certifying examination
        o >90% of graduates seeking employment are employed within 6 months of graduation
1.3 Demonstrate excellent teaching, mentoring, and advising
    • Benchmarks
        o >80% teaching evaluations scored >4 (IDEA Survey)
        o >80% students very satisfied/satisfied with advising


          1
              Numbers in parentheses correspond to number on Table 1.1.c Strategic Plan Outcome Measures.

                                                                                                            3
1.4 Provide faculty with the tools necessary to excel
   •   Benchmarks
       o >50% of faculty participate in at least one Faculty Development offering annually
       o >80% of internal and external facilities audit recommendations completed annually
       o All MPH core courses offered via distance education format by Fall 2008
1.5 Evaluate all courses for relevance and efficiency
    • Benchmark
       o Complete triennial external department program reviews

Goal 2: Collaborative and Innovative Research Enterprise
We are committed to a culture of collaboration and innovation in research and scholarship
unparalleled in the University.

   Objectives to accomplish Collaborative and Innovative Research Enterprise

2.1 Demonstrate all faculty have sufficient time for scholarly work (1 - 4)
2.2 Demonstrate and facilitate collaboration across the University, the nation, and the world (5)
2.3 Demonstrate independent research agendas for all faculty members (4)
2.4 Recognize excellence in research (6)

   Indicators of Success

2.1 Demonstrate all faculty have sufficient time for scholarly work
    • Benchmarks
       o Scholarly publications to meet or exceed UAB Scorecard goals
       o Research expenditures to meet or exceed UAB Scorecard goals
2.2 Demonstrate and facilitate collaboration across the University, the nation, and the world
    • Benchmark
       o >20% of research expenditures collaborative
2.3 Demonstrate independent research agendas for all faculty members
    • Benchmark
       o Each faculty member has two or more peer-reviewed publications annually
2.4 Recognize excellence in research
    • Benchmark
       o > 50% faculty attend annual Public Health Research Day

Goal 3: Commitment to Service
We will serve our professional and geographic communities through the effective interaction of our
faculty, staff, and students.

   Objectives to accomplish Commitment to Service

3.1 Develop school-based service programs (1 - 7)
3.2 Facilitate faculty, staff, and student community service opportunities (8 - 9)
3.3 Encourage faculty and student professional service (10)

   Indicators of Success

3.1 Develop school-based service programs
    • Benchmarks
       o Publish Picture of Public Health at least 6 times annually

                                                                                                    4
       o Work with Congregations for Public Health to complete at least two projects annually
       o Facilitate production of Body Love
       o At least 30 students enrolled in undergraduate public health course
       o Implement annual Endowed Public Health Lecture Series
       o Support Black Belt Institute for Public Health annually
       o Award Lou Wooster Public Health Hero award annually
3.2 Facilitate faculty, staff, and student community service opportunities
    • Benchmarks
       o >50% of faculty, staff, and students participate in a local community organization
       o Facilitate creation of the Public Health Policy Council
3.3 Encourage faculty and student professional service
    • Benchmark
       o >80% of faculty and > 20% students provide service to professional organizations

Goal 4: Resource Development
We will work to give our faculty, staff, and students the most state-of-the-art environment possible
by identifying new resources and expanding current resources.

   Objectives to accomplish Resource Development

4.1 Increase donor contributions (1 - 2)
4.2 Increase scholarship endowments (3)
4.3 Add new space to accommodate growth in school activities (4)
4.4 Maintain connections with alumni (5)
4.5 Expand activities of the Broad Street Committee (6)

   Indicators of Success

4.1 Increase donor contributions
    • Benchmarks
        o Meet or exceed UAB Scorecard benchmarks for private gifts
        o Meet or exceed UAB Scorecard benchmarks for private financial aid
4.2 Increase scholarship endowments
    • Benchmarks
        o Increase scholarship endowments 10% annually
        o Add at least one endowed scholarship annually
4.3 Add new space to accommodate growth in school activities
    • Benchmark
        o Complete annual space assessment
4.4 Maintain connections with alumni
    • Benchmarks
        o 10% annual increase in alumni giving
        o 20% annual alumni participation in school activities
4.5 Expand activities of the Broad Street Committee
    • Benchmarks
        o Award annually Lou Wooster Public Health Hero Award
        o Support an annual development activity

Goal 5: Work Environment
We are dedicated to developing the most excellent and diverse faculty, staff, and student body
possible.


                                                                                                       5
    Objectives to accomplish Work Environment

5.1 Attract and retain the most highly qualified faculty, staff, and students (1 – 3)
5.2 Ensure diversity of faculty, staff, and students (4)
5.3 Recognize outstanding performance by faculty, staff, and students (5)

    Indicators of Success

5.1 Attract and retain the most highly qualified faculty, staff, and students possible
    • Benchmarks
        o Meet or exceed UAB Scorecard benchmarks for faculty and staff
        o Annually assess faculty satisfaction
        o > 80% faculty and staff participation in development activities
        o 100% student participation on appropriate school committees
5.2 Ensure diversity of faculty, staff, and students
    • Benchmark
        o 100% compliance with University and School Diversity and Equity Program goals
 5.3 Recognize outstanding performance by faculty, staff, and students
    • Benchmark
        o Annual Awards Program for faculty, staff, and students



                                         UAB School of Public Health
                                 Strategic Plan 2003-2010 Outcome Measures
Table 1.1.c Strategic Plan Outcome Measures
Note: Bolded benchmarks are from UAB Strategic Plan Scorecard
Educational Excellence            Actual    Goal    Actual      Goal    Actual   Goal    Actual   Goal
                                   2004     2005     2005       2006     2006    2007     2007    2008
1. Graduate enrollment               407      415      363        375      403     388      426      406
   --Masters/Postmasters             240               255        265      291     275      311      290
   --Doctoral/Postdoctoral           105               108        110      112     113      115      116
2. % Minority                     26.7%      23%    26.7%        23%    22.6%     24%    24.9%     >25%
   --Masters/Postmasters          26.7%             29.8%        30%    21.7%     30%    24.1%     >30%
   --Doctoral/Postdoctoral        26.7%             19.4%        20%    25.0%     20%    27.0%     >20%
3. Average GRE
   --Verbal                        491.4    525.4    504.2      534.3    496.7   543.2    545.5     552.2
   --Quantitative                  619.4    646.9    643.8      661.6    638.3   676.2    610.0     690.8
4. Doctorates awarded                20       13       20         15       15      16       18         17
5. Competencies (Mastery)                                                                           >85%
6. Communication Skills                              2008       Goals                               >50%
7. Internship (Satisfaction)                 80%      71%        80%      74%     80%      81%      >80%
8. IHGS Program (Satisfaction)                       2008        Goal                               >80%
9. Graduation Rate (MPH)                     80%      75%        80%      77%     80%      76%      >80%
10. NPHB Exam (Pass Rate)                            2008        Goal                               >95%
11. Employment                      79%      90%    78%%         90%      94%     90%      93%      >90%
12. Teaching Evaluations            85%     >80%      82%       >80%      84%    >80%      64%      >80%
13. Advising Evaluations                     80%      73%        80%      77%     80%      70%      >80%
14. Faculty Development                              2008        Goal                              > 50%
15. Facilities Audit                 n/a/     n/a     85%        80%      70%     80%        P      >80%
16. Distance Education                               2008        Goal                              5 Core
17. External Departmental                                                                            MCH
     Review                                          2008        Goal                             EHS HB


                                                                                                        6
    Table 1.1.c Strategic Plan Outcome Measures cont.

Research Enterprise                  Actual    Goal    Actual     Goal       Actual     Goal     Actual     Goal
                                      2004     2005     2005      2006        2006      2007      2007      2008
1. Research Expenditures 2           35,544            42,618    43,470      44,626    46,978      P       50,704
2. Books                                   4       5         8        5            2        5      P            6
3. Monographs                            25        8       39         5          24         8      P            9
4. Publications                         376      241      368       243         318       244      P          246
   --Per Faculty Member                  9.6     >2        6.3      >2           5.1      >2       P          >2
5. Collaborative Research                                                               >20%       33%      >20%
6. Public Health Research Day                            2008        Goal                                  > 50%


Commitment to Service                Actual    Goal    Actual    Goal        Actual     Goal     Actual     Goal
                                      2004     2005     2005     2006         2006      2007      2007      2008
1. Picture of Public Health                4      5          6          7        12         6         6         6
2. Congregations for Public
Health Projects                           6       7         5           8         7         8         7          9
3. Body Love Episodes                    33      50        45          60        80        70        80         80
4. Undergraduate Course                   0      30         4          30        30        30        30         30
5. Endowed Lecture Series
   --Samuelson Lecture                  2nd     3rd       3rd          4th       4th      5th       5th        6th
   --Norwood                            2nd     3rd       3rd          4th       4th      5th       5th        6th
   --Glenwood                            NA     1st       1st         2nd       2nd       3rd       3rd        4th
   --McMillan                                                                                                  1st
   --Alumni                                                                               1st       1st       2nd
6. Black Belt Institute                  1st    3rd       2nd          4th       3rd      5th       4th        6th
7. Lou Wooster Award 3                                                                    1st       1st       2nd
8. Community Service Program                                                                                >50%
9. Pub. Health Research Council                2008     Goals                                              Establish
10. Professional Service (faculty)                                                                          >80%



Resource Development                 Actual    Goal    Actual     Goal       Actual     Goal     Actual     Goal
                                      2004     2005     2005      2006        2006      2007      2007      2008
1.Total Private Gifts 4               1,036    1,204    2,273     1,294       1,197     1,391     3,075     1,474
   --Number of Donors                   156      313      132       371         269       428       370       485
   --Gifts to Endowment                  28    3,789      243     5,031         108     6,273       293     7,516
2. Private Financial Aid              3,020    8,947    3,025    10,158       7,295    11,368      7100    12,579
3. Scholarships
   --Existing Endowments              603.1    663.4     658.8       725.5      726     798.6     793.1     872.1
   --New Endowments                       1        1         2           1        1         1         3     1 new
4. Space Audit (annual)                   √        √         √           √        √         √         √         √
5. Alumni
   --Membership                         133      119       187         135      155       151       159        168
   --Giving (# of givers)               269      205       241         235      288       265       207        295
   --Participation (%)                 20%      20%       24%         20%      16%       20%       15%        20%
6. Broad Street Committee
   --Lou Wooster Award                                                                     1st       1st       2nd
   --Development Activity                                                              10,000    10,000       TBD


2
  $ x 1,000
3
  Prior to 2007 the award was the Alabama Public Health Hero Award
4
  # x 1,000
P = Pending


                                                                                                                  7
Work Environment                       Actual   Goal   Actual   Goal    Actual   Goal    Actual   Goal
                                        2004    2005    2005    2006     2006    2007     2007    2008
1. Faculty
   --Percent Terminal Degree           94.8%     94%   97.7%     94%    97.7%     94%    98.8%     95%
   --Percent CHP by Faculty            92.6%           85.1%     85%    85.4%     85%    94.7%     85%
   --Number Minority                       14     11       18      12       19      13       17      14
   --Retention                                                                                    >90%
   --Satisfaction                                                                   P        P      A/A
2. Staff
   --# Minority Administrators                             1       2        1       2        1       2
   --Development                                                                                  >85%
3. Students
   --School Committees Participation                                                      100%    100%
4. Diversity and Equity (School)                        2008    Goal
5. Awards Program                                       2008    Goal                                 1st

1.1.d Manner in which mission, goals and objectives are developed, monitored and
periodically revised, and the manner in which they are made available to the public.

The SOPH Strategic Plan 2003-2010, described in 1.1.b and outcome measures in Table 1.1.c,
incorporates reviews and revisions by our key stakeholders during the spring and summer of 2007.
The plan is based on a multi-year plan originally developed in 2002. It focuses on the five major
goals introduced in the 2003 plan (that parallel goals in the University’s strategic plan) which are
measured by specific benchmarks (http://main.uab.edu/show.asp?durki=55211) and presented in a
Scorecard.

Success in achieving annual goals and school-specific benchmarks is reviewed each summer
before the start of the fiscal year, first with the Executive Committee followed by the President,
Provost, and selected vice presidents. These reviews address achievement of benchmarks,
school-specific goals, and institutional challenges. The Dean receives a summary of the
President-Provost review to serve as a planning guide for the coming year. The Executive
Committee also receives a summary which is subsequently shared with the faculty and staff
through minutes and other communications. [RR]

Informal review of the School’s mission occurs annually during the above process, however no
permanent changes have been deemed warranted over the last five years. Likewise the five goals
have remained unchanged since they were established. The School's goals and objectives are
periodically revised through the evaluation and planning process shown in Section 1.2, a process
in large part driven by the University's annual planning process. The School's benchmarks and
annual performance are posted on the UAB website noted above. Copies of the strategic plan are
provided to stakeholders, faculty, and staff of the School.

1.1.e Statement of values that guide the School, with a description of how the values are
determined and operationalized.

The School has identified eight core values which guide the goals and objectives. Please see
Section 1.1.b and Table 1.1.c.

•    Respect for every individual is emphasized through Strategic Plan actions such as promoting
     the role of service, public health advocacy and diversity (Goal 3 and 5).




                                                                                                         8
•   Open and honest communications are encouraged by Strategic Plan actions such as
    providing each student an emphasis on communication skills and providing mentoring
    programs for junior faculty and students (Goal 1).
•   Positive, supportive behavior is shown through promotion of staff training opportunities;
    recognition of outstanding performance by faculty, staff and students; and opportunities for
    faculty to improve teaching effectiveness (Goal 1, Objective 3; Goal 5, Objectives 1 and 3).
•   Celebration of individual diversity is attained partly through the School’s Diversity and Equity
    Program (Goal 1, Objective 1; Goal 5, Objective 2).
•   Teamwork is emphasized through collaborative and interdisciplinary research within the
    School and across campus (Goal 2, Objective 2) and by developing partnerships and
    collaborative relationships with community organizations (Goal 3, Objective 2).
•   Integrity is part of the SOPH Honor Code and UAB Policy on Maintenance of High Ethical
    Standards. Jointly developed and adopted by students and faculty, it assumes that all students
    will be honorable and honest, and that all members of the academic community will maintain
    the highest ethical and professional standards.
•   Excellence in everything we do is achieved by recruiting the most highly qualified faculty
    from nationally recognized programs (Goal 1, Objective 1; Goal 5, Objective 1), by recruiting
    the most highly qualified masters and doctoral students (Goal 1, Objective 3), and by
    encouraging staff training opportunities (Goal 5, Objective 1).
•   The School is making a difference with its commitment to providing service that ensures the
    personal and social conditions to achieve maximum feasible health and well-being within the
    communities we serve (Goal 3).

1.1.f   Assessment of the extent to which this criterion is met.

This criterion is met.

Strengths
• The SOPH has implemented a strategic planning process that involves faculty, staff, students,
   alumni and community partners.
• The annual planning process is fully and completely integrated with the University's plans as
   well as those of the other schools on campus.
• Goals and objectives have been clearly stated, and indicators of success with measurable
   outcomes identified.

Weaknesses
• The annual process to review and update the strategic plan has been too informal.

Future Plans
The annual review of the strategic plan will more formally parallel that of the University's planning
process which begins in June and concludes in August. Beginning in September 2008 the
Strategic Plan 2003-2010 and the additions to the University Scorecard will be formally reviewed
with the Executive Committee (Dean, department chairs and chair of the faculty), the Broad Street
Committee (community-based advisory council), the Faculty Council (an elected faculty member
from each department), the Public Health Student Association (elected student government
association), the Staff Council, and groups of relevant stakeholders such as the Alabama
Department of Public Health, the Jefferson County Department of Public Health, and others. The
newly created position of Director, Communications and Monitoring will be responsible for
collecting data. A final document reflecting the input from these groups will be posted on our web
site by November of each year for review and comment before the final document is posted in
December.


                                                                                                        9
1.2 EVALUATION AND PLANNING

1.2     Evaluation and Planning. The school shall have an explicit process for evaluating
        and monitoring its overall efforts against its mission, goals and objectives; for
        assessing the school’s effectiveness in serving its various constituencies; and for
        planning to achieve its mission in the future.

1.2.a   Planning Process

The strategic planning process is integrated with that of the University. A strategic plan covering
2002-2006 was developed in the fall of 2001 with the assistance of Vantage Associates, a local
consulting firm. That plan was updated in the fall of 2002. In spring 2003 a University-wide
strategic planning process was initiated by newly selected President Carol Z. Garrison based on
six goals, as noted in Section 1.1.c. The School’s revised plan, titled Strategic Plan 2003-2010,
contained five goals relevant to our activities(Appendix 1.2.a) relied heavily on the benchmarks and
Scorecard established for each school at the University level. The process for the current revision
of this plan (found in Section 1.1.b) began with additions developed by the Executive Committee.
This draft was then reviewed by both internal and external stakeholders as depicted in Figure
1.2.a. Input from the reviewers was used by the Executive Committee to revise the plan and
submit to the faculty for approval.
               Figure 1.2.a School of Public Health Strategic Planning Process




The membership of the primary external review committees – Broad Street Committee, Alumni
Representatives, and Community Leaders – is shown in the following table.

Table 1.2.a School of Public Health Strategic Planning External Review Committees
Committee                    Members
                             Lynn Wagenknect, Professor, Wake Forest School of Medicine
                             David Martin, Cardiovascular Medicine, Cleveland Clinic
Alumni Representatives
                             Carol Stekel, Commissioner, Alabama Medicaid Agency
                             Charles Collins, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention


                                                                                                 10
Committee                      Members
                               William Bryant, attorney
                               Cameron Vowell, community volunteer
                               Steve Rudd, practicing physician
Broad Street Committee
                               Ann Florie, Executive Director Leadership Birmingham
                               Ann McMillan, community volunteer
                               Terry Kellogg, Senior Vice President, Blue Cross/Blue Shield of Alabama
                               Mike Fleenor, Jefferson County Health Officer
                               Reverend Don Solomon, Chair, Congregations for Public Health
Community Leaders
                               Don Williamson, State Health Officer & AL Dept. of Public Health Leadership
                               Jonathan Dunning, CEO, Birmingham Health Care

1.2.b Program and Activity Quality Enhancements

On an annual basis, action items are developed for the School by evaluating performance against
the strategic plan. The action items for 2003-2010 are shown in Sections 1.1.b and c.

1.2.c Outcome Measures

Benchmarks for each goal and objective may be found in Table 1.1.c.

1.2.d Qualitative and Quantitative Assessments

Qualitative assessments, provided by several review groups, are shown in the following table.

Table 1.2.d SOPH Health Qualitative Assessment of Mission, Goals, and Objectives
Assessor                                  Assessment
Alabama Department of Public Health:      Discussion and review of strategic plan. Discussion regarding
Don Williamson MD, State Health           how to ensure meaningful ongoing collaborations between SOPH
Officer; Frances Kennemer, Director of    and Alabama Department of Public Health. An ongoing
Professional Services; Tom Miller, MD,    relationship has emphasized workforce development, internship
Director of Family Health Services; and   opportunities, collaborative research and distance education. The
Ed Davidson, Chief Fiscal Officer         idea of establishing a Public Health Foundation or Institute was
May 9, 2007                               seen as an ideal way to accomplish part of this goal.
Public Health Student Association         Discussion and review of the plan's theme, objectives, and
April 9, 2007                             benchmarks. The Dean made notations on the master copy.
                                          Attendees agreed on the proposed changes/modifications as
                                          discussed. A final draft with suggested revisions was distributed
                                          to the Public Health Student Association.
Selected Faculty                          Discussion and review of the plan's theme, objectives, and
April 17, 2007                            benchmarks. The Dean made notations on the master copy.
                                          Attendees agreed on the proposed changes/modifications as
                                          discussed. A final draft with suggested revisions was distributed
                                          to the faculty.
Staff Council                             The group reviewed and discussed each of the plan's theme,
April 5, 2007                             objectives, and benchmarks. Max Michael made notations on the
                                          master copy. The attendees agreed on the proposed
                                          changes/modifications as discussed. A final draft with suggested
                                          revisions was distributed to the Staff.

The UAB Office of the Provost performs quantitative measures in the form of scorecards. The
Dean meets with the Provost annual to discuss School progress towards Scorecard measures, as
well as, School specific issues. Annual reports may be found in the Resource Room. [RR]



                                                                                                         11
1.2.e School Responses to Last Accreditation Report

During our last accreditation, Criteria V.B and VIII.C were partially met. The interim report was
submitted to the Council on Education for Public Health in the Spring of 2003. A copy of that report
is located in the Resource Room. [RR] A summary of our response is as follows:

Criterion V.B. The report shall provide evidence that the school requires a practice
experience for all professional degree curricula or specifies waivers for the experience
based on an individual assessment of students.

The School requires all students receiving an MPH to complete a practice experience (internship).
Students must complete a minimum of three hours of internship, but departments may require
additional hours. A waiver option is available for students with previous relevant experience. The
School also established an internship coordinator position in the Dean’s office who works with
departments, students and field placement sites. Details of the practice experience are discussed
in 2.4.a and policies and procedures may be found at http://www.soph.uab.edu/internships.

Criterion VIII.C. The report shall provide evidence that the school has a plan to achieve
demographic and ethnic diversity among its faculty complement.

The SOPH is dedicated to the goals of diversity in our faculty, students and staff as embodied in
our mission and values. Our dedication builds on the strong commitments to diversity made by
senior officials at UAB. Section 4.3 details our policy, recruitment and retention efforts, and other
efforts to provide and maintain an environment that supports diversity. Section 4.4 outlines our
recruitment efforts for a diverse student population. The School continues a rigorous effort to
recruit an ethnically diverse workforce and student body. Table 1.2.e demonstrates minority
faculty, staff and student representation for the past three years, details on faculty and staff are
included in Sections 4.3.a and b and
4.5.d. In 2006, we lost three African       Table 1.2.e Minority Representation*
American faculty who were highly            Outcome Measure               Goal        2005        2006        2007
recruited by other universities.            Primary Faculty                >25%          31%        34%        31%
Although our numbers will continue to       Primary and Other              >25%          31%        33%        30%
fluctuate due to competition for the        Staff                          >25%          44%        41%        44%
faculty pool, the University and School     Student Body                   >25%          27%        23%        21%
strive to improve the process of            New Fall Enrollees             >25%          23%        27%        25%
                                            *US citizens whose race is black, Asian, Hispanic, or American
attracting and retaining a diverse
                                            Indian; international students are not included. Staff data are not
faculty. The School will continue to        systematically collected at the university level so these are estimates.
rigorously recruit and retain a diverse
faculty, staff and student body.

1.2. f   Method of Developing Self-Study Document

The self-study process began in August 2006 with the Dean’s appointment of the School’s
Accreditation Steering Committee. Nine working groups were formed. Each working group was
comprised of faculty, staff, and a student where appropriate. The self study included four stages:

Stage One
August 2006-June 2007 The chairs of each working group convened meetings and gathered
information to address specific accreditation criteria. Meetings were generally one-on-one and
small groups. The committee chairs met with the CEPH Self Study Chair and Dean monthly to
review progress and to address school-wide issues (minutes in RR). Consultation with the CEPH
Executive Director occurred May 24, 2007.


                                                                                                                 12
Stage Two
June 2007 The School’s Accreditation Steering Committee reviewed draft documents to discuss
content changes, strengths and weaknesses, and corrective actions. The recommended CEPH
consultant changes were incorporated.
August-October 2007 Faculty, staff, students and the larger public health community were invited
to review and comment on the self-study document. The Alabama Department of Public Health,
the Broad Street Committee, alumni, and community leaders reviewed the document. A draft and
a comment section were available on the SOPH web site. Recommendations were reviewed and
incorporated.
October-November 2007 The document was reviewed by: the Educational Policy Committee
(School-wide curriculum committee), the Faculty Assembly (governing body consisting of all
primary faculty), the Staff Council (staff representatives from each department), and the Public
Health Student Association (elected student government body).

Stage Three
October-November 2007 The self-study was refined and submitted to CEPH for preliminary review
on November 14, 2007.

Stage Four
November 2007-January 2008 A preliminary review is conducted by CEPH. (Letter provided in
RR). The School continues to refine document and receive input from stakeholders. The self
study is placed on web with a comment section. The CEPH address was also provided on the web
site for public comments to CEPH. On December 6, 2007 a meeting occurred with stakeholders to
review the document, discuss areas of concern and formulate an action plan.
January-March 2008 The self study document is refined by the CEPH Steering Committee and
reviewed by stakeholders. Documents are collected for the Resource Room and the agenda is
distributed for the site visit. The improvement plan is finalized and the Strategic Plan is adapted to
reflect identified problems. On March 14, 2008 the final copy of the Self Study is sent to CEPH
and site visitors. Contents of the Resource Room are also finalized at this time.
April 14-16, 2008 The CEPH Site Visit occurs.

1.2. g Assessment of the extent to which this criterion is met.

This criterion is met.

Strengths
• Well-defined planning process.
• Good representation from external/internal committees with excellent reputation of members.

Weaknesses
• An annual strategic planning process separate from the University review of the School’s
  benchmarks on the UAB Scorecard metrics is not clearly established.
• Difficult to maintain a consistent level of quality for all sections.
• No centralized monitoring system for evaluating strategic outcomes.
• No systematic annual review of the data.

Future Plans
A central coordinating committee under the Associate Dean’s authority will be established by July
31, 2008 to evaluate the strategic plan and other indicators of success. A Director of
Communications and Monitoring has been established in the Dean’s Office to assist with
monitoring and evaluation activities. A formal annual strategic plan review process will be
established and parallel the University process.

                                                                                                   13
1.3 INSTITUTIONAL ENVIRONMENT

1.3     Institutional Environment. The school shall be an integral part of an accredited
        institution of higher education and shall have the same level of independence and
        status accorded to professional schools in that institution.

1.3.a   University Setting and Accrediting Bodies

UAB is a publicly supported institution of higher education occupying over 82 city bocks in
Birmingham, Alabama. It is a nationally- and internationally-respected center for educational,
research and service programs and has been designated by the Carnegie Foundation as one of
the top 95 research institutions in the country. Student enrollment exceeds 17,000 and faculty and
staff number more than 16,000.

UAB is one of three institutions comprising the University of Alabama System. UAB has three
major academic units: Academic Affairs, the Academic Health Center, and the Graduate School.
Within Academic Affairs, baccalaureate-level academic programs are offered through six schools:
Arts and Humanities, Business, Education, Engineering, Natural Sciences and Mathematics, and
Social and Behavioral Sciences. The Academic Health Center offers sub-baccalaureate,
baccalaureate, and professional instruction through six health professions schools: Dentistry,
Health Professions, Medicine, Nursing, Optometry, and Public Health. It also provides primary,
secondary, and tertiary health care through the University of Alabama Hospital and affiliated clinics.
Post-baccalaureate degree programs are offered individually and cooperatively by each of the
schools through the Graduate School. Both Academic Affairs and the Academic Health Center
house a number of special centers and institutes that focus on specific research and service areas.

Undergraduate Education

Through the six schools within Academic Affairs, UAB offers a full range of undergraduate
programs in liberal arts, technical, pre-professional, and professional studies. Also, the Schools of
Nursing, Dentistry, and Health Professions provide accredited health profession instructional
programs at the baccalaureate levels.

Health Professions Training

The UAB Academic Health Center has achieved a position of national prominence for the training
of health professionals. Each of its six schools offers a comprehensive range of programs from
basic preparation to sophisticated graduate and specialty training. The Schools of Dentistry and
Public Health are the only such schools in the state, and the School of Optometry is the only such
public facility in the Southeast. The exceptional quality of all its programs enables the Academic
Health Center to attract substantial external funding in support of its educational, research, and
service activities. Among the twelve schools on campus, the SOPH ranks second in total active
extramural support from grants and contracts. However, based on per faculty level of extramural
support, the SOPH ranks first.

Graduate Education

The Graduate School offers post-baccalaureate graduate programs. Graduate education
transcends the presentation of existing knowledge and specifically trains individuals to generate
new knowledge through research and creative thinking. Currently, the Graduate School
administers doctoral programs in 35 areas and master's level programs in 45 areas. Graduate
School programs offered in the SOPH include PhD and Masters of Science (MS) programs.


                                                                                                    14
Accrediting Bodies

UAB is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and
Schools (SACS) to award degrees at the bachelor’s, masters’, specialist and doctoral levels. The
SACS Commission on Colleges reaffirmed the accreditation of UAB in December 2005. Listed
below are the Academic Health Center Schools and their corresponding accrediting bodies:

Table 1.3.a Accrediting Bodies for Academic Health Center Schools
 School                       Accrediting Bodies
 Dentistry                    American Dental Association Commission on Accreditation
 Health Professions           Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs of American
                              Medical Association; Council on Accreditation of Nurse Anesthesia Educational
                              Programs; Accrediting Commission on Education for Health Services
                              Administration; American Dietetic Association; American Physical Therapy
                              Association; American Board of Examiners in Audiology and Pathology
 Medicine                     Liaison Committee on Medical Education
 Nursing                      Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education
 Optometry                    Accreditation Council on Optometric Education
 Public Health                Council on Education for Public Health

1.3.b One or more organizational charts of the University indicating the school’s
relationship to the other components of the institution, including reporting lines.

The SOPH has equal status to all schools within UAB. All UAB Deans and Library Directors report
to the Provost. Dean Max Michael reports to Provost Eli Capilouto within the organizational
structure of UAB (Figure 1.3.b) and the Provost reports to UAB President Carol Garrison.




Note: Incumbent’s names not included due to expected turnover.



                                                                                                              15
Dr. Garrison reports to Chancellor Malcolm Portera, Chief Executive Officer of the University of
Alabama System. Dr. Portera is appointed by and reports to the University of Alabama System
Board of Trustees, which is composed of three members from the Congressional district in which
the Tuscaloosa campus is located and two members from each of the other six Congressional
districts. The Governor and the State Superintendent of Education are ex-officio members of the
Board. Those members who are not ex-officio are elected by the Board.

1.3.c   A brief description of the university practices regarding:
(1)     lines of accountability, including access to higher-level university officials
(2)     prerogatives extended to academic units regarding names, titles and internal
        organization
(3)     budgeting and resource allocation, including budget negotiations, indirect cost
        recoveries, distribution of tuition and fees, and support for fund-raising
(4)     personnel recruitment, selection and advancement, including faculty and staff
(5)     academic standards and policies, including establishment and oversight of curricula

1.3.c(1)       Accountability

As indicated in organizational chart (1.3.b), the SOPH, like the eleven other schools on campus, is
under the auspices of the Provost with regard to faculty and academic matters. The Provost
reports to the President who reports to University of Alabama System Chancellor. Specific
authority and duties of these officers are detailed in Appendix 1.3.c(1).

1.3.c(2)      Prerogatives extended to academic units regarding names, titles and internal
organization.

The SOPH establishes faculty and staff positions in accordance with UAB policies and procedures.
Funding for these positions must be budgeted and identified. Tenure and tenure-earning faculty
positions must be approved by the Dean and the School’s Executive Committee and forwarded to
the Provost’s Office for final approval. Tenured faculty positions must be approved by the President.

The School’s internal organization is determined by the Dean, with the Provost’s approval. Staff
titles and positions are approved by the University’s Compensation office under the department of
Human Resource Management. Recruitment of faculty or staff positions are determined by
departments and units according to need and available funding, either from state funding or
extramural support. All positions are approved by the Dean.

1.3.c(3)       Budgeting and Resource Allocation

The SOPH, like the other academic health center schools, annually receives revenue from three
sources as determined by the Provost and President: 1) “state funding” (i.e., Special Education
Trust Fund), 2) tuition and fees, and 3) grants and contracts. Funds received as gifts to the
schools are processed centrally but go in full to the recipient school.

State funding is allocated to UAB through the Chancellor based on the amount appropriated from
the Education Trust Fund by the state legislature. Within UAB, state appropriations are allocated
as follows: 80-90% by Alabama Commission on Higher Education (ACHE) formula or 80-90% by
ACHE-adjusted formula using lower ratio for graduate:undergraduate credit hours; and 10-20%
through “University-wide Goal Performance Pool” according to scorecard performance on indicators
such as research, credit hour production and exam pass. Outside of the annual allocation of state
funds are special appropriations for capital expenditures that are made by the President and
Provost according to a review of proposals and requests by various units on campus.

                                                                                                   16
Tuition and fee revenues are allocated by a formula to each school within the Academic Health
Center according to credit hour production and the fees actually charged by the respective units.
An administrative tax of approximately 14.5% is applied by UAB central administration.

Grant and contract revenues received by the schools are dispersed according to allocation rules
applied respectively to direct and indirect extramural revenues. Direct revenues (i.e., funds that
support salary) are allocated fully to the schools according to expenditures for personnel support
as approved by the respective granting agencies. Indirect expense recovery is distributed
according to the market shares of all schools and units based on actual annual indirect cost
expenditures between April 1 and March 31. The indirect cost revenues, minus approximately
50% in revenue reallocation to the University, are allocated directly to schools in accordance with
the primary faculty appointment unit of the of the grant/contract’s principal investigator. In cases
where there is collaboration among several schools, the respective schools enter into a formal
Indirect Cost Revenue Redistribution Agreement with the UAB Office of Grants and Contracts to
share indirect revenues. The shared amounts are negotiated taking into account such factors as
personnel, space and administration across the respective schools. The schools within the
Academic Health Center are assigned space and utility costs according to the type and amount of
space occupied. The Summary of Economic Rules Committee Discussion on Budget Models
[Appendix 1.3.c(2)] further details revenue allocation criteria.

University-wide Centers

We have a strong history of collaboration across units. To foster this UAB provides financial
support to qualifying University-Wide Interdisciplinary Research Centers (UWIRCs) and Pilot
UWIRCs. Support of these designated centers derives from an agreed upon percentage of the
indirect expense recovery revenues received by the University, generally 4%. This allocation is
agreed to by all 12 deans and represents 70% of the UWIRC support. Applicants for UWIRC
status exhibit substantive involvement of faculty from more than two schools and receive funding
from the sponsoring schools that totals the remaining 30% of support. The review process occurs
at the school and university level with final approval coming from the Provost in consultation with
the 12 deans. [Sample applications that include descriptions of the review process are enclosed in
Appendix 1.3.c(3)]. In fiscal year 2007, the SOPH provided primary or secondary sponsorship and
financial support to 17 centers: the Arthritis and Musculoskeletal Center, the BioMatrix Engineering
and Regenerative Medicine (BERM) Center, the Center for Aging, the Center for AIDS Research,
the Center for Emerging Infections & Emergency Preparedness, the Center for Free Radical
Biology, the Center for Metabolic Bone Disease, the Center for Outcomes and Effectiveness
Research and Education, the Center for the Study of Community Health, the Center for Women’s
Reproductive Health, the Civitan International Research Center, the Clinical Nutrition Research
Center, the Comprehensive Cancer Center, the Gregory Fleming James Cystic Fibrosis Research
Center, the Heflin Center for Human Genetics, the Minority Health and Research Center, the
Recessive Polycystic Kidney Disease Core Center, and the Vision Science Research Center.

1.3.c(4)       Personnel Recruitment, Selection and Advancement

UAB has established processes for recruiting and appointing faculty and other personnel which
have as their foundation a policy of equal employment opportunities. The UAB Senate Faculty
Policy and Procedures Committee develops, monitors, and reviews university-wide policies on
faculty recruitment, retention, promotion and tenure. Recruitment, appointment, and promotion
policies are set forth in Section 2 of the UAB Faculty Handbook and Policies:
http://main.uab.edu/Sites/provost/facultyresources/facultyhandbook/ and in Section 4 of the You
and UAB - A Handbook for Administrative, Professional and Support Personnel:
http://main.uab.edu/show.asp?durki=43608. [Appendices1.3.c(4) and 1.3.c(5) and resource room.)


                                                                                                    17
[RR] The recruitment process involves department chairs, search committee members, and staff
working collaboratively with the Dean’s office to ensure compliance with the University’s affirmative
action policies and other applicable personnel system requirements. Typically, changes in current
faculty appointments and promotions are recommended by the department chairs and reviewed by
the School’s Faculty Affairs Committee which, in this capacity, is advisory to the Dean. However,
requests for changes in rank and tenure status may be initiated by the individual rather than the
chair. Criteria for faculty appointment and promotion are contained in the UAB Faculty Handbook
(Sections 2.3-2.6) and the Bylaws of the Faculty Affairs Committee of the SOPH [Appendix
1.3.c(6)]. Faculty Affairs Committee recommendations are forwarded to the Dean. If the Dean
agrees with a recommendation for promotion, it is forwarded to the Provost for review. Final
approval is given by the President. Complete procedures and policies related to faculty
appointment and promotion are contained in the UAB Faculty Handbook (Section 2.6).

Staff personnel are recruited and interviewed primarily by the individual supervisor within the
department, center or unit, with the Dean’s office ensuring compliance with affirmative action
policies and assisting with the review of credentials. Requests for hiring and promotion of staff are
reviewed by the Dean, who forwards the requests to the attention of the Provost.

Links include: UAB Faculty Handbook & Policies
               http://main.uab.edu/sites/provost/facultyresources/facultyhandbook/
               You and UAB - A Handbook for Administrative, Professional and Support Personnel
               http://main.uab.edu/show.asp?durki=43608
               Bylaws of the Faculty Affairs Committee of the SOPH
               http://www.soph.uab.edu/resources/faculty

1.3.c(5)       Academic Standards and Policies

The SOPH Faculty Assembly is responsible for approving all degree programs of the School. It is
also responsible for approving all programs being terminated for other than administrative reasons.
The approval of the content of specific courses and the structure of programs of study is the
responsibility of the Faculty Assembly. This responsibility has been delegated to the School’s
Educational Policy Committee (EPC), but approval remains subject to review by the Faculty
Assembly. The development and adoption of policies that underlie the specific criteria for
admission to, and graduation from, the Schools’ various programs is the responsibility of the
Faculty Assembly. The development and application of these criteria to individuals are delegated
to the SOPH committee on Admissions and Graduation.

1.3.d Identification of any of the above processes that are different for the School of Public
Health than for other professional schools, with an explanation.

Reporting at University level for the SOPH is the same as at other professional schools. Internally,
reporting processes are followed as stated below.

1.3.d(1)      Budgeting and Resource Allocation
The SOPH follows a responsibility-center-management approach to equitably allocate funds to the
departments where authority and responsibility for budget management rests. A full description of
the budget and resource allocation process may be found in Section 1.5.a(3).

1.3.d(2)        Personnel Recruitment, Selection and Advancement
The SOPH Faculty Assembly has approved the UAB SOPH Policies and Procedures for Faculty
Search Committees to direct recruiting efforts and Bylaws of the Faculty Affairs Committee to
further specify the policies, procedures and criteria to be used in promotion and tenure decisions.


                                                                                                   18
A detailed description of these policies may be found in Section 1.5.a(5). Staff personnel are
recruited and interviewed primarily by the individual supervisor within the department, center or
unit, in accordance with UAB affirmative action policies. Recommendations for hiring and promotion
of staff are reviewed by the department chair or unit director, with final approval by the Dean.

1.3.d(3)        Academic Standards and Policies

The SOPH Educational Policy Committee (EPC) as delegated by the SOPH Faculty Assembly,
develops, reviews, and monitors academic standards and policies for the School as a whole in
accordance with University policies, and presents them to the Faculty Assembly for ratification.
Individual departments are responsible for curriculum development, but the EPC must review and
approve new or modified degree programs, new courses, and changes in curricula or course
content. A detailed description of policy development processes may be found in Section 1.5.a(6).

1.3.e If a collaborative school, descriptions of all participating institutions and delineation
of their relationships to the school.

Not applicable.

1.3.f If a collaborative school, a copy of the formal written agreement that establishes the
rights and obligations of the participating universities in regard to the school’s operation.

Not applicable.

1.3.g Assessment of the extent to which this criterion is met.

This criterion is met.

Strengths
• The SOPH is 1 of 12 schools, all of which enjoy equal status and independence regarding
   management of funds, programs, and resources.
• The School follows all policies and practices in accordance with the University’s guidelines.
• UAB is a fully accredited institution of higher learning.
• Tuition charges are consistent across campus and established by the Board of Trustees.
• Only accredited school of public health in Alabama; target area includes Alabama, Mississippi,
   Tennessee, western Georgia, and the Panhandle of Florida.
• Very strong relationships with other institutions across Alabama, including Auburn, University of
   West Alabama, and University of South Alabama.

Weaknesses
• The School is dispersed among seven buildings on and off the University campus.
• Consistent tuition charges for graduate programs limit tuition growth for the SOPH as
  compared to other schools of public health in other locations.

Future Plans
To better foster collegial relationships and a sense of community, the School will continue working
with the Provost’s Office to secure space to coalesce its faculty and staff in fewer buildings in
closer proximity to one another. It will also approach UAB Administration about having a separate
tuition or fee structure for the SOPH to more adequately reflect the educational costs in Spring
2008.



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1.4 ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION

1.4      Organization and Administration. The School shall provide an organizational
         setting conducive to teaching and learning, research and service. The
         organizational setting shall facilitate interdisciplinary communication, cooperation
         and collaboration. The organizational structure shall effectively support the work
         of the school’s constituents.

1.4.a    Organizational Chart.

The SOPH is organized into six departments, one University-wide center, two endowed centers,
and two professional training and development centers. The Dean’s Office is divided into five
administrative units. The departments, centers and units are described in Section 1.4.b. The
SOPH organizational chart is shown below in Figure 1.4.b.
                        Figure 1.4.b UAB SOPH Organizational Chart
                                              Dean,
                                            School of
                                           Public Health




                                 Community             Broad Street
                                  Liaison               Committee



                                 Special Asst.           Office of
                                  to Dean’s            Public Health
                                    Office               Practice




          Departments                            Centers                         Administration



                                 Center for the            Deep South   Administrative              Assoc. Dean
                 Environmental
 Biostatistics                     Study of                  Center      and Fiscal                 for Academic
                    Health
                                  Community                 for OHS        Affairs                  and Strategic
                   Sciences
                                    Health                                                            Programs


                                   Lister Hill        South Central                                            Student &
Epidemiology        Health           Center             Center for                        Communication        Academic
                   Behavior        for Health         Public Health                        & Monitoring         Affairs
                                     Policy           Preparedness


 Health Care                      Sparkman                                                   Alumni &        Multimedia &
 Organization     Maternal &        Center                                                   External        Information
   & Policy       Child Health    for Global                                                  Affairs        Technology
                                    Health                                                                     Services

The Dean of the SOPH serves as chief executive officer of the School and shares administrative
responsibilities with six department chairs, five center directors, one associate dean, and directors
of various administrative offices. The department chairs and center directors, and the Director of


                                                                                                                      20
Fiscal and Administrative Services report directly to the Dean, as does the Associate Dean for
Academic and Strategic Programs. The Directors of the Office of Student and Academic Services,
Alumni and External Affairs, Communications and Monitoring, and Multimedia and Information
Technology Services report to the Associate Dean. The department chairs, the chair of the faculty
assembly (elected by the faculty), and the Dean constitute the School’s Executive Committee. The
Associate Dean, Special Assistant to the Dean’s Office, and the Director of Fiscal and Administrative
Services are ex officio members of the Committee and are invited to attend all meetings.

1.4.b Description of the roles and responsibilities of major units in the organizational chart.

The Dean is responsible for oversight of all aspects of the School’s activities and operations. Dean
Max Michael serves as the primary representative of the School at meetings of the Council of
Deans, Academic Programs Council and Campus Planning. He reports to the Provost. He also
represents the School and serves as chief advocate and spokesperson to external constituencies.

The Associate Dean for Academic and Strategic Programs has primary responsibility for the
organization and coordination of all academic programs and for strategically managing internal and
external programs. Activities and responsibilities within these programs include oversight of faculty
affairs, student services, information services, alumni relations, and monitoring and representing
the School on behalf of the Dean when required. The Associate Dean serves as an ex officio
member of the Educational Policy and Executive Committees. Dr. Melissa Galvin serves as
Interim Associate Dean for Academic and Strategic Programs.

The Special Assistant to the Dean’s Office has responsibility for a variety of programmatic
initiatives related to the Strategic Plan. She works closely with the Dean and Associate Dean as a
part of the senior leadership team and spends approximately 30% of her time in the Dean’s Office.
Dr. Beverly Mulvihill serves in this capacity.

The Office of Public Health Practice provides a liaison with the Alabama Department of Public
Health, facilitating collaborations and interactions for faculty and students. Dr. Melissa Galvin
leads this Office to coordinate public health practice activities for SOPH faculty and students.

The Director of Administration and Fiscal Affairs is responsible for financial analysis;
forecasting; budgeting; personnel policy management and enforcement; space and facilities
planning and management; and grants administration relevant to the Dean’s office, and for the rest
of the School as needed. Director Ada Mailhot establishes administrative and financial accounting
systems to track expenditures across the School and directs the staff to support these systems.

The Office of Communications and Monitoring is a newly established part of the Dean's Office
with the October 2007 departure of the Director of the Office of Communications and Public Liaison.
The Office will be responsible for the School’s communications portfolio, including oversight of the
web site and all publications, and monitoring of its teaching and service activities. It will assist in
the annual tracking and monitoring of the strategic plan and selected indicators. The director will
work closely with the Dean and Associate Dean to ensure coordination of these activities. Ms.
Cheryl Johnson is the Director of the Office of Communications and Monitoring.

The Director of Alumni and External Affairs is responsible for alumni relations, career services
and internship coordination. She is responsible for developing, implementing and managing
alumni relations; identifying and cultivating individual, foundation and corporate donors; and
managing fund-raising events. This includes planning alumni events, maintaining alumni records,
assessing alumni needs, and managing the School’s alumni association. As Director, Joan Ohrn



                                                                                                     21
works closely with the UAB Office of Development to enhance scholarships and other
endowments, and with the Director of Public Health Practice for career services and internships.

The Director of Media and Information Technology Services has primary responsibility for
providing information technology support throughout the School including management of the
computer resource labs, software development, project management, multimedia support, and
management of the School’s web site. Its Director, Richard Mailhot, serves as an ex officio
member of the Advisory Committee on Information Technology.

The Director of Student and Academic Services, Pamela Williams, has primary responsibility for
all functions relating to recruitment, outreach and promotion; admissions and enrollment; financial
aid; maintenance of graduate student records and databases; graduation; and orientation and
convocation events planning.

The Broad Street Committee, the SOPH external advisory committee, includes outstanding
members of the corporate, civic, academic, and public health communities. The Committee has a
threefold mission: 1) to counsel the Dean and faculty on the quality of existing programs and
review new programs, services and activities; 2) to assist in interpreting the School’s goals and
objectives to its constituents in other parts of the state and nation; and 3) to advance those
objectives by helping to identify, cultivate and solicit support from individuals, foundations, and
other organizations to secure a continuing standard of excellence for the School. The Broad Street
Committee meets quarterly. A list of its members is included in Table 1.2.a (Section 1.2.a).

The Community Liaison, Rev. Don Solomon, works closely with the Dean developing community
partnerships and collaborations, primarily in the African American community.

Departments

Responsibility for the administration and implementation of academic programs within the SOPH
rests with six departments (as shown in Figure 1.4.b): Biostatistics, Environmental Health Sciences,
Epidemiology, Health Behavior, Health Care Organization and Policy, and Maternal and Child
Health. Each department is administered by a chair who is appointed by the Dean. Chairs serve
terms of 3-5 years. For additional information, see Appendix 1.4.b(1). Primary responsibilities of
the Chairs include: university- and school-level leadership, research and educational programs,
student affairs, service, personnel management and development, and financial management.

Centers

There are five Centers within the School which are described in detail in Appendix 1.4.c(1).

Deep South Center for Occupational Health and Safety (DSC). The DSC’s mission is to
develop professionals who protect and promote the health and safety of workers through
interdisciplinary education, research, training and outreach. This Center is sponsored by the CDC
National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. For additional details see: www.uab.edu/dsc.

Sparkman Center for Global Health. The mission of the Sparkman Center is to contribute to
solutions of health problems in developing countries through graduate-level public health
education, research, and training programs. These programs are organized collaboratively with
academic institutions, international agencies, and health ministries within the host country.
Additionally, the Center works to enhance the capacity of the UAB community to engage in global
health. For additional details visit: http://www.soph.uab.edu/sparkman.



                                                                                                   22
Lister Hill Center for Health Policy. This endowed Center has a university-wide mission to
facilitate the conduct of health policy research and to disseminate the findings of that research
beyond the usual academic channels. The Center fosters research through the work of its Scholars
whose primary research interests are: health care markets and managed care, maternal and child
health, management in public health organization, clinical health services research, and aging
policy. Additional information may be found at: http://www.soph.uab.edu/default.aspx?id=34.

Center for the Study of Community Health. The Center focuses on reducing health risks among
underserved populations throughout Alabama and plays a leading role in the development of
community-based research at UAB. The Center’s high-quality research is grounded in the
development of the Community Health Advisors model (CHA), adapted by the Center in the early
90’s and piloted in a rural Alabama African-American community. As a University-Wide
Interdisciplinary Research Center, the Center for the Study of Community Health offers a unique
prevention research environment that includes over 130 faculty clinicians, researchers, and health
professionals. Further details may be found at: http://www.uabchp.com/page.asp?id=41.

South Central Center for Public Health Preparedness (SCCPHP). The mission of the Center is
to design assessments and train public health practitioners to prepare for and respond to public
health threats and emergencies, particularly those related to bioterrorism. The SCCPHP is funded
under a cooperative agreement with the CDC/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry/
Association of Schools of Public Health. For additional details see: www.southcentralpartnership.org.

1.4.c    Description of the manner in which interdisciplinary coordination, cooperation and
         collaboration is supported.

Interdisciplinary coordination, cooperation and collaboration is carried out at several levels, a
reflection of our Institution and School’s strong culture and history. UAB is exemplary in the
absence of barriers between schools and of boundaries between departments. The richness of
opportunities for cross-campus interdisciplinary collaboration is a critical element in our ability to
recruit outstanding scholars to join our faculty. Formal structures and policies are in place to foster
and ensure cooperation and collaboration, though the collegial environment of the campus
encourages this regardless of the presence or absence of formal mechanisms.

•   Joint Appointments. Many UAB faculty have multiple appointments. As of October 1, 2006,
    of the 87 faculty with primary SOPH appointments, 39 had secondary appointments in various
    schools and departments across campus. There are 90 appointments with centers across the
    University. In addition, 63 faculty with primary appointments in other schools have secondary
    appointments in the SOPH, and there are 60 external faculty appointments in SOPH Centers.
    The former arrangements allow us to contribute a public health perspective to the scholarly and
    educational efforts of other groups on campus, while the latter arrangements allow us to benefit
    from specific expertise in disciplines related to the advancement of public health.
•   University-wide Centers. The SOPH provides financial support to 17 University-Wide
    Interdisciplinary Research Centers across campus.
•   Courses. Students from across campus enroll in and complete courses in the SOPH. During
    Fall 2006, 178 students from 20 different graduate programs on campus, other than Public
    Health, completed public health courses.
•   Joint Degrees. The SOPH offers 12 joint degrees with other UAB Schools (Business, Medicine,
    Nursing, Optometry, Social and Behavioral Sciences) and other Universities (Samford
    Cumberland School of Law, University of Alabama at Tuscaloosa, Auburn University).
•   Campus-wide events. The School has active and productive programs that host presentations
    on a variety of public health-related topics. These include the Public Health Lecture Series


                                                                                                     23
    which includes: the Carole W. Samuelson Endowed Lectureship in Public Health Practice, the
    Glenwood Endowed Lectureship in Mental Health, the Janet L. Norwood Award for Excellence
    by a Woman in the Statistical Sciences, the Ann Dial McMillan Endowed Lecture in Child and
    Family Health, and the Alumni Award for Scientific Excellence. Presentations are open to UAB
    and the community. The Lou Wooster Public Health Hero Award, named in honor of
    Birmingham’s heroic madam of the late 19th century, is presented annually by the Broad Street
    Committee.
•   Joint Research. The versatile faculty of the School often seek and are sought to participate in
    research and educational programs outside their respective departments. At any point in time,
    the School’s 87 primary faculty serve as principal investigators on more than 130 research
    projects. They also serve as co-investigators on an estimated 120 projects outside the School.

At the School level, the Executive Committee works to ensure collaboration and cooperation by
establishing and implementing budgetary, administrative, and evaluation policies and procedures
that are applied equitably across the SOPH. All new tenured and tenure-earning faculty positions
are reviewed and voted on by the Executive Committee’s voting members (i.e., department chairs
and Chair of the Faculty Assembly). A key component of this review is the extent to which the new
position supports achievement of UAB and SOPH goals, rather than just departmental goals.

The SOPH has established five Centers (1.4.b) that conduct interdisciplinary and interdepartmental
activities with different foci on teaching, research and service to further ensure interdisciplinary
coordination and collaboration across UAB’s departments and schools. Each has its own director
that reports to the Dean. Faculty may be appointed as scholars or investigators within these
Centers. More details about the Centers may be found in Appendix 1.4.c(1). Faculty participation
in these and other campus-wide centers is detailed in Appendix 1.4.c(2). Governance of the
centers are contained in Guidelines for School of Public Health Centers - Policy and Management
Procedures [see Appendix 1.4.c(3)], approved in July 1999. These guidelines address mission
and goals, annual budget development and review, appointments, oversight, internal and external
advisory committees, and annual reports and evaluations.

1.4.d Identification of written policies that are illustrative of the school’s commitment to
fair and ethical dealings.

The SOPH and UAB have adopted numerous policies in commitment to fair and ethical dealings
and to student, staff and faculty rights. Many are in the UAB Faculty Handbook and Policies
[Appendix 1.3.c(4)], the You and UAB-Handbook for Administrative, Professional and Support
Personnel [Appendix 1.3.c(5)], and the SOPH Student Handbook [RR], or are distributed
individually. In addition, periodic notification via e-mail, campus mail and web postings serve to
widely publicize and reinforce these policies. Workshops are also held to ensure that polices are
followed. Examples of policies include the following ("Policy Documents" [RR]): the SOPH Student
Honor Code and Student Grievance Procedure (also found in the SOPH Student Handbook):
http://www.soph.uab.edu/about/vision/honorcode; the Graduate School Student Handbook:
http://main.uab.edu/Sites/gradschool/students/publications/ ; Policies on Academic Ethics and
Conduct, and Nonacademic Conduct; Graduate School Policy Concerning Student Participation in
Proprietary Research; UAB Policy Concerning the Maintenance of High Ethical Standards in
Research and Other Scholarly Activities; Grievance; Conflicts of Interest; Conflicts of Commitment;
Consulting; Drug Free Workplace; and Faculty/Staff Medical Leave of Absence.

Policies are approved through appropriate administrative levels, as required in the University of
Alabama System and UAB regulations, and embraced by leadership across campus. The School’s
commitment to an environment of fair and ethical treatment and mutual respect is manifest in the



                                                                                                 24
numerous workshops we have sponsored on diversity (listed in detail in Sections 4.3 and 4.5) and
the recently revitalization of diversity affairs within the SOPH.

1.4.e Description of the manner in which student grievances and complaints are addressed,
including the number of grievances and complaints filed for each of the last three years.

Grievance procedures are followed according to the UAB’s Student Grievances Policy
http://www.app.uab.edu/progress_conduct_Griev.html#Student%20Grievances. Student
complaints on academic matters are the responsibility of the department and school involved.
Normally, such complaints can be resolved quickly through discussion with the involved faculty. In
rare situations where such resolution does not occur, the student should contact the chair of the
appropriate department to file a formal grievance. The student’s grievance should be submitted in
writing and accompanied by any documentation at the earliest possible time. Consideration will
not be given to any grievance submitted later than the end of the term immediately following the
term in which the matter in question arose. The department should acknowledge the date the
grievance is received and notify the student about when an answer may be expected. It is the
responsibility of the department chair to provide an answer to the student within 10 working days.
If the matter cannot be settled within the department, the student has 10 working days from the day
of the department’s response to appeal to the associate dean of the SOPH. The associate dean
should acknowledge receipt of the student’s appeal and inform the student of the course of action
within 10 working days. At the associate dean’s discretion, an advisory panel may be appointed to
study the disagreement and make a recommendation to the dean. However, it is the responsibility
and prerogative of the associate dean to make, in a timely manner, a decision on any academic
disputes which have not been resolved at lower levels. The decision of the associate dean is final
on academic matters.

When complaints on non-academic matters cannot be settled by the persons directly involved, a
written complaint should be forwarded to the appropriate office. If the administrative officer is
unsuccessful in resolving the complaint, it may then be forwarded in writing to the Provost or a
designee for further consideration. There have been no formal grievances in the last 3 years.

In addition to the formal grievance procedure, the Public Health Student Association (PHSA) meets
with the Dean on an annual basis to discuss student concerns. Departmental representatives
collect concerns from other students in their department and collectively present them to the Dean.
Concerns are listed in the Resource Room. [RR]

1.4.f   Assessment of the extent to which this criterion is met

This criterion is met.

Strengths
• Structures and policies are in place to encourage and support cooperation, coordination and
   interdisciplinary collaboration across units at the SOPH and UAB.
• The School provides a highly participatory organizational setting to support its academic and
   research programs.
• The School and University subscribe to high standards that facilitate the development and
   adoption of professional public health values and ethics.
• Roles and accountability are clearly established.
• The departmental structure is highly decentralized, which promotes growth and effective
   decision making at the department level.



                                                                                                    25
Weaknesses
• The highly decentralized departmental structure can be difficult to coordinate.
• The current Associate Dean for Academic and Strategic Programs is an interim appointment.

Future Plans
The Dean will continue working with departmental and committee chairs to focus departments on
the School’s mission. A permanent Associate Dean will be identified by October 2008.




                                                                                              26
1.5 GOVERNANCE

1.5     Governance. The school administration and faculty shall have clearly defined rights
        and responsibilities concerning school governance and academic policies. Students
        shall, where appropriate, have participatory roles in conduct of school and program
        evaluation procedure, policy-setting and decision making.

1.5.a   Structure and Processes

General School Policy Development

The Dean, Faculty Assembly, and Executive Committee are responsible for policy development at
the SOPH. General administrative policies and procedures are developed by the Dean with the
advice and consent of the Executive Committee. All policies relevant to curriculum are the
responsibility of the Faculty Assembly through certain standing committees and units. Once
proposed policy changes have been considered by the appropriate committee or unit, the policy
issue and recommendations are presented at a regular scheduled meeting of the Faculty Assembly.
If this is not possible due to time constraints, the issue is presented to the Faculty Council, which
consists of six elected faculty members who are authorized to act in place of the Faculty Assembly.
Changes may include, but are not limited to, policies regarding academic programs/requirements,
admissions, faculty compensation strategies, and budget allocations. See Appendices 1.5.a(1) for
copies of the Faculty Assembly charter, 1.5.a(2) for standing committees, and 1.3.c(4) for copies of
the faculty handbook and various policies (e.g., Consultation Policy, Center Policy, etc.).

Planning

Within the SOPH, planning occurs at department and center levels, and for the School. The
School’s Executive Committee has final responsibility for School planning (see Section 1.5.c). The
process of developing the strategic plan involved School faculty, staff and students; professional
colleagues, alumni and potential employers; and leaders in the fields of public health education
and practice. Strategic Plan goal achievement progress is shared at faculty assembly meetings.

Since 2004, the Provost has requested an annual meeting with the Dean, through which additional
planning is carried out. Discussions include School accomplishments, short- and long-term goals,
and assessment and evaluation activities based on a score-card system. Copies of the SOPH
planning documents are on file in the Resource Room. [RR]

Budget and Resource Allocation

Budgetary policy and resource allocation are developed by the Dean in consultation with the
Executive Committee. In July 2002, the Executive Committee voted to adopt the School’s
Budgeting Policy [see Appendix 1.5.a(3)]. This policy addresses the distribution of all SOPH
revenues (state allocation, tuition and fees, and indirect expense recovery) to the departments.
Funds are divided according to specific allocation rules based on principles of productivity. Costs
are spread among departments based on consumption of resources (space, student services,
administrative support, etc.). Direct revenue from grants, such as salary support, are not included
in the School budget allocation, but are assigned directly to units as the funds are received. The
Executive Committee monitors and evaluates the state budget allocation system on an ongoing
basis, and has made minor revisions as necessary.

This responsibility-centered-management approach is designed to equitably allocate funds to the
departments where authority and responsibility for budget management rests. All allocations are


                                                                                                  27
shared with the departments and faculty, and are open for review. This system trusts the
departments to make the most prudent financial decisions about expenditures and investments.
With revenues being linked to a department’s ability to attract and graduate good students, there is
a strong incentive to develop and maintain quality programs. The budget allocation system also
motivates departments to compete successfully for extramural funds to support teaching, research
and service programs. Reserve accounts derived from unspent funds are maintained by each
department to be used in cases of funding shortfalls or to invest in future resources. Unspent
funds may result from allocations made through the budgeting system, but not immediately needed
because of obtained extramural support. Monthly budget reviews are conducted with the Dean,
the Director of Administrative and Fiscal Affairs, and the department chairs and administrators.

Student Recruitment, Admission and Award of Degrees

The Office of Student and Academic Services administers student recruitment, admission and the
awarding of degrees. The Associate Dean for Academic and Strategic Programs is the
administrative head for this area. The Admissions and Graduation Committee of the faculty
recommends and develops admissions policies, which are then ratified by the Faculty Assembly.
This Committee has developed policies for the required elements of an application package,
criteria for admission, admission deadlines, and the process for reviewing exceptions to these
policies. The Admissions and Graduation Committee continues to review and monitor policies they
have developed even after ratification. Student recruitment and admission policies and procedures
are described in criteria 4.4. Also see Appendix 1.5.a(4), Student Recruitment.

Faculty Recruitment, Evaluation of Performance, Retention, Promotion and Tenure

The UAB Senate Faculty Policy and Procedures Committee develops, monitors, and reviews
university-wide policies on faculty recruitment, retention, promotion and tenure. These policies are
published in the UAB Faculty Handbook and Policies, and may be augmented at the school level.
The SOPH Faculty Assembly has approved the UAB SOPH Policies and Procedures for Faculty
Search Committees to direct recruiting efforts, and Bylaws of the Faculty Affairs Committee to
further specify the policies, procedures and criteria to be followed in promotion and tenure
decisions. Also see Appendix 1.5.a(5), Faculty Recruitment.

Academic Standards and Policies

The Educational Policy Committee (EPC) of the faculty develops, reviews, and monitors academic
standards and policies for the School and presents them to the Faculty Assembly for ratification.
Individual departments are responsible for curriculum development, but the EPC must review and
approve new or modified degree programs, new courses, and changes in curricula or course
content. EPC meetings are open to all faculty members, with agendas distributed one week prior.
Following all meetings, EPC minutes are distributed to the full faculty. A decision by the EPC
becomes accepted policy of the School one month after distribution of the minutes unless a review
of the decision is requested by a primary full-time faculty member. A review of the decision is a
request for open discussion during the next school-wide faculty meeting. A request for review
must be made in writing to the chair of the EPC and the Chair of the Faculty Assembly and must
be co-signed by at least two other primary full-time faculty members. After review of the decision
at a faculty meeting, a vote of the faculty will be taken to either reject or accept the EPC’s decision.
This vote may be polled at the faculty meeting or by each department’s EPC representative. If
rejected by the majority, the decision is overruled. A request for a review automatically suspends
an EPC decision from becoming policy until after the faculty has voted on the issue. No further
action is required by the EPC on the issue unless new proposals are submitted for review.



                                                                                                     28
It is the responsibility of the Associate Dean to monitor and ensure compliance with academic
policies. All requests for program transfer, course substitutions, course waivers and application for
degree are reviewed and approved or denied by the Associate Dean. It is also the responsibility of
the Associate Dean to seek clarification on academic policy from the EPC and to submit for their
review and consideration policy questions that arise in the course of carrying out the
responsibilities of the position.

Research and Service Expectations and Policies

Expectations for faculty regarding research and service are outlined in the criteria for appointment
and promotion as presented in the Bylaws of the Faculty Affairs Committee. These are further
articulated in the objectives described in Section 1.3. In March 2000, the faculty voted to adopt
new criteria for faculty scholarship. The scholarship component was expanded to include both the
traditional research scholarship and a new public health practice scholarship, the latter recognizing
how important public health practice is for schools of public health. [See Section 4.2 and the
Faculty Affairs Committee Bylaws in Appendix 1.3.c(6)] Besides faculty expectations for service
performance, the School’s interdisciplinary centers (see Section 1.4.c) have service as an integral
part of their respective missions. The annual reports of these centers reveal a strong record of
accomplishment in making a positive difference in communities. [RR] This subject is discussed in
detail in Criteria 3.1 and 3.2.

1.5.b A copy of the constitution, bylaws or other policy document that determines the
rights and obligations of administrators, faculty and students in governance of the school.

The rights and obligations of administrators, faculty and students in governance are reflected in the
Charter of the Faculty Assembly of the SOPH, the UAB Faculty Handbook, the Bylaws of the
Faculty Affairs Committee, and the You and UAB Handbook for Administrative, Professional and
Support Personnel. Please see Appendices 1.5.a(1), 1.3.c(4), 1.3.c(6) and 1.3.c(5), respectively.

1.5.c A list of standing and important ad hoc committees with a statement of charge,
composition, and current membership for each.

Admissions and Graduation Committee (A&G): The A&G Committee monitors compliance with
established policies and procedures for admissions and graduation for all degree programs that
are the responsibility of the SOPH including the MPH, MSPH and DrPH. This responsibility
includes, but is not limited to, conducting reviews and developing recommendations for admission
status for applicants who do not meet approved admissions guidelines and developing general
admission and graduation guidelines that the Committee deems necessary. This Committee also
solicits nominations and selects winners for the annual SOPH outstanding student awards.

The Committee consists of one faculty member from each of the six SOPH academic units and one
student. Faculty are elected by the primary full-time faculty within their departments; the student is
appointed by the Public Health Student Association President. Current members include Drs.
Meredith Kilgore (Chair), Monica Baskin, Andrzej Kulczycki, Sibylle Kristensen, Stacey Cofield and
Rui-Ming Liu, plus the student representative, Caroline Rank.

Advisory Committee on Information Technology: This Committee advises the Dean on
information/instructional technology, operational growth, and development needs. Representatives
serve as liaisons between their departments or units and this Committee, transferring information,
ideas and suggestions from the units to the Committee and back to the units.




                                                                                                   29
Membership consists of one faculty or staff member from each department, appointed by their
chairs, two representatives from the Dean’s Office, and one student. Current members include
Drs. Max Michael (Dean), Edmond Kabagambe, Hemant Tiwari, Russell Kirby, Stephen
Mennemeyer, Bradley Lian, and Claudiu Lungu, Mr. Richard Mailhot, and a student representative
(Rebecca Vincent).

Educational Policy Committee (EPC): The EPC is responsible for the development of policies
and discharge of certain responsibilities in academic affairs. These responsibilities include, but are
not limited to: approving new courses and modifications to the description, objectives or credit
hours of existing courses; new tracks and/or degree programs; and substantial modifications to
existing tracks and/or degree programs which involve more than one department and/or are
deemed substantial by the Associate Dean. For more information, see Section 1.5 Academic
Standards and Policies.

The EPC includes one faculty member from each of the six academic units and one student.
Faculty are elected by the primary full-time faculty within their departments; the student is
appointed by the Public Health Student Association President. Current members are Drs. Connie
Kohler (Chair), Chi Chi Aban, Claudiu Lungu, John Waterbor, Joshua Klapow, and Mary Ann Pass,
and Rebecca Vincent (student representative). The Associate Dean is an ex-officio member.

Executive Committee: The Executive Committee advises the Dean on issues and policies related
to administration, budgeting and resource allocation, compensation, and planning and evaluation
polices and procedures. It assesses the extent to which the SOPH is achieving its mission and
goals and also serves as the oversight body for ongoing self-evaluation and for accreditation.

This Committee consists of department chairs; chair of the Faculty Assembly; and the Dean, the
Associate Dean for Academic and Strategic Programs, the Special Assistant to the Deanand the
Director of Administrative and Fiscal Affairs (all ex officio). Appointments are made by position
held (i.e., chairs, associate deans). Current members are chairs Drs. Donna Arnett, Frank
Franklin, Peter Ginter, Diane Grimley, George Howard, and Ed Postlethwait; Faculty Assembly
Chair, Dr. Chris Coffey; and ex-officio members Drs. Max Michael (Dean), Beverly Mulvihill
(Special Asst.), Melissa Galvin (Interim Associate Dean) and Ms. Ada Mailhot (Director of
Administrative and Fiscal Affairs).

Faculty Affairs Committee (FAC): The FAC develops and reviews the criteria for appointment,
promotion and tenure and evaluates proposals for the appointment, promotion and/or tenure of
faculty. This Committee also conducts interim reviews of all faculty at the assistant and associate
professor levels, and may develop recommendations on other faculty-related matters.

Membership consists of one faculty member from each of the six academic units and three at-large
faculty members. Departmental faculty are elected within their departments; at-large faculty are
appointed by the Dean. Current members are Drs. Jalie Tucker (Chair), Suzy Davies, John Ehiri,
Frank Franklin, Al Bartolucci, Janet Bronstein, Elizabeth Delzell, and Ed Postlethwait.

Faculty Assembly: The Faculty Assembly consists of all members of the faculty with primary
appointments within the School. Its Charter is included in Appendix 1.5.a(1). The Chair of the
Faculty Assembly is elected from the School’s primary full-time faculty for a three-year term. The
Faculty Assembly meets once per academic quarter unless there is reason to meet more
frequently.

Faculty Council: The Faculty Council (an elected chair and five additional members, each
representing different departments) represents and is empowered to act in the stead of the Faculty


                                                                                                    30
Assembly when the majority of them judge that they should do so. This is expected to occur only
in circumstances when it is impractical to convene the Faculty Assembly.

Membership consists of the chair of the Faculty Council and five primary faculty members from
separate departments. All members are elected at-large by primary full-time faculty members.
Current members include Faculty Council Chair, Dr. Chris Coffey, and Faculty Councilors
Drs. Janet Bronstein, Connie Kohler, Rui Ming Liu, John Waterbor, and Grier Page.

Financial Aid Committee: This Committee formulates financial aid policies and recommends
them to the Dean, establishes and maintains a system to allocate financial aid to qualified
applicants, allocates financial aid by means of established policies and systems, and addresses
problems that arise during consideration of individual financial aid applications.

Membership consists of one faculty member from each of the six academic units and one student.
Faculty are appointed by department chairs; the student is appointed by the Public Health Student
Association President. Current members include Drs. Stephen Mennemeyer (Chair), Grier Page,
Sibylle Kristensen, and Melissa Norman. Staci Sudenga is the student representative.

Centers: Advisory Boards to the Sparkman Center for Global Health, the Lister Hill Center for
Health Policy and the Center for the Study of Community Health, as described in the Guidelines for
SOPH Centers - Policy and Management Procedures, are technical/professional committees that
contribute special expertise to the development of approved center projects and evaluation of new
projects. They also facilitate implementation of the work to be done locally and internationally.
Current Committee members are listed below:

Sparkman Center
• Internal Advisory: Drs. J. Jackson Barnette, Gerald Glandon, Michael Kimerling, Dwight Rouse
• External Advisory: Drs. Jane T. Bertrand, Michael H. Merson, and Charles Woernle; Mr. Ted C.
    Kennedy and Mr. Frank McPhillips
Center for the Study of Community Health
• Internal Advisory: Drs. Jay McDonald, Doreen Harper, Harold Jones, Robert Kimberly, Richard
    Marchase, Loring Rue, Michael Saag, Huw Thomas, Tim Garvey, Grosbeck Parham, and Jean
    Ann Linney
• External Advisory: Drs. Lee Green and Marinelle Payton and Ms. Pat Fairchild
Lister Center for Health Policy
• Internal Advisory: Drs. Jack Duncan, Janet Bronstein, Jalie Tucker, and Tony Fargason
• External Advisory: Drs. Jeffrey A. Alexander, Roger Feldman, Willard G. Manning, and Larry
    Menefee, and Mr. Terry Kellogg and Ms. Marion Ein Lewin.

Research Advisory Committee (RAC): This Committee advises both the Dean and UAB’s
Research Advisory Group. It performs scientific review of intramural faculty research applications
(e.g., University-wide Center Grants) and makes recommendations regarding faculty awards.

Membership consists of one faculty member from each of the six departments, who are appointed
by department chairs. Current members include Drs. David Allison (Chair), Donna Arnett, John
Bolland, Meredith Kilgore, Russell Kirby, and Ed Postlethwait.

Staff Council: The Dean created the Staff Council in 1999 to provide a mechanism by which staff
can bring ideas and suggestions to the Dean for programs and events to benefit staff and faculty.

Membership includes one staff member from each of the departments and units. Council members
are elected by their department or unit staff members. Current members include Sally Headley,

                                                                                                  31
Mary Ann Rice, Cassandra Johnson, Lee Howard, Robert Caldwell, Victor Stark, Paul Wolff and
Marlis Richardson (chair). Anne Smith and Ada Mailhot are ex-officio members.

1.5.d Identification of school faculty who hold membership on university committees,
through which faculty contribute to the activities of the university.

At the University level, faculty participate in a variety of committees, from the Faculty Senate to ad
hoc committees designed to address specific short-term issues. Table 1.5.d identifies faculty by
department who serve on various committees at the University level.

Table 1.5.d SOPH Faculty and the Committees on which they Serve 2006-2007
 SOPH Faculty          University Committee
 Biostatistics
                       Research Advisory Group; Council of Center Directors; Executive Committee, Ctr. for Nutrient
 Allison, David        Genome Interaction; Trans-institutional Advisory Committee, Ctr. for Computational and Structural
                       Biology; Steering Committee, Interdisciplinary Genetics Graduate Program (IGGP)
 Bartolucci, Al        UAB Grievance Committee
 Coffey, Chris         Faculty Senate (alt); UAB Faculty Senate Curriculum and Research Committee
 Cutter, Gary          IRB Certification
                       Internal Advisory Board, Alzheimer's Disease Research Ctr.; Executive Committee, Arthritis and
 Howard, George
                       Musculoskeletal Ctr.; Executive Committee, K30 Program for Clinical Research Training
 Liu, Nianjun          Faculty Affairs Committee, Faculty Senate
 Zhang, Kui            Governance and Operations Committee, Faculty Senate (alt)
 Environmental Health Sciences
 Bailey, Shannon       Steering Committee, Integrated Biomedical Sciences Program; Faculty Senate; Graduate Coun.
 Dickinson, Dale       Steering Committee, Ctr. for Free Radical Biology
 Oestenstad, R. Kent   UAB Chemical Safety Committee
 Epidemiology
                       Strategic Planning Committee, School of Medicine; Advisory Committee, Ctr. for AIDS
 Arnett, Donna
                       Research; Steering Committee, IGGP
 Jolly, Pauline        President Garrison's Commission on the Status of Women
 Kaslow, Richard       Human Subjects Advisory Committee
 McGwin, Gerald        Graduate Council
 Waterbor, John        Faculty Senate Policy and Procedures Committee; UAB Grievance Committee; Ingalls/UAB
                       Alumni Society Lifetime Teaching Award Selection Committee
 Maternal and Child Health
 Ehiri, John           UAB Faculty Policy and Procedures Committee (alt); UAB Affirmative Action Committee
 Kulczycki, Andrzej    University’s IRB Re-Accreditation Committee
 Health Behavior
 Baskin, Monica        University Research Advisory Group
 Galvin, Melissa       Graduate Council; UAB Affirmative Action Committee; Faculty Development, ADCOM
 Grimley, Diane        Document Review Committee, IRB
 Kohler, Connie        Graduate Council
 Health Care Organization and Policy
                       Conflict of Interest Review Board, Vice Chair; UAB Affirmative Action Committee; Distinguished
 Bronstein, Janet
                       Faculty Lecturer Selection Committee
 Gary, Lisa            President’s Award for Teaching
 Mennemeyer, Stephen Senate Finance Committee, Chair; UAB Faculty Senate
                       Council of Center Directors; Academic Program Council; Comprehensive Cancer Ctr. Internal
                       Advisory Committee; Injury Control Research Ctr. Management Committee; Ctr. for Aging Internal
 Michael, Max          Advisory Committee; ad hoc Distinguished Faculty Designation Committee; Chair, Steering
                       Committee, Laboratory for Global Health Observation; Ctr. for Minority Health & Research Internal
                       Advisory Committee
                       UAB Fringe Benefits Committee; Ctr. for Aging Steering Committee; Ctr. for Outcomes and
 Morrisey, Michael
                       Effectiveness Research and Education Internal Advisory Committee


                                                                                                                  32
1.5.e Description of student roles in governance, including any formal student
organizations, and student roles in evaluation of school and program functioning.

Public Health Student Association (PHSA): The PHSA is responsible for fostering an academic,
professional and social environment for students of the SOPH; facilitating an interactive
relationship between faculty, staff, alumni and students of the School; promoting student
involvement in the School and university through service, programming and special events; and
presenting the suggestions and concerns of the student body to School officials.

Membership includes all SOPH students. PHSA officers are elected by the student body. For
2007-2008 they include President Becca Vincent, Vice President Caroline Ranck, Secretary Staci
Sudeng, and departmental Representatives: Biostatistics - Celeste Yang, Environmental Health -
Stephanie Lynch, Epidemiology - Mathew Jackson, Health Behavior - Vasu Manimarin, Health
Care Organization and Policy - Jitesh Parmar, and Maternal and Child Health - Namita Bohra.

Students also have representation on and provide valuable input to the following SOPH
Committees: the Admissions and Graduation Committee, the Advisory Committee on Information
Technology, the Educational Policy Committee, the Financial Aid Committee, the Communications
Committee, the ad hoc Honor Code Committee, and the Broad Street Committee. For 2007-2008,
student assignments for SOPH and other committees include the following:
    • Admissions and Graduation Committee – Caroline Ranck
    • Advisory Committee on Information Technology – Rebecca Vincent
    • Educational Policy Committee – Rebecca Vincent
    • Financial Aid Committee – Staci Sudenga
    • Communications Committee – Shaun Crawford
    • Ad hoc Honor Code Committee – Lorie Chestnut and Carol Ranck
    • Broad Street Committee – Rebecca Vincent
    • UAB Cultural Activities Committee – Namita Bohra
    • UAB Student Publications Committee – Celeste Yang
    • UAB Lectures Series Committee – Vasanthi Manimaran
    • UAB Intramurals Committee – Stephanie Lynch
    • UAB Program Allocations Board – Matthew Jackson
    • American Public Health Association – Rebecca Vincent and Jitesh Parmar
    • Diversity Committee – Kartikey Acharya

1.5.f   Assessment of the extent to which this criterion is met

This criterion is met.

Strengths
• The School has clearly defined rights and responsibilities concerning governance and
   academic policies are in place and operational.
• Governance includes faculty members involved in and leading important committees.
• Students are involved, where appropriate, mainly through standing and ad hoc committees.

Weakness
• Ad hoc committees should have a defined beginning and ending time limit of service.

Future Plans
Ad hoc committees will be evaluated to determine a specific term limit for each, with goals and
objectives to be evaluated annually. This will be completed by April 1, 2008.

                                                                                                  33
1.6 RESOURCES

1.6       Resources. The school shall have resources adequate to fulfill its stated mission
          and goals, and its instructional, research and service objectives.

1.6.a     Budgetary and Allocation Processes

The SOPH receives annual revenue from three sources as determined by the Provost and
President: 1) state funding (i.e., Special Education Trust Fund), 2) tuition and fees, and 3) grants
and contracts. Funds received as gifts are processed centrally but go in full to the School. State
funding, tuition and fees, and indirect expense recovery are allocated by a formula to each school;
the process for allocation was discussed in Sections 1.3.c(3) and 1.5.a.

1.6.b Budget Statement

Table 1.6.b shows revenue and expenditures by major category items for the last five years, which
includes FY03 through FY07. Tuition and fees over the past five years have increased by 44% and
state appropriations by 9%. There has been a steady increase in grants and contracts comparing
FY03 to FY07; data shows an increase of 104% – a clear indication of faculty and staff research
productivity. Cumulative total revenue and expenditures FY07 vs FY03 show an increase of 77%
and 76% respectively. Budgetary policy and resource allocation were discussed in Section 1.5.

This School budgeting policy is designed to distribute funds according to productivity measures,
assign costs according to resource consumption, promote savings for future investments and to
offset funding shortfalls, stimulate growth, and protect physical plant funds. Specific criteria and
methods are used to distribute revenue and assign costs in this system. Criteria include student
enrollment, credit hour production, extramural faculty salary support, and indirect cost recovery.

Table 1.6.b Sources of Funds and Expenditures by Major Category, Fiscal Years 2003-2007
    Source of Funds                        2003               2004             2005             2006             2007
    Tuition & Fees                    $1,783,529         $1,903,789       $1,978,623       $1,945,030       $2,306,093
    State Appropriation/UAB Funds     $6,063,659         $5,779,115       $6,073,629       $6,513,962       $7,063,477
    Grants/Contracts                 $26,213,585        $32,851,901      $37,909,410      $39,614,650      $37,239,983
    Indirect Cost Recovery2           $2,501,221         $2,981,253       $3,609,614       $3,585,714       $3,385,928
    Endowment – Income3               $1,108,147         $3,257,496        $882,378         $883,523        $1,189,348
    Gifts                                $26,476          $108,473         $274,898         $100,740           $59,736
    Other/Transfer Gen. Op. Rev.       $172,387             $41,853        $521,478         $746,034         $248,000
    Endowment Gifts & Other            $179,214             $35,713        $134,261         $130,632         $281,511
    Educational Activities             $178,757           $304,114         $299,182         $721,238         $218,672
    Total Revenue                    $38,226,975        $47,263,707      $51,683,473      $54,241,522      $51,992,748
    Expenditures                           2003               2004             2005             2006             2007
    Faculty Salaries & Benefits       $8,187,773         $8,468,097      $10,516,653      $11,518,427      $11,461,854
    Staff Salaries & Benefits        $10,480,557        $11,155,173      $13,702,895      $15,226,709      $15,113,330
    Operations                       $14,484,905        $22,294,881      $22,352,039      $22,260,712      $20,739,674
    Travel                            $1,125,184         $1,419,818       $1,313,508       $1,127,303        $977,105
    Student Support                   $1,114,317         $1,341,866        1,270,496       $1,268,363       $1,268,854
    University Tax                     $196,261           $198,118         $273,612         $264,476         $313,638
    Total Expenditures               $35,588,997        $44,877,953      $49,429,203       51,665,990       49,874,455
1                                                   2                                                          3
 Sources: Oracle, FAS and BA3 accounting systems; Allocation from Provost’s Office based on productivity ratio; In
FY2004, endowment income of $3,257,496 shows a change by UAB from a separate investment to a pool strategy.


                                                                                                                     34
1.6.c   Financial Contributions from Collaborative Schools.

Not applicable.

1.6.d    Number of Faculty per Concentration Area

Table 1.6.d shows faculty resources over the past three years. The data includes full-time, part-
time, secondary and adjunct faculty.

Table 1.6.d Faculty Count* by Discipline, 2005-2007
                                               2005              2006            2007
 Biostatistics                                20 +( 8)          23 +( 7)       25 + (7)
 Environmental Health Science                 21 + (0)          17 + (1)       14 + (1)
 Epidemiology                                 21 + (3)          26 + (4)       21 + (5)
 Health Behavior                              14 + (3)          14 + (2)         9 + (3)
 Health Care Organization and Policy          14 + (5)          12 + (8)       12 + (5)
 Maternal and Child Health                    11 + (2)          11 + (1)         9 + (4)
 Total                                       101+(21)=122    103+(23)= 126   90+(25) = 115
* Full time + (part-time, secondary and adjunct)

1.6.e   Faculty, Students, and Student/Faculty Ratios, by Organizational Unit*

Faculty, student and student/faculty ratios by area over the past three years are shown in Table
1.6.e. Full-time core faculty have decreased from 101 FTE (fall 2005) to 90 (fall 2007), a decrease
of 11%. During the same period, other faculty, including part-time, secondary and adjunct faculty
increased by 19%. Full-time students increased from 304 to 364, an increase of 20%. The student
to faculty ratio increased from 2.90 (fall 2005) to 3.89 (fall 2007), an increase of 34%.

Table 1.6.e Faculty, Students, and Student/Faculty Ratios by Department
Fall 2005          HC Core FTEF HC          FTEF Total       Total   HC       FTE      SFR by SFR by
                   Faculty Core Other       Other Faculty    FTEF    Students Students Core    Total
                                Faculty            HC                                  FTEF    FTEF
BST                      20  20         8     1.07      28    21.07        33    28.87    1.44    1.37
ENV                      21  21         0        0      21       21        34    28.53    1.36    1.36
EPI                      21  21         3      0.3      24      21.3      140 119.64      5.70    5.62
HB                       14  14         3     0.16      17    14.16        52     44.2    3.16    3.12
HCOP                     14  14         5      0.5      19      14.5       61    52.97    3.78    3.65
MCH                      11  11         2      1.7      13      12.7       37    29.99    2.73    2.36
Total                   101 101       21      3.73     122   104.73       357    304.2    3.01    2.90
Fall 2006          HC Core FTEF HC          FTEF Total       Total HC         FTE      SFR by SFR by
                   Faculty Core Other       Other Faculty    FTEF Students Students Core       Total
                                Faculty            HC                                  FTEF    FTEF
BST                      23  23         7     0.97      30    23.97        39    30.43    1.32    1.27
ENV                      17  17         1      0.1      18      17.1       33    28.88    1.70    1.69
EPI                      26  26         4     0.28      30    26.28       168 145.74      5.61    5.55
HB                       14  14         2     0.16      16    14.16        58    47.65    3.40    3.37
HCOP                     12  12         8      0.8      20      12.8       45    39.43    3.29    3.08
MCH                      11  11         1     0.95      12    11.95        49    40.54    3.69    3.39
Total                   103 103       23      3.26     126   106.26       392 332.67      3.23    3.13




                                                                                                    35
Table 1.6.e Faculty, Students, and Student/Faculty Ratios cont.

Fall 2007           HC Core FTEF HC        FTEF Total     Total HC     FTE      SFR by SFR by
                    Faculty Core Other     Other Faculty FTEF Students Students Core    Total
                                 Faculty          HC                            FTEF    FTEF
BST                       25  25         7   0.97      32 25.97     44    34.65    1.39    1.33
ENV                       14  14         1    0.1      15    14.1   34     27.2    1.94    1.93
EPI                       21  21         5    0.5      26    21.5  189 165.09      7.86    7.68
HB                         9   9         3   0.24      12    9.24   54     48.1    5.34    5.21
HCOP                      12  12         5    0.5      17    12.5   53    49.88    4.16    3.99
MCH                        9   9         4   1.25      13 10.25     47    39.31    4.37    3.84
Total                     90  90       25    3.56     115 93.56    421 364.23      4.05    3.89
Key: HC Core Faculty= full time faculty; other=adjunct, part-time and secondary, FTE=Full time equivalent, FTEF=Full
time equivalent faculty, SFR=Student/Faculty Ratio, HC=Head Count
Note: FTE faculty calculated as sum of full- and part-time faculty members. FTE students calculated as total enrollment
in semester hours divided by 9 semester hours FTE, which is considered full-time enrollment by UAB.

1.6.f Other Administration and Staff Personnel
As of September 1, 2007, non-faculty personnel within the School included 164 full-time and 14
part-time staff members supported by extramural and institutional funds. Departments and centers
within the School have at least one administrative staff member. Other staffing of departments and
centers may occur at their discretion based on institutional and extramural funding. Research
projects and center grants are administratively staffed in accordance with their budget and
cooperative agreements.

1.6.g Space

The Frank and Kathleen Ellis Ryals School of Public Health is a six-story building with
approximately 117,000 square feet of space. It houses the academic departments and the
Sparkman and the Lister Hill Centers. All SOPH classrooms and seminar rooms are located within
the Ryals Building. Over 40,499 square feet of usable space is dedicated to offices.

The Ryals Building is equipped with seven lecture classrooms, two computer labs, three seminar
rooms, and a teaching wet lab. These areas include 8,364 square feet and can accommodate
approximately 380 students. The classrooms are equipped with the latest technologies for
teaching and presentations. Items available in each classroom include laptop computers,
projectors, VCRs and other teaching aids. In fall 2007 teleconferencing equipment was installed in
Room 407 which will allow a bridge between the SOPH and the Alabama Department of Public
Health and Auburn University Veterinary School.

In addition, the School leases an estimated 7,981 square feet of office space for the Center for the
Study of Community Health on a single floor of the Liberty National Building in downtown
Birmingham. The Deep South Center for Occupational Health and Safety is housed at Volker Hall.
Projects are also housed at the 912 Building, the Community Health Services Building, the Lyons
Harrison Research Building, and the Biomedical Research Building II.

1.6.h Laboratory Space

The sixth floor wet lab at Ryals is designed with the concept of shared resources to promote
efficient use of equipment and space. Approximately 10,167 square feet of wet lab space is
available. Primary laboratory programs include Industrial Hygiene, Environmental Health,
Environmental Toxicology, Infection and Immunity, Molecular Biology, and Oxidative Stress.

Individual Research/Teaching Laboratories. There are nine individual labs. Each has bench and
floor space to accommodate equipment and supplies for teaching and performing research.


                                                                                                                     36
Cabinets are positioned below and above benches for storage of supplies and consumables and
several gas and vacuum lines are located along each bench. Each lab has phone and internet
jacks and regular and emergency power outlets, both 110 and 220V. There are 10 chemical fume
hoods in the nine labs and two sinks in each lab, each with regular and in-house deionized water.

Shared Laboratory Space. The laboratory space also provides general-use and specialized
facilities in support of the faculty research and teaching interests. For a list of equipment in use,
please see Appendix 1.6.h. There is one tissue culture room with four positive flow hoods and
several incubators; one freezer room containing eight -80°C freezers that are connected to
emergency outlets and to a campus alarm system; one cold room also connected to the campus
alarm system; one wash room containing two autoclaves, an ice machine, PureLab water filter (18
ohm), and an automotive dishwasher; and a dark room with an accessory room containing an
imaging analysis system. There are also two microscope rooms, three storage rooms, a room for
PCR set-up with two laminar flow hoods, and three shared-equipment rooms for general use.

1.6.i   Computer Facilities and Resources

The School’s Advisory Committee on Information Technology provides advice on areas such as
information technology and computer technology changes and uses. SOPH computer facilities
occupy approximately 2,427 square feet of space; 1,482 square feet solely for computer teaching
and 945 square feet for offices and to house the School’s computer servers.

The Computer Resource Labs (CRLs) are in rooms 127 and 417 of the Ryals Building. The CRL in
room 127 is open to students who have access to the building 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.
This lab has 21 IBM compatible PCs using 3.2GGHZ PIV processors, 512MB memory, 40GB of
hard drive storage, and running Windows XP. The CRL in room 417 is open weekdays from 8 a.m.
to 10 p.m. It has 30 IBM compatible PCs, using 2.2GHZ PIV processors, 512MB memory, 30GB of
hard drive storage, and running Windows XP. All lab machines contain: Microsoft Office 2003,
SAS version 9, SPSS version 13, DBMS Copy, Epi Info 2000, TreeAge, XWin32, and Clogic.

1.6.j   Library/Information Resources

UAB provides a broad range of library resources in support of its academic programs. The two
major libraries on campus are the Lister Hill Library of the Health Sciences (LHL) located in the
Academic Health Sciences Center and the Mervyn Sterne Library, which primarily serves the
undergraduate academic programs and includes materials in psychology, sociology, business and
government. Because public health encompasses such a broad range of subjects and disciplines,
faculty and students use both libraries extensively. Please see Appendix 1.6.j for detailed
information about these libraries’ resources.

The Thomas W. Martin Memorial Library of the nearby Southern Research Institute is also a
valuable research resource available to faculty and students. While materials are not circulated to
persons outside of Southern Research Institute, they may be used in-house and photocopied. This
library currently holds about 13,500 books; 55,000 bound volumes of periodicals; and 800
subscriptions to periodicals, abstracts and indexes. Approximately 60% are devoted to environ-
mental health sciences. A full-time Information Scientist with Master's degrees in biology and
library services is available to conduct literature searches by computer using Lockheed's DIALOG
Information Services and STN International (CAS OnLine) or by manually abstracting and indexing
in-house sources. This collection is especially strong in chemical carcinogenesis and air pollution.

Another major resource is the Birmingham Public Library (BPL). It is significant that the BPL is a
repository library for selected government documents. It has a full collection covering house and

                                                                                                     37
senate hearings, legislation and committee prints as well as technical reports and announcements.
The Code of Federal Regulations, the Federal Register, and full census materials are also held.
Departments in the SOPH maintain and share small collections of texts, journals and subscriptions
to periodicals of professional interest for students and faculty. The reference collections are not
intended to replace, but rather to complement, the existing library resources of UAB, Southern
Research Institute, the Cumberland School of Law Library at Samford University in Birmingham,
and the Birmingham Public Library.

1.6.k     Community Resources Available for Instruction, Research and Service

SOPH students and faculty benefit from strong and enduring relationships with other units on
campus, as well as with a variety of resources in our immediate and surrounding communities.

•     A long-standing formal contractual relationship between the School and the Jefferson County
      Department of Health supports practice-based internships for students.
•     Agreements between the School and various state agencies (e.g., Alabama Department of
      Public Health, Alabama Medicaid Agency, Jefferson County Department of Health) support
      research, teaching and service.
•     Faculty and students have also negotiated opportunities with other state and local public health
      agencies outside of Alabama.

The School’s Centers, described in Section 1.4.c help create and foster these relationships.
Annual reports of the Center for the Study of Community Health, the Deep South Center for
Occupational Health and Safety, the Sparkman Center for Global Health, and the Lister Hill Center
for Health Policy are available in the Resource Room. [RR] These reports contain additional
information on community resources cultivated, supported and utilized by the School to enhance
research, instruction, and service activities.

1.6.l      “In-Kind” Academic Contributions Available for Instruction, Research and Service

Not applicable.

1.6.m Outcome Measures by which the School may judge the Adequacy of its Resources

Outcome measures include FTE student to FTE faculty ratios, institutional expenditures per FTE
student, and research expenditures per FTE faculty. Data on the student/ faculty ratios are
presented in Table 1.6.e. Overall, student/faculty ratios have increased by 34%. Institutional
expenditures per FTE student have decreased by 3%, due in part to the increase of full-time
students by 20% from fall 2005 to fall 2007. Research Expenditures per full-time-equivalent faculty
have increased by 1% from 2005 to 2007.

Table 1.6.m(1) Institutional Expenditures per Full-Time Equivalent Student
    Outcome Measure                Target             2005           2006           2007
    Institutional Expenditures     No quantitative      $6,073,629     $6,513,962     $7,063,477
    FTE Students                   target has been             304            333            364
    Expenditures per FTE Student   established yet.        $19,979        $19,561        $19,405




                                                                                                    38
Table 1.6.m(2) Research Expenditures per Full-Time Equivalent Faculty
 Outcome Measure                 Target             2005           2006           2007
 Research Expenditures           No quantitative     $42,617,688    $44,625,546    $38,542,006
 FTE Faculty                     target has been             101            103             90
 Expenditures per FTE Faculty    established yet.      $421,957       $433,258       $428,245

1.6.n Assessment of the extent to which this criterion is met.

This criterion is met.

Strengths
• Over the past five years, the School has experienced a growth of 42% in extramural funding.
• During the same period, student support increased by 14%, as shown in Table 1.6.b, despite
   challenges in federal funding.
• The School employs a well-qualified and diverse faculty and staff to support its mission.
• The budget is adequate to run the School, and the School has adequate other resources to
   fulfill its mission and objectives.

Weakness
• The SOPH is dispersed among seven buildings on the University campus.

Future Plans
The School should continue working with the Provost’s Office to secure additional space to
coalesce its faculty and staff in fewer buildings and in closer proximity to one another, in order to
better foster collegial relationships and a sense of community.




                                                                                                        39
                          Chapter 2: Instructional Programs

2.0    Instructional Programs
       2.1     Masters of Public Health Degree
       2.2     Program Length
       2.3     Public Health Core Knowledge
       2.4     Practical Skills
       2.5     Culminating Experience
       2.6     Required Competencies
       2.7     Assessment Procedures
       2.8     Academic Degrees
       2.9     Doctoral Degrees
       2.10    Joint Degrees
       2.11    Distance Education or Executive Degree Programs

Introduction

Beginning in 2005 the Dean’s Office and faculty initiated a complex assessment of our
educational enterprise, especially at the master’s program level. The Integrated Core
Curriculum, implemented in 2001, was an experiment in educational design developed to
address the intellectual and experiential content of public health. All entering students
participated in a two semester program comprised of 9 and 7 hours, respectively, that
integrated the five core courses, supplemented by a laboratory experience. While the
students were generally enthusiastic about the Integrated Core Curriculum, the dedicated
commitment by a limited number of faculty and the complete loss of the part time and non-
traditional student highlighted the need for an assessment of this curricular experiment.

After considerable study and deliberation and not without significant controversy the
Integrated Core Curriculum transitioned to the more traditional individual core course
offerings combined with programmatic efforts to ensure ongoing integration of content
across the disciplines. The revised curriculum, launched in the fall of 2006, has experienced
some of its own implementation challenges, most occasioned by a rather dramatic increase
in enrollment. The efforts to ensure content integration remain a work-in-progress drawing
from the important lessons and insights from the Integrated Core Curriculum.

The recently launched undergraduate course, “Origins of the Epidemics,” begins to embrace
the IOM recommendations for increased focus on undergraduate introduction to the science
and practice of public health. This course has been much more popular than anticipated
with requests from undergraduate advisors to offer it every semester rather than once a
year.

The School’s distance education efforts present special challenges in time and resource
management. The newly launched DVM-MPH program with Auburn University, our
commitment to the Alabama Department of Public Health, and plans to develop
complementary programs for the University of South Alabama in Mobile highlight the need
to become increasingly efficient and effective in our distance education programs.




                                                                                                40
2.0 Instructional Programs

2.1    Master of Public Health Degree. The School shall offer instructional programs
       reflecting its stated mission and goals, leading to the Master of Public Health (MPH)
       or equivalent professional masters degree in at least the five areas of knowledge
       basic to public health.

The School of Public Health offers the MPH, MSPH, MS, DrPH and PhD degrees. The offering of
these degrees differs by department. To provide each student the opportunity to gain expertise in
a specific area, each of these degrees has several areas of specialization which are listed in the
instructional matrix (Table 2.1.a). The MPH and the DrPH are professional degrees, while the MS,
MSPH, and PhD are academic degrees.

Table 2.1.a Instructional Matrix
 Masters and Doctoral Degrees by Department
                                                                  Academic   Professional (hours)
     Degree: Specialization
 Department of Biostatistics
    MPH                                                                          √(45 hours)
    MS                                                               √
    MSPH: Clinical Research                                          √
    PhD                                                              √
 Department of Environmental Health
    MPH: Environmental Health/Toxicology                                             √(43)
            Environmental Health/Occupational Health and Safety                      √(60)
            Industrial Hygiene                                                       √(63)
            Accelerated Program in Industrial Hygiene                                √(44)
            International Health and Global Studies                                √(51-63)
   MSPH: Clinical Research                                           √
           Environmental Health/Toxicology
   DrPH: Environmental Health Sciences
           Environmental Management and Policy                                     √(~60)
           Occupational Health and Policy
   PhD:    Environmental Health Sciences                             √
           Industrial Hygiene
           Environmental Management and Policy
 Department of Epidemiology
   MPH: Epidemiology                                                               √(42-60)
           International Health and Global Studies                                 √(48-60)
   MSPH: Clinical Research                                           √
           Epidemiology
   DrPH: Epidemiology, International Health and Global Studies                      √(63)
   PhD                                                               √
 Department of Health Behavior
   MPH: Health Behavior                                                            √(43-55)
           International Health and Global Studies                                 √(49-61)
   MSPH: Clinical Research                                           √
   PhD: Health Education/Promotion                                   √
 Department of Health Care Organization and Policy
   MPH: Health Care Organization                                                     √(46)
           Preparedness Management and Policy                                      √(46-52)
           General Theory and Practice                                               √(43)
   MSPH: Health Policy                                               √
           Outcomes Research
   DrPH: Public Health Management                                                  √(42+)

                                                                                                41
 Table 2.1.a Instructional Matrix cont.

 Department of Maternal and Child Health
   MPH: Enhanced MCH Skills                                                                      √(61)
         Advanced Leadership and Practice                                                        √(43)
         International and Global Studies                                                      √(49-51)
   DrPH: Maternal and Child Health                                                              √(42+)

 Instructional Matrix – Joint Degrees                                     Dept.      Professional (hours)
 MPH – Health Behavior/PhD Sociology                                        HB              √ (43)
 MPH – Health Behavior/PhD Psychology                                       HB              √ (43)
 MPH – Health Behavior/MSN                                                  HB              √ (43)
 MPH – Health Care Org/MBA                                                 HCO              √ (76)
 MPH – Health Care Org/DOpt.                                               HCO              √ (43)
 MPH – Health Care Org/JD                                                  HCO              √ (45)
 MPH – Health Care Org/PhD Psychology                                      HCO              √ (43)
 MPH – Epidemiology/MSN                                                    EPI             √ (43+)
 MPH – Maternal and Child Health/MSN                                       MCH              √ (43)
 MPH – Maternal and Child Health/MSW                                       MCH              √ (42)
 MPH/MD (General Track MPH with six possible focus areas)             BST, EHS, EPI,
                                                                                            √ (42)
                                                                      HB, HCO, MCH
 MPH/DVM from Auburn University (General Track MPH with 4               EHS, EPI,
                                                                                            √ (42)
 focus areas) – pending approval by UA Board of Trustees, 11/07         HB, HCO
None of the above are distance education degrees. However, some coursework uses distance education technology.

2.1. b The school bulletin.

The school bulletin information is no longer published in print form. Copies will be provided in the
Resource Room. [RR] The UAB SOPH web site includes the following:
       Course Catalog:                 http://www.soph.uab.edu/students/catalog
       Degree Requirements:            http://www.soph.uab.edu/prospective/degreerequirement
       Student Handbook:               http://www.soph.uab.edu/students
       Class Schedules:                http://www.soph.uab.edu/students/schedule
       Internships:                    http://www.soph.uab.edu/internships
       Registration:                   students.uab.edu/academics/show.asp?durki=4982

2.1.c Assessment of the extent to which this criterion is met.

This criterion is met.

Strengths
• The SOPH offers a MPH in the five core areas and in Maternal and Child Health (focus area).
• The School has a robust combination of professional and academic degrees (see Table 2.1.a).
• Links to catalog-type information to use in planning degree programs have been specified.

Weaknesses
• Currently, there is no periodic assessment of each degree.
• Some degree tracks have few students enrolled.

Future Plans
The Educational Policy Committee of the SOPH will review each department’s degree program
every three years. Environmental Health/Health Care Organization and Policy (2008),
Epidemiology/Health Behavior (2009) and Biostatistics/Maternal and Child Health (2010) are
scheduled for review. Reviews will include the course of study, programmatic competencies,
number of students enrolled, number of students who graduate, and job placement of graduates.

                                                                                                                 42
2.2 PROGRAM LENGTH

2.2     Program Length. An MPH degree program or equivalent professional masters degree
        must be at least 42 semester credit units in length.

2.2.a   Definition of a credit

All coursework is in the form of standard semester credit hours. A three-semester hour course has
a minimum of 37.5 class contact hours.

2.2.b Minimum degree requirements.

Table 2.1a (Template C) provides the semester hour ranges for each professional degrees.

2.2.c Information about the number of MPH degrees awarded for less than 42 semester
credit units. A summary of the reasons should be included.

Table 2.2.c indicates that some MPH students have graduated with less than 42 semester hours of
credit. An examination of the records of these students revealed that they all transferred credit
from other programs that were counted toward the minimum of 42 hours for the degree. No student
has graduated with less than 42 hours since Summer 2006.

Table 2.2.c Number of Graduates with less than 42 hours by Semester and Hours.
                         Fall 2004            Spring 2005         Summer 2005
 Graduate Hours Earned           N/A                  N/A
                     38                                                   1
                     40                                                   1
                         Fall 2005            Spring 2006         Summer 2006
                     38          N/A                  N/A                 1
                         Fall 2006            Spring 2007         Summer 2007
                                 N/A                  N/A                N/A
                         Fall 2007
                                 N/A

2.2.d Assessment of the extent to which this criterion is met.

This criterion is met.

Strengths
   • All MPH degrees, including joint degrees with the MPH, are at least 42 semester
      hours in length.

Weaknesses
  • None

Future Plans
The graduation hours for the MPH degree will be monitored by the Director of Student Services
and reviewed annually by the Associate Dean for Academic and Strategic Programs.




                                                                                                43
2.3 PUBLIC HEALTH CORE KNOWLEDGE

2.3     Public Health Core Knowledge. All professional degree students must demonstrate
        an understanding of the public health core knowledge.

2.3.a   School Core Requirements

The School requires that MPH students satisfy competency requirements in the five core areas of
public health. Syllabi are located in the Resource Room. [RR]

Table 2.3a School Core Requirements
 Course                           Core Area                              Credit Hours
 BST 600 (or BST 611/612)         Biostatistics                          4 (or 6)
 ENH 600                          Environmental Health                   3
 EPI 600 (or EPI 610/610L)        Epidemiology                           3 (or 4)
 HCO 600                          Health Services Administration         3
 HB 600                           Social and Behavior Science            3

For most MPH students, the set of core courses is: BST 600, ENH 600, EPI 600, HCO 600, and
HB 600. However, students enrolled in the MPH in Biostatistics or Epidemiology program take
BST 611/612 rather than BST 600. In addition, students in the MPH in Epidemiology take EPI 610
rather than EPI 600. These courses encompass the five core areas of public health. Descriptions
of the courses are as follows:

 Biostatistics

BST 600 – Biostatistics for Public Health, 4 semester hours
The purpose of this course is to provide students not enrolled in the Biostatistics or Epidemiology
MPH programs with the ability to understand and utilize basic biostatistical concepts and tools and
to facilitate their capacity to seek and utilize biostatistical expertise required to conduct their own
research or review that done by others.

BST 611 – Intermediate Statistical Analysis I, 3 semester hours
Students will gain a thorough understanding of basic analysis methods, elementary concepts,
statistical models and applications of probability, commonly used sampling distributions, parametric
and non-parametric one and two sample tests, confidence intervals, applications of analysis of two-
way contingency table data, simple linear regression, and simple analysis of variance. Students
are taught to conduct the relevant analysis using current software such as the Statistical Analysis
System (SAS).

BST 612 – Intermediate Statistical Analysis II, 3 semester hours
This course introduces students to the basic principle or tools of simple and multiple regression. A
major goal is to establish a firm foundation in the discipline upon which the applications of
statistical and epidemiologic inference will be built. Prerequisite: BST 611 or Permission of
Instructor.

 Environmental Health

ENH 600 – Fundamentals of Environmental Health Sciences, 3 semester hours
This is an introductory course designed to teach public health graduate students the fundamental
concepts of Environmental Health Science, the scientific research methods used to study the



                                                                                                     44
interaction between human health and the environment, and basic issues in environmental
management.

 Epidemiology

EPI 600 – Introduction to Epidemiology, 3 semester hours
This course emphasizes principles of epidemiologic thinking, measures of disease frequency and
association, determinants of disease, and distribution of factors influencing health and disease in
populations. It is a core requirement for non-Epidemiology MPH majors.

EPI 610/610L Principles of Epidemiologic Research (taken by MPH students in
Epidemiology), 4 semester hours
This course provides concepts and methods of epidemiology, measures of disease frequency,
study design and analysis, indices of disease and health, an overview of major categories of acute
and chronic disease, and analysis of epidemiologic data sets. This is the core requirement for
Epidemiology majors. Co-requisite: EPI 610L-Principles of Epidemiologic Research - Lab.

 Health Services Administration

HCO 600 – Introduction to Public Health Systems and Population-Based Health Programs, 3
semester hours
Topics concerning the structure, financing, and current status of the US health care system, as well
as the history, organization, financing, and services of the public health care system are discussed
from a population-based perspective. The purposes of the course are to: provide the student with
fundamental concepts and information concerning the provision of public health services, enhance
the student’s ability to discuss and analyze population-based interventions appropriate for delivery
through the public health system, and instill in the student a willingness to think creatively about the
organization and financing of public health services.

 Social and Behavior Science

HB 600 – Social and Behavioral Science Core, 3 semester hours
This course provides students the required competencies in social and behavioral science.
Successful completion of this course will enable the student to describe the role of social and
community factors in the onset and solution of public health problems; identify the causes of social
and behavioral factors that affect health of individuals and populations; identify basic theories,
concepts and models; apply ethical principles to public health program planning, implementation
and evaluation; specify multiple targets and levels of intervention; identify individual, organizational
and community concerns, assets, resources and deficits; apply evidence-based approaches in the
development and evaluation of interventions; describe the merits of social and behavioral science
interventions and policies; describe steps and procedures for the planning, implementation and
evaluation of public health programs; and identify critical stakeholders for the planning,
implementation and evaluation of public health programs, policies and interventions.

DrPH Students
DrPH students are required to have an MPH or its equivalent. If deficiencies are noted in the
student’s academic background, the student may be required to take additional MPH core courses
or courses in their selected department to ensure that all MPH competencies are met before
matriculating into the DrPH program of study.




                                                                                                      45
School Transition
In an effort to keep the core as integrated as possible after the Integrated Core Curriculum was
discontinued in 2006, the School developed two “book-end courses” – one offered at the beginning
of the students’ course of study in the MPH and the other offered near the end of the MPH
program. Students were required to take MCH 610 (Introduction to Public Health) and conclude
with HCO 690 (Integrative Experience). The Health Services competencies were distributed
between these two courses. Upon further introspection and evaluation by the CEPH consultant
(May 2007), the School decided that the Health Service competencies would be offered in a stand-
alone course prior to the integrative experience. The School revised the core courses in the
Summer of 2007. Students enrolled in the 2006-07 school year were assessed to ensure they had
a broad understanding of the health services competencies. Data on each student enrolled in the
2006-07 school year may be found in the Resource Room. [RR] A revised culminating experience
(MCH 695) was developed and offered beginning Fall 2007.

2.3.b Assessment of the extent to which this criterion is met.

This criterion is met.

Strengths
• The school has carefully planned and considered how to best present the core competencies
   and knowledge to its students. The demands of the public health work environment, as well as
   the changing needs of the students, are central to the planning and considerations given to
   presentation of the MPH core knowledge.
• All MPH and DrPH programs are grounded in the knowledge of the five core disciplines in
   public health through the core coursework.

Weaknesses
• The Integrative Core provided cross-collaboration and maximized integration between and
  across departments. The core courses are now offered by individual departments and thus
  interactions and integration between disciplines is more challenging and has been diminished.
• There has been minimal oversight or coordination of the core courses.

Future Plans
The School established a Core Oversight Committee in Fall 2007 which meets each semester to
problem-solve best ways to achieve an interdisciplinary approach. For example, modules that
were developed and used in the integrated core curriculum could be adapted to provide intra-
course introductions of similar topical areas as applicable to each discipline. The Committee
explores ways to provide integration, reinforce competencies, provide distance education, and
assess student achievement of MPH school-wide competencies. Members of the Committee
include instructors in the MPH core courses, instructors from the Integrative Experience, and the
Associate Dean for Academic and Strategic Programs. By Summer 2008, a practice representative
will be added. All core courses will be offered by distance by Fall 2008. Currently, the School is
pilot testing two core courses (HCOP 600 and ENV 600) with the Alabama Department of Public
Health utilizing teleconferencing.




                                                                                               46
2.4 PRACTICAL SKILLS

2.4     Practical Skills. All professional degree students must develop skills in basic public
        health concepts and demonstrate the application of these concepts through a
        practice experience that is relevant to the students’ areas of specialization.

2.4.a   Policies and procedures regarding practice experiences.

The practice experience is referred to as the internship. Following is a description of the internship
and the Waiver Policy. More extensive information on the Internship can be found at the following
web site: http://www.soph.uab.edu/default.aspx?id=51.

All MPH students in the SOPH are required to complete a minimum of 3 credit hours
(approximately 240 clock hours) in an internship experience. All DrPH students have completed
the MPH or an equivalent degree, thus, an internship is optional for those students. Most would
have had such experience prior to entry into the DrPH.

The internship is a field experience which bridges professional academic preparation and public
health practice. Knowledge and skills learned in the core and discipline-specific courses are
applied in an agency setting under the supervision and guidance of an experienced preceptor as
well as a faculty member in the School. Faculty internship advisors, departmental program
coordinators, and/or the internship program coordinator may assist the student in locating a
position. At the completion of the internship, the student provides a final product to document the
experience and is graded based upon the agency preceptor's evaluation and the student's final
product. All internships are graded on a Pass/No Pass basis.

WAIVER POLICY
Students who believe they meet the criteria for waiver of the internship requirement must submit a
completed Internship Experience Waiver Request Form to the internship program coordinator.
Waivers must adhere to the following guidelines:
        1. Residents in preventive medicine, occupational medicine, aerospace medicine, and
public health and general preventive medicine who are completing their academic year in the
School may count their practicum year which is accredited by the Accreditation Council for
Graduate Medical Education, as the required internship experience for the MPH program.
        2. Students who can provide substantial evidence of prior public health experience deemed
to equal the three credit hours (or 240 hours) of direct public health experience relevant to their
area of concentration may apply for a waiver.
        3. Clinical practice by itself does not constitute public health experience and therefore does
not support a waiver.
        4. A prior professional degree in another field or prior work experience not closely related
to the academic objectives of the student’s degree program is not sufficient reason for waiving the
practice requirement.
        5. Independent research does not qualify for an appropriate internship experience.
        6. Students enrolled in dual degree programs are required to complete internship
experiences unless they meet the waiver criteria.

We evaluate the internship using evaluation forms completed by the student and the internship
supervisor. Copies of these completed evaluations are in the Resource Room. [RR]




                                                                                                    47
2.4.b Identification of agencies and preceptors used for practice experiences for students,
by program area, for the last two academic years.

Identification of agencies and preceptors used for practice experiences for the past two academic
years are found in the Appendix 2.4.b.

 2.4.c Data on the number of students receiving a waiver of the practice experience for
each of the last three years.

Over the past three years, waivers of the internship have been provided to:

                21 students in 2004-2005
                21 students in 2005-2006
                18 students in 2006-2007
                12 students in 2007-2008 (partial year: Fall, Spring)

2.4.d Data on the number of preventive medicine, occupational medicine, aerospace
medicine, and public health and general preventive medicine residents completing the
academic program for each of the last three years, along with information on their
practicum rotations.

Over the past three years, there were no residents completing the MPH.

2.4.e Assessment of the extent to which this criterion is met.

This criterion is met.

Strengths
• All MPH students are required to complete a formal, supervised practice experience in public
   health with relevance to their major, unless they meet specified waiver criteria.
• The number of students who report they are satisfied with their internship experience (81%)
   meets the stated strategic plan outcome measure (80%).

Weaknesses
• The School has a large number of international students with no transportation which limits the
  location of the internship placements. These students, in particular, may be placed at UAB and
  then the faculty, students and internship placement coordinators work to ensure that the
  internship provides an opportunity for them to demonstrate the basic skills in public health
  practice. The project and final product usually determine the relevance of the placement as
  well as involvement from their academic advisors in the School.
• Students in International Health and Global Studies find it challenging to find and finance an
  international internship.
• The self study revealed a need to expand the number and quality of practice-based internships.

Future Plans
The School’s Internship Coordinator will continue to monitor the quantity and quality of internship
experiences and develop more options in the Birmingham area that could be accessed by students
without transportation. The Special Assistant to the Dean’s Office and the Internship Coordinator
will review the current procedures and make necessary improvements by May 2008. The
Sparkman Center will assist International Health and Global Studies students in internship
placements.


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2.5 CULMINATING EXPERIENCE

2.5     Culminating Experience. All professional degree programs identified in the
        instructional matrix shall ensure that each student demonstrates skills and
        integration of knowledge through a culminating experience.

2.5.a   Identification of the culminating experience required for each degree program.

MPH
The development of the culminating Integrative Experience has evolved as changes in the core
curriculum have been instituted over the last three years. Prior to Fall 2006, the culminating
experience was PUH 690. This course was team taught by six faculty members (one from each
department); the course master rotated among the departments. Students worked in cross-
discipline teams to develop and present case-studies. When the Integrated Core was discontinued
in Spring 2006, students were required to take HCO 690 as the culminating experience. Syllabi for
both courses may be found in the Resource Room. [RR] To maintain maximum integration, the
School provided integrative content in MCH 610, Introduction to Public Health, and the integrative
experience in HCO 690, The Public Health Integrative Experience. Health Services competencies
were split between the two courses. After reflecting on this experience in the 2006-07 school year
and seeking advice during the CEPH consultation visit on May 24, 2007, the SOPH decided that
Health Services competencies should be covered in one course and separated from the Integrative
Experience. Thus in the Summer of 2007 the School revised both the Health Services core course
and the Integrative Experience.

Since the Summer of 2007 the culminating experience is provided through The Public Health
Integrative Experience (MCH 695). This three-hour required course is designed to fulfill the
requirement that all MPH degree candidates have the opportunity, as defined by the Council for
Education on Public Health, “to synthesize and integrate knowledge acquired in course work and
other learning experiences and to apply theory and principles in a situation that approximates
some aspect of professional practice.” All MPH students, regardless of program affiliation, must
complete this course to graduate. It is required that students take this course their last semester
and that all core courses be completed before taking this course. The course is offered every term
to accommodate the varying graduation schedules of MPH students. Beginning in Fall 2008 we
will encourage all incoming students to participate in service opportunities; students who contribute
30 hours to community service will receive extra credit within MCH 695. We hope this will enrich
the experience, as well as provide structured learning. Students enrolled in other degree programs
(MSPH, MS, DrPH, or PhD) are also invited and encouraged to enroll in this course on an as-room-
permits basis.

This culminating experience emphasizes the data-driven and applied nature of public health
practice. Its coursework is problem-based and focuses on a community health planning process
and prevention of a health problem. Student self-assessment regarding achievement of the
required competencies in each of the MPH core disciplines guides individual learning. Students
conduct systematic reviews of relevant literature, perform basic data analysis, and apply other
planning and evaluation techniques to develop an evidence-based population-based prevention
program for a specific global or US population. Students also perform a self-assessment in the
course to determine their level of proficiency on the MPH competencies. The syllabus for MCH
695 can be found in the Resource Room. [RR] Example case studies and final products from the
Integrative Experience (PUH 690, HCO 690 and MCH 695) are found in the Resource Room. [RR]




                                                                                                  49
DrPH
The DrPH students conduct dissertation research as their culminating experience. DrPH
dissertations are found in the Resource Room. [RR]

2.5.b   Assessment of the extent to which this criterion is met.

This criterion is met.

Strengths
• All professional degree students in the MPH and DrPH participate in a culminating experience.
• Examples of products are provided in the Resource Room. [RR]

Weakness
• Over the last three years, the school has been revising the Integrative Experience and
  incorporating lessons learned. The integration of the disciplines in PUH 690 was resource
  intensive and, without a departmental home, there was no consistent ownership of the course.
  When the MPH core was revised each department in the School assumed responsibility for its
  core course and the associated competencies. Because of the inter- and cross-disciplinary
  nature of Maternal and Child Health, this department was given responsibility for the integrative
  experience course. This arrangement gives the integrative experience course a departmental
  home which has provided consistency in content and instruction.

Future Plans
The course master of the integrative experience is a member of the Core Oversight Committee and
is working with the other core instructors to provide maximum integration of core content and to
provide a venue for competencies assessment.




                                                                                                50
2.6 REQUIRED COMPETENCIES
2.6   Required Competencies. For each degree program and area of specialization within
      the program identified in the instructional matrix, there shall be clearly stated
      competencies that guide the development of the educational program.
2.6.a and 2.6.b Identification of school wide core competencies and matrix that identifies
learning experience.
A matrix of the school wide core public health competencies and the learning experiences by which
public health competencies are met is provided in Table 2.6.a/b. The School has adopted 53
school wide competencies as developed by the Association of Schools of Public Health (ASPH).
All MPH students are required to take the 5 core courses in public health which provides them with
learning experiences which lead to the mastering of the school wide competencies. The
competencies are also reinforced in the internship and integrative experience. A brief description
of each core course is listed below and the syllabi are located in the Resource Room. [RR]
Biostatistics is the development and application of statistical methods related to statistical
reasoning and methods in addressing, analyzing and solving problems in public health; health
care; and biomedical, clinical and population research. Core competencies in Biostatistics for all
MPH students are met primarily through the completion of BST 600 or BST 611 and 612:
Intermediate Statistical Analysis I, II.
Environmental Health Sciences is the study of environmental determinants of human health and
disease. It is a broad discipline that includes environmental toxicology, occupational health and
safety, industrial hygiene, industrial hygiene – hazardous substances, and environmental health in
the context of international health and global studies. Core competencies in Environmental Health
Sciences are met through ENV 600.
Epidemiology is the study of disease and injury in human populations. It is the basic science of
public health. Descriptive epidemiology provides information on disease patterns and high-risk
populations that can be used by public health professionals to understand health care needs.
Analytical epidemiology examines the causes of diseases and injuries so that steps can be taken
to prevent new cases or deaths. Core competencies are met primarily through the completion of
EPI 600: Introduction to Epidemiology (for non-Epidemiology majors) or EPI 610: Principles of
Epidemiologic Research (for Epidemiology majors).
Social and Behavioral Science in public health addresses the behavioral, social, and cultural
factors related to individual and population health and health disparities over the life course.
Research and practice in this area contribute to the development, administration and evaluation of
programs and policies in public health and health services to promote and sustain healthy
environments and healthy lives for individuals and populations. Core competencies are met
primarily through the completion of HB 600.
Health Services Administration. Health policy and management is a multidisciplinary field of
inquiry and practice concerned with the delivery, quality, and costs of health care for individuals
and populations. MPH students synthesize and integrate theory from health care management
and policy with the knowledge acquired from the other public health core courses and other
learning experiences. Through the analysis of actual cases from the annals of public health
practice, participation in a strategic planning exercise, and the development of a new case from
current and emerging areas of critical interest to public health, students will master the core
competencies in health care management and policy. The core competencies for all MPH
students in the area of health care organization and policy are mastered through the completion of
the course, HCO 600: Public Health Programs and Policies.



                                                                                                     51
Table 2.6.a and 2.6.b School wide Core Public Health Competencies and Learning Experiences
 2.6.a School wide Core Public Health Competencies              Biostatistics Environ   Epidemiology   Health     Social &
 2.6.b Learning experiences to meet competencies                BST 600 or Health       EPI 600 or     Services   Behav
       (required courses)                                       BST 611/612 Sciences EPI 610           Admin      Sciences
 Upon Graduation all MPH students will be able to:                            ENH 600                  HCO 600    HB 600
Domain: Biostatistics
MPH 1. Describe the roles biostatistics serves in public health including
applications in other areas of public health and the health sciences.
MPH 2. Apply descriptive techniques commonly used to summarize public
health data.
MPH 3. Utilize the logic and language of scientific methods in public
health and other life sciences research.
MPH 4. Use key concepts of probability, random variation, and commonly
used statistical probability distributions.
MPH 5. Understand and utilize basic biostatistical concepts and distinguish
among the different measurement scales and the implications for selection
of statistical methods to be used based on these distinctions.
MPH 6. Describe the basic methods of measurement including reliability
and validity.
MPH 7. Use basic statistics in testing hypotheses and setting confidence
intervals and apply common statistical methods for inference.
MPH 8. Specify preferred methodological alternatives to commonly used
statistical methods when assumptions are not met.
MPH 9. Understand analysis of basic experimental designs and apply
descriptive and inferential methodologies according to the type of study
design for answering a particular research question.
MPH 10. Understand simple and multiple linear regression.
MPH 11. Interpret results of statistical analysis in public health studies.
Domain: Environmental Health Sciences
MPH 12. Specify approaches for assessing, preventing, and controlling
environment hazards that pose risks to human health and safety.
MPH 13. Describe the direct and indirect human, ecological, and safety
effects of major environmental and occupational agents.
MPH 14. Specify current environmental risk assessment methods.
MPH 15. Describe genetic, physiologic, and psychosocial factors that
affect susceptibility to adverse health outcomes following exposure to
environmental hazards.
MPH 16. Discuss various risk management and risk communication
approaches in relation to issues of environmental justice and equity.



                                                                              52
2.6.a School wide Core Public Health Competencies                                Biostatistics Environ   Epidemiology   Health     Social &
2.6.b Learning experiences to meet competencies                                  BST 600 or Health       EPI 600 or     Services   Behav
      (required courses)                                                         BST 611/612 Sciences    EPI 610        Admin      Sciences
Upon Graduation all MPH students will be able to:                                              ENH 600                  HCO 600    HB 600
MPH 17. Explain the general mechanisms of toxicity in eliciting a toxic
response to various environmental exposures.
MPH 18. Develop a testable model of environmental injury.
MPH 19. Describe federal and state regulatory programs, guidelines, and
authorities that control environmental health issues.
Domain: Epidemiology
MPH 20. Identify key sources of epidemiologic data.
MPH 21. Describe disease patterns according to person, place and time.
MPH 22. Define and use basic epidemiologic terms as they are commonly
used today.
MPH 23. Calculate and interpret measures of disease in one population,
such as risk, rate, incidence, and prevalence.
MPH 24. Calculate/interpret relative measures of disease (relative risk).
MPH 25. Calculate/interpret impact measures of disease (attributable risk).
MPH 26. Interpret epidemiologic data with regard to bias, confounding,
and precision.
MPH 27. Describe common epidemiologic study designs (e.g., cross-
sectional, cohort, and case-control) and their strengths and weaknesses.
MPH 28. Describe goals and process of screening, and define/interpret
the screening measures’ sensitivity, specificity, & positive predictive value.
MPH 29. Evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of conclusions reached
in epidemiologic reports and published studies.
MPH 30. Communicate the interpretation of epidemiologic data to lay
audiences.
MPH 31. Describe the importance of epidemiologic data as a basis for
public health interventions for disease control.
MPH 32. Describe important legal and ethical issues relating to the
collection, use, analysis, and dissemination of epidemiologic data.
Domain: Social & Behavior Science
MPH 33. Identify basic theories, concepts & models from a range of social
& behavioral disciplines that are used in public health research & practice.
MPH 34. Identify the causes of social and behavioral factors that affect
health of individuals and populations.
MPH 35. Identify individual, organizational, & community concerns, assets,
resources and deficits for social and behavioral science interventions.


                                                                                 53
2.6.a School wide Core Public Health Competencies                              Biostatistics Environ   Epidemiology   Health     Social &
2.6.b Learning experiences to meet competencies                                BST 600 or Health       EPI 600 or     Services   Behav
      (required courses)                                                       BST 611/612 Sciences    EPI 610        Admin      Sciences
Upon Graduation all MPH students will be able to:                                            ENH 600                  HCO 600    HB 600
MPH 36. Identify critical stakeholders for the planning, implementation
and evaluation of public health programs, policies and interventions.
MPH 37. Describe steps and procedures for the planning, implementation
and evaluation of public health programs, policies and interventions.
MPH 38. Describe the role of social and community factors in both the
onset and solutions of public health problems.
MPH 39. Describe the merits of social and behavioral science
interventions and policies.
MPH 40. Apply evidence-based approaches in the development and
evaluation of social and behavioral science interventions.
MPH 41. Apply ethical principles to public health program planning,
implementation and evaluation.
MPH 42. Specify multiple targets and levels of intervention for social and
behavioral science programs and/or policies.
Domain: Health Services Administration
MPH 43. Identify the main components & issues regarding organization,
financing & delivery of health services and public health systems in the US.
MPH 44. Discuss policy process for improving health status of populations.
MPH 45. Describe legal & ethical bases for public health & health services.
MPH 46. Apply principles of strategic management, planning and
marketing to public health.
MPH 47. Communicate health policy and management issues using
appropriate outlets and effective technologies.
MPH 48. Demonstrate leadership skills for building partnerships.
MPH 49. Apply principles of program planning, development, budgeting,
management and evaluation in organization and community initiatives.
MPH 50. Explain methods of ensuring community health safety and
preparedness.
MPH 51. Apply “systems thinking” for resolving organizational issues and
public health practice problems.
MPH 52. Apply quality and performance improvement concepts to
address organizational performance issues.
MPH 53. Apply research principles to understanding health policy
problems and policy issues.




                                                                               54
2.6.c   Programmatic Competencies. A set of competencies for each program of study,
        major or specialization including professional and academic degree curricula.

DEPARTMENT OF BIOSTATISTICS

The Department of Biostatistics offers programs leading to the Master of Public Health (MPH),
Master of Science (MS), Master of Science in Public Health (MSPH), Doctor of Philosophy (PhD),
and a Certificate in Statistical Genetics (CSG). Table 2.6.c(BST) describes the programmatic
competencies for each of the degrees.

MPH
The MPH degree in biostatistics is intended for individuals from decision-making positions in public
health and other health care settings who have an interest in data management, statistical
analyses and interpretation, and presentation of analytical results. In particular, the degree is for
those who want to improve their knowledge of biostatistics in order to better apply these skills in a
public health setting. This degree can be completed in approximately 2 years. An internship is
required and students may enroll for additional research credits. Successful completion of the
program requires maintaining a GPA of 3.0, completing all required courses and an internship, and
successful evaluation by the academic advisor. The competencies listed in Table 2.6.c (BST) are
in addition to the MPH core competencies required for all MPH students.

MS
The MS degree is intended primarily for those who wish to acquire a master’s degree with an
emphasis in statistical methodology. Students who successfully complete this degree usually
pursue a career in research. Successful completion requires a GPA of 3.0 or better, passing the
comprehensive examination at the MS level, completing a masters project under the direction of an
advisor with committee approval, and an oral and written defense of this project.

MSPH in Clinical Research
This program is a post-medical or other health science degree training program for fellows and
faculty interested in developing skills required for clinical research. This academic training will
supplement extensive training in the content area in which the student is trained, and provide
senior mentoring in the politics and policies of development and management. A graduate of this
program will be able to develop and lead independent research programs and projects. The
program consists of a set of courses common to all students, plus research electives and focus
elective courses that reflect the academic interest of the student. The program can accommodate
students with specific interest in biostatistics (CRBS), epidemiology (CREP), environmental health
(CREH), and health behavior (CRHB). There will be some variation in the specific knowledge and
skills acquired by each graduate, however, the primary learning objectives will apply to all students,
irrespective of departmental affiliation.

PhD
This program provides a balance between theory and application. In addition to providing students
with an in-depth understanding of statistical theory and methodology, the main objectives of the
program are to train students to become independent researchers, effective statistical consultants,
collaborators in scientific research, and effective teachers. All students entering the PhD program
are required to complete the 33 credit hours of regular coursework and the consulting course
required for the MS degree. In addition to the MS competencies, PhD graduates should acquire
the additional competencies listed in Table 2.6.c (BST).




                                                                                                   55
Table 2.6.c(BST) Biostatistics Programmatic Competencies and Learning Experiences
         Biostatistics Programmatic Competencies               MPH   MS   MSPH      PhD   Primarily gained     Secondarily gained
                                                                                          through required     through elective or
                                                                          in Clin         courses              other required courses
                                                                          Resrch
BST 1    Describe the basic concepts of probability, random                               BST 611              BST 621
         variation and commonly used statistical probability
         distributions
BST 2    Distinguish among different measurement scales                                   BST 611              BST 621
         and the implications for selection of statistical
         methods to be used based on these distinctions
BST 3    Apply common statistical methods for inference                                   BST 611, 612         BST 621
BST 4    Describe preferred methodological alternatives to                                BST 611, 612         BST 621
         commonly used statistical methods when
         assumptions are and are not met
BST 5    Apply descriptive and inferential methodologies                                  BST 611, 612         BST 621, 640
         according to the type of study design for
         answering a particular research question
BST 6    Interpret results of statistical analyses found in                               BST 611, 612, 619    BST 621
         public health studies
BST 7    Develop written and oral presentations based on                                  BST 697
         statistical analyses for both public health
         professionals and educated lay audiences
BST 8    Utilize common computer programs to aid in                                       BST 619, 626, 626L   BST 661
         analysis, description, and presentation of
         statistical data and results
BST 9    Understand the courses and means of control of                                                        Elective in EPI, ENH,
         infectious and chronic diseases                                                                       HB, HCOP and MCH
BST 10   Gain experience in biostatistical consulting                                     BST 690
BST 11   Understand common statistical models and                                         BST 621, 631         BST 670
         applications of probability, commonly used
         sampling distributions and density functions
BST 12   Recognize and implement parametric and non-                                      BST 621, 622         BST 640
         parametric analysis methods for testing hypotheses
BST 13   Understand and utilize analysis of variance                                      BST 621, 622         BST 623
         designs with the use of contrasts and multiple
         comparisons procedures
BST 14   Utilize simple survival analysis and multivariate                                BST 622, 623         BST 655, 660, 665
         methods


                                                                                                                                       56
Table 2.6.c (BST) Biostatistics cont.

         Biostatistics Programmatic Competencies             MPH   MS   MSPH      PhD   Primarily gained    Secondarily gained
                                                                                        through required    through elective or
                                                                        in Clin         courses             other required courses
                                                                        Resrch
BST 15   Understand and apply linear and multiple                                       BST 623             BST 723
         regression using matrix approach
BST 16   Understand weighted and nonlinear regression                                   BST 623             BST 723
BST 17   Utilize variable selection methods; modeling                                   BST 623             BST 621, 622
         techniques; regression diagnostics and model
         validation
BST 18   Distinguish between, apply, and analyze common                                 BST 623             BST 625
         experimental designs
BST 19   Determine moments and use moment generating                                    BST 631             BST 735
         functions
BST 20   Utilize exponential families, marginal and                                     BST 631, 632        BST 735
         conditional distributions, transformation and
         change of variables
BST 21   Understand convergence concepts and large                                      BST 631, 632        BST 735
         sample theory
BST 22   Understand sufficiency and likelihood principles                               BST 632
BST 23   Define, derive and investigate properties of                                   BST 632             BST 735
         maximum likelihood and moment estimators
BST 24   Derive likelihood ratio tests and uniformly most                               BST 632
         powerful tests
BST 25   Derive confidence intervals from inverting a test                              BST 632
         and use of pivotal quantities
BST 26   Recognize and implement statistical methods                                    BST 621, 622, 655
         associated with categorical data
BST 27   Utilize logistic regression models and understand                              BST 621, 622, 655
         associated regression diagnostics
BST 28   Interpret and communicate results of statistical                               BST 690, 698, 699   BST 621, 622, 623,
         analyses                                                                                           655, 660, 665, 671
BST 29   Propose, design and defend a research study in a
         public health area
BST 30   Understand the theory of multivariate normal                                   BST 723
         distributions and quadratic forms
BST 31   Understand theory of and implement least square                                BST 723
         estimation and weighted least squares estimation



                                                                                                                                 57
Table 2.6.c (BST) Biostatistics cont.

         Biostatistics Programmatic Competencies               MPH   MS   MSPH      PhD   Primarily gained        Secondarily gained
                                                                                          through required        through elective or
                                                                          in Clin         courses                 other required courses
                                                                          Resrch
BST 32   Understand theory of and implement contrasts                                     BST 723
         testing and multiple comparison procedures
BST 33   Understand maximum likelihood theory of loglinear                                BST 723
         models
BST 34   Distinguish families of models                                                   BST 735
BST 35   Define likelihood and sufficiency                                                BST 735
BST 36                                                                                    BST 735
         Utilize significance tests and point and interval
         estimation
BST 37   Define invariant tests; asymptotic theory and large                              BST 735
         sample inference
BST 38                                                                                    BST 735
         Define Log Rank, score and Wald tests and other
         robust procedures
BST 39   Recognize, define and distinguish between                                        BST 760                 BST 660
         generalized linear models; mixed models; and
         generalized estimating equations
BST 40   Design and implementation of repeated measures                                   BST 760                 BST 660
         designs
BST 41   Define and distinguish between numerical                                         BST 765
         algorithms useful in biostatistics
BST 42   Utilize randomization tests and resampling                                       BST 765                 BST 670
BST 43   Demonstrate a clear ability to carry out                                         BST 799
         independent biostatistics research, publishable in
         peer-reviewed statistics journals
BST 44   Design, conduct, and evaluate research studies                                   EPI 607, 680, BST 625
BST 45   Understand issues of data collection, analysis and                               BST 611, 612, 625
         study management
BST 46   Demonstrate an understanding of the ethics of                                    EPI 607, 680
         scientific research
BST 47   Formulate a proposal for a research study, present                               EPI 680, HB 699
         it, and revise it appropriately for implementation
BST 48   Effectively communicate research results orally                                  EPI 680, HB 699


                                                                                                                                      58
Table 2.6.c (BST) Biostatistics cont.

         Biostatistics Programmatic Competencies             MPH   MS   MSPH      PhD   Primarily gained       Secondarily gained
                                                                                        through required       through elective or
                                                                        in Clin         courses                other required courses
                                                                        Resrch
         and in writing across the spectrum of scientific
         venues
BST 49   Critically evaluate published research                                         EPI 680, 607, HB 699
BST 50   Demonstrate expertise in a area of specialization




                                                                                                                                   59
DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SCIENCE

The Department of Environmental Health Science (DEHS) offers four degrees (MPH, MSPH,
DrPH, and PhD), each with several options, for a total of 13 degree specializations. Table 2.6.c
(ENV) provides the competencies for each of those options. Competencies 1-8 are repeated
several times for different degree options since they have separate learning experiences to meet
the competency.

MPH
The Master’s of Public Health (MPH) is a professional degree for students who are preparing for a
career in public health practice. The MPH in Environmental Health Sciences can be earned in
each of the following five specializations: Environmental Health/Toxicology (eTox), Occupational
Health and Safety (OHS), Industrial Hygiene (IH), Industrial Hygiene/Hazardous Substances
(IHHS), and Environmental Health with emphasis in International Health and Global Studies
(EnvHlth/IHGS). Each specialization generally requires 1-2 years of study. The MPH training we
offer is quantitative and analytical, and emphasizes a strong foundation of biomedical and physical
sciences. An internship (field practicum) is required, though a waiver may be obtained based on
prior experience. Research is not generally required for the MPH degree (with the exception of the
IH and IHHS tracks), although students may enroll for elective research credits.

Students interested in the IH track (who have undergraduate degrees in industrial hygiene from
ABET-accredited, NIOSH-funded, programs) may complete the IH track on an “accelerated” basis.
Students enrolled in the IHHS track are required to complete either the 40-hour hazardous waste
site worker course [OSHA29 CFR1919.102 (3)] or the 45-hour hazardous materials emergency
response technician course in addition to their SOPH coursework.

Successful completion of any of the MPH programs is marked by maintaining a graduate GPA of at
least 3.0; completion of all required core and track courses, the appropriate number of total credit
hours, and an internship; and by the assessment of the academic advisor that the student is ready
to graduate. By the time of graduation, MPH students majoring in EHS will have the competencies
described in Table 2.6.c (ENV).

MSPH
The Master’s of Science in Public Health (MSPH) is a research-oriented degree with two different
tracks: Environmental Health/Toxicology, and Clinical Research with Emphasis on Environmental
Health. The first specialization is intended mainly for students interested in more advanced studies
in the basic-research aspects of EHS, such as the PhD degree. Students in the MSPH in
Environmental Health/Toxicology track may also have an engineering background and an interest
in prevention, mitigation and control of environmental health problems. The Clinical Research
specialization with a focus in Environmental Health is intended primarily to aid post-graduate
physicians (i.e., residents, fellows, medical practitioners, and medical school faculty) and enhance
their clinical research skills.

DrPH
The Doctor of Public Health (DrPH) is the highest professional degree for public health
practitioners. Its goal is to provide advanced training to professional practitioners, working
primarily in government or industry, in the core disciplines of public health and to provide an
intensive focus in an area of specialization. The Department offers three specializations for the
DrPH: Environmental Health (EH), Environmental Management and Policy (EMP), and
Occupational Health and Safety (OHS). Applicants to the DrPH program generally have an MPH
or equivalent degree, and should have a minimum of four years professional experience in one of
the three areas given above. Additionally, they must have a minimum score of 1100 (verbal and


                                                                                                   60
math) on the GRE, and a GPA of 3.0 in prior degree work. Beyond the MPH-level capabilities in
environmental health sciences/occupational health, biostatistics and epidemiology, DrPH students
are required to complete an 18-credit-hour departmental core curriculum and a minimum of 15
additional credit hours of coursework selected in consultation with the academic advisor for
research project preparation. Completion of the DrPH degree requires a dissertation on an applied
or management problem, thus trainees must demonstrate competency in a number of essential
problem-solving and analytical skills.

PhD
The Doctor of Philosophy is an academic research degree intended primarily for students who are
preparing for research careers in academic, private industry/consultancy, or government
laboratories. Graduates of this program are expected to have developed skills that will enable
them to identify and define critical questions of environmental health importance, design research
studies to address these questions, and complete a program of research that demonstrates ability
to function as an independent investigator. PhD program graduates are able to critically analyze
and evaluate the environmental health sciences literature; identify environmental health problems;
formulate research hypotheses; design original research to test these hypotheses; conduct all
aspects of the requisite research including data gathering and data analysis; prepare a
comprehensive and persuasively written report on the research with clarity and rigor; defend the
methods, results, and conclusions drawn from the research in public forums; and communicate
those findings in the peer-reviewed published literature.

The PhD degree specializations are: PhD in Environmental Health Sciences Research (ENSR),
PhD in Industrial Hygiene (IH), and PhD in Environmental Management and Policy (EMP). Each
specialization begins with the student taking formal coursework during the first two years,
culminating in the administration of a candidacy exam. Students in the ENSR program must take a
three-semester sequence of graduate-level courses in biochemistry, physiology, pathophysiology,
genetics and genomics offered through the university-wide Integrated Biological Sciences doctoral
program. Students in the OHS and EMP PhD tracks take a series of courses offered by the
Department. Students in all three tracks must take a minimum of one graduate-level toxicology
course and one intermediate-level introductory graduate biostatistics course. Passing the
candidacy exam is followed by the selection of a dissertation advisor and an advisory committee.
The student then embarks upon a program of original research, to be presented in a formal
dissertation and oral defense, which takes a minimum of three years beyond the candidacy exam.
At regular intervals during this period, the student meets with the advisory committee to ensure that
satisfactory progress is made.

The competencies and coursework in the accompanying Table 2.6.c (ENV) are broadly defined.
Each student’s program of study involves advisor-guided choices of elective coursework during the
first two years, and highly individualized selection of primary literature reading.




                                                                                                  61
Table 2.6.c(ENV) Environmental Health Sciences Programmatic Competencies and Learning Experiences
        Environmental Health              MPH MPH MPH MPH MPH MSPH DrPH DrPH DrPH PhD PhD PhD Primarily     Secondarily
        Sciences Programmatic             eTox OHS IH IHHS IHGS eTox ENH OHS EMP ENSR IH EMP gained         gained through
        Competencies                                            or Clin                       through       elective or
                                                                 Res                          required      other required
                                                                                              courses       courses
ENH 1   Specify approaches for                                                                ENH 600,      ENH 601, 606,
        assessing, preventing, and                                                            602, 651,     609, 610, 621,
        controlling environmental                                                             660           622, 624, 625,
        hazards that pose risks to                                                                          626, 630, 648,
        human health and safety                                                                             649, 670, 681
ENH 2   Describe the direct and                                                                 ENH 600,    ENH 601, 606,
        indirect human, ecological,                                                             602, 650,   609, 610, 621,
        and safety effects of major                                                             660         622, 624, 625,
        environmental and                                                                                   626, 630, 648,
        occupational agents                                                                                 649, 670, 681
ENH 3   Specify current                                                                         ENH 600,    ENH 603, 610,
        environmental risk                                                                      602, 651,   621, 622, 625,
        assessment methods                                                                      660         626, 630, 648,
                                                                                                            649, 661, 662,
                                                                                                            670, 681
ENH 4   Describe genetic,                                                                       ENH 600,    ENH 610, 625,
        physiologic, and                                                                        650         630, 636, 670
        psychosocial factors that
        affect susceptibility to
        adverse health outcomes
        following exposure to
        environmental hazards
ENH 5   Discuss various risk                                                                    ENH 600,    ENH 603, 606,
        management and risk                                                                     602, 651    610, 625, 630,
        communication approaches                                                                            648, 649
        in relation to issues of
        environmental justice and
        equity
ENH 6   Explain the general mech-                                                               ENH 600,    ENH 601, 621,
        anisms of toxicity in eliciting                                                         650, 651,   626, 661, 662
        a toxic response to various                                                             660
        environmental exposures
ENH 7   Develop a testable model of                                                             ENH 600,    ENH 601, 602,
        environmental injury                                                                    602, 650,   606, 621, 622,
                                                                                                651, 660    626, 670


                                                                                                                         62
Table 2.6.c (ENV) Environmental Health Sciences

        Environmental Health             MPH MPH MPH MPH MPH MSPH DrPH DrPH DrPH PhD PhD PhD Primarily     Secondarily
        Sciences Programmatic            eTox OHS IH IHHS IHGS eTox ENH OHS EMP ENSR IH EMP gained         gained through
        Competencies                                           or Clin                       through       elective or
                                                                Res                          required      other required
                                                                                             courses       courses
ENH 8   Describe federal and state                                                           ENH 600,      ENH 606, 621,
        regulatory programs,                                                                 602, 660      622, 625, 626,
        guidelines, and authorities                                                                        670, 681
        that control environmental
        health issues
ENH 1   Specify approaches for                                                                 ENH 600,    ENH 601, 602,
        assessing, preventing, and                                                             621, 651,   606, 609, 610,
        controlling occupational and                                                           670, 681    622, 624, 625,
        industrial hazards that pose                                                                       626, 630, 648,
        risks to worker health and                                                                         649, 660
        safety
ENH 2   Describe the direct and                                                                ENH 600,    ENH 601, 602,
        indirect human, ecological,                                                            621, 650,   606, 609, 610,
        and safety effects of major                                                            670, 681    622, 624, 625,
        industrial and occupational                                                                        626, 630, 648,
        agents                                                                                             649, 660
ENH 3   Specify current occupational                                                           ENH 600,    ENH 602, 603,
        and industrial risk                                                                    621, 650,   610, 622, 625,
        assessment methods                                                                     651, 670,   626, 630, 648,
                                                                                               681         649, 660, 661,
                                                                                                           662
ENH 4   Describe genetic, physiologic,                                                         ENH 600,    ENH 610, 625,
        and psychosocial factors that                                                          650, 670    630, 636
        affect susceptibility to
        adverse health outcomes
        following exposure to
        occupational and industrial
        hazards
ENH 5   Discuss various risk                                                                   ENH 600,    ENH 602, 603,
        management and risk                                                                    651, 670    606, 610, 625,
        communication approaches                                                                           630, 648, 649
ENH 6   Explain the general                                                                    ENH 600,    ENH 601, 626,
        mechanisms of toxicity in                                                              621, 650,   660, 661, 662
        eliciting a toxic response to                                                          651
        various industrial and
        occupational exposures


                                                                                                                        63
Table 2.6.c (ENV) Environmental Health Sciences

        Environmental Health           MPH MPH MPH MPH MPH MSPH DrPH DrPH DrPH PhD PhD PhD Primarily     Secondarily
        Sciences Programmatic          eTox OHS IH IHHS IHGS eTox ENH OHS EMP ENSR IH EMP gained         gained through
        Competencies                                         or Clin                       through       elective or
                                                              Res                          required      other required
                                                                                           courses       courses
ENH 7   Develop a testable model of                                                        ENH 600,      ENH 601, 602,
        environmental injury in the                                                        621, 650,     606, 622, 626,
        context of occupational and                                                        651, 670      660
        industrial settings
ENH 8   Describe federal and state                                                           ENH 600,    ENH 602, 606,
        regulatory programs,                                                                 621, 670    622, 625, 626,
        guidelines, and authorities                                                                      660, 681
        that control occupational
        and industrial health and
        safety issues
ENH 1   Specify approaches for                                                               ENH 600,    ENH 606, 609,
        assessing, preventing, and                                                           601, 602,   610, 630, 648,
        controlling occupational and                                                         621, 622,   649, 651, 660
        industrial hazards that pose                                                         624, 625,
        risks to worker health and                                                           626, 670,
        safety                                                                               681
ENH 2   Describe the direct and                                                              ENH 600,    ENH 603, 610,
        indirect human, ecological,                                                          601, 602,   630, 648, 649,
        and safety effects of major                                                          621, 622,   651, 660
        industrial and occupational                                                          624, 626,
        agents                                                                               650, 670,
                                                                                             681
ENH 3   Specify current occupational                                                         ENH 600,    ENH 610, 630,
        and industrial risk                                                                  602, 621,   636
        assessment methods                                                                   622, 625,
                                                                                             626, 661,
                                                                                             662, 670,
                                                                                             681
ENH 4   Describe genetic,                                                                    ENH 600,    ENH 610, 630,
        physiologic, and                                                                     621, 625,   636
        psychosocial factors that                                                            626, 650,
        affect susceptibility to                                                             670
        adverse health outcomes
        following exposure to
        occupational and industrial
        hazards


                                                                                                                      64
Table 2.6.c (ENV) Environmental Health Sciences

         Environmental Health            MPH MPH MPH MPH MPH MSPH DrPH DrPH DrPH PhD PhD PhD Primarily     Secondarily
         Sciences Programmatic           eTox OHS IH IHHS IHGS eTox ENH OHS EMP ENSR IH EMP gained         gained through
         Competencies                                          or Clin                       through       elective or
                                                                Res                          required      other required
                                                                                             courses       courses
ENH 5    Discuss various risk                                                                ENH 600,      ENH 603, 606,
         management and risk                                                                 601, 602,     610, 630, 648,
         communication approaches                                                            621, 622,     649, 651
                                                                                             625, 670
ENH 6    Explain the general                                                                 ENH 600,      ENH 601, 651,
         mechanisms of toxicity in                                                           621, 626,     660
         eliciting a toxic response to                                                       650, 661,
         various industrial and                                                              662
         occupational exposures
ENH 7    Develop a testable model of                                                           ENH 600,    ENH 606, 651,
         environmental injury in the                                                           601, 602,   660
         context of occupational and                                                           621, 622,
         industrial settings                                                                   626, 650,
                                                                                               670
ENH 8    Describe federal and state                                                            ENH 600,    ENH 606, 660
         regulatory programs,                                                                  602, 621,
         guidelines, and authorities                                                           622, 625,
         that control occupational                                                             626, 670,
         and industrial health and                                                             681
         safety issues
ENH 1    Specify approaches for                                                                ENH 600,    ENH 606, 609,
         assessing, preventing, and                                                            601, 602,   610, 630, 648,
         controlling occupational and                                                          621, 622,   649, 651, 660
         industrial hazards that pose                                                          624, 625,
         risks to worker health and                                                            626, 670,
         safety                                                                                681
ENH 2    Describe the direct and                                                               ENH 600,    ENH 606, 609,
         indirect human, ecological,                                                           601, 602,   610, 625, 630,
         and safety effects of major                                                           621, 622,   648, 649, 660
         industrial and occupational                                                           624, 626,
         agents                                                                                650, 670,
                                                                                               681




                                                                                                                          65
Table 2.6.c (ENV) Environmental Health Sciences

        Environmental Health            MPH MPH MPH MPH MPH MSPH DrPH DrPH DrPH PhD PhD PhD Primarily     Secondarily
        Sciences Programmatic           eTox OHS IH IHHS IHGS eTox ENH OHS EMP ENSR IH EMP gained         gained through
        Competencies                                          or Clin                       through       elective or
                                                               Res                          required      other required
                                                                                            courses       courses
ENH 3   Specify current occupational                                                        ENH 600,      ENH 603, 610,
        and industrial risk                                                                 602, 621,     630, 648, 649,
        assessment methods                                                                  622, 625,     651, 660
                                                                                            626, 661,
                                                                                            662, 670,
                                                                                            681
ENH 4   Describe genetic,                                                                   ENH 600,      ENH 610, 630,
        physiologic, and                                                                    621, 625,     636
        psychosocial factors that                                                           626, 650,
        affect susceptibility to                                                            670
        adverse health outcomes
        following exposure to
        occupational and industrial
        hazards
ENH 5   Discuss various risk                                                                  ENH 600,    ENH 603, 606,
        management and risk                                                                   601, 602,   610, 630, 648,
        communication approaches                                                              621, 622,   649, 651
                                                                                              625, 670
ENH 6   Explain the general                                                                   ENH 600,    ENH 601, 651,
        mechanisms of toxicity in                                                             621, 626,   660
        eliciting a toxic response to                                                         650, 661,
        various industrial and                                                                662
        occupational exposures
ENH 7   Develop a testable model of                                                           ENH 600,    ENH 606, 651,
        environmental injury in the                                                           601, 602,   660
        context of occupational and                                                           621, 622,
        industrial settings                                                                   626, 650,
                                                                                              670
ENH 8   Describe federal and state                                                            ENH 600,    ENH 606, 660
        regulatory programs,                                                                  602, 621,
        guidelines, and authorities                                                           622, 625,
        that control occupational                                                             626, 670,
        and industrial health and                                                             681
        safety issues




                                                                                                                         66
 Table 2.6.c (ENV) Environmental Health Sciences

        Environmental Health            MPH MPH MPH MPH MPH MSPH DrPH DrPH DrPH PhD PhD PhD Primarily     Secondarily
        Sciences Programmatic           eTox OHS IH IHHS IHGS eTox ENH OHS EMP ENSR IH EMP gained         gained through
        Competencies                                          or Clin                       through       elective or
                                                               Res                          required      other required
                                                                                            courses       courses
ENH 1   Specify approaches for                                                              ENH 600,      ENH 601, 606,
        assessing, preventing, and                                                          602, 660      609, 610, 621,
        controlling occupational and                                                                      622, 624, 625,
        industrial hazards that pose                                                                      626, 630, 648,
        risks to worker health and                                                                        649, 670, 681
        safety
ENH 2   Describe the direct and                                                               ENH 600,    ENH 601, 606,
        indirect human, ecological,                                                           602, 650,   609, 610, 621,
        and safety effects of major                                                           660         622, 624, 625,
        industrial and occupational                                                                       626, 630, 648,
        agents                                                                                            649, 670, 681
ENH 3   Specify current occupational                                                          ENH 600,    ENH 603, 610,
        and industrial risk                                                                   602, 660    621, 622, 625,
        assessment methods                                                                                626, 630, 648,
                                                                                                          649, 661, 662,
                                                                                                          670, 681
ENH 4   Describe genetic,                                                                     ENH 600,    ENH 610, 625,
        physiologic, and                                                                      650         630, 636, 670
        psychosocial factors that
        affect susceptibility to
        adverse health outcomes
        following exposure to
        occupational and industrial
        hazards
ENH 5   Discuss various risk                                                                  ENH 600,    ENH 603, 606,
        management and risk                                                                   602, 610    625, 630, 648,
        communication approaches                                                                          649
ENH 6   Explain the general                                                                   ENH 600,    ENH 601, 621,
        mechanisms of toxicity in                                                             610, 650,   626, 661, 662
        eliciting a toxic response to                                                         660
        various industrial and
        occupational exposures
ENH 7   Develop a testable model of                                                           ENH 600,    ENH 601, 602,
        environmental injury in the                                                           602, 610,   606, 622, 626,
        context of occupational and                                                           650         670
        industrial settings


                                                                                                                       67
Table 2.6.c (ENV) Environmental Health Sciences

         Environmental Health             MPH MPH MPH MPH MPH MSPH DrPH DrPH DrPH PhD PhD PhD Primarily    Secondarily
         Sciences Programmatic            eTox OHS IH IHHS IHGS eTox ENH OHS EMP ENSR IH EMP gained        gained through
         Competencies                                           or Clin                       through      elective or
                                                                 Res                          required     other required
                                                                                              courses      courses
ENH 8    Describe federal and state                                                           ENH 600,     ENH 606, 621,
         regulatory programs,                                                                 602, 660     622, 625, 626,
         guidelines, and authorities                                                                       670, 681
         that control occupational
         and industrial health and
         safety issues
ENH 9    Detailed knowledge of the                                                              TOX 711
         mechanisms of environ-                                                                 (or ENH
         mental toxin effects on                                                                650),
         human health and physiology                                                            TOX 713
ENH 10   Demonstrate expertise in                                                               ENH 695,
         area of specialization                                                                 790, 791
ENH 11   Effectively communicate                                                                ENH
         research results orally and in                                                         790,799
         writing across the spectrum
         of scientific venues
ENH 12   Understand issues of data                                                              BST 600,   BST 612
         collection, analysis and                                                               611
         study management
ENH 13   Numerical data analysis, as                                                            BST 611    BST 612
         outlined in BST
         competencies 1-7
ENH 14   Writing of research proposals,                                                         ENH 710
         including supervised
         research project for degree
ENH 15   Ethical conduct of scientific                                                          GRD 717
         research (required of all
         UAB PhD students in
         participating departments)
ENH 16   Conduct supervised original                                                            ENH 699
         masters thesis research
         project
ENH 17   Conduct original exploratory                                                           ENH 796
         research towards dissertation
ENH 18   Conduct original doctoral                                                              ENH 798,
         dissertation research                                                                  799


                                                                                                                       68
Table 2.6.c (ENV) Environmental Health Sciences

         Environmental Health                MPH MPH MPH MPH MPH MSPH DrPH DrPH DrPH PhD PhD PhD Primarily      Secondarily
         Sciences Programmatic               eTox OHS IH IHHS IHGS eTox ENH OHS EMP ENSR IH EMP gained          gained through
         Competencies                                              or Clin                       through        elective or
                                                                    Res                          required       other required
                                                                                                 courses        courses
ENH 19   Comprehensive biological                                                                ENH 720/
         basis of health and disease                                                             IBS 700,
                                                                                                 ENH 721/
                                                                                                 IBS 701,
                                                                                                 ENH 722/
                                                                                                 IBS 702
ENH 20   Comprehensive                                                                           TOX 711        TOX 713
         understanding of how                                                                    (DrPH and      required for PhD
         environmental toxicants                                                                 PhD EMP        ENSR students,
         cause diverse human                                                                     students       elective for PhD
         diseases                                                                                substitute     IH students
                                                                                                 ENH 650)
ENH 21   Chemical, physical,                                                                     ENH 700
         geological, and biological
         bases of environmental
         health sciences
ENH 22   Advanced mastery of                                                                       ENH 701
         environmental chemistry
ENH 23   Advanced mastery of topics                                                                ENH 702
         in environmental
         management
ENH 24   Causes, effects, and                                                                      ENH 770
         responses to environmental                                                                required -
         disasters (both natural and                                                               doctoral
         human-made)                                                                               tracks,
                                                                                                   ENH 610
                                                                                                   required
                                                                                                   for MPH-
                                                                                                   IHGS
ENH 25   Propose a research project                                                                ENH 790
         in sufficient detail that a
         research committee can
         review it for scientific validity
         and for feasibility
ENH 26   Conduct a research project                                                                ENH 699,
         under the guidance of senior                                                              796


                                                                                                                             69
Table 2.6.c (ENV) Environmental Health Sciences

         Environmental Health            MPH MPH MPH MPH MPH MSPH DrPH DrPH DrPH PhD PhD PhD Primarily        Secondarily
         Sciences Programmatic           eTox OHS IH IHHS IHGS eTox ENH OHS EMP ENSR IH EMP gained            gained through
         Competencies                                          or Clin                       through          elective or
                                                                Res                          required         other required
                                                                                             courses          courses
         investigators
ENH 27   Write and present a                                                                   ENH 699,
         manuscript reporting                                                                  799
         research background,
         methods, results,
         discussion, and conclusions
ENH 28   Conduct a literature review                                                           ENH 790        Various journal
         on a topic of ENH research                                                                           clubs, as per
         interest                                                                                             student interest
                                                                                                              and advisor
                                                                                                              recommendation
ENH 29   Informatics tools appropriate                                                         ENH 699,       Note that ENH
         for specialty                                                                         ENH796,        699 is elective
                                                                                               ENH798,        for MPH-eTox
                                                                                               ENH799         track
                                                                                               (as
                                                                                               appropriate)




                                                                                                                           70
DEPARTMENT OF EPIDEMIOLOGY

The Department of Epidemiology offers six degree options. Table 2.6.c (EPI) describes the
competencies for each of these options.

MPH
The MPH degree in Epidemiology is a professional degree for students who plan a career in public
health practice. The MPH degree in Epidemiology can be earned in 1½ - 2 years. MPH training is
quantitative and analytical, with a strong bio-medical under-pinning. An internship (field practicum)
is required. Research is not required although students may enroll for elective research credits.
The MPH degree in Epidemiology/IHGS is a professional degree for students who are preparing
for a career in public health practice in developing countries; it may be earned in two years of
study. This MPH is also quantitative and analytical, with a strong bio-medical under-pinning and
an emphasis on health problems that are global in nature. An internship (field practicum) in a
developing country is required. Other requirements match those in the regular MPH program
without the IHGS emphasis described above.

MSPH (Epidemiology or Clinical Research)
The Department of Epidemiology offers the MSPH in two areas of specialization: Epidemiology and
Clinical Research. The degree can be completed in1½ - 2 years. The MSPH degree in
Epidemiology is an academic degree for students who are preparing for a career in epidemiologic
research. Only exceptionally well-qualified applicants having a research background or graduate
training in another discipline are admitted. The training is quantitative and analytical, with a strong
bio-medical under-pinning. MSPH training is more focused than is MPH training on epidemiologic
methods, data management, and analytic approaches. A course in research ethics is
recommended. Completion of a research project and production of a publishable manuscript are
required. The MSPH in Clinical Research is an academic degree for physicians preparing for a
career in clinical research. Physicians supported on the K30 training grant held by the UAB
Schools of Medicine and Public Health, and other qualified students (with the program director’s
permission) are eligible to enroll. This training is also quantitative and analytical, with a strong bio-
medical under-pinning. Experimental research designs (clinical trials and outcomes research) are
emphasized. Other requirements for the degree match those in the regular MSPH in Epidemiology
course described above.

DrPH with a focus in International Health and Global Studies
The Doctor of Public Health (DrPH) in Epidemiology and IHGS is a professional degree that
provides broad, but advanced, education and training in epidemiology and public health as they
apply to the assessment and control of diseases in developing countries. Training is multi-
disciplinary and is afforded in public health practice and administration, program development and
evaluation. This degree is for individuals preparing for leadership positions in public health in the
international setting. A dissertation on an aspect of public health practice research is required.

PhD
The Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) in Epidemiology is an academic degree that provides training in
the conduct of epidemiologic research. Training is focused on epidemiologic methods and their
application to the study of infectious diseases, chronic diseases, and injuries. This degree is
appropriate for individuals preparing for careers in research and teaching, and positions in
universities, government, or private industry. A dissertation requiring the design and
implementation of a research study, with appropriate analysis, interpretation, and presentation of
results, is required. The PhD graduate will have the required competencies, through completion of
the courses indicated. As a master’s degree in epidemiology is required for admission to the PhD
program, only the competencies beyond the master’s level are listed on Table 2.6.c (EPI).


                                                                                                      71
Table 2.6.c (EPI) Epidemiology cont.

Table 2.6.c(EPI) Epidemiology Programmatic Competencies and Learning Experiences
         Epidemiology Programmatic                       MPH MPH    MSPH MSPH DrPH PhD Primarily gained       Secondarily gained
                                                             IHGS   EPI                                       through elective or
         Competencies                                                    in Clin       through required       other required courses
                                                                         Resrch        courses
         Formulate a plan or a study to address an                                     EPI 610, 611           EPI 602, 605, 612
EPI 1
         epidemiologic question
                                                                          ( )
                                                                                          (EPI 607, 680)
         State a hypothesis that can be objectively                                       EPI 610, 611        EPI 610, 611
EPI 2
         and specifically addressed in a study
                                                                          ( )
                                                                                          (EPI 607)
EPI 3    Collect and manage data in an appropriate                                        EPI 610, 611, 697   BST 619, 626, 655,
         and comprehensive fashion                                                                            EPI 612, 698
EPI 4    Describe the statistical basis for computing                                     BST 611, 612,
         epidemiologic measures
                                                                                          EPI 610, 625
EPI 5    State the biologic basis, means of                                               EPI 610, 611        EPI 601, 604, 605,
         causation, and principles of control of                                                              608, 621
         infectious diseases
EPI 6    State the biologic basis, means of causation,                                    EPI 610, 611        EPI 602, 606, 612, 640
         and principles of control of chronic diseases
EPI 7    Research an epidemiologic topic to find                                          EPI 610, 611        EPI 606, 612, 621
         relevant published reports and papers
EPI 8    Describe the format and sections of a                                            EPI 610             EPI 612
         published epidemiologic study
EPI 9    Describe disease causation, as it may                                            EPI 610, 611        EPI 606, 608, 621
         relate to biological, environmental, and
         psycho-social factors
EPI 10   State the principles of designing an                                             EPI 610, 611        EPI 607, 612
         epidemiologic research study
EPI 11   Describe how epidemiology relates to the                                         HCO 600, EPI 610,   EPI 605, 612, 621
         other core disciplines in public health                                          ENH 600, HB 600,
                                                                                          MCH 695
EPI 12   Describe how real-world epidemiologic                                            EPI 610, 697        EPI 601, 605, 618, 621
         issues relate to public health practice
EPI 13   Describe approaches to the analysis of                                           EPI 611, 625        BST 655, 665,
         discrete and continuous data
                                                                                                              EPI 612
EPI 14   Display epidemiologic data via tables,                                           EPI 610, 611, 625   BST 619, 626,


                                                                                                                                   72
Table 2.6.c (EPI) Epidemiology cont.

         Epidemiology Programmatic                        MPH MPH    MSPH MSPH DrPH PhD Primarily gained        Secondarily gained
                                                              IHGS   EPI                                        through elective or
         Competencies                                                     in Clin       through required        other required courses
                                                                          Resrch        courses
         charts, and graphs, so that they can be                                                                EPI 612
         easily understood
EPI 15   Describe common ethical issues relating to                                        HCO 600, EPI 610,    EPI 612, 621
         the use or abuse of epidemiologic data                                            MCH 695
EPI 16   Verbally present epidemiologic data and its                                       MCH 695              EPI 603, 696
         interpretation to a lay audience
EPI 17   Manage datasets and select the                                                    EPI 611, 625, 626    BST 626,
         appropriate approach to analyze data
                                                                                                                EPI 612, 630
EPI 18   Describe the exposure and disease data                                            EPI 610, 611, 625,   EPI 606, 612
         sources typically used by epidemiologists,                                        ENH 600
         and the sources’ strengths and limitations
EPI 19   State the importance and ramifications of                                         EPI 610, 611,        EPI 605
         accurately communicating the results of                                           MCH 695
         epidemiologic studies to the public
EPI 20   Describe the roles of public health                                               EPI 610,             EPI 605, 608
         professionals in furnishing data relevant to
         epidemiologic issues                                                              MCH 695
EPI 21   Describe the principles of public health                                          EPI 610              EPI 603, 605, 621,
         surveillance                                                                                           MCH 614
EPI 22   Describe the principles of conduct of clinical                                    EPI 611              EPI 607,
         trials and experimental research
                                                                                                                BST 625
EPI 23   Describe the environmental, occupational,                                         HCO 600,             EPI 603, 608, 609,
         and medical causes of disease, and the                                                                 612, 616, 617
         means of their study                                                              EPI 610
EPI 24   Describe the application of epidemiologic                                         EPI 610              EPI 603
         principles to the study of injury prevention
EPI 25   Interpret mathematical models of                                                  EPI 610              EPI 605
         epidemiologic phenomena such as
         transmission of infectious agents
EPI 26   Describe research and practice approaches                                         EPI 697,             EPI 601, 605, 608, 621,
         or methods that differ from those typically
         used in epidemiologic research in the U.S.                                        MCH 608              ENH 609
EPI 27   Describe data management and analysis                                             MCH 608              EPI 630


                                                                                                                                     73
Table 2.6.c (EPI) Epidemiology cont.

         Epidemiology Programmatic                        MPH MPH    MSPH MSPH DrPH PhD Primarily gained       Secondarily gained
                                                              IHGS   EPI                                       through elective or
         Competencies                                                     in Clin       through required       other required courses
                                                                          Resrch        courses
         procedures appropriate for field work in
         resource-poor settings
EPI 28   Describe the health problems most                                                 MCH 617             EPI 601, 605, 612,
         common in the world today, their causes                                                               621, ENH 615,
         and associated high-risk populations
                                                                                                               MCH 603, 614
EPI 29   Describe the process of formulating and                                           EPI 697
         implementing public health programs in the
         international setting                                                             MCH 608




EPI 30   Propose a research project in sufficient                                          EPI 680, 699
         detail that a research committee can review
         it for scientific validity and for feasibility
EPI 31   Conduct a research project under the                                              EPI 680, 699
         guidance of senior investigators
EPI 32   Write and present a manuscript reporting                                          EPI 610, 680, 699
         research background, methods, results,
         discussion, and conclusions
EPI 33   State the principles of designing                                                 EPI 680
         observational and interventional studies
EPI 34   Describe the principles, goals, and conduct                                       EPI 607,            HCO 677,
         of clinical trials
                                                                                           BST 625             EPI 610
EPI 35   Describe approaches to the analysis of                                            BST 611, 612        BST 655, 665, 670
         discrete and continuous data
EPI 36   Display epidemiologic data via tables,                                            BST 611, 612        BST 655, 665, 670
         charts, and graphs, so that they can be
         easily understood
EPI 37   Describe common ethical issues relating to                                        EPI 607             EPI 621,
         the use or abuse of epidemiologic data


                                                                                                                                    74
Table 2.6.c (EPI) Epidemiology cont.

         Epidemiology Programmatic                     MPH MPH    MSPH MSPH DrPH PhD Primarily gained        Secondarily gained
                                                           IHGS   EPI                                        through elective or
         Competencies                                                  in Clin       through required        other required courses
                                                                       Resrch        courses
                                                                                                             GRD 717
EPI 38   Verbally present epidemiologic data and its                                    EPI 607, 680, 699    EPI 605
         interpretation to a professional audience
EPI 39   Manage datasets and select the                                                 BST 611, 612, 625    BST 619
         appropriate approach to analyze data
EPI 40   Describe the exposure and disease data                                         EPI 607, 680
         sources typically used by epidemiologists,
         and the sources’ strengths and limitations
EPI 41   Research an epidemiologic topic to find                                        EPI 610, 708         EPI 606
         relevant published reports and papers
EPI 42   Manage datasets and select the                                                 EPI 625, 626, 798,
         appropriate approach to analyze data                                           799
EPI 43   Describe research and practice approaches                                      MCH 608,
         or methods that differ from those typically
         used in epidemiologic research in the U.S.                                     EPI 799
EPI 44   Formulate a proposal for a research study,                                     EPI 799
         present it, and revise it appropriately for
         implementation




EPI 45   Prepare, present, and defend a dissertation                                    EPI 799
         that includes research methods, results,
         discussion, and conclusions
EPI 46   Discuss and critique published                                                 EPI 790
         epidemiologic studies and reports with
         regard to design choice, precision, bias,
         confounding, and ethical issues
EPI 47   Describe the genetic basis underlying many                                     EPI 730, 731
         chronic diseases
EPI 48   Understand molecular biology and its                                           EPI 788
         relevance to the epidemiology of human
         diseases
EPI 49   Demonstrate expertise in the statistical                                       EPI 709


                                                                                                                                 75
Table 2.6.c (EPI) Epidemiology cont.

         Epidemiology Programmatic                      MPH MPH    MSPH MSPH DrPH PhD Primarily gained    Secondarily gained
                                                            IHGS   EPI                                    through elective or
         Competencies                                                   in Clin       through required    other required courses
                                                                        Resrch        courses
         basis for the analysis of epidemiologic data
EPI 50   Be able to thoroughly analyze data                                              EPI 720
         collected in a follow-up (cohort) study
EPI 51   Be able to thoroughly analyze data                                              EPI 710
         collected in a case-control study
EPI 52   Analyze, interpret, and present                                                 EPI 797          EPI 703, Teaching
         epidemiologic data in an understandable                                                          Assistantship
         fashion
EPI 53   Demonstrate ability to teach epidemiologic                                      Teaching
         concepts to master’s-level students                                             Assistantship
EPI 54   Write a grant proposal suitable for                                             EPI 703          EPI 797, 799
         submission to the NIH or to another funding
         agency
EPI 55   Design a dissertation research project                                          EPI 798
         (including hypothesis formulation, design
         choice, plan for data collection, etc.)
EPI 56   Propose and defend a plan for conducting a                                      Dissertation
         dissertation research project                                                   Proposal
                                                                                         Presentation
EPI 57   With appropriate guidance, conduct a                                            EPI 799, Final
         dissertation research project from design                                       Dissertation
         through analysis and interpretation, with                                       Defense
         oral presentation of results and preparation
         of a publishable manuscript




                                                                                                                              76
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH BEHAVIOR

The Department of Health Behavior offers four degree options (MPH, MPH/IHGS, MSPH in Clinical
Research, and a PhD). Table 2.6.c (HB) describes the competencies for each of the areas.

MPH
The MPH degree is a professional degree for students preparing for a career in public health
practice. The MPH in Health Behavior can be earned in 1½ - 2 years of study. The MPH training
provides students with a strong background in the development, implementation and evaluation of
theory-based approaches to solving public health problems. An internship is required (field
practicum). Successful completion of the program is marked by maintaining a graduate GPA of a
least 3.0; completing all required core and track courses, the appropriate number of total credit
hours, a final project, and an internship; and the assessment of the academic advisor that the
student is ready to graduate. By the time of graduation, MPH students majoring in Health Behavior
will have the competencies in described in Table 2.6.c (HB) below, through their completion of the
courses indicated. This table lists only the competencies that are above and beyond the MPH core
competencies required of all MPH students. Students may elect for their required final project to
produce either an intervention-focused, evaluation-focused, or research-focused paper. Literature
review is a requirement for all.

The MPH in Health Behavior with a concentration on International Health and Global Studies
(IHGS) can be earned in 1½ - 2 years of study. An overseas internship is required (field
practicum). Successful completion of the program is marked by maintaining a graduate GPA of a
least 3.0; completing all required core and track courses, the appropriate number of total credit
hours, a final project and an internship; and by the assessment of the academic advisor that the
student is ready to graduate.

MSPH in Clinical Research with a focus in Health Behavior
The MSPH is an academic degree for students preparing for a career in clinical research. The
MSPH in Health Behavior can be earned in 1½ - 2 years of study. By the time of graduation,
MSPH students majoring in Health Behavior should have the competencies in Health Behavior
described in the Table 2.6.c (HB) through their completion of the courses indicated.

PhD in Health Promotion and Education
The PhD degree is for students preparing for a research or academic career. The PhD degree in
Health Promotion and Education is earned on average in 4.5 years. A 12-hour research internship
is required. By the time of graduation, PhD students majoring in Health Promotion and Education
will have the competencies described in Table 2.6.c (HB), through completion of the courses and
research requirements indicated.




                                                                                                77
Table 2.6.c(HB) Health Behavior Programmatic Competencies and Learning Experiences
        Health Behavior Programmatic                          MPH   MPH    MSPH   PhD   Primarily gained   Secondarily gained
                                                                    IHGS                                   through elective or other
        Competencies                                                                    through required   required courses
                                                                                        courses
HB 1    Understand and apply social and behavioral                                      HB 624, 697        HB 600, 602, 638, 608,
        science theories as they relate to solutions to                                                    660, 611, 692, 630, 635
        public health problems.
HB 2    Critically examine health behavior literature.                                  HB 624, 699        HB 600, 602, 635, 603,
                                                                                                           660, 611
HB 3    Develop and implement theory and/or evidence-                                   HB 600, 624, 630   HB 604, 680, 699
        based health promotion and disease prevention
        programs.                                                                                          MCH 608
HB 4    Apply principles and procedures for evaluating                                  HB 643             HB 602, 608, 611, 699*,
        health promotion & disease prevention programs.                                                    740
HB 5    Develop, implement, and evaluate behavioral                                     BST 619,           HB 608, 643, 699*,
        research.
                                                                                        HB 641             714, 740
HB 6    To analyze public health problems, with special                                 MCH 608, 617       ENH 610
        emphasis for work in international settings,
        including work in developing countries, resource
        poor conditions and multi-cultural settings
HB 7    To plan, implement and evaluate programs                                        MCH 608            ENH 602,
        appropriate for improving health conditions in
        international settings.                                                                            EPI 605, 609,

                                                                                                           MCH 614
HB 8    To identify public health conditions, practices and                             MCH 617            ENH 602, 610,
        issues involved in working in an international
        environment.                                                                                       EPI 601, 608, 612, MCH
                                                                                                           603
HB 9    To gain experience solving public health problems                               MCH 617
        through field placements in international settings
HB 10   To understand the linkages between public health                                MCH 617            ENH 610
        challenges in international settings and emerging,
        global health concerns.
HB 11   To analyze public health problems, with special                                 MCH 617
        emphasis for work in international settings,


                                                                                                                                78
Table 2.6.c (HB) Health Behavior cont.

        Health Behavior Programmatic                         MPH   MPH    MSPH   PhD   Primarily gained        Secondarily gained
                                                                   IHGS                                        through elective or other
        Competencies                                                                   through required        required courses
                                                                                       courses
        including work in developing countries, resource
        poor conditions and multi-cultural settings.
HB 13   Design, conduct, and evaluate research studies                                 EPI 607, 608,           HB 641, 643

                                                                                       BST 625
HB 14   Understand issues of data collection, analysis and                             BST 611, 612, 625       HB 641, 643
        study management
HB 15   Demonstrate an understanding of the ethics of                                  EPI 607, 680            HB 600, 641
        scientific research
HB 16   Formulate a proposal for a research study, present                             EPI 680,
        it, and revise it appropriately for implementation
                                                                                       HB 699
HB 17   Effectively communicate research results orally                                EPI 680,
        and in writing across the spectrum of scientific
        venues.                                                                        HB 699
HB 18   Critically evaluate published research                                         EPI 680, 607,           HB 641, 610, 720

                                                                                       HB 699
HB 19   Demonstrate expertise in area of specialization                                HB 624, 630, 643, 641
HB 20   Demonstrate theoretical knowledge from related                                 HB 730, 750             HB 624, 635, 660, 720
        social and behavioral sciences.
HB 21   Demonstrate knowledge and skills needed to                                     BST 611/EPR 609BST      EPR 696, 710,HB 714,
        become independent researchers                                                 612/EPR 710,BST         720,HCO 677
                                                                                       619/SOC 701,EPI 610,
                                                                                       HB 770, 798, 799
HB 22   Effectively plan, implement and evaluate health                                HB 730, 740, 760        HB 600, 604, 635,
        education and health promotion programs.
                                                                                                               680, 720HCO 677
HB 23   Understand the theoretical and philosophical basis                             HB 750                  HB 600, 660
        of health education and promotion.




                                                                                                                                    79
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH CARE ORGANIZATION AND POLICY (HCOP)

The Department of Health Care Organization and Policy (HCOP) offers three degrees with seven
specializations (MPH/Health Care Organization, MPH/Health Policy, MPH/Quantitative Health
Policy Analysis, MPH/Public Health Preparedness Management and Policy, MPH/General Theory
and Practice, MSPH/Outcomes Research, and DrPH/Public Health Management). Table 2.6.c
(HCOP) describes the competencies for each of these degrees. HCOP also offers five coordinated
degree program options with other disciplines (MPH/MBA, MPH/MPA, MPH/OD, MPH/JD with
Cumberland School of Law at Samford University, and MSPH/PhD in Psychology).

MPH
The MPH is a professional degree for students preparing for a career in public health practice.
HCOP offers 5 specialty areas: 1) Health Care Organization emphasizes management in the
health sector and provides students with training in health economics, public health management
and planning, strategic management, finance, marketing, and health law. 2) Health Policy
prepares students for a career in health policy analysis and public health practice within
government agencies; nonprofit health organizations; local, state, and federal legislative bodies;
managed care organizations; consulting firms; or other health sector entities. The program
provides students with training in policy analysis modeling and simulation, health politics, health
insurance, health economics, health policy, and health law. 3) Quantitative Health Policy Analysis
prepares students for a career in health policy and research and provides training in the policy
analysis modeling and simulation, statistical methods, data management, health politics, health
economics, health policy, and health law. 4) Public Health Preparedness Management and Policy
emphasizes hazards preparedness and management and provides students with training in major
hazards preparedness concepts including event typologies, response organization, leadership and
management, hazard and risk assessment policy development, and risk communication. In
addition to these specialized topics, the program requires mastery of major concepts from health
policy, health law and program evaluation. 5) General Theory and Practice is a professional
degree intended primarily for students who are preparing for a career in advanced public health
practice and are required to have a doctoral degree or at least 5 years of senior level experience in
public health or a closely allied field prior to admission. This program is customized to the
demands of practicing professionals and is directed by the academic advisor with a focus on public
health systems theory and practice. In addition, students receive training in health economics,
health policy, and health law.

MSPH in Outcomes Research
The MSPH degree in Outcomes Research is an academic degree for students preparing for a
career in health services research with an emphasis on clinical outcomes research. It provides
training in cost-effectiveness analysis, survey research methods, advanced statistical methods,
clinical decision making, patient-based outcomes measurement, epidemiology, and clinical trials
methodology.

DrPH in Public Health Management
The Doctor of Public Health (DrPH) in Public Health Management is a professional degree that
provides advanced education and training in public health management, policy, and planning and
prepares current and future public health leaders to apply critical thinking and rigorous research
methods to the complex practical problems facing practitioners and policy-makers in public health
practice. This program has a specific focus on management, organizational, and leadership
strategies and provides a unique opportunity for a research focus related to public health
preparedness issues. Students must have completed a core set of advanced HCO courses. Other
requirements for the DrPH program include courses in research methods and statistical analysis, a
specific set of courses related to management and leadership, and a set of elective courses.


                                                                                                  80
Table 2.6.c (HCOP) Health Care Organization and Policy Programmatic Competencies and Learning Experiences
          Health Care Organization and Policy          MPH MPH MPH MPH   MPH MSPH DrPH   Primarily gained Secondarily
          Programmatic Competencies                        HP  QHP       GTP Out.                         gained through
                                                       HCO         PHPMP     Res.        through required elective or other
                                                                                         courses          required courses
HCOP 1    Identify the main components and issues                                        HCO 600, 601,    HCO 603, 604
          regarding the organization, financing and                                      720
          delivery of health services and public
          health systems in the US
HCOP 2    Describe the legal and ethical bases for                                       HCO 607, 670
          public health and health services
HCOP 3    Communicate health policy and                                                  HCO 600,           HCO 697
          management issues using appropriate
          outlets and effective technologies                                             MCH 695
HCOP 4    Evaluate effectiveness, access, and                                            HCO 601, 603       HCO 673, 692,
          quality of personal and population-based                                                          693
          health services
HCOP 5    Demonstrate leadership skills for building                                     HCO 697            HCO 600,
          partnerships
                                                                                                            MCH 695
HCOP 6    Formulate methods for ensuring                                                 HCO 600, 601,      HCO 603, 604,
                                                                                         607                641, 720
          community health safety and preparedness
HCOP 7    Apply critical systems analysis for                                            HCO 697,           HCO 612, 686,
          resolving organizational issues and public                                                        693
          health practice problems                                                       MCH 695
                                                                                                            MBA 632
HCOP 8    Apply quality and performance                                                  HCO 612            HCO 601, 693,
          improvement concepts to address                                                                   720
          organizational performance issues

HCOP 9  Apply basic planning and management                                              HCO 697,           HCO 612, 615
        skills for successful administration of
        health care organizations                                                        MCH 695
HCOP 10 Apply principles of management, finance,                                         HCO 612, 615,      HCO 618, 720,
        marketing, accounting and strategic                                              640
        planning to health care organizations and                                                           MBA 609, 632,
        public health initiatives                                                                           650



                                                                                                                            81
Table 2.6.c (HCOP) Health Care Organization and Policy cont.

           Health Care Organization and Policy        MPH MPH MPH MPH   MPH MSPH DrPH   Primarily gained Secondarily
           Programmatic Competencies                      HP  QHP       GTP Out.                         gained through
                                                      HCO         PHPMP     Res.        through required elective or other
                                                                                        courses          required courses
HCOP 11 Understand the health policy-making                                             HCO 601, 607     HCO 603, 604,
        process in the U.S.                                                                              686
HCOP 12 Describe legal principles governing                                             HCO 607
        selected public health problems as
        derived from court decisions, statutes,
        and regulations
HCOP 13 Apply theory of organizational structures                                       HCO 618
        to professional practice by examining
        organization structure, management,
        finance and budgeting, human resources,
        contracts, negotiation, and operations
        research in public health settings
HCOP 14 Develop in-depth knowledge of a sub-                                            HCO 680, 692,      HCO 680, 692,
        stantive health policy area such as aging,                                      673/773            673/773
        health disparities, or child health policy
HCOP 15 Utilize statistical methods for decision                                        HCO 693            HCO 687
        analysis and health planning problems

HCOP 16 Understand the theoretical frameworks                                           HCO 603, 686       HCO 604, 670
        related to the processes of policy
        formulation, implementation, and change
HCOP 17 Demonstrate knowledge of data collection                                        BST 619
        techniques, data cleaning, and data
        management using appropriate software
HCOP 18 Demonstrate how to select appropriate                                           HCO 693
        analytical strategies for particular policy
        analysis issues.
HCOP 19 Evaluate technical policy analysis                                              HCO 603, 686,
        literature                                                                      693
HCOP 20 Utilize advanced statistical and                                                HCO 687, 693       HCO 694
        econometric methods for decision
        analysis and health planning problems
HCOP 21 Demonstrate mastery of simple and                                               HCO 687
        multivariate regression models, simple
        binary dependent variable models,
        instrumental variables estimators, sample


                                                                                                                           82
Table 2.6.c (HCOP) Health Care Organization and Policy cont.

          Health Care Organization and Policy              MPH MPH MPH MPH   MPH MSPH DrPH   Primarily gained Secondarily
          Programmatic Competencies                            HP  QHP       GTP Out.                         gained through
                                                           HCO         PHPMP     Res.        through required elective or other
                                                                                             courses          required courses
          selection and two-part models, and simple
          panel data models
HCOP 22   Demonstrate mastery of advanced                                                    HCO 687
          econometric data analysis using statistical
          software on computers
HCOP 23   Identify role of federal, state, and local                                         HCO 640, 641
          governments in emergency management
          and public safety
HCOP 24   Demonstrate mastery of simple and                                                  HCO 687
          multivariate regression models, simple
          binary dependent variable models,
          instrumental variables estimators, sample
          selection and two-part models, and simple
          panel data models
HCOP 25   Demonstrate mastery of advanced                                                    HCO 687
          econometric data analysis using statistical
          software on computers
HCOP 26   Identify the role of federal, state, and local                                     HCO 640, 641
          governments in the area of emergency
          management and public safety
HCOP 27   Understand the disaster life cycle and                                             HCO 640, 641
          assess the public health system role in
          each stage of the cycle
HCOP 28   Perform risk assessment and hazard                                                 HCO 640, 641       ENH 610
          vulnerability analysis

HCOP 29 Apply principles of management, finance,                                             HCO 640, 641,
        marketing, and strategic planning in                                                 644
        health care organizations, public health
        initiatives, emergency management, and
        disaster preparedness
HCOP 30 Understand formulation & implementation                                              HCO 641
        of health policy for emergency
        management and disaster preparedness
HCOP 31 Assess emergency response plans and                                                  HCO 640            HCO 644/
        make recommendations for emergency


                                                                                                                              83
Table 2.6.c (HCOP) Health Care Organization and Policy cont.

           Health Care Organization and Policy        MPH MPH MPH MPH   MPH MSPH DrPH   Primarily gained Secondarily
           Programmatic Competencies                      HP  QHP       GTP Out.                         gained through
                                                      HCO         PHPMP     Res.        through required elective or other
                                                                                        courses          required courses
           response policies based on needs                                                              MCH 609
           assessment and other analytic techniques
HCOP 32    Describe the psychological responses                                         HCO 643
           and human functioning during crisis
           events
HCOP 33    Identify the psychological phases of a                                       HCO 643
           crisis situation
HCOP 34    Understand how to communicate public                                         HCO 643
           health messages to various populations
           during crisis events
HCOP 35    Describe and analyze the major topics of                                     HCO 604,           HCO 641
           health policy formation and analysis and
           health politics                                                              MCH 695
HCOP 36    Describe the public health impact of                                         HCO 642
           zoonotic and non-zoonotic diseases
HCOP 37    Identify public health consequences of                                       HCO 642, EPI
           animal disease outbreaks                                                     605, ENH 610
HCOP 38    Identify and analyze the policy and                                          HCO 640, 641,      ENH 770
           regulatory issues that influence disease                                     642,
           control strategies
                                                                                        ENH 610
HCOP 39 Design, conduct, and evaluate research                                          HCO 699, 722       BST 625
HCOP 40 Understand issues of data collection,                                           HCO 721, 722,      BST 625,
        analysis and study management
                                                                                        BST 626, EPI 600 EPI 607
HCOP 41 Demonstrate an understanding of the                                             HCO 670          HCO 722
        ethics of scientific research
HCOP 42 Effectively communicate research results                                        HCO 721, 722       HCO 699
        orally and in writing across the spectrum
        of scientific venues.
HCOP 43 Critically evaluate published research                                          BST 611/612        HCO 722

                                                                                        HCO 677, 721
HCOP 44 Demonstrate expertise in area of                                                HCO 677, 693,      BST 625,
        specialization


                                                                                                                         84
Table 2.6.c (HCOP) Health Care Organization and Policy cont.

           Health Care Organization and Policy       MPH MPH MPH MPH   MPH MSPH DrPH   Primarily gained Secondarily
           Programmatic Competencies                     HP  QHP       GTP Out.                         gained through
                                                     HCO         PHPMP     Res.        through required elective or other
                                                                                       courses          required courses
                                                                                       699, 721/722     HCO 687
HCOP 45 Formulate a proposal for a research                                            HCO 699, 722     BST 625
        study, present it, and revise it
        appropriately for implementation
HCOP 46 Conduct an independent dissertation                                            HCO 797
        project under the guidance of dissertation
        committee
HCOP 47 Prepare, present, and defend a                                                 HCO 797
        dissertation that includes research
        methods, results, discussion, and
        conclusions
HCOP 48 Understand the theoretical and                                                 HCO 601/701,       HCO 709, 715,
        philosophical basis of advanced public                                         720, 797           718,
        health management and policy
                                                                                                          AH 714, 775




                                                                                                                          85
DEPARTMENT OF MATERNAL AND CHILD HEALTH

The Department of Maternal and Child Health (MCH) offers four degree options (MPH/Advanced
Leadership and Practice, MPH/Enhanced MCH Skills, MPH/International and Global Studies,
MPH/Administration/Policy, and the DrPH). The competencies for each of the degree options are
found in Table 2.6.c (MCH).

MPH
The Advanced Leadership and Practice in MCH program is designed specifically for students who
wish to continue professional careers, but would like to expand their community leadership roles.
The focus areas for the Advanced Leadership and Practice Program are: 1) MCH epidemiology
and analytical skills and 2) MCH program administration, policy and advocacy. The MCH
Epidemiology Analytical Skills Emphasis focuses on the enhancement of quantitative, qualitative,
and data-based analytical skills. The emphasis area is designed for students interested in
acquiring advanced research and evaluation skills that can be applied to the study and/or
assessment of maternal and child health and related public health issues at the local, state,
national, and international levels in public and private organizations. The MCH Program
Administration Policy/Advocacy Emphasis focuses on the enhancement of skills needed in the
planning, development, and implementation of programs and policy and advocacy-based
activities. The emphasis is designed for students interested in acquiring advanced policy and
advocacy skills that can be applied to maternal and child health and related public health issues at
the local, state, national and international levels in public and private organizations. The MCH
Enhanced Skills Program requires 4-5 semesters of course work, including a full-time (480 hour)
internship. The MCH International Health and Global Studies Emphasis focuses on the
enhancement of skills needed for work in international and resource poor settings. The emphasis
is designed for students interested in acquiring the knowledge and skills necessary to assess and
monitor health status and health care utilization issues related to the health of children and their
families; to plan, implement, evaluate and administer public health programs and policies; to
undertake research, develop data systems and analyze data; and to advocate and promote
essential policy development and change in international and resource poor settings across the
globe. This emphasis usually requires 4-5 semesters of course work, including a full-time
internship in an international setting.

DrPH
The DrPH prepares students for advanced administrative, research, and teaching positions. Upon
completion of the program, graduates will be prepared to assume academic positions or to be
employed as MCH epidemiologists, policy analysts, evaluation specialists or program directors.
Graduates may also assume senior administrative positions in health care organizations serving
families or MCH-related advocacy programs. These positions may be in the public or private
sector at the local, state, federal, or global level. Students who have not completed the MPH core
must successfully do so prior to matriculation into the DrPH program. In addition, students must
have completed a core set of MCH courses.




                                                                                                  86
Table 2.6.c (MCH) Maternal and Child Health Programmatic Competencies and Learning Experiences
         Maternal and Child Health Programmatic                  MPH- MPH   MPH-   DrPH   Primarily gained    Secondarily gained
                                                                 ALAP ESP   IHGS                              through elective or
         Competencies                                                                     through required    other required courses
                                                                                          courses
MCH 1    The major domestic and international causes of                                   MCH 600             MCH 603, 608, 612,
         mortality and morbidity within MCH populations                                                       614, 617, 703, 720
         including differences between the U.S. and other
         developed and less developed countries
MCH 2    The normal patterns of individual and family growth                              MCH 600             MCH 602, 603, 610,
         and development from an intergenerational and                                                        614, 617, 619, 702,
         lifespan perspective                                                                                 703
MCH 3    The determinants of health and illness, and                                      MCH 600             MCH 603, 608, 610,
         concomitant theories including biological, behavioral                                                703
         and socio-cultural influences such as racism, sexism,
         and economic disparity, as well as protective factors
MCH 4    The characteristics of health care systems,                                      HCO 618,            MCH 603, 606, 608,
         including dimensions of, use of, and access to                                                       610, 614, 703, 710,
         health care                                                                      MCH 605             711, 796
MCH 5    The principles and theories of population-based                                  MCH 600             MCH 603, 608, 612,
         health promotion at the individual, family and                                                       614, 617, 619, 703,
         community levels                                                                                     720
MCH 6    The theories and principles of community                                         MCH 609             MCH 603, 610, 614,
         organization, change, and development                                                                617, 703
MCH 7    A comprehension of the foundations of scientific                                 MCH 605             MCH 603, 608, 610,
         inquiry, and the uses and limitations of conceptual                                                  703, 710
         frameworks
MCH 8    Describe MCH problems in terms of time,                                          MCH 600, 609        MCH 603, 608, 614,
         magnitude/severity, scope, dispersion/location, and                                                  703, 710, 711, 796
         co-occurrence/co-morbidity

MCH 9  Identify the scientific underpinnings and determine                                MCH 601, 605, 609   MCH 603, 606, 608,
       the validity of evidence for interventions addressing                                                  617, 703, 711, 796
       MCH problems
MCH 10 Apply knowledge of demographic, health, familial,                                  MCH 601, 609        MCH 602, 603, 608,
       socio-cultural, environmental and community factors                                                    614, 619, 702, 703
       to the design of MCH programs and services




                                                                                                                                    87
Table 2.6.c (MCH) Maternal and Child Health cont.

         Maternal and Child Health Programmatic                 MPH- MPH   MPH-   DrPH   Primarily gained   Secondarily gained
                                                                ALAP ESP   IHGS                             through elective or
         Competencies                                                                    through required   other required courses
                                                                                         courses
MCH 11 Critically analyze inequities in health status based                              MCH 600, 601       MCH 603, 617, 703,
       on race/ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and gender                                                  711, 796
MCH 12 Recognize different strengths, needs, values, and                                 MCH 600, 601       MCH 602, 603, 608,
       practices of diverse cultural, racial, ethnic, and                                                   612, 617, 702, 703,
       socioeconomic groups and determine how these                                                         711, 720
       factors affect health status, health behaviors, and
       program design
MCH 13 Research design, sampling, basic descriptive and                                  MCH 605            MCH 603, 605, 608,
       inferential statistics, and validity/reliability                                                     614, 703, 711, 796
       assessment of measures
MCH 14 Epidemiological concepts and descriptive                                          MCH 600, 605       MCH 603, 607, 610,
       epidemiology                                                                                         614, 703, 707, 710,
                                                                                                            711, 796
MCH 15 The use of data to illuminate ethical, political,                                 MCH 600, 601       MCH 608, 609, 610,
       scientific, economic, and overall public health                                                      695, 711, 796
       issues
MCH 16 Strengths and limitations of qualitative and                                      MCH 605, 609       MCH 606, 608, 796
       quantitative methods
MCH 17 Data collection strategies and their strengths and                                MCH 605, 609       MCH 608, 710, 711,
       limitations, including surveys, focus groups, and                                                    720, 796
       record-based information
MCH 18 Principles and key features of community                                          MCH 601, 609       MCH 606, 608
       assessment, program design, implementation, and
       evaluation
MCH 19 Prepare and interpret data from vital statistics,                                 MCH 600, 601       MCH 603, 608, 610,
       censuses, surveys, service utilization, and other                                                    614, 695, 703, 710,
       relevant reports on the health of MCH populations,                                                   711, 714, 796
       and have the ability to detect meaningful inferences
       from data and the translation of data into information
MCH 20 Apply appropriate qualitative methods to                                          MCH 605            MCH 603, 608, 614,
       understand maternal and child health status                                                          703, 710, 711, 796
MCH 21 Ability to conceptualize and appropriately use data                               MCH 601            MCH 603, 608, 614,
       and statistical/epidemiological methods for problem                                                  695, 703, 714, 796
       and asset identification, assessment, program
       planning, implementation, and evaluation


                                                                                                                                  88
Table 2.6.c (MCH) Maternal and Child Health cont.
 Table 2.6.c (MCH) Maternal and Child Health cont.

         Maternal and Child Health Programmatic                MPH- MPH   MPH-   DrPH   Primarily gained    Secondarily gained
                                                               ALAP ESP   IHGS                              through elective or
         Competencies                                                                   through required    other required courses
                                                                                        courses
MCH 22 Formulate hypotheses or research questions,                                      MCH 605             MCH 602, 603, 608,
       develop and implement an analytic strategy                                                           702, 703, 711, 714,
                                                                                                            796, 798, 799
MCH 23 Evaluate the integrity and comparability of data and                             MCH 605             MCH 603, 608, 703,
       identify existing gaps                                                                               710, 711, 714, 796
MCH 24 Extract data from primary and secondary sources;                                 MCH 605             MCH 603, 608, 614,
       use basic statistical and graphics software,                                                         619, 703, 714
       including programs such as EPI-info, SPSS, and
       SAS for data management, analysis, and the
       linkage of data sets
MCH 25 Organizational & management theories & practices,                                HCO 618             MCH 603, 607, 619,
       and their administration in public & private agencies                                                690, 703, 707
MCH 26 The application of inter-organizational theories                                 HCO618              MCH 603, 690, 703
       including contractual agreements and linkages and
       the use of principles of systems development,
       management, and analysis
MCH 27 The purpose, rationale, activities, and performance                              MCH 600, 601, 609   MCH 603, 703
       measures for existing major MCH programs
MCH 28 Appropriate use of networking, team building, small                              MCH 609             MCH 610, 619, 690,
       group processes, advocacy, negotiation, & conflict                                                   695, 707
       resolution skills, and the knowledge of community
       organization and coalition-building techniques to
       address MCH issues and problems
MCH 29 Techniques for soliciting and maintaining consumer                               MCH 609
       and other constituency involvement at all levels of
       an organization


MCH 30 The processes, organization, and administration of                               MCH 601             MCH 603, 690, 703
       quality management techniques in maternal and
       child health programs and agencies, including an
       understanding of the appropriate use, analysis, and
       interpretation of quality improvement data as it
       applies to employees, clients, and management
MCH 31 Apply knowledge of management and organizational                                 HCO 618             MCH 603, 619, 690,


                                                                                                                                  89
Table 2.6.c (MCH) Maternal and Child Health cont.

         Maternal and Child Health Programmatic                MPH- MPH   MPH-   DrPH   Primarily gained   Secondarily gained
                                                               ALAP ESP   IHGS                             through elective or
         Competencies                                                                   through required   other required courses
                                                                                        courses
       theories and practices to the development, planning,                                                703
       staffing, administration, and evaluation of public
       health programs, including the implementation of
       strategies promoting integrated service systems for
       MCH populations
MCH 32 Integrate population-based health promotion and                                  MCH 600            MCH 603, 607, 617,
       disease prevention strategies within primary care                                                   703, 707
       and other service delivery systems
MCH 33 Develop mechanisms to monitor and evaluate                                       MCH 601, 609       MCH 603, 608, 703
       programs and service networks for their
       effectiveness and quality, including the use of
       performance measures
MCH 34 Develop, justify, and present a budget                                           HCO 618,           MCH 608, 690

                                                                                        MCH 609
MCH 35 Develop the background and significance section of                               MCH 690            MCH 603, 608, 690,
       a grant application and/or develop the rationale for                                                703, 796
       a program or intervention, incorporating scientific,
       methodological, and practice knowledge and skills
       as appropriate
MCH 36 Effective written and oral communication skills,                                 MCH 600, 609       MCH 602, 603, 606,
       including accurate and effective preparation and                                                    607, 610, 702, 703,
       presentation of reports to agency boards,                                                           707, 720, 796
       administrative organizations, legislative bodies,
       consumers, and/or the media using demographic,
       statistical, programmatic, and scientific information
MCH 37 Use appropriate techniques for development and                                   MCH 660, 661
       dissemination of professional development and
       continuing education programs for MCH
       professionals

MCH 38 Effectively resolve internal employee and/or                                     HCO 618            MCH 690
       organizational conflicts through knowledge of
       applicable management techniques
MCH 39 Develop and maintain an affiliation with community/                              HCO 618,           MCH 619, 690

                                                                                                                                 90
Table 2.6.c (MCH) Maternal and Child Health cont.

         Maternal and Child Health Programmatic                 MPH- MPH   MPH-   DrPH   Primarily gained    Secondarily gained
                                                                ALAP ESP   IHGS                              through elective or
         Competencies                                                                    through required    other required courses
                                                                                         courses
       consumer boards, boards of directors, and coalitions                              MCH 609
MCH 40 Effective and appropriate use of information                                      MCH 600             MCH 603, 610, 690,
       technology, including but not limited to computer                                                     703, 720
       graphics and other software necessary for efficient
       program management and communication
MCH 41 Develop strategies to ensure integrated service                                   MCH 601             MCH 602, 607, 649,
       systems for MCH populations                                                                           702, 707
MCH 42 The historical development and scientific basis of                                MCH 601             MCH 603, 703
       MCH public policies and practices in the U.S. for
       federal, state, and local agencies and programs
       serving maternal and child health populations
MCH 43 Significant past and current national legislative                                 MCH 600, 601        MCH 610
       mandates relevant to the development and delivery
       of maternal and child health services
MCH 44 The structure and roles of legislative, judicial, and                             MCH 601             MCH 610
       administrative bodies at the national, state, and
       local levels
MCH 45 The organization and financing of health services in                              MCH 600, 601        MCH 610
       the U.S. and the position of MCH within the system
MCH 46 The theories and mechanisms of MCH policy                                         MCH 601             MCH 607, 707
       development and implementation within the scope
       of health & other public policy programs in the U.S.
MCH 47 The operation of federal entitlement programs in                                  MCH 601             MCH 607, 707
       conjunction with private insurers to financially
       support maternal and child health services
MCH 48 Identify essential gaps in existing MCH programs                                  MCH 600, 601, 609   MCH 603, 703
       and implement appropriate policy and advocacy
       measures to ensure optimal care
MCH 49 Identify public health laws, regulations, and policies                            MCH 601             MCH 603, 607, 610,
       related to specific programs                                                                          703, 707
MCH 50 Place a maternal and child health program within the                              MCH 600             MCH 603, 703
       historical and current context of related programs

MCH 51 Collect and summarize data relevant to a particular                               MCH 600, 601        MCH 603, 690, 703


                                                                                                                                  91
Table 2.6.c (MCH) Maternal and Child Health cont.

         Maternal and Child Health Programmatic                  MPH- MPH   MPH-   DrPH   Primarily gained    Secondarily gained
                                                                 ALAP ESP   IHGS                              through elective or
         Competencies                                                                     through required    other required courses
                                                                                          courses
         policy/problem; articulate the health, fiscal,
         administrative, legal, social, and political
         implications of each policy option
MCH 52   State the feasibility and expected outcomes of, and                              MCH 601             MCH 603, 690, 703
         barriers to, achieving each policy option and decide
         on the appropriate course of action
MCH 53   Write a clear and concise policy statement, position                             MCH 600, 601        MCH 690
         paper, and/or testimony appropriate for a specific
         audience
MCH 54   Develop a plan to implement a policy, including                                  MCH 601             MCH 608, 690
         goals, outcome and process objectives,
         implementation steps and evaluation plan
MCH 55   Translate policy into organizational plans,                                      MCH 600 MCH 601     MCH 608, 690
         structures, and programs
MCH 56   The philosophy, values, and social justice concepts                              MCH 609             MCH 603, 610, 612,
         associated with public health practices in MCH, and                                                  703, 720
         an appreciation that concepts and theories apply to
         all MCH populations, irrespective of socioeconomic
         or Title V eligibility status
MCH 57   The principles and issues involved in the ethical and                            MCH 605             MCH 606, 608, 612,
         sensitive conduct of practice and research within                                                    711
         MCH populations, and in the organization and
         delivery of public health services within communities
         and government agencies; including ethical and
         confidential data collection, management, analysis
         and dissemination
MCH 58   The philosophical concept s and rationale                                        MCH 600, 601, 609
         underlying the delivery of family- centered,
         comprehensive, community-based, and culturally
         competent MCH and public health services and
         programs, including recognition of community
         assets
MCH 59   Ethical conduct in practice, program management,                                 MCH 605,            MCH 608, 612, 614,
         research, and data collection and storage                                                            711, 796
                                                                                          HCO 618

                                                                                                                                   92
Table 2.6.c (MCH) Maternal and Child Health cont.

         Maternal and Child Health Programmatic           MPH- MPH   MPH-   DrPH   Primarily gained   Secondarily gained
                                                          ALAP ESP   IHGS                             through elective or
         Competencies                                                              through required   other required courses
                                                                                   courses
MCH 60 Promotion of cultural competence concepts within                            MCH 600            MCH 603, 703
       diverse MCH settings
MCH 61 Ability to build partnerships within MCH                                    MCH 609            MCH 608, 690
       communities and constituencies to foster
       community empowerment, reciprocal learning and
       involvement in design, implementation, and
       research aspects of MCH programs and systems




                                                                                                                          93
2.6.d Manner in which competencies are developed, used, and made available to students

The UAB School of Public Health reviewed the ASPH core competencies. With input from our
departmental curriculum committees and School-wide Educational Policy Committee, the School
adopted 53 School-wide competencies that each graduate is expected to master. The
departmental programmatic competencies were developed at the department level and approved
by department faculty. Faculty members are to adhere to these competencies when proposing
learning objectives for new courses and when revising learning objectives for existing courses.
Course learning objectives are fashioned (or modified) to meet the competencies agreed upon,
and also take into account feedback and suggestions from our alumni, our external advisors,
specific accrediting bodies (as for Industrial Hygiene), and the research and practice experiences
of our faculty. Although ASPH guidelines are dominant, our faculty emphasizes learning objectives
and competencies of particular interest to our School in light of its international mission and
location in the Deep South. Thus, for example, we offer several courses that include learning
objectives that stress programmatic competencies relating to rural health, racial disparities in
disease rates, cultural barriers to disease control, and public health problems of developing
countries.

The School wide MPH Core and departmental programmatic competencies are made known to our
students in several ways. The MPH competencies were given to each student during the Fall
Orientation, placed on the SOPH web site, stated on core syllabi, evaluated on core course
evaluations, and reinforced in the Integrative Experience (MCH 695). Students also complete a
web-based pre/post-test on competencies through WebCT (began Fall 2007). For the
departmental programmatic competencies, each department provides all students copies of the
programmatic competencies at their departmental orientation, are placed on course syllabi and
listed on the departmental website. All syllabi are required to list the programmatic competencies
and corresponding learning objectives by January, 2007. Syllabi are provided in the Resource
Room. [RR] A copy of the syllabus template may be found in appendix 2.6.d. During Fall
orientation, most departments give their incoming students a master’s degree or doctoral degree
handbook that describes each degree program’s learning objectives and degree requirements.

2.6.e Manner in which changing practice needs are periodically assessed and
competencies are adjusted.

Our School and its faculty remain current on national public health needs and priorities, and have
curricula content (especially for the MPH and DrPH programs) that prepares our students to
address these needs. We remain in touch with these needs and priorities in several ways. We
have a presence in the national public health arena – with our Dean, Interim Associate Dean and
many of our faculty being very active on a number of committees (e.g., the DrPH sub-committee of
the Education Committee of ASPH, the Distance Education Committee, Practice Coordinators).
Also we have several faculty members who serve on CEPH ad hoc site teams and in this way
become familiar with the program innovations being implemented at other Schools.

Our School has a close working relationship with the Alabama Department of Public Health
(ADPH) in Montgomery, Alabama. The ADPH offers internships and our Interim Associate Dean
serves in a liaison capacity between the school and ADPH. We have an excellent relationship with
the Jefferson County Alabama Department of Health (5 blocks from the School) and the Health
Officer is a graduate of our program. Senior leaders from these health departments have adjunct
faculty appointments at our School and are frequently called upon to be guest lecturers and to
provide guidance relating to our instructional programs and internship experiences. The Dean’s
Broad Street Committee (external advisory board) is also consulted regularly regarding the content
of our curricula. Our Alumni Affairs Office conducts alumni surveys which include questions about


                                                                                                94
the relevance of the content of our degree programs. Alumni are asked to reflect upon their
education and training at our School, and to comment on the relationship it bears to their current
job and career. And each year alumni are invited to our School to present information on their
career paths and their assessment of which areas of our curricula were relevant to their jobs, and
which other areas could be re-focused. We are linking our curricula to public health practice needs
and priorities, and modify our curricula to meet workforce and other changing needs. Specifically,
our course evaluation tool allows us to add up to 20 questions specifically related to each course.
All core course masters have placed the competencies on the course evaluation to determine if the
material was covered sufficiently.

2.6.f   Assessment of the extent to which this criterion is met.

This criterion is met.

The School-wide competencies were adopted and incorporated in the 2006-2007 school year. The
programmatic competencies vary by department. Competencies for the various programs were
finalized in the Summer of 2007, thus are currently being integrated along with the School wide
competencies. In the Fall of 2007, the Interim Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and Strategic
Programs formed a DrPH and an MSPH committee to develop competencies for those degrees. In
addition, UAB has recently purchased “WEAVE,” a software package which will organize and
analyze all assessments of students and link them to the competencies. The SOPH has been
chosen as one of the first schools at UAB to implement WEAVE. The implementation process is
scheduled to begin in Spring 2008.

Strengths
• Our School offers a vibrant and topical curriculum with courses designed around specific
   learning objectives that are linked to competencies agreed upon by the School’s faculty and
   administration.
• Our departments and the School-wide Educational Policy Committee reviews our degree
   programs and course syllabi.
• We offer targeted instruction to teach the agreed-upon competencies, to ensure that each
   graduate will be well-prepared to assume a range of professional public health positions as well
   as academic, governmental and industry positions.
• We stress, and reward, quality teaching and this is reflected in high level instructional programs
   that produce quality graduates.
• We teach a wide variety of courses that cover a range of public health topics.
• Each of our courses has specific learning objectives that relate to the competencies that we
   have decided are appropriate for each course of study.

Weaknesses
• We lack a formal, regular, on-going assessment of each degree program and related
  competencies.
• Significant challenges are associated with adopting and implementing an explicit set of
  measurable competencies that can be evaluated for each degree program and specialization
  within departments and across the School.
• It is difficult to achieve balance between teaching factual information and conveying processes
  such as critical thinking and effective learning strategies while incorporating specific
  competencies.
• Long lists of discipline-specific and programmatic competencies have made application of the
  competencies, assurance of their achievement, and measurement of that achievement a
  complex process.


                                                                                                 95
•   Learning objectives to achieve competencies change.

Future Plans
Several options for streamlining the curriculum to be maximally effective and efficient in delivering
and measuring the competency-based approach to teaching and learning are being planned.

•   We will review the current lists of competencies, both School-wide and programmatic, with the
    goal of consolidating them to emphasize more universal principles and broad-based concepts
    needed for the public health professional in the 21st century. Under the leadership of the
    Associate Dean, a group of faculty, students and practitioners will be formed in Spring 2008 to
    review the current competencies and make recommendations to the School.
•   We will develop more focused School-wide and discipline/program specific competencies.
•   We will provide on-going School-wide oversight and systematic discussion of curricular matters
    through the Core Oversight, MSPH and DrPH Ad Hoc Committees.
•   We will ensure that on-going annual review occurs through guidance from the Associate Dean
    for Academic and Strategic Programs, the School-wide Educational Policy Committee, and
    various departmental mechanisms for curricular review.
•   The University has recently purchased a software package (WEAVE) which will assist the
    School in monitoring competencies. The SOPH has been chosen as a pilot site and we are in
    the beginning stages of implementation.




                                                                                                    96
2.7 ASSESSMENT PROCEDURE

2.7    Assessment Procedure. There shall be procedures for assessing and documenting
       the extent to which each student has demonstrated competence in the required
       areas of performance.

2.7.a Description of the procedures used for monitoring and evaluating student progress
in achieving the expected competencies.
The primary procedures for measuring whether students have obtained the School-wide Core
Public Health competencies are course examinations/assignments, internship evaluations, and the
School’s pre/post student self-assessment (described below). For measuring attainment of
programmatic competencies, the primary procedures vary by program but include course
examinations, final products/projects for courses, internship evaluations, theses or similar final
products, professional credentialing examinations (Industrial Hygiene), and measurement of
discipline specific objectives – as in the case of Maternal and Child Health.
At the course level, evaluation of student progress is generally done by the course instructor(s).
Although the course director has the flexibility to design his/her grading structure, didactic courses
generally follow a competency-based (as opposed to norm-based “grading on a curve”)
assignment of points by which A=90% and up; B=80-89%; C=70-79% and below 70%=F. Non-
didactic courses often carry a Pass/No Pass designation. For internships, both preceptor and
instructor evaluate student progress. All student performance evaluation processes are submitted
to the School’s Educational Policy Committee for approval.
The core competencies adopted by the School are those published by the ASPH and addressed in
the MPH core courses and courses within programmatic areas. The five MPH core courses use
midterm and/or final examinations to evaluate student learning and three evaluate student papers
as well. The table below shows the core courses and their evaluation activities. In addition to
these assessment activities, the School has implemented a self-assessment on achievement of the
competencies that students complete three times during their course of study: 1) a pretest upon
entry into the MPH program; 2) a pretest at the first class meeting of the culminating course, MCH
695; and 3) a posttest at the final class meeting of that culminating course. In Fall 2007, core
courses included the competencies on the course evaluation.

Table 2.7.a School-wide Competency Achievement Processes
 Course         Measures
 EPI 600        Two in-class quantitative exams: Mid-Term and Final Exams; completion of approximately
                5 homework assignments; attendance and participation in class discussions; judgment of
                the course master and teaching assistants that the student has mastered the objectives
                sufficiently to earn an “A” or a “B.”
 EPI 610        Two in-class objective examinations; an in-class objective and quantitative final exam; a
                take-home paper critique final examination; brief in-class presentations; performance at
                review sessions prior to each of the three in-class exams; attendance at the computer
                laboratory sessions and completion of approximately 6 laboratory homework assignments;
                a laboratory final examination; judgment of the course master and teaching assistants that
                the student has learned the material sufficiently well to earn an “A” or a “B.”
 BST 600        Five in-class examinations, each covering 3 weeks of course material; critique of data
                analysis methods used in a research article; critique of a data collection instrument; and
                critique of applied measurement in a research article.
 BST 611/612    Midterm exam, final exam, homework.
 ENH 600        Two exams, administered during scheduled class time as the semester unfolds, each
                represent about 30% of the lecture content (and corresponding assigned readings). The
                third – administered during finals week – represents about 40% of the lecture content (and


                                                                                                        97
Table 2.7.a School-wide Competency cont.

 Course         Measures
                corresponding assigned readings). The third exam is NOT cumulative.
 HB 600         Midterm exam covering all Social and Behavioral Sciences competency areas; final project
                in which students must synthesize assigned work into a final document outlining an
                intervention development, implementation and evaluation plan.
 HCO 600        Mid-term examination and strategic planning exercise.
 MCH 695        Group work and oral presentations, weekly quiz, homework, midterm exam, group project
 Integrative    which includes written program rationale and presentation, and a final exam. Students are
 Experience     also asked to complete a pre and post school-wide competency assessment.
 Internship     At the completion of the internship, students provide a final product to document the
                experience and are graded based upon the agencies preceptor evaluations and the
                students’ final products. All internships are graded on a Pass/No Pass basis.

2.7.b Identification of outcomes that serve as measures by which the school will evaluate
student achievement in each program, and presentation of data assessing the school’s
performance against those measures for each of the last three years.

The primary student outcomes by which the School evaluates its own performance are grade point
averages, graduation rates, and post graduation activities. Table 2.7.b shows the specific desired
outcomes and data on the School’s performance with regard to each for each of the last three
years. UAB policy prohibits students with a GPA of less than 3.0 to graduate, therefore, all
students will graduate with a minimum 3.0 GPA. Approximately 20-25% of our students are part-
time, therefore, we hope to have 80% of our MPH student population graduate within 2 years. The
self-study has revealed an issue with regard to MPH graduation rates. The initial analysis reveals
that between 11-19% of the enrollees leave the program (Appendix 2.7.b). UAB has a large
number of foreign trained physicians who leave the program prior to degree completion for a
residency program. The other students are still enrolled in the program and further study will
hopefully reveal why they have not successfully completed their degree within 2 years. In addition,
beginning with the 2007 class, all students will take a pre/post test on the core competencies. In
2007 it will be self-report and in 2008 we will incorporate knowledge questions related to the
competencies. We strategically plan for 85% or more of the students will demonstrate mastery of
the school wide competencies by receiving a B or better on the post-test.

Table 2.7.b Student Outcomes for School Performance 2004-2007
 Outcome                                         Target      2004-2005       2005-2006       2006-2007
 GPA                                              >3.0         100%            100%            100%
 Percent of MPH students completing the
                                                  80%           70%             77%             76%
 program within 2 years of matriculation
 Percent of graduates employed in public
                                                                78%             94%
 health related field at one year post            90%                                           93%
                                                                N=24            N=35
 graduation or pursuing further education
 Mastery of MPH School Wide Competencies          85%            n/a             n/a             n/a

2.7.c   Outcome measure related to job placement experience and graduation rates

Each October, the director of career services conducts an anonymous New Graduate Survey of
the previous academic year's graduates (December, May, and August of the previous year). This
survey seeks information about the new graduate's first job including: job status (full- or part-time,
not employed, etc.), as well as type of organization, discipline area, and salary. SOPH strategically
expects over 90% of the student population will be employed within 6 months of graduation.
In consideration of the 78% employment rate demonstrated in the 2004-05 academic year (Table
2.7.b), we reviewed the results of the 2004-05 New Graduate Survey and were able to isolate the
degree group reporting they had not yet found employment. Of the 12 students who graduated


                                                                                                       98
 from this group, 8 were non-US citizens and two others had just completed summer internships in
 the previous August (one was an international internship). This accounts for 10 of 12 possible
 students. Of those responding, 6 reported that they were not yet employed but were looking. The
 combination of these two circumstances explains students not employed at the time of the survey.

 2.7.d Destination of graduates by specialty area for each of the last three years.

Table 2.7.d Destination of Graduates by Department or Specialty Area for Last 3 years
 Destination of Graduates by Program Area in 2004-05 n=23
                   Govern- Non-              Health      Private Univ./   Proprie- Further Non-Hlth Not
                   ment    profit            Care        Prac.   Research tary     Educ. Related Employed
                   #    % # %                # %         # %      #     %  #   % # % #         %     #  %
 Biostatistics                                                     2 100
 Env. Health
 Sciences                                                               1    100
 Epidemiology        1     17                                           4     66       1    17
 Health Behv                                                            3    100                      1   50
 Health Care
 Org. & Policy       1     50
 Maternal &
 Child Health                                                           2    100
 *Int'l Health                   2     29                                                                      5   71
 Destination of Graduates by Program Area in 2005-06 n=35
                   Govern- Non-              Health      Private Univ./   Proprie- Further Non-Hlth Not
                   ment    profit            Care        Prac.   Research tary     Educ. Related Employed
                   #    % # %                # %         # %      #     %  #   % # % #         %     #  %
 Biostatistics                                                     3 100
 Env. Health
 Sciences                                     1    50                   1      50
 Epidemiology         2    17     1      8                              3      25      4     33                2   17
 Health
 Behavior                         1    20                               3      60                     1   20
 Health Care
 Org. & Policy        2    29                 2    28                   3      43
 Maternal &
 Child Health         1    33                                                          1     33       1   33
 *Int'l Health                                                          2    100
 Destination of Graduates by Program Area in 2006-07 n=28
                   Govern- Non-   Health                 Private Univ./   Proprie- Further Non-Hlth Not
                   ment    profit Care                   Prac.   Research tary     Educ. Related Employed
                   #    % # % # %                        # %      #     %  #   % # % #         %     #  %
 Biostatistics             1 100
 Env. Health
 Sciences                                                                              1 100
 Epidemiology         1    10     1    10     2    20                   5      50                     1   10
 Health
 Behavior                         1    50                                                                      1   50
 Health Care
 Org. & Policy        1    14                                           3      43      2     29       1   14
 Maternal &
 Child Health         1    25                                                          1     25       2   50
 *Int'l Health                    1    33                                                             1   33   1   33
 *not a department, but we capture alumni who identify their type of work as "international health"


                                                                                                                    99
2.7.e   Certification of professional competence

Two degrees we award qualify graduates for certification of professional competence: Certified
Industrial Hygienist (CIH) and Certified Health Education Specialist (CHES). According to the
American Board of Industrial Hygiene that offers the exam for the CIH, the applicant must have
four years of certified industrial hygiene employment before applying to take the exam; however,
one year is credited if the applicant has a master's degree in industrial hygiene. The American
Board of Industrial Hygiene reports that 67 of our 193 graduates have successfully completed the
exam. The Certified Health Education Specialist (CHES) exam is offered annually. In the last
three years, according to the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. we
have had 16 graduates take the CHES exam; all 16 have successfully passed.

2.7.f Data describing results from periodic assessments of alumni and employers of
graduates’ ability to effectively perform the competencies in a practice setting.

In addition to the employment information requested in the annual New Graduate Survey, a section
of this survey deals with how prepared the new graduates feel at various skills. The following table
demonstrates their responses to these questions.

2.7.f Data describing results from periodic assessments of alumni and employers of
graduates’ ability to effectively perform the competencies in a practice setting.

Table 2.7.f New Graduate Survey 2004-05, 2005-06 and 2006-07
                                          2004-05 (n=24)                   2005-06 (n=35)                    2006-07(n=29)
                                                 somewhat




                                                                                  somewhat




                                                                                                                   somewhat
                                      prepared


                                                 prepared


                                                            prepared


                                                                       prepared


                                                                                  prepared


                                                                                             prepared


                                                                                                        prepared


                                                                                                                   prepared


                                                                                                                              prepared
                                      very




                                                                       very




                                                                                                        very
                                                            not




                                                                                             not




                                                                                                                              not
 Integration of various public
 health disciplines in approaching,
                                       63%        33%          4%       59%         35%         6%       78%        15%          7%
 analyzing and resolving public
 health problems
 Conducting basic data
                                       55%        33%        12%        59%         38%         3%       44%        41%        15%
 analysis
 Consideration of various study
 designs and selection of              54%        33%        13%        38%         53%         9%       50%        36%        14%
 appropriate statistical analyses
 Communicating with other public
                                       44%        56%             0     56%         38%            0     74%        26%             0
 health professionals
 Communicating risk to different
                                       50%        42%          8%       47%         44%         9%       68%        25%          7%
 audiences
 Identifying and analyzing ethical
                                       42%        50%          8%       38%         56%         6%       75%        21%          4%
 arguments
 Interpreting and communicating
                                       46%        46%          8%       59%         35%         6%       57%        36%          7%
 data analyses

In 2007, we began to offer a similar survey to the employers of our new graduates. The table
below represents the employers’ responses to the same questions asked of the students.




                                                                                                                                100
Table 2.7.f (1) Employer of New Graduate Survey
                                                                              2006-07 (n=16)
                                                                          very somewhat         not
                                                                      prepared    prepared prepared
Integration of various public health disciplines in approaching,
                                                                         87%         13%           0
analyzing and resolving public health problems
Conducting basic data analysis                                           81%         19%           0
Consideration of various study designs and selection of appropriate
                                                                         73%         27%           0
statistical analyses
Communicating with other public health professionals                    100%           0           0
Communicating risk to different audiences                                69%         31%           0
Identifying and analyzing ethical arguments                              69%         31%           0
Interpreting and communicating data analyses                             81%         19%           0

2.7.g Assessment of the extent to which this criterion is met.

This criterion is met.

Strengths
• Evaluation of student mastery of learning objectives occurs at all stages throughout
   professional and academic degree programs.
• Assessment of graduates, alumni and employees is routinely conducted.
• Employers perceive that students are better prepared than do the students in their self-
   assessments.

Weakness
• Surveys of graduates indicate that data analysis skills such as conducting analyses, selecting
  appropriate analyses, and interpreting and communicating data analyses are seen as areas in
  which only about 50% of the graduates feel very prepared.
• Response rates are for surveys are low. In the Fall, 2007 we conducted the survey via email
  rather than mail in hopes that our response rates would be better.
• Graduation rates are below target.

Future Plans
The Interim Associate Dean established three committees in the Fall of 2007 to review the
competencies: the Core Oversight, MSPH and DrPH Committees. The Core Oversight Committee
explores ways to provide integration, reinforce competencies, and assess student achievement of
MPH School-wide competencies. An assessment system that will incorporate student
achievement processes (Table 2.7.a), student competency post tests, course evaluation
competencies questions, graduate and employer surveys and graduate rates will be established by
the Core Oversight Committee. The Core Oversight Committee will be expanded to include
practitioners and students. Department programmatic competency assessments will be developed
and monitored. The MSPH and DrPH Committees have reviewed the departmental program
competencies from a degree perspective and made recommendations to the departments. Those
recommendations are currently being reviewed at the departmental level. In addition, review by
the Associate Dean and Core Oversight Committee of the survey information will occur to
determine its validity and relevance to the course of study in the SOPH. Areas of weakness
identified in the alumni survey will be assessed by the Core Oversight Committee and the DrPH
Committee for curricular implications. Follow-up phone surveys or other methods will be
considered to further explore areas of weakness identified in the survey. Information gathered
could be used to reorganize course content or shift emphasis in some of the quantitatively-oriented
courses.

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2.8 OTHER PROFESSIONAL DEGREES

2.8     Other Professional Degrees. If the school offers curricula for professional degrees
        other than the MPH or equivalent public health degrees, students pursing them must
        be grounded in basic public health knowledge.

2.8.a Identification of professional degree curricula offered by the school, other than those
preparing primarily for public health careers, and a description of the requirements for
each.

Not applicable.


2.8.b Identification of the manner in which these curricula assure grounding in public
health core knowledge.

Not applicable.

2.8.c   Assessment of the extent to which this criterion is met.

Not applicable.




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2.9 ACADEMIC DEGREES

2.9      Academic Degrees. If the school also offers curricula for academic degrees,
         students pursuing them shall obtain a broad introduction to public health, as well
         as an understanding about how their discipline-based specialization contributes
         to achieving the goals of public health.

2.9.a    Identification of all academic degree programs, by degree and area of specialization.

The academic degrees are listed in Tables 2.1.a(1) and 2.1.a(2). The MS, MSPH and PhD are
academic degrees within the School. The MS is offered in Biostatistics. The MSPH is offered in
Epidemiology, Environmental Health/Toxicology, Outcomes Research, and Clinical Research (with
a focus in Biostatistics, Environmental Health Sciences, Epidemiology, and Health Behavior). The
PhD is offered in Biostatistics, Environmental Health Sciences, Epidemiology, and Health
Education/Health Promotion.

2.9.b Identification of the means by which the school assures that students in research
curricula acquire a public health orientation. If this means is common across the school, it
need be described only once. If it varies by degree or program area, sufficient information
must be provided to assess compliance by each program.

The School is strongly committed to ensuring that all students acquire a broad public health
orientation. This is accomplished in several interrelated ways. First, faculty members in the
School’s six departments have extensive backgrounds and experience in public health research
and/or practice. This helps create a culture and environment in which students see research and
practice linked every day to identify, understand and address public health problems and promote
the health of the community. The extensive work of faculty members in a host of professional
arenas and in local, state, national and international settings, serves to further emphasize a broad
public health orientation.

Second, students in the SOPH, regardless of degree program, are advised of and encouraged to
take advantage of the numerous courses, seminars, scientific lectures and satellite broadcasts with
public health relevance that may be found within the School and across campus. In addition,
students are advised of, and encouraged to take advantage of, the Endowed Lecture Series
(formerly Public Health Grand Rounds). Initiated in 1998, the Series brings in leading public health
practitioners to share their insights into a particular area of public health practice. Speakers have
included local and state health officers, officials from the CDC and other federal agencies,
specialists on disaster preparedness, and a wide range of other presenters with public health
expertise. Over the past few years, the School has worked to endow these lectures and currently
we have four endowed lectures which are described in detail in criterion 3.3.a.

Third, the School’s emphasis on helping students acquire a broad public health orientation is
further reinforced through curricular requirements. There are common course requirements for the
MSPH and MSPH in Clinical Research programs:

•     MSPH – The School offers an MSPH in Environmental Health/Toxicology, Epidemiology,
      Health Policy, and Outcomes Research. For these degree programs, students are required to
      take core courses in biostatistics (Biostatistics I and II) and epidemiology (Principles of
      Epidemiologic Research and Principles of Epidemiologic Research Lab) and complete a
      minimum of 15 hours of methodologic and specialty area courses. Students are also
      encouraged to enroll in other core public health courses.



                                                                                                 103
•   MSPH in Clinical Research – The School also offer the MSPH in Clinical Research through the
    Departments of Biostatistics, Epidemiology, Environmental Health Sciences, and Health
    Behavior. The MSPH in Clinical Research consists of a minimum of 41 credit hours. Of these,
    14 hours are required, including 9 hours of specific biostatistics courses (Biostatistics I and II,
    Clinical Trials) and 5 hours of specific epidemiology courses (Epidemiology of Clinical
    Research, Topics in Clinical Research). Students then select at least 9 credit hours from a list
    of approved Masters Research Electives; complete 9 hours of focus specific electives in
    biostatistics, epidemiology, environmental health sciences, or health behavior; and take at least
    9 hours of directed (699 level) masters research to fulfill the MSPH requirement for conducting
    a research project.

In addition, PhD programs at the SOPH are organized to ensure that students are provided with a
public health orientation. Specific departmental requirements are detailed below.

Finally, all students enrolled in an academic program (beginning Fall 2007) are required to
complete a 12½ hour WebCT course entitled “Overview of Public Health” by the end of their
second semester. Students with prior public health education (coursework in each of the public
health core disciplines) or experience (5 years in public health) may be waived from this
requirement by permission of the Associate Dean.

2.9.b(1)       MS-PhD - Biostatistics

The Department offers an MS degree in Biostatistics, which serves as the foundation for doctoral
study. Students enrolled in the MS program must take at least two courses in a non-quantitative
field such as public health, biology, or medicine. The PhD degree program in Biostatistics produces
research-oriented scientists who can advance statistical and modeling theory and can interact
effectively with scientists in other disciplines to advance knowledge in those fields. All students in
Biostatistics are strongly encouraged to enroll in other core public health courses at the School.

2.9.b(2)       PhD - Environmental Health Sciences

Students enrolled in the PhD program in Environmental Health Sciences may choose to study in
one of three focal areas: 1) Environmental Management and Policy, 2) Environmental Health
Sciences Research, 3) or Industrial Hygiene. In the Environmental Management and Policy
curriculum, students are required to take two biostatistics courses, a course in scientific integrity, a
wide range of environmental health sciences courses, and at least seven electives that can be
drawn from across the public health curriculum. Students in the Environmental Health Sciences
Research curriculum are required to take a course in biostatistics, a course in scientific integrity,
and a wide range of courses in toxicology and environmental health sciences. Students enrolled in
the Industrial Hygiene PhD are required to complete two biostatistics courses, a course in scientific
integrity, a wide range of courses in toxicology and environmental health sciences, and at least six
electives that may be drawn from across the public health curriculum.

2.9.b(3)       PhD - Epidemiology

Students enrolled in the PhD program in Epidemiology are required to complete a range of
epidemiology courses; at least two advanced biostatistics courses; at least one doctoral level
course, in an area of medicine or in one of the major areas of public health other than EPI and
BST; and at least one course related to research ethics and scientific integrity (e.g., HCO 670).




                                                                                                    104
2.9.b(4)        PhD - Health Behavior

Students enrolled in the PhD program in Health Education and Health Promotion are required to
complete a minimum of one course in epidemiology (Advanced Epidemiological Research
Methods), three courses in biostatistics (or their equivalent), three courses in the social and
behavioral sciences, two elective courses in evaluation research/research methods/statistics, and
a variety of health behavior courses.

2.9.c   Identification of the culminating experience required for each degree program.

For students in academic degree programs, the SOPH conforms to all requirements of the
Graduate School and the University. The culminating experience for the MS and MSPH degree is
the design and successful completion of a masters-level research project. For the PhD degree, the
culminating experience is the development and defense of a thesis that constitutes an original
contribution to scientific knowledge.

2.9.d Assessment of the extent to which this criterion is met.

This criterion is met.

Strength
• The development and offering of the “Overview of Public Health” course for students in the
   academic programs without prior public health coursework or experience will ensure that each
   student has at least minimum exposure to basic public health concepts and ideas.

Weakness
• Many opportunities have been available to SOPH students seeking academic degrees to also
  achieve a broad understanding of public health, however, there was no universal means to
  ensure each student was exposed to public health principles and practice.

Future Plans
We plan to track student attendance and evaluate student knowledge pre and post completion of
the “Overview of Public Health.”




                                                                                               105
2.10 DOCTORAL DEGREES

2.10 Doctoral Degrees. The school shall offer at least three doctoral degree programs
that are relevant to any of the five areas of basic public health knowledge.

2.10.a Identification of all doctoral programs offered by the school, by degree and area of
specialization.

Table 2.1.a.3 provides a list of the DrPH and PhD degree programs. The DrPH is offered in four
areas: Environmental Health Sciences, Epidemiology International Health and Global Studies,
Public Health Management, and Maternal and Child Health.

There are four academic PhD degrees: Biostatistics, Environmental Health Sciences,
Epidemiology, and Health Education and Health Promotion. Each of these degree programs is
staffed with at least five FTE faculty.

2.10.b Data on the number of active students in each doctoral degree program as well as
applications, acceptances, enrollments and graduates for the last three years.

No systematic review has been conducted on doctoral graduation rates. The School is in the
process of reviewing the doctoral rates, establishing a tracking system and will establish a
benchmark for the departments.

Table 2.10.b: PhD and DrPH Degree Data for the Past Three Years
 DEPARTMENT      Year 2004-2005
                      Applied      Accepted         Enrolled     Graduated          Total enrolled
 PhD-BST                   34            15               10      0 (3- MS)                     19
 PhD-ENH                    3             0                0              1                      6
 PhD-EPI                   12             4                3              3                     17
 PhD-HB                    12             7                3              5                     16
 DrPH                      28            16                8              6                     44
                 Year 2005-2006
 PhD-BST                   21             8               5       0 (2 –MS)                    22
 PhD-ENH                    5             2               2               2                     5
 PhD-EPI                   21             3               3               0                    14
 PhD-HB                    15             6               4               4                    17
 DrPH                      16            14               5               9                    49
                 Year 2006-2007
 PhD-BST                   21             9               6               1                    29
 PhD-ENH                   11             7               5               1                     9
 PhD-EPI                   22             5               3               0                    13
 PhD-HB                    24            15               9               5                    23
 DrPH                      30            21               7               7                    44

2.10.c Assessment of the extent to which this criterion is met.

This criterion has been met.

Strengths
   • There are five doctoral degree programs; all have graduates over the past three years.
   • There are 5 FTE Faculty for each doctoral degree program.



                                                                                                106
Weaknesses
  • No systematic review has been conducted on doctoral graduation rates.

Future Plans
The Associate Dean for Academic and Strategic Programs will continue to monitor applications
and enrollment. A system will implemented that will monitor graduation rates of doctoral students
and set benchmarks for the departments.




                                                                                               107
2.11 JOINT DEGREES

2.11   Joint Degrees. If the school offers joint degree programs, the required curriculum for
       the professional public health degree shall be equivalent to that required for a
       separate public health degree.

2.11.a Identification of joint degree programs offered by the school and a description of the
requirements for each.

The UAB SOPH offers 12 dual degree programs that enable students to pursue a degree in public
health and another degree simultaneously. All of these programs require students to complete a
minimum of 42 semester hours, complete the core set of courses, complete or waive the
internship, and complete the culminating experience. All of the degree programs permit counting
of public health related coursework toward the 42 minimum semester hours. These are specified
as certain courses and not simply a transfer of a block of credit hours. The recently approved
DVM/MPH in collaboration with the College of Veterinary Medicine at Auburn University will be
operational by Fall 2008. Current enrollment data for the dual degree programs may be found in
Table 4.4.e. Detailed descriptions of the dual degree options and their degree requirements are
below.

   The Department of Health Behavior has three joint degrees with their MPH: the MSN, the
   PhD in Psychology, and the PhD in Sociology.

   •   Coordinated MPH/MSN - The dual MPH/MSN program (coordinated with the School of
       Nursing) is designed to address the health behavior issues and needs of advanced practice
       nurses. This program of study prepares graduates to participate in the development,
       implementation, and evaluation of innovative health behavior programs and policies.
       Graduates may assume a variety of positions in nursing or health behavior including health
       behavior program directors and project coordinators. This program builds on the synergy
       generated through two complementary curriculum tracks. Its purpose is to prepare nurses
       for leadership positions in public health and health behavior intervention programs.
       Students enrolled in the joint MPH/MSN program through the Department of Health
       Behavior must complete the 19-hour public health core (BST 600, ENH 600, EPI 600, HB
       600, HCO 690 and MCH 610), a 15-hour HB track, and two nursing courses with relevance
       to HB.

   •   Coordinated MPH/PhD in Psychology - The dual MPH/PhD in Psychology is coordinated
       between the UAB Department of Health Behavior, the UAB Department of Psychology, and
       the University of Alabama (Tuscaloosa) Department of Psychology. Students enrolled in
       the program complete the 19-hour MPH core (BST 600, ENH 600, EPI 600, HB 600, HCO
       690 and MCH 610), 12 credits in the health behavior track, and 12 credits in behavioral
       science.

   •   Coordinated MPH/PhD in Sociology - The dual MPH/PhD in Sociology is coordinated
       between the UAB Department of Health Behavior and the UAB Department of Sociology.
       Students enrolled in the program complete the 19-hour MPH core (BST 600, ENH 600, EPI
       600, HB 600, HCO 690 and MCH 610), 12 credits in the health behavior track, and 12
       credits in behavioral science.

   The Department of Health Care Organization and Policy offers five dual degrees. These
   are the MPH/JD (Juris Doctor), MPH/MPA (Masters in Public Administration), the MPH/MBA


                                                                                             108
(Masters in Business Administration), the MPH/OD (Doctor of Optometry), and the MSPH/PhD
in Psychology.

•   Coordinated MPH/JD - The MPH/JD dual degree program links the UAB SOPH and the
    Cumberland School of Law at Samford University. The program is intended to expose
    future attorneys to broad areas of public health. The JD degree requires 90 semester hours
    of coursework, and the MPH degree requires 45 semester hours. In the coordinated
    program, 14 hours of public health courses are credited toward the JD degree and 14 hours
    of law courses are credited toward the MPH degree. A minimum of 28 credit hours must be
    taken in the SOPH. Because this is a coordinated dual degree track, graduation from one
    program is contingent on completion of all requirements for graduation from the other
    program.

•   Coordinated MPH/MPA - The MPH/MPA dual degree program is intended to provide
    students with the ability to describe the economic, legal, organizational, and political
    underpinnings of the US health system (both tracks); apply skills required to work effectively
    in an administrative position in the government sector based on public health principles and
    programs (both tracks); apply the principles of management and strategic planning in health
    care organizations (management track); apply basic planning and management skills
    necessary for administration of health care organizations (management track); critically
    evaluate health policy research studies and resulting recommendations (policy track); and
    design and implement health policy studies and draw appropriate conclusions (policy track).
    The MPH/MPA program requires the satisfactory completion of at least 59 credit hours.
    Students must complete both MPH core (MCH 610, EPI 600, ENH 600, HB 600, BST 600),
    and MPA core requirements. Students may choose either of two program options - health
    policy analysis or management. It is anticipated that a full-time student can complete the
    dual curriculum in two years. Part-time students may take up to five years to complete their
    studies. This is a coordinated dual degree track, so graduation from one program is
    contingent upon completion of all requirements for graduation from the other program.

•   Coordinated MPH/MBA - The MPH/MBA dual degree program (coordinated with School of
    Business) prepares students who lack previous public health education or experience with
    the skills needed for advanced positions in health management. For students who do
    already have public health experience and/or a relevant advanced degree, the joint
    MPH/MBA provides a health-management credential with broad applicability. Students in
    the joint program complete the MPH core (MCH 610, EPI 600, ENH 600, HB 600, BST
    600), as well as 24 credit hours of additional HCOP courses, and 36 hours of Graduate
    School Management courses, for a total of at least 76 credit hours. The work can be
    completed in two to three academic years. This is a coordinated dual degree program, and,
    as such, graduation from one program is contingent on completion of all requirements for
    graduation from the other program.

•   Coordinated MPH/OD - The MPH/OD dual degree program recognizes that vision disorders
    and eye diseases are major public health problems worldwide. This degree option provides
    optometrists in public health with the skills to assess community needs for vision care
    services. In addition, it enhances their ability to develop, administer, and evaluate eye and
    vision health programs in research projects. Students enrolled in the MPH/OD program are
    required to complete the 16-hour public health core (MCH 610, EPI 600, ENH 600, HB 600,
    BST 600), 21 credit hours of additional HCOP courses, an HCOP internship, and HCO 690
    (The Public Health Integrative Experience).




                                                                                              109
•   Coordinated MSPH/PhD in Psychology - The MSPH/PhD dual degree program prepares
    PhD students in Psychology to perform research in health outcomes or health policy
    analysis. The program is coordinated between the Department of Health Care Organization
    and Policy and the Department of Psychology at UAB or the Department of Psychology at
    the University of Alabama (Tuscaloosa). To be considered for this program, applicants
    must first be admitted to the PhD program in Psychology at UAB or the University of
    Alabama (Tuscaloosa). The MSPH degree requires completion of a minimum of 43 hours.
    The program of study includes a core of two courses in epidemiology and two courses in
    biostatistics; seven additional courses in biostatistics and health care organization and
    policy; an elective in health behavior, biostatistics or health care organization and policy;
    and a master’s level research project (HCOP). This is a coordinated dual degree track, so
    graduation from one program is contingent on completion of all requirements for graduation
    from the other program.

The Department of Maternal and Child Health offers two joint degrees with their MPH.
These are with the MSN and the MSW.

•   Coordinated MPH/MSN – This dual degree option is coordinated with the UAB School of
    Nursing. The program prepares nurse practitioners to participate in the development,
    implementation, and evaluation of innovative maternal and child health programs and
    policies. This dual degree builds on the synergy generated through two complementary
    curriculum tracks. In this educational experience, advanced clinical skill is combined with
    expertise in program planning and evaluation. The coordinated MPH/MSN degree can be
    completed in two years of full-time study. Students may select a focus in the nursing
    curriculum in any of three tracks: 1) Nursing and Health Systems Administration, 2) Nurse
    Practitioner or Clinical Nurse Specialist, or 3) Quality and Outcomes Management in Health
    Systems. At the completion of the degree, nurse practitioner graduates are eligible to take
    the certification examination for pediatric nurse practitioner, family nurse practitioner, or
    women's health nurse practitioner, depending on the specialty course of study. Students
    enrolled in the joint MPH/MSN program through the Department of Maternal and Child
    Health must complete the 19-hour public health core (BST 600, ENH 600, EPI 600, HB 600,
    HCO 600 and MCH 695), the 18-hour MCH core, and two nursing courses with relevance to
    maternal and child health.

•   Coordinated MPH/MSW - The MPH/MSW (Master of Public Health/Master of Social Work)
    program is coordinated between the UAB Department of Maternal and Child Health and the
    School of Social Work at the University of Alabama (Tuscaloosa). Dual degree students
    can earn the two graduate degrees in two academic years, including summers. The
    program is available to students enrolled in the School of Social Work and subsequently
    enrolled in the SOPH. The coursework is designed to prepare social workers for
    interdisciplinary practice in public health programs concerned with the promotion and
    improvement of the health of diverse populations, including women, children, and families.
    Graduates may pursue careers in a variety of social work and/or public health settings
    related to policy and program development; organization of community services; program
    administration, planning and evaluation; research; and teaching. Students in the
    coordinated program will complete courses in the Enhanced MCH Skills MPH program in
    Maternal and Child Health. This includes 19 hours of MPH core courses (BST 600, ENH
    600, EPI 600, HB 600, HCO 600, MCH 695), 20 hours of MCH core courses (including 17
    hours in MCH and 3 hours in HCOP), and SW 520 (Research Methods for Social Work
    Practice).




                                                                                             110
    The School of Public Health also offers a coordinated Master of Public Health and Doctor of
    Medicine (MPH/MD) program in cooperation with the UAB School of Medicine for students
    pursuing medical education who have career interests in public health or disease prevention
    practice or research and an MPH/DVM with Auburn University.

    •   Coordinated MPH/MD - The MPH/MD is a general track degree that permits students to
        focus coursework in one of the six departments in the School. Competencies are
        individualized to each student in consultation with the student and his/her advisor.
        MPH/MD students complete the MPH core courses (16 semester hours), 15 semester
        hours in one of the SOPH departments, the culminating experience course (HCO690), and
        a minimum of 8-semester-hour-equivalent-coursework from the medical curriculum, some
        of which would meet the internship requirement.

    •   Coordinated MPH/DVM – The MPH/DVM is a general track MPH where students take
        focused coursework in one of the following departments: Environmental Health,
        Epidemiology, Health Behavior, or Health Care Organization and Policy (public health
        preparedness). MPH/DVM students complete the MPH core courses (16 semester hours),
        15 semester hours in one of the four SOPH departments, the internship, the culminating
        experience course (HCO690), and a minimum of 8 semester hours of coursework from the
        DVM curriculum. It is possible that some practice experience in the DVM might be counted
        toward the internship requirement.

211.b Assessment of the extent to which this criterion is met.

This criterion is met.

Strengths
• Without exception, the dual degree programs are structured to ensure that students receive a
   strong grounding in public health principles, research, and practice.
• The MSPH dual degree program requires students to complete 43 credit hours of public health
   courses.
• All MPH dual degree programs require the same minimum of 42 hours of credit, and they have
   the same internship and culminating experience requirements.

Weakness
• Some programs have small enrollments.

Future Plans
The Associate Dean for Academic and Strategic Programs will monitor programs for effectiveness
and cost efficiency. A review of each department’s joint programs will occur every other year. Low
numbers appear to be related to recruitment and limited options for the non-traditional student.
Core courses will be offered via distance in Fall, 2008. The School is collaborating with the
University of South Alabama in an effort to offer a coordinated joint MPH/MD degree as well as a
Certificate in Public Health to other interested students.




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2.12 DISTANCE EDUCATION

2.12   Distance Education or Executive Degree Programs.

2.12.a Identification of all degree programs that are offered in a format other than regular,
on-site course sessions.

Not applicable.

2.12.b Description of the distance education or executive degree programs.

Not applicable.

2.12.c Assessment of the extent to which this criterion is met.

Not applicable.




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     Chapter 3: Creation, Application and Advancement of Knowledge

3.0 CREATION, APPLICATION AND ADVANCEMENT OF KNOWLEDGE
       3.1     Research
       3.2     Service
       3.3     Workforce Development

Introduction

The UAB School of Public Health has a national and international reputation for excellence in
public health research. It ranks 12th among all accredited schools of public health in NIH funding,
according to the most recent NIH rankings for schools of public health. This accounts for less than
half of the School’s total research expenditures. For the period from 2004 through 2006, an
average of 82 faculty in the school produced an average of 354 papers in refereed journals, 28
monographs, and 4 books annually, and acquired an annual average of $40,836,435 million in
extramural funds. Approximately 79% of these funds came from federal government sources, and
the rest from industry, state government, and non-profit sources.

The research conducted in the School relates directly to its mission to develop, teach and apply
knowledge to promote health and prevent disease. Faculty publications have appeared in
respected scientific journals and have been cited frequently by others. School researchers also
participate in a wide range of academic societies, serve on national and international leadership
committees and tasks forces, and provide review services for journals and study sections.

Our service is a strength of our school and we strive to encourage faculty, staff and students to
participate through our policies, rewards, opportunities and a sense of good citizenship. The school
partners with community, state and international organizations to address many of the health
issues facing them. As abundant as our service is, we feel that we need to develop a “Program for
Service” (Strategic Goal 3) that will increase service activities for faculty, students and staff. In
addition, we need a central depository and tracking system which we will create within the next 6
months.

Our relationship with the workforce is continuing to improve and grow with the establishment of the
Office of Public Health Practice. A formal relationship with the Alabama Department of Public
Health was created in Fall, 2006 and continues to build a bridge in research, training, internships
and workforce placement.




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3.0      Creation, Application and Advancement of Knowledge
3.1      Research. The school shall pursue an active research program, consistent with its
         mission, through which its faculty and students contribute to the knowledge base of
         the public health disciplines, including research directed at improving the practice
         of public health.

3.1.a    Research activities, policies, procedures and practices.

UAB is one of America’s premier research universities. Its current research portfolio contains over
2,500 active grants and contracts, totaling $363 million annually. With a world-renowned academic
health center and approximately 100 interdisciplinary research centers, UAB’s pioneering
breakthroughs offer new solutions and hope for families and communities worldwide.

The UAB SOPH is among the leading research institutions in public health and provides singular
leadership for the Southeastern United States. The School has been rated second out of the
twelve schools at UAB in terms of amount of funding and first in terms of faculty productivity when
adjusted by number of faculty. The scope of research conducted by the School spans academic
disciplines from bench science through the social sciences, all focused on improving the public
health and health care systems. Faculty and students routinely partner in research activities in
diverse areas such as statistical genetics, epidemiology, occupational health, toxicology, nutrition
science, oncology, chronic diseases, health disparities in vulnerable populations, substance abuse,
sexually transmitted diseases, maternal and child health, health care organization and policy, and
health services and outcomes research.

Policies, Procedures, and Practices Supporting Research and Scholarship

University
The SOPH follows research policies and procedures established by the University. The Office of
the Vice President for Research and Economic Development oversees research compliance for
the entire University, through 13 units which focus on various aspects of the research process and
provide administration and oversight.

•     The Office of Grants and Contracts Administration deals directly with funding agencies in
      relation to externally funded activity at UAB. The Assistant Vice President for Sponsored
      Research Administration signs all applications for funding and accepts all awards on behalf of
      the University. More information may be found at http://main.uab.edu/show.asp?durki=30265.

•     The Animal Resources Program is accredited by the Association for Assessment and
      Accreditation of Laboratory Animal Care International and registered as a research facility with
      the United States Department of Agriculture. It also has an Assurance of Compliance on file
      with the Public Health Service Office of Protection from Research Risks. The Animal
      Resources Program is the service unit that provides care for all animals required in research
      and teaching programs at UAB and affiliated hospitals. More information may be found at
      http://main.uab.edu/show.asp?durki=30285.

•     The Conflict of Interest Review Board provides guidelines for evaluating financial interests in
      terms of conflict or potential conflict; disclosure of any relevant financial interests which may
      exist; and additional terms and conditions which may be required, depending on the nature of
      any financial conflict and of the proposed research activities. More information may be found at
      http://main.uab.edu/show.asp?durki=30255.


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•   The Grants and Contracts Accounting Department manages the post-award accounting,
    compliance, and reporting for UAB's sponsored grants and contracts. More information may be
    found at http://main.uab.edu/show.asp?durki=5253.

•   The Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee office is responsible for maintaining proper
    record-keeping to ensure accountability for the quality of the program, to ensure proper records
    for the issuance of approval for use of vertebrate (and some invertebrate) animals, and to
    ensure that the laws governed by the Public Health Service/Office of Laboratory Animal
    Welfare, United States Department of Agriculture, and the American Association for
    Accreditation of Laboratory Animal Care are followed. In order to ensure institutional
    compliance with sound principles of humane animal care and existing laws, and to protect the
    research interests of the community, all protocols requiring the use of animals must be
    reviewed and approved by the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee. This policy
    extends to all intramural and extramural grants submitted (including pilot studies), all testing,
    and any teaching involving the use of animals. More information may be found at
    http://main.uab.edu/internal/show.asp?durki=34597.

•   The Office of Human Research serves as an ombudsman for clinical trial investigators, helping
    them communicate with UAB entities, research sponsors, and regulatory agencies. More
    information may be found at http://www.uab.edu/ohr.

•   The Office of Research Compliance promotes adherence to research-related federal and state
    laws and regulations through internal controls and education of the members in its research
    enterprise. More information may be found at http://main.uab.edu/show.asp?durki=55742.

•   The Office of Sponsored International Programs was established to facilitate the University’s
    ability to conduct service, education, and research programs at international sites by
    continuously building on experiences and by adapting University policy for international
    activities. More information may be found at http://main.uab.edu/show.asp?durki=95133.

•   The UAB Research Foundation (UABRF) identifies, assesses, protects, and markets
    commercially viable intellectual property developed at UAB. The UABRF reviews intellectual
    property disclosures submitted by UAB associates and initiates steps to protect the rights of the
    discovery, including the filing of domestic and foreign patents, when appropriate. The UABRF
    seeks, negotiates, manages, and monitors commercial licensing agreements on behalf of UAB
    and also ensures compliance with certain government regulations. More information may be
    found at http://main.uab.edu/sites/UABRF.

•   The Office of Counsel of the University System is operated by the General Counsel, which
    represents the System in all legal matters and is responsible for the delivery of all legal
    services, including the conduct and resolution of litigation, the prosecution and settlement of all
    claims, and the legal review of all significant transactions. The General Counsel staffs,
    organizes, and administers the Office of Counsel to fulfill these responsibilities. More
    information may be found at http://main.uab.edu/show.asp?durki=1966.

•   The Institutional Review Board for Human Use (IRB) is a committee that protects the rights and
    welfare of human research subjects involved in research activities as prescribed by federal
    regulations. More information may be found at http://main.uab.edu/show.asp?durki=30246.




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•   The Department of Occupational Health and Safety has several key functions related to
    teaching, conducting research, and delivering health care. It is responsible for inspection of all
    university areas for fire and safety problems; issuance and control of radioactive materials
    licenses; development of control programs for biological and chemical agents; the safe disposal
    of biohazardous, radioactive, and chemical wastes; health and safety education and training;
    and the establishment of procedures and standards of safe work practices. Monitoring records
    are maintained for exposures to toxic substances, building safety inspections, incident/accident
    reports, radiation exposure levels, fire alarm tests, fire exit drills and certain medical records.
    More information may be found at http://www.healthsafe.uab.edu/default.html.

School
The Research Advisory Committee of the SOPH is advisory to the Dean and the University’s
Research Advisory Group. This Committee is charged with performing scientific review of
intramural faculty research applications (e.g., University-Wide Interdisciplinary Research Center
grants) and making recommendations regarding faculty awards. Membership consists of one
faculty member from each of the School’s six departments, who are appointed by department
chairs. A list of members may be found in section 1.5.c.

Additionally, an IRB Review Officer is appointed by each department to review IRB protocols
before submission to the UAB IRB. Faculty members serving in this role for each department are
as follows: Maternal and Child Health, Dr. Russell Kirby; Health Behavior, a panel of faculty
including Drs. Connie Kohler, Susan Davies, and Diane Grimley; Epidemiology, Dr. Richard
Kaslow; Environmental Health, Dr. Edward Postlethwait; Health Care Organization and Policy,
Dr. Janet Bronstein; and Biostatistics, Dr. George Howard.

Both the University and the SOPH require that tenured or tenure-earning faculty conduct original
and collaborative research. Tenured or tenure-earning faculty are evaluated for hiring, tenure, and
promotion on the basis of teaching, service and scholarship. Scholarship is defined as the “diligent
and systematic inquiry into a subject, which defines or revises theories, contributes to existing
bodies of knowledge, or advances the state of the art of public health practice.” Assistant and
associate professors are evaluated biennially by the Faculty Affairs Committee to assess progress
toward tenure and promotion, specifically including information on scholarship. Non-tenure earning
faculty may also be evaluated on teaching, service, and scholarship; but some may be hired to be
focus more on research and teaching or in some cases solely on research. In addition each faculty
member (tenured, tenure-earning and non-tenure-earning) completes a Faculty Activity Report
annually to determine merit salary increases.

In order to facilitate broad-based interdisciplinary collaboration, UAB maintains a number of
University-Wide Interdisciplinary Research Centers which are described in detail in 1.3.c. A listing
of the University-Wide Interdisciplinary Research Centers may be found in Appendix 3.1.a.

3.1.b Community Based Research

A list of specific community-based projects can be found in Appendix 3.1.c. The School
undertakes a wide variety of community-based research under grants and contracts with
foundations, federal sources, and state and community agencies. These activities include health
promotion and disease prevention programs and their evaluation, risk assessment and
communication, injury prevention, substance abuse avoidance, and needs assessments. The
School works extensively with the Alabama Departments of Public Health and Rehabilitation
Services, local health departments, the US Department of Health and Human Services, the
Alabama Medicaid Commission, Jacksonville State University, the American Lung Association, the



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American Diabetes Association, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and the Centers for
Disease Control and Prevention on community-based projects.

A list of the formal agreements are included in Appendix 3.1.c specifically formal agreements exist
with Congregations for Public Health, Alabama Department of Public Health, Jefferson County
Health Department, Calhoun County Foundation, Governor’s Office and Esonian Baptist Bible
College (pending).

3.1.c   Current Research Activity

Please see Appendix 3.1.c for a list of research activities.

3.1.d Measures for Evaluating Research Success

The University and the School have traditionally evaluated research success based on publications
in refereed journals, monographs and books. SOPH faculty meet or exceed monographs and
publications goals and over a two year average meet book publications goals. In recent years,
goals have been added based on research expenditures. Although NIH funding has decreased
nationally, research expenditures per full-time-equivalent faculty have increased by 1% from 2005
to 2007. Please also see Table 1.6.m.

Table 3.1.d SOPH Research and Scholarship
    Research and            2005          2006            2006          2007             2007
     Scholarship           Actual         Goal           Actual         Goal            Actual
 Research
 Expenditures           $42,617,688   $43,470,042      $44,625,546   $46,947,645      $38,542,006*
 Books                            8             5                2             5     count pending
 Monographs                      39             8               24             8     count pending
 Publications in
 Refereed Journals              368            243             318          244      count pending
 FTE Faculty                    101             n/a            103           n/a                90
 Expenditures per FTE
 Faculty                   $421,957              n/a     $433,258              n/a      $428,245*
*Estimated

3.1.e   Student Involvement

All MPH students are required to complete internships which can include a research component
directed at improving public health practice. Academic masters students must complete a masters
project and doctoral candidates are required to present and defend a formal dissertation. In the
past three years, 32% of research projects in the School have utilized students as research
assistants or investigators. Students benefit from the opportunities to work directly with faculty,
many of whom are recognized nationally and internationally in their respective fields. Student
research often develops from the research efforts of faculty advisers. The nature of student
research is determined by major faculty considering the interests and academic needs of students.

In addition, several funding sources are available from the School to support student research,
including the following:

    •   Minority Health International Research Training Program
    •   Fogarty International Research Training Programs

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    •   Cancer Prevention and Control Training Program
    •   Sparkman Center for Global Health Framework Program
    •   Traineeships, fellowships and graduate assistantships

3.1.f   Assessment of the extent to which this criterion is met.

This criterion is met.

Strengths
• The School’s success in attracting external funding has contributed to its ranking second in
   total extramural funding, as compared to other Schools within the University.
• All tenured, tenure-track and non-tenured faculty are involved in research.
• The SOPH has the largest grant ever funded to the University. The REGARDS project focuses
   on providing insight into the causes of the racial and geographic disparities in stroke mortality.

Weaknesses
• There has been a decrease in extramural funding due to competition and cuts in NIH funding.
  Junior faculty are especially affected by this trend.
• An imbalance of research awards received exists among the departments.

Future Plans
We will create a systematic mentoring plan for junior faculty and look for alternative funding
opportunities from industry, local agencies, and the state to fill some of the gaps created by the
reduced available funding at the federal level.




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3.2 SERVICE

3.2    Service. The School shall pursue service activities, consistent with its mission
       through which faculty and students contribute to the advancement of public health
       practice.

The mission of the SOPH is to develop, teach and apply knowledge to promote health and prevent
disease. Service activities by faculty, staff and students, representing departments, centers and
administration across the School contribute to achieving this mission by sharing knowledge and
competence with community and professional contacts. These activities have broad geographic
reach at the local, state, national and international levels. There is a rich historical commitment on
the part of our School to reach out to populations that benefit from the knowledge and work of
public health and to collaborate with academic, organizational and community partners that assist
us in planning, implementing and evaluating our service work. These partners and the public
health professionals who are trained to apply the knowledge generated through research efforts
are essential to the School’s success in achieving its mission, goals and objectives.
3.2.a Description of Service Activities, Service Policies, Procedures and Practices
Service to the field of public health and related professional fields, the community, and the
university is conducted by faculty, staff and students across the School. Service to the university is
described in 1.5.d. Service to the profession and its many related fields is carried out by
individual faculty and staff through membership and participation in local, state, national and
international professional organizations; service on editorial boards of professional journals and as
peer reviewers of manuscripts; participation on grant review committees and study sections of
federal agencies and private grant-making organizations; and provision of consultation to various
agencies, organizations and institutions locally, nationally and abroad.

Service to the community is provided by individual faculty and staff affiliated with academic
departments and through university and school-based centers operating from the SOPH. Such
service includes consultation and technical assistance to community and state public health
departments, and health care or other related agencies and organizations; membership on local
and state agency and community organization boards, committees, advisory groups and task
forces; participation in local health events including health fairs, community workshops and
seminars for the public, health-related media programs, student mentoring programs, and
continuing education for community practitioners.

Policies, procedures and practices that support service are addressed at the university, school,
and departmental level (Appendix 3.2.a). The University’s mission and strategic plan
(www.uab.edu/strategicplan), the School's mission and vision, "to be recognized for improving the
health of the citizens of Alabama and the world," the School’s strategic plan with goals and
objectives (see Section 1.1.b/c), faculty tenure and promotion guidelines (see Section 4.2), and
Centers’ missions and objectives (See Section 1.4.b) all identify service as a key element of
professional contribution to the University and field of endeavor. Along with research and teaching
accomplishments, service is a significant point in tenure and promotion decisions at the
department, school and university levels. Further, faculty report their service activities annually to
their department chair and the Dean, noting the types of activities performed and the associated
percent level of effort. Within the annual Faculty Activity Report (FAR), full-time primary faculty, for
whom such information is appropriate, must include a full description of all service activities
conducted during the previous year. This information is used, in conjunction with information on
teaching and research efforts, in assessing annual faculty performance and in formulating
recommendations for merit-based salary increases. It is also used to document overall


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departmental performance each year and to compile the School’s annual report for submission to
the Provost.
Two service awards established by the Dean honor a faculty member and a community member or
group whose service is exemplary and recognized as such by public health practitioners and the
community. Faculty are recognized with The Outstanding Public Health Service Award. The
community is recognized with the Lou Wooster Public Health Hero Award. Both awards include a
nomination and review process and presentations are part of the School’s annual awards
celebration.
A list of the formal agreements are included in Appendix 3.1.c specifically formal agreements exist
with Congregations for Public Health, Alabama Department of Public Health, Jefferson County
Health Department, Calhoun County Community Foundation, Governor’s Office and Esonian
Baptist Bible College (pending).
3.2.b List of Current Local, Regional, National and International Service Activities
Service activities carried out over the past three years which have directly benefited public health
are listed below and service to Alabama specifically is provided in detail in Appendix 3.2.b(1).
Faculty serve in leadership positions on 24 editorial boards and as reviewers for over 178 of the
most prestigious national and international journals in public health and related fields. An non-
inclusive list follows: American Journal of Public Health, American Journal of Epidemiology, Journal
of Public Health Management and Practice, American Journal of Medicine, American Journal of
Managed Care, Journal of the American Medical Association, American Journal of Clinical
Nutrition, Obesity Reviews, Journal of Rural Health, Journal of Healthcare for Poor and
Underserved, Journal of General Internal Medicine, Journal of Clinical Endocrinology &
Metabolism, Maternal and Child Health Journal, Journal of Pediatric and Perinatal Epidemiology,
Diabetes Care, Hypertension, American Journal of Hypertension, Ethnicity and Disease,
Circulation, Stroke, Journal of Clinical Oncology, Journal of Surgical Oncology, Journal of Multiple
Linear Regression Viewpoints, Measurement and Evaluation in Counseling and Development,
Research in the Schools, Psychology and Aging, Research on Aging, Educational and
Psychological Measurement, Journal of Modern Applied Statistical Methods, Journal of
Bioinformatics Theory and Application, Computational Statistics and Data Analysis, Human
Genetics, Behavior Genetics, AIDS and Behavior, Health Psychology, Journal of Social Science
and Medicine, Archives of Internal Medicine, Free Radical Biology and Medicine, Inhalation
Toxicology, Journal of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene, Journal of Environmental
Monitoring, Journal of Business and Economic Statistics, Nursing Outlook, Canadian Medical
Association Journal, European Journal of Health Economics and The Israel Science Foundation.
Faculty serve as leaders and members of committees, project reviews, study sections and also
provide consultation and technical assistance to groups representing a broad range of public and
private sector agencies at the international, national, state and community level, including the
following: International Life Science Institute, North America, Ethics of Placebo Controlled Trials
International Task Force, Scientific Advisory Board, Sylvia Lawry Center Munich, International
Health Economics Association, Singapore National Medical Research Council, International
Society for Sexually Transmitted Diseases, Public Health Foundation of India, International Society
for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research, Association of Schools of Public Health,
Jamaican HIV/AIDS Prevention Program, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National
Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, American Lung Association,
American Cancer Society, American Heart Association, Obesity Society, Robert Wood Johnson
Foundation, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, United Soybean Nutrition Advisory
Board, Scientific Advisory Board for Kraft Foods, Scientific Advisory Board for Genome
Explorations, Inc., Federal Trade Commission, Department of Justice, External Advisory Council-


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Center for Alaska Native Health Research, External Advisory Board, University of Illinois Health
Policy Center, American Behavioral Benefit Managers, Inc., National Science Foundation,
Annenberg Public Policy Center, President’s Commission on the Status of Women, Congressional
Budget Office, Mid-South Division, American Cancer Society, Alabama Chapter, American Red
Cross, Alabama Chapter, Representative to American Statistical Society, University of
Pennsylvania Faculty, University of Minnesota Faculty, Alabama Department of Public Health-
Steps to a Healthier Alabama, Alabama Medicaid Agency, Jefferson County Department of Public
Health-Syphilis Elimination Coalition and Roadmap Project, Mobile County Health Department,
Franklin Primary Care Health Center in Mobile County, Planned Parenthood of Alabama,
Jefferson/Shelby Unit of the American Cancer Society, Alabama Baby Coalition, Alabama Rural
Self Help Initiative, Jefferson County Committee on Economic Opportunity, Collat Jewish Family
Services, Community Hypertension and Stroke Initiative Projects, Boys and Girls Club, StrongGirls
Program, Alabama Public Health Association, Alabama Board of Nursing, Alabama Emergency
Committee for Health Care Crisis, Montgomery Community Wellness Coalition, and Gateway
Social Services, Inc.
Service to the profession also includes international, national, state and community activities.
Examples of public health agencies the faculty and staff have provided service to over the past
three years include 2 US Territory Health Departments (Puerto Rico and the US Virgin Islands), the
National Center for Environmental Health, the Indian Health Service, the National Association of
County and City Health Officials, 10 state health departments in the Southeast including the
Alabama Department of Public Health, and 17 county health departments.
Many of the community service activities of SOPH faculty, staff and students (whether volunteer or
components of training/education or research) address a substantial number of needs related to
education, housing, access to care, chronic diseases, prevention, capacity building, underserved
and special populations, public health policy, and public health education through media. A state
profile describing the significance of these issues in Alabama can be found in [Appendix 3.2.b (1)]
along with descriptions of the service activities in these areas.
Table 3.2.b illustrates the percent of faculty involved in a range of service activities across the 6
departments of the School. Aggregate service hours by department and number of faculty within
participating departments are contained in Appendix 3.2.b(2).

Table 3.2.b Percent Faculty and Service Activities by Department and Overall

  120
  100
   80
   60                                                                                              Boards
   40                                                                                              Presentations
   20
                                                                                                   Technical Assistance to Agencies
    0
                                                                                                   Advisory/Community Groups
                                                   Epidemiology




                                                                                  Entire Faculty
                                 Behavior




                                                                  Environmental
                           MCH




                                            HCOP
           Biostatistics




                                  Health




                                                                    Sciences




                                                                                                   Outreach Activities
                                                                     Health




                                                                                                   Other




School Centers promote community/agency partnerships and conduct substantial community
based services including:

Center for the Study of Community Health (CSCH) - this CDC funded Prevention Research
Center focuses on risk reduction, primarily in underserved populations by conducting original,

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interdisciplinary, community-based participatory research and by building community capacity to
address health promotion and disease prevention issues at the individual and community level.
The Center provides several ongoing services, in addition to the ones carried out as part of is
community-based research endeavors. These include:
    • Community Organization and Resource Development. The Center has provided the
        leadership to develop three community based 501c3 organizations: Congregations for
        Public Health, Inc.; Coalition for a Tobacco Free Jefferson County; and the New South
        Public Health Foundation, Inc.
    • Education and Training Institutes. The Black Belt Institute and the Community Health
        Advisors Training and Support Institute, both housed in the Center, conduct annual and/or
        ongoing education and training programs for communities and volunteers that support
        community-based research and service activities.
    • Survey Research. The Survey Research Unit is a statewide resource that supports
        academic and organizational research that informs the practice of public health at the
        community, state and national levels.
    • Special Interest Projects (SIPs). The Center serves as the pathway for CDC-funded SIPs
        that often have service components as part of the research endeavor. SIP announcements
        are distributed to faculty across the university and peer review, administrative and budget
        support are provided to those submitting applications. The Center ranks in the top three
        PRCs for the number of SIPs awarded to faculty, having received a total of 23 to date.
    • SIP of Knowledge Series. This series allows researchers that have been awarded SIPs to
        share their research projects with faculty, staff and students from across the university.
    • Newsletter. Distributed quarterly, this publication highlights the activities of the Center and
        its community partners and serves as a mechanism to identify community resources,
        upcoming events, seminars and workshops.
    • Student Interns. The Center typically has 2-4 student interns from the SOPH and other
        disciplines across campus. They work with faculty and staff on Center initiatives primarily
        to gain experience working in the community setting while fulfilling internship requirements.

Lister Hill Center for Health Policy - This endowed Center has a university-wide mission to
facilitate the conduct of health policy research and to disseminate findings of that research beyond
the usual academic channels. The Center has five primary service activities including:
    • Seminar Series. This series brings a nationally known scholar to the SOPH each month to
         present health policy analysis of current issues. The series is open to the public and draws
         attendees from several schools across campus, providing an opportunity for students and
         faculty to interact with experts who are shaping the nation’s health care future. The Center
         hosts an average of 10 seminars a year.
    • Abstract Series. This monthly publication is a one page summary of the work produced by
         Lister Hill Scholars. Written in layperson language, the abstracts are mailed to policy
         makers in Washington, DC and ten southeastern states. The Center publishes an average
         of eight abstracts per year.
    • Fellowship Program. This program provides a six-month stipend to support up to two
         graduate students whose interest is health policy to serve in public or private agencies or
         health advocacy organizations. The Center chooses two students per year to participate as
         a Lister Hill Center Fellow.
    • Newsletter. Distributed twice a year, this publication highlights the work of Lister Hill
         Scholars and serves as a bulletin board for upcoming seminars, workshops, and other
         Center announcements.
    • Research Methods Workshops. This quarterly series provides researchers an opportunity
         to learn about recent methodological advances. Attendees include students and faculty, as



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       well as representatives from the health care industry. Workshops are held two to three
       times per year.

South Central Center for Public Health Preparedness - Launched in 2002, this Center serves
the public health workforce in the four state region of Alabama, Arkansas, Louisiana, and
Mississippi. It acts as a liaison between the UAB SOPH and the public health preparedness
workforce (e.g., state and local public health personnel, emergency management agency
personnel, first responders, first receivers, law enforcement personnel, etc.). Service activities
associated with this training center include:
    • Newsletter. The Center provides an electronic publication that profiles partner activities,
       research tools, course offerings, workshops and conferences, and video briefs on
       emergency preparedness public awareness messages.
    • Technical assistance and community education. The Center collaborates in planning and
       conducting community awareness and education programs, such as assisting with planning
       for the 2007 National Public Health Week which focused on “Preparedness and Public
       Health Threats.” Featured speakers were identified and invited by the Center to participate
       in a forum to provide detailed information the general public should know to meet their
       immediate life saving and life sustaining needs in a disaster.
    • Coordination of special events. The Center also supports community events focused on
       disaster preparedness such as the “show and tell” public event at a park on the UAB
       campus during National Public Health Week. Participating agencies and their contributions
       to the event included the U.S. Army 46th Civil Support Team’s WMD mobile laboratory;
       Birmingham Fire and Rescue’s Hazmat vehicle and fire extinguisher training; Jefferson
       County Emergency Management Agency’s mobile command unit and mass casualty trailer;
       Birmingham Police’s bomb pod and robot and their mounted patrol; UAB’s Center for Labor
       Education and Research’s Hazmat training unit; Jefferson County Health Department’s
       preparedness information booth; and the Red Cross’s emergency response vehicle.

Deep South Center for Occupational Health and Safety - Supported by the CDC’s National
Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, the Center is dedicated to the protection and
promotion of the health and safety of workers. In addition to its strong research, academic and
training activities, the Center has a robust Outreach Program. It continues to be a regional
resource for practicing occupational safety and health professionals, other academic institutions,
government organizations, and industries. Some examples of our services are listed below:
    • The Center offers a significant number of discipline-specific, as well as interdisciplinary,
         courses throughout the region. We present in-house training courses for industries to meet
         their specific workforce needs. We also collaborate with governmental agencies on all
         levels (federal, state and local) and professional organizations to co-sponsor additional
         educational programs. Of special note is the Center’s involvement in the OSHA Alliance on
         the Prevention of Workplace Violence. The Alliance, established in 2006, includes non-
         profit organizations, healthcare providers and academic institutions, all with a common goal
         of providing educational and learning opportunities to prevent workplace violence.
    • The Center provides materials to help other educational programs teach or promote the
         field of occupational safety and health. This includes providing faculty lecturers in courses
         or seminars, and providing materials for undergraduate career days.
    • The Center provides industry with materials and videotapes to help develop in-house
         training courses (i.e., ergonomics). We also present lectures and presentations to regional
         workplaces, and provide assistance to state and local health departments in developing
         workshops on occupational health and safety.
    • Faculty and students of the Center have conducted numerous research projects to assist
         regional industries with occupational health problems such as hearing conservation, injury


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       control, workplace design, cost containment, hazardous waste control, respirator fit,
       occupational skin disease, and ergonomic hazards.
   •   Some of our academic courses are taught in a web-based format, thus permitting persons
       who are employed full-time in the region and elsewhere to pursue graduate work in
       occupational safety and health.
   •   Center faculty assists regional industry by providing numerous no-fee consultations on a
       variety of occupational safety and health issues.
   •   The Center has a monthly eNews publication that provides an update on student and
       faculty activities, including training opportunities.
   •   We recently received funding to provide research pilot project funding for students and
       junior faculty.
   •   The Center is also committed to reaching Historically Black Colleges and Universities
       through its recruiting efforts.

Sparkman Center for Global Health – This federally-endowed Center has a mission of
contributing to solutions of health problems in developing countries by implementing
comprehensive, graduate-level training and educational public health programs that are organized
collaboratively with academic institutions, international agencies, and health ministries within the
host country. Global and domestic service activities of the Center include:
    • Public Health Programs. The Center collaborates with foreign institutions to assist in
       developing public health courses, certificate and degree programs.
    • Public Health Curricula. The Center evaluates existing or proposed public health curricula
       in academic and field settings.
    • Global Education. We offer training support and short courses in public health research
       and education.
    • Newsletter. This ongoing electronic publication provides information useful to the
       international health community, in particular, information generated by the programs and
       activities of the Sparkman Center.
    • Seminar Series. The Sparkman Seminar Series in Global Health was initiated in 2001 to
       provide a forum for UAB faculty, staff, and students to present/discuss their global health
       research, training, educational, and/or service efforts. The series highlights UAB’s existing
       global health expertise and interest, but also includes invited speakers from outside UAB.
       Seminars are open to all UAB faculty, staff and students, as well as the greater Birmingham
       community. For those unable to attend, web videos are provided for most, if not all,
       seminars. Seminars are conducted in partnership with SIFAT under the Framework
       Program for Public Health.
    • NIH Framework Grant for Global Health. The Framework Program provides financial
       support for Global Health field experiences for undergraduate and graduate students
       working on global health issues. In addition, faculty grants are available for activities that
       range from planning and coordination to preparatory training for research, as well as
       support from Sparkman for pilot studies and educational projects. All faculty grants require
       the support and active mentoring of UAB graduate students, and target specific UAB
       capacity building goals. Faculty support is also available for Global Health related course
       development.
    • Pilot Grants. These support student and faculty engagement in global health by supporting
       work overseas and in resource-limited settings in the US. Partnerships include working
       with domestic partners like Southern Institute for Appropriate Technology to provide support
       and services for individuals/institutions interested in working in such resource-limited settings.
    • Global Health Award. The UAB SOPH Global Health Award, sponsored by the UAB
       Sparkman Center, recognizes the interest, motivation, and contributions of a SOPH student
       to the field Global Health. One award of $5,000 will be given to a student who embodies


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       these ideals. The award money may be applied towards the cost of graduate level
       education at UAB and/or an internship experience.

Additional service activities including those associated with funded research (e.g., Regards, Flying
Sparks, Magic City and CDC funded Special Interest Projects) are described in Appendix 3.2.b(1).

3.2.c Measures of Success of Service Programs

The SOPH expectation is that all tenured and tenure-earning faculty will participate in service
activities to the profession and/or the community. This expectation is linked to promotion, as well
as, merit increases. Although service is documented at the faculty level, it has not been collected
systematically at the school level nor have outcomes been established. The school has set a
number of new goals for service which are detailed in Table 1.1.c and in Table 3.2.c

     Table 3.2.c Proposed School Measures of Success of Service Programs
     School Service Measure                                           Target      2008
     Community Service Program Participation
        Faculty
        Staff
        Student                                                        >50%
     Establish Public Health Policy Council                           Establish
     Professional Service Participation
         Faculty (>80%)                                                >80%
        Student (>20%)                                                 >20%
     Community Partnerships and Linkages Baseline                   Establish
     School Service Monitoring System Established                   Establish
     Service Types and # Provided                                   Establish

Standard measures that are documented for service activities include the range, number,
audience, and types of service provided [Appendix 3.2.b(2)]. The percent of individual faculty
engaged in service activities is also documented (Table 3.2.b). Outcome data relevant to
individual community programs (changes in individual behavior, changes in policies, etc.),
professional continuing education (participant application of new information in practice), technical,
consulting, and committee services (ensuring quality research is published, ensuring evidence-
based practice and public policy) are typically documented and available at the level of service by
the recipient agency and/or group and not necessarily collected by the individual faculty or the
School. Other fundamental measures of success include partnerships and linkages established
and maintained with the community, public health agencies, employers and stakeholders who
collaborate with the School and University to improve the health status of the state, region, nation
and world.

A new strategic initiative with be the creation of the Public Health Policy Council which is modeled
after the highly successful Pubic Affairs Research Council of Alabama, which is housed at Sanford
University, the Public Health Policy Council is envisioned as an independent, objective resource to
business, government, and other interested parties for the analysis and evaluation of policy options
and initiatives of interest and importance to the health and well being of the public. The Council
will serve as a convener of organizations and institutions interested in more fully understanding the
complex interface between science and public policy in Alabama as these relate to important public
health issues ranging from access to health care services to the impact of incarceration on
community health. Funding for the Council will be from local and national foundations and grant
activities.



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3.2d. Student Involvement in Service

Students are involved in service in a variety of ways including: formal/informal field placements or
internships; involvement in faculty service activities; community service projects sponsored by the
Public Health Student Association; and individual volunteer efforts. The Department of Maternal
and Child Health has a student association that furthers opportunities for community service
through participation in projects such as the annual March of Dimes Walk, the Susan B. Komen
Race for the Cure, and fundraising to support various community causes. Other examples of
student service activities are highlighted in Appendix 3.2.d. It is estimated that over 60% of
students participate in volunteer service activities annually, in addition to the service provided
through their internships and collaboration with faculty in research endeavors. Approximately 30%
of internships are unpaid and therefore a large amount of uncompensated services are provided by
our students under the guidance of faculty to a wide variety of agencies in the state. Students also
serve on various committees in the School as described in Section 1.5.e.

3.2e. Assessment of the extent to which this criterion is met.

This criterion is met.

Strengths
The School conducts a substantial amount of service work in the community and in the profession.
The leadership provided by faculty, staff and students is evident and the continuing financial
commitment of state dollars by the School to service endeavors provides the opportunity to
leverage and to focus on problems that are driven by community perceived need as well as those
that are attached to available research dollars. Specific strengths include:
• Commitment of state funding to service endeavors
• Community Partnerships
• Breadth and depth of service activities focused on key public health needs and issues in State.
• Faculty leadership roles in community agencies, as well as state, national, and international
    service endeavors
• Formal recognition of faculty and community leaders in service

Weaknesses
While the School carries out a substantial amount of service to meet the needs of the communities
and populations it serves, it still has no systematic or formal approach regarding how service is
planned or documented indicators of success. Specific weaknesses include:
• Lack of strategic plan for service activities with indicators of success
• Lack of systematic documentation of service activities

Future Plans
The self study creates an opportunity to look more strategically at how the School can impact our
communities and populations through service, how to evaluate those efforts based on specific
indicators, and how to formally recognize staff in addition to faculty and community representatives
who make significant contributions. The following will be completed by May 2008.
• Develop a strategic plan focused on service needs that can be met intentionally by the School
    in addition to those selected as volunteer efforts or supported through research interest and
    activities of the faculty, staff and students.
• Develop a monitoring system that is tied to specific service indicators and promotes
    consistency in the way service data is collected and reported.
• Establish a staff recognition award for service.
• Develop the Public Health Policy Council.

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3.3 WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT

3.3                          Workforce Development. The school shall engage in activities that support the
                             professional development of the public health workforce.
3.3.a                        Description of the School’s Continuing Education Program.
The SOPH recognizes the importance of workforce development and is committed to enhancing
public health practice through outreach and continued education. The School maintains a highly
diverse set of continuing education programs through several well-developed mechanisms. These
include offerings through the Dean’s office, departments, Centers, training grants and contracts,
and faculty and staff activities. Continuing education programs are provided through various
modalities including traditional classroom settings, web-based (live and archived) programs,
interactive television, conferences, and workshops.
Needs Assessment
The SOPH has close working relationships with key public health agencies, institutions,
organizations, businesses and industries that provide input to advisory boards, executive
committees and planning committees for continuous assessment of how the School can best serve
the needs of the public health workforce. Several Centers within the School assess the needs of
their target audience through surveys, focus groups, and stakeholder input. For example, for a
CDC/ASPH-funded project, Environmental Health Practitioners (EHPs) working in the ADPH
Bureau of Environmental Health Services were asked about their educational needs. With a
response rate of 88%, the results were used to develop a series of educational programs for EHPs
in Alabama. In addition the South Central Center for Public Health Preparedness, launched in 2002
to serve the public health workforce in the region of Alabama, Arkansas, Louisiana, and
Mississippi, has conducted training needs assessments and developed programs in response to
those needs. An extensive assessment of the training needs of the Alabama Department of Public
Health was conducted in 2005, with questions about the ten essential public health services (Table
3.3.a). Copies of these assessments are located in the Resource Room. [RR]
Table 3.3.a Alabama Department of Public Health Employee Perceptions of Ten Essential
Services: necessity, self-efficacy and training needs.
                                                                     Alabama

                       100


                        90


                        80


                        70
  P rc n o R s o s s
   e et f epne




                        60

                                                                                                       Necessary?
                        50                                                                             Confident?
                                                                                                       Need Training?

                        40


                        30


                        20


                        10


                        0
                                A      B      C      D          E          F          G    H   I   J
                                                     Essential Services / Core Functions




                                                                                                                 127
Practices
The SOPH sponsors workforce development activities through a variety of mechanisms, including
the following:

Office of Public Health Practice. This Office was created in the Fall of 2006 to increase
partnerships with the Alabama Department of Public Health in Montgomery. The Director spends
one day a week there. This has strengthened collaboration in research, teaching, workforce
development, internships and practice. A pilot project to assess the feasibility of offering the
School’s MPH core courses via a distance learning format to Alabama Department of Public Health
employees was launched during the spring semester of 2008.

Office of Career Services. This Office helps SOPH students prepare for internship and job
searches. Students are provided with information including the introductory career primer "Careers
in Public Health - An Introduction for Masters Students," a seminar and workshop series, a
distribution service of job and internship announcements, and other self-help aids accessed
from the School's web site. Fall semester features the seminar series which focuses on the
different types of organizations that employ public health professionals and the special
considerations attached to each. This helps students decide what type of organization will be the
best fit for them. Spring semester features the workshop series that focuses on special skills that
may not be covered in the classroom. In addition to students, many alumni also attend. Separate,
day-long workshops focus on non-profit grant writing and career preparation (e.g., resume
preparation, interview and negotiation skills, etc.). Also offered in the Spring semester is the
Alumni Career Round Table series, which matches alumni with students from the same discipline
to discuss careers.

As soon as students are registered in the School, they become part of the Career Distribution
Service and begin receiving internship and employment information and announcements from the
Office of Career Services. Besides the obvious advantage of knowing what current opportunities
are available, additional benefits include an awareness of the variety of jobs available, along with
requirements, salaries, locations of jobs and other details. Students can also access various public
health employment websites, including the collaborative ASPH employment site, with links from the
School’s web site. In addition, the SOPH web site contains links to other sites that offer advice on
subjects such as resumes, curriculum vita, interviewing, cover letters and more. These sites are
good supplements to what is covered in the workshop and seminar series.

The Public Health Endowed Lecture Series. This Series is offered during each academic year.
Its overall goal is to elevate awareness of the UAB SOPH to academicians, scientists, donors,
alumni, political leaders, and prospective students. Each component of the lecture series, is
designed to reach multiple and varied constituencies. The Carole W. Samuelson Lecture, focuses
on public health practice. Past lectures have included topics such as the politics of lead poisoning,
the decline of the public health infrastructure, and the impact of public health studies on the
general population. The target audience consists of both the academic and clinical public health
communities. Secondary target audiences are community political leaders, SOPH alumni,
colleagues of Dr. Samuelson, and other stakeholders. The Distinguished Alumni Investigator
Lecture is delivered by the winner of the UAB SOPH Alumni Award for Scientific Excellence and is
generally focused on empirical research, research methodology and theory building or adaptation.
The target audience is the SOPH community and the UAB research community. The Ann Dial
McMillan Lecture is a new series that focuses on family health. The first lecture in this series was
delivered in February 2008. The Glenwood Endowed Lecture focuses on autism and other neuro-
developmental disorders. While this lecture can address research into the science of brain
disorders such as autism, it also addresses the public health impacts of such disorders. Target
audiences include the UAB research community, (e.g., from the Schools of Public Health,

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Medicine, Social and Behavioral Sciences, and Education), the providers of clinical services to
individuals with autism, and the friends and supporters of Glenwood, Inc. – particularly including
the Ireland Family. The Janet L. Norwood Lecture is presented by the recipient of the Janet L.
Norwood Award for outstanding achievement by a woman in the statistical sciences. This award
allows the school to recognize Dr. Norwood’s achievements, as well as the contribution of all
women to the statistical sciences. It is noteworthy that women have been traditionally under-
represented in many fields of science, with the degree of under-representation greater for the
quantitative sciences. This award promotes the active involvement of women in the statistical
sciences at all levels from high school through senior faculty and scientists.

South Central Center for Public Health Preparedness (SCCPHP). (Described in 1.4.b) In
addition to assessing the public health workforce training needs on preparing and responding to
public health threats and emergencies, including terrorism, as described above, the SCCPHP also
provides training programs to meet those needs. Training is delivered through web-based and
face-to-face courses, conferences, workshops, and national satellite broadcasts. The SCCPHP is
currently collaborating with UAB’s Center for Emerging Infections and Emergency Preparedness
on a number of bioterrorism, disaster preparedness and response technical assistance and training
projects. For additional details visit: www.southcentralpartnership.org.

Deep South Center for Occupational Health and Safety (DSC). (Described in 1.4.b) The DSC
has an active Continuing Education Program that offers professional development programs and
outreach to over 1,000 attendees per year. It also has CDC funding to support the continuing
education needs of individuals from state and local agencies who must deal with hazardous
materials. Through this initiative agencies throughout the southeast (Mississippi, Georgia,
Tennessee, Arkansas, Alabama and Florida) have had key personnel trained on topics such as
respirator protection, confined space entry, and hazardous materials management. For additional
details visit: www.uab.edu/dsc.

Sparkman Center. (Described in 1.4.b) The Sparkman Seminar Series in Global Health was
initiated in 2001 to provide a forum for UAB faculty, staff, and students to present/discuss their
global health research, training, educational, and/or service efforts. The seminar series highlights
the existing global health expertise and interest at UAB, but also includes invited speakers from
outside the UAB community. The Seminars are open to all UAB faculty, staff and students, as well
as the greater Birmingham community. For those unable to attend, web videos are provided for
most, if not all, seminars. In 2006, the Global Health Symposium: Building Partnerships at Home
and Abroad was held. Details may be found at: http://www.soph.uab.edu/sparkman.

Lister Hill Center for Health Policy. (Described in 1.4.b) The Center provides various continuing
education venues: a health policy fellowship program, a health services and outcomes research
training program, the abstract series, a monthly seminar series, workshops, and a virtual library.
Each month, the Lister Hill Center invites scholars with national reputations in areas pertinent to
health policy, to give a seminar. The seminars are free, open to the UAB community, and are held
in the Ryals Public Health Building, Room 407 from 12:15 pm to 1:30 pm. Details of these
programs can be found at: http://www.soph.uab.edu/default.aspx?id=34.

Section on Statistical Genetics. The Section on Statistical Genetics was inaugurated in March of
2001. The Section exists within the SOPH Department of Biostatistics. As such, its mission entails
contributing to the fulfillment of the overarching missions of these entities. More specifically, its
mission is to advance knowledge in the field of statistical genetics and in the biological, biomedical,
and behavioral sciences through applications of statistical genetics methodology. This is done
through a grant writing skills workshop, HPC Boot Camp, NIAMS StatGen Course, NIDDK StatGen


                                                                                                   129
Course, NSF Plant Microarray Short Course, R Short Course, and seminars. A complete listing of
the courses and events can be found at: http://www.soph.uab.edu/ssg/default.aspx?id=42.

Center for the Study for Community Health. (Described in 1.4.b) As a UAB University-Wide
Interdisciplinary Research Center, the Center for the Study of Community Health offers a unique
prevention research and training environment that includes faculty from a cross section of over 130
clinicians, researchers, health-related professionals, social and behavioral scientists, and
community leaders, who are setting new standards in the state of Alabama and around the world.
A compilation of continuing education activities may be found at:
http://www.uabchp.com/page.asp?id=41.

Evaluation of Our Activities
Continuing education efforts related to workforce development are evaluated at the program level
through many classical means such as evaluation forms and pre- and post-tests. Innovative
approaches to evaluation include an initiative by the Deep South Center to collect impact
evaluations from participants of continuing education programs. Web-based surveys are sent 90
days after workshop completion to assess if the training provided skills or knowledge to impact
worker health and safety at their site. Additionally, Centers offering professional development
programs are periodically reviewed by their respective funding agencies and professional boards.
For example, the DSC continuing education program was reviewed and approved for another five
years by the Alabama Board of Nursing as an approved provider of continuing education for
nurses.

3.3.b Description of certificate programs offered by the school.

The School currently offers four certificate programs:

The Certificate in Statistical Genetics (CSG) is a new certificate offered by the Section on
Statistical Genetics within the SOPH Department of Biostatistics. The purpose of the CSG is to
offer recognition that certain graduate students have completed specific requirements above and
beyond those ordinarily completed by graduate students and to recognize that completion of those
requirements offers them particular expertise in statistical genetics. CSG enrollees must be
matriculated students in the Biostatistics PhD Program, have a doctoral degree in statistics or
biostatistics, or have a doctoral degree in another discipline and be judged by the CSG committee
to be capable of performing as a doctoral level academic statistician. This is an academic
certificate and has been approved by the Board of Trustees. To date there have been no
graduates. Additional details may be found at: http://www.soph.uab.edu/ssg/default.aspx?id=72.

The Certificate in Public Health Preparedness is offered by the South Central Public Health
Preparedness Training Center. When disaster strikes, many in the public health workforce will be
called upon to respond regardless of their typical job responsibilities. Since not all public health
employees have degrees in public health or experience in responding to disasters, the Alabama
Department of Public Health (ADPH) has identified the need to provide basic public health and
emergency preparedness training to the entire public health workforce. The South Central Center
for Public Health Preparedness (SCCPHP) has developed an emergency preparedness certificate
program that will be made available to all employees of the ADPH and mandatory for some. The
certificate program will address the basic and continuing education needs of the public health
workforce, with a special emphasis on emergency preparedness. Additionally, at the request of
the Jefferson County Department of Health (JCDH), the SCCPHP and the Southeast Regional
Academic Center for Environmental Public Health located at the UAB SOPH has developed a
competency-based environmental health specialist certificate program. This certification will serve
as a component of a broader environmental health training program that may culminate in

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attainment of the JCDH Registered Environmental Health Specialist credential. Both certificate
programs will start enrolling participants in Fall 2007. To date there have been no graduates.
Additional details may be found at: www.soph.uab.edu/scph/default.aspx?ID=679/default.asp.

The Certificate Course in Global Health is aimed towards improving the ability of current and future
health professionals to analyze problems and apply alternative solutions to current and emerging
global health challenges. The certificate is designed to meet the need for skill enhancement for
both foreign and domestic individuals that have limited time to pursue a full degree. The
coursework involved in the Certificate Course is aimed towards improving participants’ abilities to
analyze problems and apply alternative solutions to current and emerging global health challenges.
To qualify for award of the certificate, participants are required to complete a total of 15 credits
including 2 required courses, 4 elective courses, and a practicum. Each course is offered once a
year and lasts for 6 weeks, giving the participant the opportunity to enroll in two six-week sessions
per semester. The course can be completed within one year. The course is built in the WebCT
course management system, which offers a rich variety of features to facilitate and enrich online
teaching and learning, and will be supported with interactive CD-ROMs. WebCT allows us to make
course content available, and also provides several interactive tools, including asynchronous
threaded discussion boards, chat rooms, white board, and email. This certificate program began in
Fall 2007 and has no graduates to date. Additional information can be found at
http://www.soph.uab.edu/sparkman/default.aspx?id=30.

The Community Public Health Certificate Program (CPHCP), a program of the SOPH’s Center for
the Study of Community Health, was started in the Fall of 2006. Through continued collaboration
and partnership with Congregations for Public Health, the CPHCP was piloted and offered at
Birmingham-Easonian Baptist Bible College, a local predominantly African American bible college
in the western part of Birmingham. The program consists of SOPH faculty, staff and other partners
presenting health promotion and disease prevention information for the Bible College students
once a week. The purpose of the CPHCP is to expand the reach of the UAB SOPH and
Congregations for Public Health into the community in order to help reduce health disparities and
the burden of diseases in African American churches and communities. CPHCP is a one-year
course offering. The program is offered during the Fall and Spring semesters for 12 weeks (12
total contact hours). Students must attend and successfully participate in 80% (10 of 12 sessions)
of the classes each semester and participate in course evaluations. Students may also choose to:
1) develop a mini health sermon, and/or 2) identify ways to disseminate presented information in
their churches and communities. Following the successful completion of the CPHCP, participants
will be able to: 1) describe a comprehensive view of selected health topics, 2) identify ways to
activate the church and community in the maintenance of health and prevention of diseases,
3) develop a health ministries model for their own specific ministry context and community,
4) identify ways the faith community can bridge the gap between health and ministry, and 5) serve
as a catalyst and a leader in the development of health ministry programs for churches and the
communities they serve.

3.3.c   List of Continuing Education Programs offered by the School

As evidenced by the extensive list of continuing education offerings (Table 3.3.c), faculty provide
continuing education on specific topics to targeted audiences. Each year faculty detail continuing
education efforts in their annual Faculty Activity Report (Appendix 4.2.g).




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Table 3.3.c School Workforce Development Program Types, Examples, Target Population and Number of Participants (2005-2007)
Program Type and          Examples                                            Target Audience                                    Number of
sponsor                                                                                                                          Participants
Workforce Development     Face to Face Trainings
South Central Center      Forensic Epidemiology Training (3 hrs)              First Responders, Public Health, and                        599
for Public Health                                                             Emergency Management Agency (EMA)
Preparedness              Reporting Bioterrorism (8 hrs)                      First Responders, Public Health, and EMA                     29
                          EMS Training (8 hrs)                                First Responders, Public Health, and EMA                    326
                          Risk Communication: Bioterrorism (8 hrs)            First Responders, Public Health, and EMA                    174
                          Mark I Nerve Agent: Train the Trainer (4 hrs)       First Responders, Public Health, and EMA                     97
                          How to Manage Conflict (8 hrs)                      First Responders, Public Health, and EMA                     10
                          Leadership/Management Communication (8 hrs)         First Responders, Public Health, and EMA                     18
                          Negotiating Skills for Changing Times (8 hrs)       First Responders, Public Health, and EMA                     50
                          Improving Interpersonal Communication (8 hrs)       First Responders, Public Health, and EMA                     27
                          Chemical Attack Tabletop Exercise (6 hrs)           First Responders, Public Health, and EMA                     14
                          Bioterrorism 101 ( 6 hrs)                           First Responders, Public Health, and EMA                      2
                          Public Health Law (8 hrs)                           First Responders, Public Health, and EMA                    247
                          Mass Casualty Incident Training (8 hrs)             First Responders, Public Health, and EMA                    371
                          Forensic Epidemiology Training (3 hrs)              First Responders, Public Health, and EMA                    328
                          Arkansas EMS Biological Training (8 hrs)            First Responders, Public Health, and EMA                     34
Maternal and Child        Three-part seminar series on Geographic Information Public health practitioners                                 150
Health                    Systems and health research
Epidemiology              Scientific Writing Workshops                        Tuberculosis Research Center in Chennai                       9
Health Behavior           STI/HIV Training Center                             Healthcare professionals, nurses, physician                   5
                                                                              assistants, technicians
Biostatistics             Statistical Genetics for Nutrition and Obesity      Public Health Researchers                                   175
                          Frontiers in Statistical Genetics for NIAMS         Public Health Researchers                                    82
                          Design and Analysis of Plant Microarray Experiments Public Health Researchers                                    85
Deep South Center for     Short courses, workshops, conferences               Occupational health and safety practitioners,              1000
Occupational Health and                                                       researchers, human resource managers,                  annually
Safety
Endowed Lecture Series    Samuelson, Glenwood Endowed Lecture                 Public health practitioners, researchers, faculty,         ~450
                          25th Anniversary Series                             staff, public health advocates                         annually
Seminar Series            Satellite Broadcast Programs (1½ hrs each)
                          Planning & Implementation of a Field Exercise       First Responders, Public Health, and EMA                  1,140
                          Preparedness Update Tools for Computers             First Responders, Public Health, and EMA                  1,783
                          Exploring Policy Issues of Public Health Prep.      Public Health Workforce                                   2,785
                          Historical Roots for Bioterrorism                   First Responders, Public Health, and EMA                  4,413
                          Psychological Sequence of WMD 1st Responder         First Responders, Public Health, and EMA                  4,203
                          The National Incident Management System             First Responders, Public Health, and EMA                  4,311


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Table 3.3.c School Workforce Development Program Types cont.

Program Type and        Examples                                                 Target Audience                                     Number of
sponsor                                                                                                                              Participants
                        Avian Influenza: Implications for Agriculture and        First Responders, Public Health, Agriculture               2,870
                        Public Health                                            agencies, elected officials, and EMA
                        Supporting Children in a Time of Crisis                  First Responders and Receivers, Public Health,             1,771
                                                                                 and EMA
                        Agro-terrorism: Vulnerabilities, Factors, and            First Responders, Public Health, Agriculture               2,089
                        Implications                                             agencies, elected officials, and EMA
                        Bio-security: Perception is Not Reality                  First Responders, Public Health, Agriculture               2,078
                                                                                 agencies, elected officials, and EMA
                        Radiological Terrorism                                   Public Health Professionals, First receivers and           3,490
                                                                                 responders, EMA personnel
                        Chlorine release in South Carolina                       Public Health Professionals, First receivers and           2,397
                                                                                 responders, EMA personnel
                        ESF 8: Mississippi Response to Hurricane Katrina         Public Health Professionals, First receivers and           1,945
                                                                                 responders, EMA personnel, disaster relief and
                                                                                 homeless shelters, churches, domestic violence
                                                                                 programs
                        Needs of Our Children: Pediatric Care                    Public Health Professionals, First receivers and           2,395
                                                                                 responders, EMA personnel, child care centers,
                                                                                 faith-based and home schools, private and public
                                                                                 schools, school administrators, counselors,
                                                                                 nurses, teachers, soc. workers, resource officers
                        Applications of North Carolina’s GIS for Agriculture     Public Health Professionals, First receivers and             683
                        Emergencies                                              responders, EMA personnel
                                                                                 Graduate students in public health, faculty, and             205
                                                                                 local public health partners
                        Web-Based & Televised
                        Preparedness Minutes                                     Public health workforce                               1745 (hits)
                        Web-based Distance Learning                              Public health workforce                                     359
                        Web-based Biological Response preparation for            EMS personnel, Public Health Professionals,                   83
                        EMS (8 hrs)                                              nurses, social workers, other First Responders
                                                                                 and Receivers
                        Web-Based Pediatric Issues in Disasters (7 hrs)          Public Health Personnel, agencies involved with               12
                                                                                 child health care, journalists, EMA, EMS
Dean’s Office           Special topics                                           SOPH students and alumni                                   ~200
Health Behavior         Syphilis Elimination Project in Two Cities in Alabama.   Prevention and control experts within the STD                55
                        CDC, STD Seminar, April 19, 2006                         Division
Health Behavior         The Vocabulary of Clinical Research (2003-present)       Medical fellows                                              440
                        Topics: survey methods, program evaluation, and
                        behavioral change Interventions

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Table 3.3.c School Workforce Development Program Types cont.

Program Type and          Examples                                               Target Audience                                    Number of
sponsor                                                                                                                             Participants
Conferences / Workshops   Southeast Regional Pediatric Disaster Response         Personnel in public health agencies, pediatric     49
                          Network                                                hospitals
SCCPHP                    Meeting (16 hrs) (August 2005)                         EMS agencies, EMAs, and others that may play
                                                                                 an important role in managing and responding
                                                                                 to disasters involving children.
                          Alabama Agriculture Security Conference (20 hrs)       Public health professionals; veterinarians;        371
                          (June 2005)                                            physicians, state and federal agencies involved
                                                                                 in agro-terrorism surveillance; recognition, and
                                                                                 response; emergency responders/first receivers;
                                                                                 medical, public health, and veterinary students;
                                                                                 food production professionals; dietitians/
                                                                                 nutritionists; law enforcement professionals;
                                                                                 producers; military personnel
                          Response to Radiological Events (8 hrs) (July 2005)    Professionals in the field of occupational,        78
                                                                                 environmental health and safety
                          South Central Center for Public Health Preparedness    Public health professionals; veterinarians;        370
                          (SCCPHP) - Agricultural Security Conference (June      physicians, state and federal agencies involved
                          2005)                                                  in agroterrorism surveillance; recognition, and
                                                                                 response; emergency responders/first receivers;
                                                                                 medical, public health, and veterinary students;
                                                                                 food production professionals; dietitians/
                                                                                 nutritionists; law enforcement professionals;
                                                                                 producers; military personnel
                          SCCPHP - Agricultural Security Conference 2006         Same as above                                      350
                          SCCPHP - Safe and Sound Children’s Preparedness        Childcare center professionals; school teachers,   348
                          Conference (June 2006)                                 administrators, nurses, counselors, resource
                                                                                 officers; social workers; Public health
                                                                                 professionals
Epidemiology              Scientific Writing                                     Public health practitioners                        32
                          Grant Writing Workshop                                 Public health practitioners                        14
                          Qualitative Data Collection Methods Workshop           Public health practitioners and researchers        31
                          Basic GCP course                                       Junior and mid-level research scientists           15
Biostatistics             SSG Seminar Series and online videos                   Public health practitioners and researchers        140
Special events            Full-scale Preparedness Drill (6 times in AL, Summer   First Responders and Receivers, Public Health      1,000
                          2006)                                                  Workforce, EMA
Epidemiology              NIH eRA Commons Tutorial                               Public health researchers and government           15
                                                                                 agency personnel
                          INDEPTH, online clinical coordinators course           Clinical coordinators                              23



                                                                                                                                            134
3.3.d List of other educational institutions or public health practice organizations.

Collaboration with academic and practice partners includes co-sponsorship of trainings, faculty
exchange and speaker participation. Among the most noteworthy collaborations are:

Academic Collaborations:                                   Practice Partners:
Alabama State (Maternal Child Health Network)              Alabama Department of Public Health
Auburn University Samuel Ginn College of Engineering       Alabama Department of Senior Services
Auburn University Cooperative Extension Service            Alabama Medicaid Agency
Auburn University at Montgomery                            Centers for Disease Control & Prevention
Jackson State University                                   Jefferson County Health Department
Samford University – School of Pharmacy                    Alabama Cooperative Extension Service
University of Alabama (at Tuscaloosa)                      Arkansas Department of Public Health
UAB Schools of Nursing, Medicine & Health Professions      Mississippi Department of Public Health
University of South Florida                                Louisiana Department of Public Health
University of Texas                                        American College of Occupational
University of North Alabama                                   and Environmental Medicine
University of West Indies                                  Jamaican Ministry of Health
Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda, School of Nursing    Occupational Safety and Health (OSHA)
Tulane Univ. School of Public Health & Tropical Medicine   Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease
UAB Center for Emergency Care and Disaster Preparedness       Registry (ATSDR)

Industry Partners/Organizations:
National Safety Council – Alabama Chapter
American Industrial Hygiene Association – Alabama Section
American Society of Safety Engineers – Alabama Chapter; Region IV
American Association of Occupational Health Nurses (Central and South Alabama Chapters)
The Children’s Hospital of Alabama
National Environmental Health Association
Association of Schools of Public Health
Association of Universities Programs in Occupational Safety and Health
Public Employees Safety Council of Alabama

3.3.e   Assessment of the extent to which this criterion is met.

This criterion is met.

Strengths
• The SOPH recognizes the importance of workforce development and is committed to
   enhancing public health practice through outreach and continued education.
• The School maintains a highly diverse set of continuing education programs through several
   well-developed mechanisms.

Weakness
• Although there are many workforce development activities there is no central coordinating
  body.

Future Plans
A Workforce Development Committee will be established under the direction of the Office of Public
Health Practice by May 1, 2008. The Committee, comprised of individuals who participate in
workforce development, will meet on a bi-annual basis to discuss current offerings, explore ways to
serve the workforce and establish a mechanism to document efforts.




                                                                                                      135
                        Chapter 4: Faculty, Staff and Students

4.0 Faculty, Staff and Students
       4.1     Faculty Qualifications
       4.2     Faculty Policies and Procedures
       4.3     Faculty and Staff Diversity
       4.4     Student Recruitment and Admissions
       4.5     Student Diversity
       4.6     Advising and Career Counseling

Introduction

Over the last six years the number of full time faculty has almost doubled. This increase is the
result of planned growth to meet the School’s academic and research needs. As a consequence
of this growth there are a large number of faculty members in the tenure earning pipeline who are
poised to replace senior faculty members planning retirement over the next five years. The
productivity of the faculty is perhaps the highest on campus, a remarkable achievement that also
poses challenges. The last several years has seen discussions about the balance between
teaching and research activities, clearly a necessary tension but one that creates stress especially
in the current funding climate. The School’s senior leadership is committed to ensuring support for
all faculty members and continues to strive for the right balance so that faculty, especially junior
faculty, do not experience burnout.

Maintaining a diverse faculty and staff remains an important goal of the School and the University.
UAB boasts one of the nation’s most diverse student bodies and its staff in all schools, including
the SOPH, reflects the students and community. Faculty diversity is a challenge, in part, because
of the relatively small pool of African American faculty candidates and aggressive recruitment of
faculty by other institutions. The University’s commitment to diversity at all levels is exemplified by
such efforts as having a Vice President for Equity and Diversity and designated faculty recruitment
and retention funds, and the Equity and Diversity Program organized within the School.

Student recruitment has been strongly supported by programs in the Dean’s Office for more than
five years. A close working relationship has developed between the science advisors at most of
the Alabama colleges and universities as well as others in the region. An aggressive regional
recruitment program that includes a series of eye-catching posters, such as “Join Our SWAT
Team” featuring a blood-engorged mosquito, has reached out to students across the region
through campus visits and special UAB tours. In addition the relatively new undergraduate course,
“Origins of the Epidemics,” increasingly serves as a pipeline for potential students from UAB.

Student advising, primarily at the master’s level, has been criticized by the students because of a
sometimes perceived lack of faculty involvement. This concern is being addressed through the
development of a revised program that will keep student advising about coursework, etc. with the
departmental program coordinator and transform mentoring to a planned interactive program with
alumni, local professionals, and faculty who share specific interests with the student.




                                                                                                    136
4.0    Faculty, Staff and Students
4.1    Faculty Qualifications. The school shall have a clearly defined faculty which, by
       virtue of its distribution, multidisciplinary nature, educational preparation, research
       and teaching competence, and practice experience, is able to fully support the
       school’s mission, goals, and objectives.

4.1.a Primary Faculty Who Support Degree Programs

The SOPH has 90 primary faculty, as indicated in Table 4.1.a which lists faculty who support
degree programs.

4.1.b Other Faculty Who Support Teaching Programs

The SOPH has 25 other faculty as indicated in Table 4.1.b who support the teaching program.




                                                                                               137
             4.1a · Primary Faculty Who Support Degree Programs
Department/                                   Title/                                     Grad.                       Area of          Area of
 Specialty                                  Academic    Tenure    %              Race   Degrees                      Degree          Teaching            Area of Research        Current/Past
   Area            Last          First        Rank      Status   Time   Gender    **    Earned    Institution      (Discipline)    Responsibility            Interest            PH Activities
Biostatistics    Aban         Inmaculada    Assistant   TT       100    F        4      PhD       Bowling         Mathematics-    Statistical Theory     Clinical Trials,
                                            Professor                                             Green State     Statistics                             Survival Analysis,
                                                                                                  University                                             Cardiology,
                                                                                                                                                         Statistical Methods
Biostatistics,   Allison      David         Professor   T        100    M        1      PhD       Hofstra         Psychology      Statistics &           Statistical Genetics:
Statistical                                 & Section                                             University                      Statistical            Obesity Research
Genetics,                                   Head                                                                                  Genetics
Obesity
Biostatistics    Barnette     Jack          Professor   NT       100    M        1      PhD       The Ohio        Educational     Biostatistics,         Evaluation of
                                                                                                  State           Research and    Psychometrics,         training, effect size
                                                                                                  University      Development     Program                measures, psycho-
                                                                                                  Columbus                        Evaluation             metric properties of
                                                                                                                                                         data collection
                                                                                                                                                         instruments
Biostatics       Bartolucci   Alfred        Professor   T        100    M        1      MA, PhD   Catholic        Statistics      Meta Analysis          Clinical Trials,
                                                                                                  University,                                            Survival Analysis,
                                                                                                  SUNY,                                                  Alzheimer’s Disease
                                                                                                  Buffalo
Biostatics       Beasley      T. Mark       Associate   T        100    M        1      PhD       Southern        Educational     Statistical analysis   Genetics
                                            Professor                                             Illinois        Psychology
                                                                                                  University:
                                                                                                  Carbondale
Biostatics       Coffey       Christopher   Associate   T        100    M        1      PhD       University of   Biostatistics   Data Management,       Neurology, Strokes
                                            Professor                                             North                           Survival Analysis
                                                                                                  Carolina:
                                                                                                  Chapel Hill
Biostatics       Cofield      Stacey        Assistant   TT       100    F        1      PhD       Virginia        Biostatistics   Statistical            Clinical Trials and
                                            Professor                                             Common-                         Methods                mixed models
                                                                                                  wealth
                                                                                                  University
Biostatistics    Cutter       Gary          Professor   T        100    M        1      PhD       University of   Biometry                               Cancer, Pulmonary
                                            & Section                                             Texas:                                                 Newborns, Genetics,
                                            Head                                                  Health                                                 Heart Disease,
                                                                                                  Science                                                Obesity, Multiple
                                                                                                  Center-                                                Sclerosis, Premature
                                                                                                  Houston                                                Babies
Biostatistics    Feng         Rui-Ming      Assistant   TT       100    F        6      PhD       Yale            Philosophy,     Statistical            Statistical Genetics
                                            Professor                                             University      Biostatistics   Analysis; Applied
                                                                                                                                  Multivariate
                                                                                                                                  Analysis;
                                                                                                                                  Advanced
                                                                                                                                  Computational
                                                                                                                                  Methods
Biostatistics    Fineberg     Naomi         Research    NT       100    F        1      PhD       Boston          Philosophy,                            Diabetes Research,
                                            Professor                                             University      Statistics                             Shock Wave
                                                                                                                                                         Lithotripsy


                                                                                                                                                                                     138
4.1a · Primary Faculty Who Support Degree Programs cont.
Department/                             Title/                                      Grad.                       Area of            Area of
 Specialty                            Academic     Tenure    %              Race   Degrees                      Degree            Teaching          Area of Research          Current/Past
   Area           Last        First     Rank       Status   Time   Gender    **    Earned    Institution      (Discipline)      Responsibility          Interest              PH Activities
Biostatistics   Gao        Guimin     Research     NT       100    M        4      PhD       Sun Yat Sei     Philosophy,                            Fine mapping of
                                      Assistant                                              University      Biostatistics                          Quantitative Trait
                                      Professor                                                                                                     Loci (QTL) and
                                                                                                                                                    complex disease gene
                                                                                                                                                    in pedigrees, via joint
                                                                                                                                                    linkage
                                                                                                                                                    disequilibrium (LD)
                                                                                                                                                    and linkage analysis
                                                                                                                                                    with the variance
                                                                                                                                                    component method;
                                                                                                                                                    developing fine
                                                                                                                                                    mapping software for
                                                                                                                                                    different population
                                                                                                                                                    structures
Biostatistics   Howard     George     Professor    T        100    M        1      MBA,      North           Biostatistics,    Statistical          Cerebrovas-cular          Co-Chair
                                      & Chair                                      M.S.,     Carolina        Operations        Analysis, Clinical   Trials and                Policy Research
                                                                                   MSPH,                     Research          Trials               Epidemiology,             Iimplemen-
                                                                                   Dr. PH                    Business                               Statistical Modeling      tation Group for
                                                                                                             Administration                         and Methods               the National
                                                                                                                                                                              Forum for
                                                                                                                                                                              Health Disease
                                                                                                                                                                              and Stroke
                                                                                                                                                                              Prevention;
                                                                                                                                                                              Resource
                                                                                                                                                                              Committee for
                                                                                                                                                                              Delta States
                                                                                                                                                                              Stroke
                                                                                                                                                                              Consortium
Biostatistics   Liu        Nianjun    Assistant    TT       100    M        6      PhD       Yale            Philosophy,                            Statistical Genetics
                                      Professor                                              University      Biostatistics                          and Genomics
Biostatistics   McClure    Leslie     Assistant    TT       100    F        1      PhD       University of   Biostatistics     Linear Models        Clinical Trials,
                                      Professor                                              Michigan                                               Environmental
                                                                                                                                                    Statistics
Biostatistics   Musani     Solomon    Instructor   NT       100    M        6      PhD       University of   Animal and        Population &         QTL Mapping,
                                                                                             Guelph          Poultry Science   Quantitative         Linkage & Assoc.
                                                                                                                               Genetics             analysis, Obesity
Biostatistics   Page       Grier      Associate    T        100    M        1      PhD       University of   Biomedical        Statistical          Genetics, Genomics
                                      Professor                                              Texas:          Sciences          Genetics
                                                                                             Austin
Biostatistics   Perumean   Suzanne    Research     NT       100    F        1      PhD       State           Criminal                               Violence, Media,
                -Chaney               Assistant                                              University of   Justice                                HLM, SEM, Missing
                                      Professor                                              New York at                                            Data
                                                                                             Albany
Biostatistics   Redden     David      Associate    T        100    M        1      PhD       University of   Applied           Data Analysis        Diabetes, Genetics,
                                      Professor                                              Alabama         Statistics                             Tuberculosis,
                                                                                                                                                    Asthma, Gerontology
Biostatistics   Roth       David      Professor    NT       100    M        1      PhD       University of   Psychology        Longitudinal         Family Caregivers,
                                                                                             Kansas                            Modeling             Social Support



                                                                                                                                                                                   139
4.1a · Primary Faculty Who Support Degree Programs cont.

Department/                                  Title/                                     Grad.                       Area of           Area of
 Specialty                                 Academic    Tenure    %              Race   Degrees                      Degree           Teaching         Area of Research         Current/Past
   Area              Last          First     Rank      Status   Time   Gender    **    Earned    Institution      (Discipline)     Responsibility         Interest             PH Activities
                                                                                                                                  Structural
Biostatistics   Szychowski   Jeffery M.    Assistant   TT       100    M        1      PhD       University of   Applied                              Design management
                                           Professor                                             Alabama         Statistics                           and analysis of
                                                                                                                                                      clinical trials with
                                                                                                                                                      primary focus on the
                                                                                                                                                      areas of maternal and
                                                                                                                                                      fetal medicine
Biostatistics   Temple       Ella          Research    NT       100    F        2      PhD       University of   Applied          Data Collection,    CVD health
                                           Assistant                                             Alabama         Statistics,      Methods and         disparities,
                                           Professor                                                             Research         Analysis            psychosocial factors
                                                                                                                 Methodology                          impact on CVD risk
                                                                                                                 and Evaluation                       factors and Black
                                                                                                                                                      Belt Region
Biostatistics   Tiwari       Hermant       Associate   T        100    M        4      PhD       University of   Statistical      Statistical         Heart, Lung, Blood
                                           Professor                                             Notre Dame      Genetics         Methods, Genetic    & Sleep Disorders,
                                                                                                                                  Analysis            Neuro-peptide &
                                                                                                                                                      Venticular Hyper-
                                                                                                                                                      rophy, Obesity, RA,
                                                                                                                                                      Statistical Genetics
                                                                                                                                                      Meth-odology,
                                                                                                                                                      Molecular Evolution,
                                                                                                                                                      Bio-informatics
Biostatistics   Yi           Nengjun       Associate   T        100    M        4      PhD       Nanjing         Statistical      Bayesian Analysis   Genetics
                                           Professor                                             Forestry        Genetics
                                                                                                 University
Biostatistics   Zhang        Kui           Research    NT       100    M        4      PhD       Peking          Statistics       Statistical         Genetics
                                           Assistant                                             University                       Methods
                                           Professor
Biostatistics   Zhang        Xiao          Research    NT       100    F        4      PhD       University of   Mathmatical                          Semi-Parametic
                                           Assistant                                             California :    Statistics                           Statistical Inference,
                                           Professor                                             Los Angeles                                          Survival Analysis,
                                                                                                                                                      Censored Data
                                                                                                                                                      Analysis, Mixed
                                                                                                                                                      Model, Medical
                                                                                                                                                      Diagnosis
                  BST               25
                  Total
Environmental   Bailey       Shannon       Associate   T        100    F        1      PhD       University of   Pharmacology     Env. Health         Mitochondrial Basis
Health                                     Professor                                             Oklahoma        & Toxicology     Research,           of Dis., Hepto-
Services                                                                                         Health                           Toxicology,         toxicity, Alcohol and
                                                                                                 Sciences                         Integrated          Obesity/
                                                                                                 Center                           Biomedical          Diabetes Induced
                                                                                                                                  Sciences            Fatty Liver Diseases,
                                                                                                                                  Curriculum,         Free Radical
                                                                                                                                  Mitochondrial,      Biology, Functional
                                                                                                                                  Basis of Disease,   Proteomics
                                                                                                                                  Current Topics of
                                                                                                                                  Env. Health



                                                                                                                                                                                   140
 4.1a · Primary Faculty Who Support Degree Programs cont.

Department/                                  Title/                                      Grad.                       Area of            Area of
 Specialty                                 Academic     Tenure    %              Race   Degrees                      Degree            Teaching          Area of Research        Current/Past
   Area           Last          First        Rank       Status   Time   Gender    **    Earned    Institution      (Discipline)      Responsibility          Interest            PH Activities
                                                                                                                                    Sciences
Environmental   Ballinger    Carol         Research     NT       100    F        4      PhD       Emory           Biochemistry      IBS                  Inhaled
Health                                     Instructor                                             University                                             Environmental
Sciences                                                                                                                                                 Toxicants
Environmental   Becker       Steven        Associate    T        100    M        1      PhD       Bryn Mawr       Environmental     Environmental        Disaster and
Health                                     Professor                                              College         Health Sciences   Disasters            Emergency
Sciences                                                                                                                                                 Communication
                                                                                                                                                         Preparedness
Environmental   Dickinson    Dale          Assistant    TT       100    M        1      PhD       University of   Molecular         Mechanisms of        Dietary
Health                                     Professor                                              Guelph          Biology &         Redox Cell
Sciences                                                                                                          Genetics          Signaling &
                                                                                                                                    Disease,
                                                                                                                                    Transduction in
                                                                                                                                    Env. Health and
                                                                                                                                    Toxicology
Environmental   Doeller      Jeanette      Research     NT       100    F        1      PhD       Clemson         Philosophy,       Environmental        Hydrogen sulfide in
Health                                     Assoc                                                  University      Biological        Health Air &         mammalian
Sciences                                   Professor                                                              Sciences          Water Pollution      physiology
Environmental   Fanucchi     Michelle V.   Assoc.       TT       100    F        1      PhD       University of   Philosophy,                            Childhood lung
Health                                     Professor                                              California :    Pharmacology                           disease, etiology and
Sciences                                                                                          Davis           & Toxicology                           Pulmonary cell
                                                                                                                                                         biology
Environmental   Garfinkel    Mark          Research     NT       100    M        1      PhD       California      Molecular         Environmental        Global Histone
Health                                     Asst                                                   Institute of    Biology           Health               Modification, Trans-
Sciences                                   Professor                                              Technology                                             Generational
                                                                                                                                                         Epigenetic
Environmental   Liu          Rui-Ming      Associate    T        100    F        4      BS, MS,   Tongji          Environmental     Environmental and    Gluthathione
Health                                     Professor                                    PhD       Medical         Toxicology        Occupational Tox     metabolism, lung
Sciences                                                                                          Univ.                             Diseases             fibrosis, asthma and
                                                                                                                                                         Neuro-degenerative
                                                                                                                                                         disease
Environmental   Lungu        Claudiu       Assistant    TT       100    M        1      PhD       University of   Industrial        Air Sampling and     Gas Contam-inants,
Health                                     Professor                                              South           Hygiene/          Analysis,            Exposure assessment,
Sciences                                                                                          Carolina :      Environmental     Industrial Hygiene   radiation
                                                                                                  Columbia        Health            Seminar, Air
                                                                                                                                    Pollution
Environmental   Maples       Elizabeth     Assistant    NT       100    F        1      PhD       The             Health            Hearing              Industrial Hygiene
Health                                     Professor                                              University of   Behavior/         conservation         presentations at
Sciences                                                                                          Alabama at      Health            program effective,   Historically Black
                                                                                                  Birmingham      Education;        exposure             Colleges and
                                                                                                                  Occupational      reconstruction       Universities
                                                                                                                  Health and
                                                                                                                  Safety
Environmental   Norman       Melissa       Assistant    NT       100    F        2      PhD       The             Industrial        Physical Agents
Health                                     Professor                                              University of   Hygiene
Sciences                                                                                          Alabama at
                                                                                                  Birmingham
Environmental   Oestenstad   R. Kent       Associate    T        100    M        1      MSPH,     The             Industrial        Occ Health           Occupational Health


                                                                                                                                                                                     141
 4.1a · Primary Faculty Who Support Degree Programs cont.

Department/                                   Title/                                      Grad.                       Area of            Area of
 Specialty                                  Academic     Tenure    %              Race   Degrees                      Degree            Teaching           Area of Research       Current/Past
   Area            Last             First     Rank       Status   Time   Gender    **    Earned    Institution      (Discipline)      Responsibility           Interest           PH Activities
Health                                      Professor                                    PhD       University of   Hygiene           Programs              and Safety
Sciences                                                                                           Alabama at                        Management,
                                                                                                   Birmingham                        Interdisciplinary
                                                                                                                                     Studies, Industrial
                                                                                                                                     Hygiene, Occ.
                                                                                                                                     Safety, Worksite
                                                                                                                                     Evaluations
Environmental   Postlethwait   Edward       Professor    T        100    M        1      PhD       University of   Environmental     Environmental         Oxidant Lung Injury,
Health                                      & Chair                                                California:     Health            Health, Advanced      Free Radical Bio-
Sciences                                                                                           Los Angeles     Sciences/Toxic    Toxicology,           chemistry, Lung
                                                                                                                   ology             Integrated            Surface Bio-
                                                                                                                                     Biomedical            chemistry, Lung
                                                                                                                                     Sciences, Grant       Growth &
                                                                                                                                     Writing               Development, Ozone,
                                                                                                                                                           Nitrogen Dioxide,
                                                                                                                                                           Reaction/
                                                                                                                                                           Diffusion
Environmental   Squadrito      Giuseppe     Research     NT       100    M        3      PhD       Louisiana       Environmental     Chemistry             Reactions of smog,
Health                                      Assoc                                                  State           Health Sciences                         combustion
Sciences                                    Professor                                              University                                              associated and
                                                                                                                                                           naturally produced
                                                                                                                                                           oxidants and free
                                                                                                                                                           radicals with
                                                                                                                                                           biological target
                                                                                                                                                           molecules
                ENV            14
                Total
Epidemiology    Aissani        Brahim       Research     NT       100    M        1      PhD       University      Human                                   Genetic
                                            Assistant                                              Paris VI        Genetics                                Epidemiology
                                            Professor                                                                                                      (cancer, HIV/AIDS,
                                                                                                                                                           Obesity)
Epidemiology    Arnett         Donna        Professor/   T        100    F        1      PhD       University of   Epidemiology      Epi. Of Chronic       Genetics
                                            Chair                                                  North                             Disease, Field        Epidemiology
                                                                                                   Carolina :                        Studies, Global
                                                                                                   Chapel Hill                       Perspectives/Disea
                                                                                                                                     se Prev & Control,
                                                                                                                                     Epi Seminar,
                                                                                                                                     Doctoral Seminar,
                                                                                                                                     Epi, Design &
                                                                                                                                     Analysis
Epidemiology    Brown          Elizabeth    Assistant    TT       100    F        1      PhD       Johns           Epidemiology,     Genetics and          Genetics,
                                            Professor                                              Hopkins         Genetics and      Molecular             Immunology,
                                                                                                   University      Molecular                               Infectious Diseases
                                                                                                                                                           Cancer
Epidemiology    Chamot         Eric         Assistant    TT       100    M        1      MD, MS,   Universite’     Epidemiology      Infectious            HIV/AIDS, Cancer,      Ran TB ward
                                            Professor                                    PhD       de Lausanne,                      Diseases              Patient reported       Ad Lucern
                                                                                                   Switzerland;                                            outcomes, global       Hospital of
                                                                                                   Tulane                                                                         Banka-Bafang,



                                                                                                                                                                                      142
 4.1a · Primary Faculty Who Support Degree Programs cont.

Department/                            Title/                                     Grad.                       Area of           Area of
 Specialty                           Academic    Tenure    %              Race   Degrees                      Degree           Teaching           Area of Research       Current/Past
   Area          Last       First      Rank      Status   Time   Gender    **    Earned    Institution      (Discipline)     Responsibility           Interest           PH Activities
                                                                                           University                                                                    CM:
                                                                                                                                                                         Supervised
                                                                                                                                                                         primary health
                                                                                                                                                                         care & health
                                                                                                                                                                         promotion
                                                                                                                                                                         programs at
                                                                                                                                                                         rural health
                                                                                                                                                                         clinics of
                                                                                                                                                                         Nkodjock,
                                                                                                                                                                         Melong &
                                                                                                                                                                         Mourmee;
                                                                                                                                                                         Design &
                                                                                                                                                                         implementing
                                                                                                                                                                         program for
                                                                                                                                                                         HIV voluntary
                                                                                                                                                                         testing &
                                                                                                                                                                         counseling at
                                                                                                                                                                         Phoenix
                                                                                                                                                                         Foundation;
                                                                                                                                                                         Infectious
                                                                                                                                                                         Disease
                                                                                                                                                                         epi/consultant
                                                                                                                                                                         for ID Section
                                                                                                                                                                         Geneva Off
                                                                                                                                                                         Public Health,
                                                                                                                                                                         Switzerland
Epidemiology   Cheng     Hong        Research    TT       100    M        4      MD, PhD   West China      Medicine,        Epidemiologic         Pharmaco-Epi-
                                     Assistant                                             University of   Biostatistics,   data analysis; SAS    demiology, Clinical
                                     Professor                                             Medical         Epidemiology                           epidemiology,
                                                                                           Sciences,                                              Occupational
                                                                                           The                                                    epidemiology
                                                                                           University of
                                                                                           Alabama at
                                                                                           Birmingham
Epidemiology   Delzell   Elizabeth   Professor   T        100    F        1      MSPH,     University of   Epidemiology     Occupational          Environmental,
                                                                                 SD        North                            Epidemiology,         Occupational and
                                                                                           Carolina,                        Cancer                Pharma-ceutical
                                                                                           Harvard                          Epidemiology,         Causes of Disease;
                                                                                           University                       Pharmaco-             Burden & outcomes
                                                                                                                            epidemiology          of Osteoporosis
Epidemiology   Go        Rodney      Professor   TT       100    M        4      PhD       Hawaii          Genetics         Human Population      Population Genetics,
                                                                                                                            Genetics and          Genetics of Complex
                                                                                                                            Genetic               Diseases,
                                                                                                                            Epidemiology          Alzheimer’s Disease,
                                                                                                                                                  Schizophrenia
Epidemiology   Howard    Virginia    Research    NT       100    F        1      MSPH      University of   Epidemiology     Cardiovascular        Cerbro-vascular        Resource
                                     Asst.                                                 North                            Disease Statistical   Disease, Multicenter   Committee for
                                     Professor                                             Charolina :                      Analysis              Clinical Trials        Delta States



                                                                                                                                                                              143
 4.1a · Primary Faculty Who Support Degree Programs cont.

Department/                              Title/                                     Grad.                       Area of           Area of
 Specialty                             Academic    Tenure    %              Race   Degrees                      Degree           Teaching           Area of Research         Current/Past
   Area           Last         First     Rank      Status   Time   Gender    **    Earned    Institution      (Discipline)     Responsibility           Interest             PH Activities
                                                                                             Chapel Hill                                                                     Stroke
                                                                                                                                                                             Consortium
                                                                                                                                                                             coordinated
                                                                                                                                                                             through health
                                                                                                                                                                             departments in
                                                                                                                                                                             Alabama,
                                                                                                                                                                             Mississippi,
                                                                                                                                                                             Tennessee
                                                                                                                                                                             Arkansas and
                                                                                                                                                                             Louisiana
               Jolly        Pauline    Professor   T        100    F        2      PhD,      Johns           Immunology       Tropical Infectious   Immunology,
Epidemiology                                                                       MPH       Hopkins         and Infectious   Diseases, Grant       Virology, HIV/AIDS
                                                                                             University      Disease          Writing               and STD’, Research
                                                                                                                                                    Training
Epidemiology   Kabagambe    Edmond     Assistant   TT       100    M        2      DVM,      Mekerere        Epidemiology     Nutritional           Cardiovascular
                                       Professor                                   PhD       University                       Epidemiology          Disease
                                                                                             and                                                    Epidemiology;
                                                                                             Louisiana                                              nutrition and genetics
                                                                                             State
                                                                                             University :
                                                                                             Baton Rouge
Epidemiology   Kaslow       Richard    Professor   T        100    M        1      MD,       Harvard         Molecular        Vaccinology,          Infectious Diseases,
                                                                                   MPH                       Epidemiology     Field Inter-          Epidemiology and
                                                                                                                              disciplinary          Immu-nogenetics
                                                                                                                              Studies
Epidemiology   Kempf        Mirjam-    Research    NT       100    F        6      PhD,      Julius-         Microbiology,    HIV/AIDS and          HIV, AIDS, STD’s in
                            Colette    Assistant                                   MPH       Maximillians    Epidemiology     STD’s                 women and their
                                       Professor                                             -                                                      infants
                                                                                             Universitaet,
                                                                                             Wuerzburg,
                                                                                             Germany;
                                                                                             The
                                                                                             University of
                                                                                             Alabama at
                                                                                             Birmingham
Epidemiology   Kristensen   Sibylle    Assistant   NT       100    F        1      DrPH      The             Epidemiology                           Perinatal outcomes
                                       Professor                                             University of                                          for LBW infants;
                                                                                             Alabama at                                             HIV/AIDS/
                                                                                             Birmingham                                             STD’s; research
                                                                                                                                                    training
Epidemiology   McGwin       Gerald     Associate   TT       100    M        1      MS, PhD   Harvard, The    Epidemiology     Analysis              Injuries; eye disease;
                                       Professor                                             University of                                          lupus; methodology
                                                                                             Alabama at
                                                                                             Birmingham
Epidemiology   Perry        Rodney     Research    NT       100    M        1      MS, PhD   The             Human Medical                          Molecular genetics of
                                       Assistant                                             University of   Genetics                               complex diseases
                                       Professor                                             Alabama at
                                                                                             Birmingham



                                                                                                                                                                                  144
 4.1a · Primary Faculty Who Support Degree Programs cont.

Department/                                   Title/                                     Grad.                        Area of          Area of
 Specialty                                  Academic    Tenure    %              Race   Degrees                       Degree          Teaching          Area of Research          Current/Past
   Area           Last           First        Rank      Status   Time   Gender    **    Earned    Institution       (Discipline)    Responsibility          Interest              PH Activities
               Sathiakumar   Nalini         Associate   T        100    F        4      MD,       Madras,          Epidemiology    Data Analysis        Occupational &
Epidemiology                                Professor                                   DrPH      India; The                                            Environmental
                                                                                                  University of                                         Epidemiology,
                                                                                                  Alabama at                                            Training and
                                                                                                  Birmingham                                            Research Aerosal
                                                                                                                                                        Research, Low Birth
                                                                                                                                                        Weight
Epidemiology   Shrestha      Sadeep         Assistant   TT       100    M        4      PhD       Johns            Genetic         Population           Genetics, HIV/AIDS,
                                            Professor                                             Hopkins          Epidemiology    Genetics and         Susceptibility to
                                                                                                  University                       Genetic              infectious disease
                                                                                                                                   Epidemiology
Epidemiology   Thomas        Helen Olivia   Assistant   TT       100    F        2      PhD       University of    Epidemiology                         Applied
                                            Professor                                             North                                                 epidemiology for the
                                                                                                  Carolina :                                            prevention of obesity
                                                                                                  Chapel Hill                                           and chronic disease
                                                                                                                                                        through physical
                                                                                                                                                        activity and nutrition,
                                                                                                                                                        food security, health
                                                                                                                                                        disparities, and
                                                                                                                                                        design of obesity
                                                                                                                                                        randomized
                                                                                                                                                        controlled trials
Epidemiology   Voeks         Jenifer        Research    NT       100    F        1      PhD       University of    Biometry/                            Diabetes and
                                            Assistant                                             South            Biometrics                           Obesity; Cerebrovas-
                                            Professor                                             Carolina                                              cular Disease,
                                                                                                  :Charleston                                           Multicenter Clinical
                                                                                                                                                        Trials
Epidemiology   Waterbor      John           Associate   T        100    M        1      MS, MD,   University of    Medicine,       Epidemiologic        Cancer Epidemiology
                                            Professor                                   DrPH      Pennsylvania     Epidemiology,   Research,            and Control; Injury
                                                                                                  , The            Public Health   Epidemiology         Epidemiology and
                                                                                                  University of                    Research Lab,        Control
                                                                                                  Alabama at                       Integrative
                                                                                                  Birmingham                       Experience, Injury
                                                                                                                                   Epidemiology
Epidemiology   Wilson        Craig          Professor   T        100    M        1      MD        University of    Medicine                             Tropical Health,
                                                                                                  Wisconsin-                                            HIV/AIDS
                                                                                                  Madison                                               Intervention,
                                                                                                                                                        Adolescent Medicine
               EPI Total     21
Health         Baskin        Monica         Assistant   TT       100    F        2      MS, PhD   Georgia          Psychology      Women’s              Obesity Preventions
Behavior                                    Professor                                             State                            Health/Social        and Minority Health
                                                                                                  University                       Behavior
Health         Bolland       John           Associate   T        100    M        1      PhD       Ohio State       Political       Dir. Research        Children Violence,
Behavior                                    Professor                                             University :     Science,                             Genet Environment
                                                                                                  Columbus         Government &
                                                                                                                   General
Health         Chen          Huey           Professor   T        100    M        4      PhD       University of    Sociology       Health Program       HIV, AIDS, STD’s          CDC Chief
Behavior                                                                                          Massachusetts:                   Evaluation                                     Program



                                                                                                                                                                                      145
 4.1a · Primary Faculty Who Support Degree Programs cont.

Department/                              Title/                                     Grad.                       Area of           Area of
 Specialty                             Academic    Tenure    %              Race   Degrees                      Degree           Teaching          Area of Research       Current/Past
   Area          Last          First     Rank      Status   Time   Gender    **    Earned    Institution      (Discipline)     Responsibility          Interest           PH Activities
                                                                                             Amherst                                                                      Evaluation
                                                                                                                                                                          Branch of
                                                                                                                                                                          HIV/AIDS
                                                                                                                                                                          Prevention
                                                                                                                                                                          Division
Health         Davies      Susan       Associate   T        100    F        1      PhD, ME   The             Public Health    Adolescents and      Adolescent Health,
Behavior                               Professor                                             University of                    AIDS, Family and     HIV Prevention,
                                                                                             Alabama at                       Community            Community-based
                                                                                             Birmingham,                      Health               Participatory
                                                                                             George                                                Research
                                                                                             Mason Univ.
Health         Galvin      Melissa     Associate   NT       100    F        1      MPH,      The             Public Health,   Public Health        Public Health,         Rural Health
Behavior                               Professor                                   DrPH      University of   Public Health    Promotion and        Alabama Nursing        Affairs, AL
                                                                                             Alabama at      Education and    Aging Seminar,       Transition Program     State Dept
                                                                                             Birmingham      Promotion        Principles and                              Public Health;
                                                                                                                              Practice of                                 Health
                                                                                                                              Community                                   Promotion, AL
                                                                                                                              Organizations,                              Dept Public
                                                                                                                              Origins of                                  Health; UAB
                                                                                                                              Epidemics                                   Liaison, AL
                                                                                                                                                                          Dept Public
                                                                                                                                                                          Health
Health         Grimley     Diane       Professor   T        100    F        1      MA, PhD   Rhode Island    Clinical         Adv Theory of        Behavioral Change
Behavior                               & Chair                                                               Psychology       Behavioral           Theory, STD
                                                                                                                              Science              Prevention
Health         Kohler      Connie      Associate   T        100    F        1      DrPH,     The             Public Health    Radio Outreach,      Smoking Cessation      Reviewed
Behavior                               Professor                                   MA        University of                    Social and           and Cancer             grants for
                                                                                             Alabama at                       Behavioral           Prevention             Oklahoma State
                                                                                             Birmingham,                      Science                                     Health
                                                                                             Univ. of                                                                     Department
                                                                                             Iowa
Health         Lian        Bradley     Assistant   NT       100    M        1      PhD       University of   International    Research Methods     Public Health
Behavior                               Professor                                             Alabama         Relations &      in Behavioral
                                                                                                             Affairs          Sciences
Health         Tucker      Jalie       Professor   T        100    F        1      PhD,      Vanderbilt      Clinical         Alcohol & Drug       Alcohol, HIV,
Behavior                                                                           MPH       University      Psychology       Abuse                Substance Users
               HB Total    9
Hlth Care      Becker      David       Assistant   TT       100    M        1      PhD       University of   Economics        Health Economics,    Reimbursement
Organization                           Professor                                             California:                      Public Health        Policy, population
Policy                                                                                       Berkeley                         Policy               health, medical
                                                                                                                                                   malpractice
Hlth Care      Bronstein   Janet       Professor   T        100    F        1      PhD       Kentucky        Anthropology     Soc/Ethical Issues   Health Care Delivery
Organization                                                                                                                  in Public Health     for low income
Policy                                                                                                                                             populations; health
                                                                                                                                                   care infrastructure,
                                                                                                                                                   insurance coverage
                                                                                                                                                   for children
Hlth Care      Gary        Lisa        Assistant   TT       100    F        2      MS,       University of   Mathematics,     Health Disparities   Mental Health Needs


                                                                                                                                                                               146
 4.1a · Primary Faculty Who Support Degree Programs cont.

Department/                              Title/                                     Grad.                       Area of            Area of
 Specialty                             Academic    Tenure    %              Race   Degrees                      Degree            Teaching          Area of Research         Current/Past
   Area          Last          First     Rank      Status   Time   Gender    **    Earned    Institution      (Discipline)      Responsibility          Interest             PH Activities
Organization                           Professor                                   MPH,      MI, Yale        Epidemiology,     Research
Policy                                                                             PhD       University      Health Policy
Hlth Care      Ginter       Peter      Professor   T        100    M        1      MBA,      Auburn,         Business          Strategic            Strategic
Organization                                                                       PhD       Univ. North                       Management           Management
Policy                                                                                       Texas                                                  Training
Hlth Care      Kilgore      Meredith   Assistant   TT       100    M        1      PhD       Pardee          Policy Analysis   Clinical Decision    Long Term Care,
Organization                           Professor                                             RAND                              Making, Cost         Home Health and
Policy                                                                                       Graduate                          Effectiveness        Hospice Care,
                                                                                             School                            Research Methods     Burden of Disease,
                                                                                                                                                    Malpractice Law
Hlth Care      Klapow       Joshua     Associate   T        100    M        1      PhD       Univ.           Clinical          Patient Based        Behavioral Med.,
Organization                           Professor                                             California :    Psychology        Outcomes             Outcome Eval., Hlth
Policy                                                                                       San Diego                         Measurement          Status/Hlth Related
                                                                                                                                                    Quality of Life,
                                                                                                                                                    Chronic Illness,
                                                                                                                                                    Provider Behavior,
                                                                                                                                                    Hlth Care Delivery
                                                                                                                                                    Systems
Hlth Care      Mennemeyer   Stephen    Professor   T        100    M        1      MA, PhD   SUNY            Economics         Health Economics,    Health Economics
Organization                                                                                                                   Policy Analysis
Policy
Hlth Care      Michael      Max        Professor   NT       100    M        1      MD        Harvard         Medicine          Policy Politics in   Public Health Policy,    Primary Care
Organization                                                                                                                   Public Health,       Prevention               practice at
Policy                                                                                                                         Narrative Pubic                               Cooper Green;
                                                                                                                               Health, Origins of                            Medical Dir.,
                                                                                                                               Epidemics                                     Birmingham
                                                                                                                                                                             Health Care
Hlth Care      Morrisey     Michael    Professor   T        100    M        1      MA, PhD   Univ. of        Economics         Health Insurance     Health Economics,
Organization                                                                                 Washington                        Managed Care         Insurance and
Policy                                                                                                                                              Regulation
Hlth Care      Rucks        Andrew     Associate   NT       100    M        1      MBA,      Auburn,         Management        Financial Mgt. for   Preparedness Policy,
Organization                           Professor                                   PhD       University of   Science           Health               Operations Mgt.,
Policy                                                                                       North Texas                       Professions,         Strategic Mgt.
                                                                                                                               Integrative          Organizational
                                                                                                                               Experience,          Design
                                                                                                                               Health Care
                                                                                                                               Organization
                                                                                                                               Seminar
Hlth Care      Sen          Bisakha    Associate   T        100    F        4      PhD       Ohio State      Economics         Health Economics,    Parenting,
Organization                           Professor                                             University:                       Empirical            Adolescents,
Policy                                                                                       Columbus                          Methods              Substance Abuse,
                                                                                                                                                    Neighborhood
                                                                                                                                                    Quality, Obesity
Hlth Care      Wingate      Martha     Assistant   TT       100    F        1      MPH,      The             Maternal and      Global Child         Pediatric disaster
Organization                           Professor                                   DrPH      University of   Child Health      Health Policy,       response, school
Policy                                                                                       Alabama at                        Integrative          disaster preparedness,
                                                                                             Birmingham                        Experience           perinatal health
                                                                                                                                                    issues, public health



                                                                                                                                                                                 147
 4.1a · Primary Faculty Who Support Degree Programs cont.

Department/                                  Title/                                      Grad.                       Area of           Area of
 Specialty                                 Academic     Tenure    %              Race   Degrees                      Degree           Teaching         Area of Research        Current/Past
   Area            Last           First      Rank       Status   Time   Gender    **    Earned    Institution      (Discipline)     Responsibility         Interest            PH Activities
                                                                                                                                                       policy development
                                                                                                                                                       needs assessment,
                                                                                                                                                       evaluation and public
                                                                                                                                                       health leadership
                 HCOP        12
                 Total
Maternal and     Altarac     Maja          Assistant    TT       100    F        1      MD,       Johns           Maternal &       Perinatal           Perinatal
Child Health                               Professor                                    MPH,      Hopkins         Child Health     Epidemiology,       Epidemiology,
                                                                                        PhD       University                       Adolescent          Women’s Health,
                                                                                                                                   Sexuality, Social   Learning Disabilities
                                                                                                                                   Justice &
                                                                                                                                   Children’s Health
Maternal and     Ehiri       John          Associate    T        100    M        2      PhD       University of   Maternal &       Global Health,      Evidence-based
Child Health                               Professor                                              Glasgow         Child Health     Maternal Child      policy and practice,
                                                                                                                                   Health Advanced     Global maternal and
                                                                                                                                   Leadership &        Child Health,
                                                                                                                                   Practice, Project   Monitoring and
                                                                                                                                   Planning in         Evaluation,
                                                                                                                                   International       Behavioral
                                                                                                                                   Health              Interventions for
                                                                                                                                                       Disease Prevention
Maternal and     Franklin    Frank         Professor/   T        100    M        1      MD,       University of   Nutritional      Maternal and        Maternal and Child
Child Health                               Chair                                        MPH,      Maryland :      Biochemistry &   Child Nutrition,    Nutrition, Adolescent
                                                                                        PhD       Baltimore       Metabolism       Adolescent Risk     Risk Behaviors
                                                                                                                                   Behaviors
Maternal and     Gilliland   Mary Janice   Research     NT       100    F        1      PhD       The             Health                               Maternal and Child      Environmental
Child                                      Assistant                                              University of   Education &                          Nutrition, Adolescent   Epidemiologist
Nutrition,                                 Professor                                              Alabama at      Health                               Risk Behaviors          AL Dept Public
Adolescent                                                                                        Birmingham      Promotion                                                    Hlth;
Risk Behaviors                                                                                                                                                                 Conducted
                                                                                                                                                                               assessments for
                                                                                                                                                                               cancer clusters
                                                                                                                                                                               or hlth
                                                                                                                                                                               problems
                                                                                                                                                                               associated with
                                                                                                                                                                               environmental
                                                                                                                                                                               pollution
Maternal and     Kirby       Russell       Professor/   T        100    M        1      MS, PhD   University of   Geography        Research            Perinatal               Research
Child                                      Vice-                                                  Wisconsin :                      Methods,            Epidemiology, Birth     Analyst and
Nutrition,                                 Chair                                                  Madison                          Epidemiology        Defects and             lead MCH
Adolescent                                 Research                                                                                Perinatal,          Developmental           statistician for
Risk Behaviors                                                                                                                     Programs &          Disabilities, GIS       Wisconsin Div.
                                                                                                                                   Policies in MCH     Applications in         Public Hlth;
                                                                                                                                                       Public Health           Senior
                                                                                                                                                                               Research
                                                                                                                                                                               Analyst for
                                                                                                                                                                               MCH statistics,
                                                                                                                                                                               Ark. Dept of



                                                                                                                                                                                    148
 4.1a · Primary Faculty Who Support Degree Programs cont.

Department/                                      Title/                                                   Grad.                           Area of             Area of
 Specialty                                     Academic      Tenure       %                    Race      Degrees                          Degree             Teaching          Area of Research        Current/Past
   Area            Last            First         Rank        Status      Time      Gender       **       Earned        Institution      (Discipline)       Responsibility          Interest            PH Activities
                                                                                                                                                                                                       Health ORISE
                                                                                                                                                                                                       Fellow
                                                                                                                                                                                                       conducted
                                                                                                                                                                                                       needs
                                                                                                                                                                                                       assessment for
                                                                                                                                                                                                       Division of
                                                                                                                                                                                                       Reproductive
                                                                                                                                                                                                       Health CDC
Maternal and     Kulczycki    Andrzej          Associate     T          100        M          1          MSc, PhD     University of    Population         Reproductive         Reproductive Health;
Child                                          Professor                                                              Michigan         Planning &         Health, Doctoral     Fertility & family
Nutrition,                                                                                                                             Interntional       Seminar, Public      Planning; Gender,
Adolescent                                                                                                                             Health             Health               Demographic &
Risk Behaviors                                                                                                                                            Demography           Population Studies;
                                                                                                                                                                               Global Health: Policy
                                                                                                                                                                               & Programs
Maternal and     Mulvihill    Beverly          Associate     NT         100        F          1          Med, PhD     Univ of          Child              Child Health and     Children with Special
Child                                          Prof/ Vice                                                             North            Development        Development,         Health Care Needs;
Nutrition,                                     Chair                                                                  Carolina,                           Needs Assessment     Needs Assessment;
Adolescent                                                                                                            Texas                                                    Children’s Health
Risk Behaviors                                                                                                        Women’s                                                  Insurance
                                                                                                                      University
Maternal and     Pass         Mary Ann         Research      NT         100        F          1          MD,          The              Pediatrics and     Issues in Maternal   Children with Special   Cnty. Hlth
Child                                          Professor                                                 MPH,         University of    Infectious         and Child Health,    Health Care Needs;      Officer for;
Nutrition,                                                                                               FAAP         Alabama at       Disease            Introduction to      Perinatal               Deputy Hlth
Adolescent                                                                                                            Birmingham                          Public Health                                Officer, ;
Risk Behaviors                                                                                                                                            Comparative                                  Pediatric Med.
                                                                                                                                                          Maternal Child                               Consultant AL
                                                                                                                                                          Health                                       Children’s
                                                                                                                                                                                                       Rehabilitation
                                                                                                                                                                                                       Service (Title V
                                                                                                                                                                                                       Agency for
                                                                                                                                                                                                       CSHCN), AL
                                                                                                                                                                                                       Department of
                                                                                                                                                                                                       Rehabilitation
                                                                                                                                                                                                       Services
Maternal and     Swaminat     Shailender       Assistant     TT         100        M          4          PhD          University of    Health             Secondary Data       Reducing racial and
Child Health     han                           Professor                                                              Southern         Economics and      Analysis             socio-economic
                                                                                                                      California       Applied                                 disparities in child
                                                                                                                                       Econometrics                            outcomes
                 MCH          9
                 Total
                 School       90
                 Total


          UAB – University of Alabama at Birmingham
          ** Race/ethnicity codes: 1 = Caucasian; 2 = African American; 3 = Hispanic/Latino; 4 = Asian/Island Pacific; 5 = Native American/Alaska Native; 6 = International




                                                                                                                                                                                                            149
4.1.b Other Faculty Who Support Teaching Programs

 Department/           Name                 Title/Academic Rank   Title & Current        FTE or Gender   Race or     Highest   Discipline                   Teaching Areas
 Specialty Area                                                   Employer                 %             Ethnicity   Degree
                                                                                          Time           **          Earned
 Health Care
 Organizational
 Policy (HCOP)
                       Abdolrasulnia,       Teaching Assistant                             0.10 M                4    MPH      Public Health, General
                       Mazier
                       Duncan, W.J.         Professor/Secondary   University Scholar/      0.10 M                1    PhD      Business Administration      Mgt Concepts in Public
                                                                  Professor/ UAB                                                                            Health Programs
                       Hites, Lisle         Adjunct Assistant                              0.10 M                1    PhD      Health Psychology
                                            Professor
                       Locher, Julie        Credentialed Course                            0.10 F                1             Sociology
                                            Instructor
                       Nelson, Leonard Jack Professor             Professor /Samford       0.10 M                1     JD      Law                          Public Health Law
                                                                  University -
                                                                  Cumberland School
                                                                  of Law
 Environmental
 Health Services
 (EHS)
                       Kraus, David         Research Associate    Associate Professor/     0.10 M                1    PhD      Nat Sci and Math             Evolutionary Medicine
                                            Professor/Secondary   UAB
 Epidemiology (EPI)
                       Chen, YuYing         Assistant             Assistant Professor/     0.10 F                4    PhD      Epidemiologist spinal cord   Introduction to
                                            Professor/Secondary   Physical Med &                                               injuries                     Epidemiology
                                                                  Rehabilitation/UAB
                       Salas, Maribel       Assistant             Assistant Professor      0.10 F                3    MD       Preventive Medicine          Pharmacoepidemiology
                                            Professor/Secondary   Medicine/UAB
                       Fine, Russ           Professor/Secondary   Professor                0.10 M                1    PhD      Immunology/Rheumatology Injury Epi
                                                                  Rheumatology UAB
                       Freedman, David      Professor/Secondary   Professor/UAB            0.10 M                1    MD       Geographic                   Gorgas Course in
                                                                                                                               Medicine/Infectious          Tropical Medicine
                                                                                                                               Diseases
                       Glasser, Steven      Professor/Secondary   Professor/UAB            0.10 M                1    MD       Preventive Medicine          Fundamentals of
                                                                                                                                                            Clinical Research
 Biostatistics (Bio)

                       Cowan, Charles       Adjunct Professor                              0.10 M                1    PhD
                       Cui, Xiangqin        Research Assistant                             0.10 F                4    PhD      Statistical Genetics
                                            Professor
                       Fernandez, Jose      Associate Professor   Associate                0.10 M                3
                                                                  Professor/UAB
                       Katholi, Charles     Professor Emeritus                             0.20 M                1    PhD                                   Advanced
                                                                  Professor Emeritus                                                                        Computational
                                                                                                                                                            Methods



                                                                                                                                                                                150
   4.1.b Other Faculty Who Support Teaching Programs cont.

Department/            Name                   Title/Academic Rank         Title & Current        FTE or Gender        Race or       Highest    Discipline                  Teaching Areas
Specialty Area                                                            Employer                 %                  Ethnicity     Degree
                                                                                                  Time                **            Earned
                       Litaker, Mark          Associate Professor         Associate Profess         0.10 M                     1     PhD       Biostatistics
                                                                          SOD
                       Loraine, Ann           Assistant Professor         Assistant Professor        0.27 F                     1      PhD     Genetics
                                                                          SOM
                       Person, Sharina        Associate Professor         Associate Professor        0.10 F                     2      PhD     Biostatistics
                                                                          Preventive Medicine
Maternal and Child
Health (MCH)
                       Child, Ian             Credentialed Course                                    0.25 M                     1 MSHA         Health Service Adm.         Global Health
                                              Instructor
                       Harris, Keecha         Adjunct Instructor          Consultant/ UAB            0.25 F                     2 DrPH         MCH Public Health           Diversity and Cultural
                                                                                                                                                                           Competency
                       Hitchcock, Laurel      Adjunct Instructor          Educational                0.50 F                     1 MPH          Public Health Social Work   Social Work in Public
                                                                          Research Assistant                                                                               Health
                                                                          MCH/UAB
                       Smolin, David Mark     Adjunct Professor           Professor of Law,          0.25 M                     1 JD           Law Review                  International Children's
                                                                          Cumberland Law                                                                                   Rights and their
                                                                          School, Samford                                                                                  Health: Public Health
                                                                          University                                                                                       and Legal Perspectives
Health Behavior
(HB)
                       Perko, Mike             Credentialed Course                                   0.08 M                    1 PhD
                                               Instructor
                        Turner, Lori           Adjunct Professor                                     0.08 F                    1
                        Usdan, Stuart          Credentialed Course                                   0.08 M                    1 PhD
                                               Instructor
** Race/ethnicity codes: 1 = Caucasian; 2 = African American; 3 = Hispanic/Latino; 4 = Asian/Island Pacific; 5 = Native American/Alaska Native; 6 = International




                                                                                                                                                                                                151
4.1.c Description of the manner in which the faculty integrates perspectives from the field of
practice, including information on appointment tracks for practitioners, if used by the
school.

The School and its faculty integrate perspectives from the field of public health practice, research,
education and service. Faculty with practice experience and the ability to direct field work and
provide students with a learning environment focused on translating knowledge and skills into
excellence in public health practice are integral to this process.

A strong practice-based perspective exists among faculty in the SOPH. This includes faculty who
regularly consult with state and local health departments and community-based organizations, and
collaborate with practitioners on teaching and research activities. Of primary faculty, 23% (20/87)
have earned graduate degrees in public health. Their practice activities include serving on local,
state, and national task forces and committees such as the Governor’s Black Belt Action Committee
for Health; working directly with the state health department and the Medicaid agency in Alabama
and other states; providing continuing education to the public health workforce, especially in
preparedness; serving on boards of voluntary health and human service agencies; serving federal
agencies such as HRSA, NIH, CDC and MCHB; developing and evaluating local and international
community interventions; and collaborating with state and local public health and community
agencies/Community Based Organizations on grant writing (see Table 4.1.a). The combination of
formal public health degree training and active involvement in practice enable faculty to provide
public health students with a “real world” perspective, presenting theoretical and scholarly expertise
in the context of examples drawn from actual activities. In addition, faculty can choose to focus
their scholarly activities on public health practice, giving those who conduct research that is applied
or translational an avenue for promotion and tenure. One example of faculty participation in the
practice community is our Dean, who came to UAB after being CEO of the state’s only public
hospital. Further, the Interim Associate Dean for Academic and Strategic Programs, who returned
to UAB after four years as Director of the Alabama Department of Senior Services, serves in a
jointly funded position as the UAB liaison to the Alabama Department of Public Health and began
her career in the State Health Department. Her practice focus shapes the academic programs.

Local, state, national and international public health practitioners serve as guest lecturers for
classes and seminars, and serve as field placement preceptors and collaborators on community
and practice-based research projects. In a broader sense, the faculty actively seeks contributions
from those in practice to satisfy the research and education missions of the School. A key activity
in this regard is the internship requirement, where students work in a practice setting with supervision
by a preceptor and a faculty advisor. Placements include local and state health departments; non-
profit agencies such as Planned Parenthood, United Way and United Cerebral Palsy; and the CDC
and public health-related agencies abroad. The UAB Minority Health International Research
Training Program provides research training opportunities to students interested in nutrition,
tropical infectious diseases, reproductive health and/or STDs, HIV/AIDS and chronic disease.
Locations for these experiences include Ghana, Guatemala, India, Jamaica, and Peru.

In addition, the SOPH has revised its Public Health Grand Rounds into endowed lectureships,
enabling us to feature nationally recognized experts in a variety of related fields. Students, faculty
and practitioners participate in these seminars, which have included the following:
    • SARS, Influenza and the Collapse of Public Health (Dr. Ron Glasser, 10/20/04)
    • Autism Spectrum Disorders (Dr. Robert Hendren, 4/20/05)
    • Family Planning and Public Health: A House A’Fire (Dr. Gloria Feldt, 10/26/05)
    • Autism, Mental Health, and Public Health (Dr. Christopher McDougle, 4/12/06)
    • Understanding the Social Nature of Autism (Dr. Fred Volkmar, 4/18/07)
    • The Ghost Map (Steven Johnson, 10/17/07)

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    •   McMillan Lecture in Child and Family Health (Dr. Maxine Hayes, 2/27/08)

This integration of practice is consistent with the mission of the SOPH to be “a community of
outstanding scholars and professionals recognized for improving the health of the citizens of
Alabama and the world.”

4.1.d Identification of outcome measures by which the school may judge the qualifications
of its faculty competent, along with data regarding the performance of the school against
the measures for the last three years.

The primary outcome on which the UAB SOPH judges its faculty competent is whether it includes
diverse, well-funded faculty who are highly competent teachers and researchers and who are
involved in serving their research and practice communities. Indicators used to make these
judgments include diversity of faculty (degrees, types, program areas; range of public health
disciplines, practice experiences; etc.), promotion and tenure, and community involvement and
recognition are described in Table 4.1.d.

Table 4.1.d Outcome Measures for Faculty
Measure                                         Target     2005     2006      2007
Books (School wide)                                  5         8        2        P
Monographs (School wide)                             8        39       24        P
Publications (School wide)                         243      368      318         P
Publications (per faculty)                          >2       6.3      5.1        P
Teaching Evaluations                             >80%      82%      84%       64%
Advising Evaluations                              80%      73%      77%       70%
Faculty Development                              >50%      2008     Goal
Facilities Audit Recommendations Implemented     >80%      85%      70%          P
Faculty-Percent Terminal Degree                   94%     97.7%    97.7%    98.8%
Percent CHP by Faculty                            85%     85.1%    85.4%    94.7%
Number Minority                                     11        18       19       17
Professional Service Participation               >80%      2008     Goal
Community Service Participation                  >50%      2008     Goal

Faculty diversity is highly valued in the School. As indicated by the data in Table 4.1.a and Table
4.1.b, the SOPH faculty includes a range of disciplines, backgrounds, research interests, and
practice experience. While criteria for faculty qualifications are set at the department level, all new
faculty appointments are approved by the school-wide Faculty Affairs Committee (FAC). In
general, departments seek faculty who have complementary skills and interests, come from
academic institutions and practice settings around the globe, and have the ability to contribute
significantly to the research and teaching missions. Over the past three years the School has
employed faculty from over 45 different academic institutions (approximately 10 from outside the
US), representing 11 broad discipline areas (i.e., Social and Behavioral Sciences, Biomedical
Sciences, Mathematics/Statistics, Epidemiology, Business/Management, Economics, Policy/
International Affairs, Geography, Public/International/Maternal and Child Health, Pharmacology,
Environmental Health Sciences). As seen in Appendix 3.1.c and Table 3.1.d, faculty are engaged
in research within a wide variety of areas impacting public health. The faculty is actively involved in
their scholarly and practice communities through committees, task forces, consultation activities,
training and continuing education, review panels, technical assistance, and Board service both
nationally and internationally (Section 3.2). Faculty diversity – as reflected in the range of
research, service and teaching activities in which faculty are engaged – is key to our ability to offer
a comprehensive and timely curriculum along with an excellent environment for students to
participate outside the classroom in research and practice activities.


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Promotion and tenure decisions are made by the FAC, on which faculty from all departments sit.
Promotion and tenure criteria include scholarly, teaching and service activities at a level of
productivity commensurate with the desired faculty rank. The degree to which faculty who seek
promotion and/or tenure attain it provides a measure of faculty qualifications. Over the last three
years, six faculty have sought promotion from Assistant to Associate Professor and six were
awarded promotion; one Associate Professor was awarded tenure. Two faculty were promoted
from Associate to Full Professor and one was awarded tenure.

Finally, faculty involvement in scholarly and practice communities is judged in terms of the faculty
member’s national-level activities (for scholarly recognition) and practice activities. These are
judged within the promotion and tenure process, but at the School-wide level the assessment of
faculty quality also includes special recognition and awards received by faculty groups and
individuals. The SOPH and UAB annually recognize outstanding teaching, research and service,
and faculty members are frequently recognized by their peers from other Schools or practice
settings. Over the past three years, special recognition in the form of a variety of honors and
awards has been given to faculty across the School. Recognition of UAB SOPH faculty through
these awards and honors provides evidence of high quality. A sample of these awards is found in
the Table 4.1.d(1).

Table 4.1.d(1) Faculty Awards and Honors
                  Award                                    Organization                   Date Awarded
 2006 President’s Award                    National Birth Defects Prevention Network          2006
 Fellow American Statistical Association   American Statistical Association                   2007
 Friend of Children Advocacy Award         Childcare Resources                                2007
 Grizzle Distinguished Alumni Award        UNC Department of Biostatistics                    2005
 Community Health Award                    Jefferson County Department of Health              2007
 Award Of Meritorious Achievement          American Heart Association                         2005
 Award for Internationalization at UAB     UAB International Scholar & Student Services       2007

4.1.e Assessment of the extent to which this criterion is met.

This criterion is met.

Strengths
• The faculty complement is clearly defined and multidisciplinary with excellent educational
   preparation, a high level of competence in research and teaching, and a significant number of
   individuals with practice experience. The faculty complement is clearly able to support the
   School’s mission, goals and objectives.
• A clear strength is the School’s across-the-board cutting edge research, teaching and service
   activities.
• SOPH faculty members are highly funded because of recognized talent in a number of areas.
• Students are thus exposed to an intellectual enterprise that permeates their training at many
   levels and demonstrates the value of both bench and applied research in strengthening the
   public’s health.
• We also boast a strong teaching program, stemming in large part from faculty members’
   passion for their work and desire to share that passion with those they teach.
• Finally, with nearly a quarter of our faculty having public health degrees and nearly all of the
   faculty members involved in public health practice, we have the capacity to train leaders of the
   public health workforce for the 21st century.




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Weaknesses
• The UAB SOPH faces many challenges in the years to come which can be labeled as
  weaknesses or as opportunities for improvement.
• While we have a growing and diverse faculty who have brought significant research dollars and
  public health experience to the School, we must be judicious in future growth to maintain a
  faculty complement that is not over-leveraged in terms of extramural versus state funding.
• Like most academic institutions, UAB depends heavily on funding from external sources. Long-
  term uncertainty in the availability of such funding can pose a threat to departments to retain
  the number of faculty hired over time and to ensure a focus on public health practice.
• In order to foster a secure and productive faculty, we must continually guard against “mission
  stretch” in our activities and remain focused on developing faculty at all levels in a way that is
  congruent with our mission.

Future Plans
Strategic planning has and should continue to guide the SOPH in terms of maintaining a faculty
complement that meets the criterion. A focused mission, a well-defined teaching program, and a
strong faculty development program offered to faculty at all levels will ensure that the School
continues to have highly-qualified faculty. See specific references in the school’s strategic plan.




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4.2 FACULTY POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

4.2    Faculty Policies and Procedures. The School shall have well-defined policies and
       procedures to recruit, appoint, and promote qualified faculty, to evaluate
       competence and performance of faculty and to support the professional
       development and advancement of faculty.

4.2.a A faculty handbook or other written documentation that outlines faculty rules and
regulations.

The UAB Faculty Handbook (http://main.uab.edu/Sites/provost/facultyresources/facultyhandbook/)
outlines University policies on appointment, promotion, tenure and termination procedures. In
addition, the SOPH revised the bylaws of the Faculty Affairs Committee in June 2006. [RR] These
bylaws reiterate important aspects of the faculty handbook, clearly state the nature of non-tenure
track appointments, and provide specific guidelines for promotion and tenure. The Faculty Activity
Report (FAR) is issued annually by the Dean. It outlines procedures used to review and score
faculty reports of research, teaching and service activities in evaluations for salary increases.

The UAB Faculty Handbook outlines the differences in expectations for non-tenure track and
tenure track faculty, and these differences are further elaborated in the SOPH Faculty Affairs
Committee bylaws. Specific expectations for individual non-tenure track faculty are outlined in their
letters of offer, and these may be updated periodically. In addition, requests to the Faculty Affairs
Committee for adjunct and secondary faculty appointments are accompanied by a form that
indicates the specific teaching, research or service expectations for these individuals.

4.2.b Description of provision for faculty development, including identification of support
for faculty categories other than regular full-time appointments.

In 2005, a SOPH committee reviewed the School’s activities concerning faculty development and
concluded that these activities are well-handled by a combination of departmental-level mentoring
and university-wide offerings on faculty development. All faculty, including faculty who are part-
time are invited to participate in the faculty development program. Recent university-wide offerings
have included several seminars on enhancing teaching effectiveness and on the use of
technology. The University Faculty Development Committee has sponsored: 1) Master Teacher
Workshops, 2) Designing Effective Tests, 3) Teaching Portfolios, 4) e-Portfolios, 5) Outcomes
Assessment, 6) Course Design, 7) Technology and Learning, 8) Case and Discussion Teaching, 9)
Problem Based Learning, 10) Teaching Large Classes, 11) Classroom Climate (teaching diverse
populations with multiple learning styles), and 12) Mentoring Faculty in Developing Teaching
Portfolios. The Associate Dean for the SOPH serves on the Development Committee. Details on
the University Faculty Development program may be found at:
http://main.uab.edu/Sites/provost/search/?query=faculty%20development.

4.2.c. Description of formal procedures for evaluating faculty competence and
performance.

In both the promotion process and the process for evaluating faculty for salary increases, research,
teaching and service are evaluated (Table 4.1.d). Teaching is considered to include both
classroom didactic teaching and the mentoring of graduate students in research. Many faculty are
also involved in continuing education activities. In all cases, faculty are evaluated for the rigor and
quality of their designed courses, for the number of students mentored and their research and
career achievements, and by the evaluations that students provide of their classroom experiences.
In addition, research productivity is evaluated on the basis of number of publications and quality of


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the venue for these publications, whether faculty members were successful in competing for
external funding, and the originality and significance of their scholarly work. Service is evaluated
by the significance of the activity described and its value to the relevant stakeholders.

4.2.d. Description of the processes used for student course evaluation and evaluation of
teaching effectiveness.

The University has recently adopted teaching evaluations designed by the IDEA Center in Kansas
that provide comparative information for instructors teaching similar courses across the country.
Teaching effectiveness is assessed in two ways: 1) progress on relevant objectives as determined
by the course instructor and 2) the student’s assessment of the teacher and course. Each course is
evaluated at the end of the semester. Assessment tool is provided in the Resource Room. [RR]

4.2.f Description of the emphasis given to community service activities in the promotion
and tenure process.

As described in the SOPH Faculty Affairs Committee bylaws, School, University, professional and
community service activities relevant to one’s faculty role are an important component of interim
review evaluations and promotion deliberations. These activities are also discussed in the annual
presentation by the Faculty Affairs Committee to the faculty. Faculty whose primary activities
involve service to the public health practice community are eligible for promotion under the
“scholarly public health practice” criterion. Faculty are evaluated on the basis of their contribution
to improving the state of the art in public health practice, on whether they disseminate their
innovations widely and effectively, and on whether knowledgeable members of the public health
practice profession provide positive evaluations of their activities. Further, the University and the
School have a policy that encourages and regulates faculty consultation activities outside the
University. These activities often include service to the community and/or the profession that may
be paid or unpaid. (Consultation Policy is provided in Resource Room). [RR]

4.2.f Assessment of the extent to which this criterion is met.

This criterion is met.

Strengths
• The School has well-defined policies and procedures to recruit, appoint, and promote qualified
   faculty as established by University and School policy.
• The School has a clear and equitable system to evaluate faculty competence and performance.
• The University is committed to faculty development and the School participates in those
   opportunities offered by the University.

Weakness
• The faculty development program has primarily been developed by the University. Efforts to
  target training to SOPH faculty are in the current strategic plan. Many of these efforts have not
  yet been fully implemented.
• Faculty development activities have not been documented or linked to performance.

Future Plans
The Associate Dean for Academic and Strategic Programs is a member of the University
committee on Faculty Development. The Associate Dean is responsible for designing a faculty
mentoring and development program by Fall 2008 which will complement the university program.
Faculty development activities will be documented and recorded.


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4.3 FACULTY AND STAFF DIVERSITY

4.3      Faculty and Staff Diversity. The school shall recruit, retain and promote a diverse
         faculty and staff; offer equitable opportunities to qualified individuals regardless of
         age, gender, race, disability, sexual orientation, religion or national origin.
The School reflects a diverse workforce. Fifty-seven percent of our primary faculty are male and
43% are female. Thirty one percent of our core faculty represent a minority (10% African American,
17% Asian, 1% Hispanic and 3% American Indian).

4.3.a Summary Demographic Data for Current Core and Other Faculty* (December 31, 2007)
                                           Core Faculty           Other Faculty               TOTAL
                                           #        %              #       %             #         %
 Male                                      51      56.7           16       64            67        58
 African American                          3         6             0        0            3          5
 Caucasian                                 37       72            14       88            51        76
 Hispanic/Latino                           1         2             1        6            2          3
 Asian/Pacific Islander                    10       20             1        6            11        16
 Native American/Alaska Native             0         0             0        0            0          0
 Unknown/Other                             0         0             0        0            0          0
 International                             0         0             0        0            0          0
 Female                                    39      43.3            9       36            38        42
 African American                          6        15             2       22            8         17
 Caucasian                                 25       64             4       44            29        60
 Hispanic/Latino                           0         0             1       12            1          2
 Asian/Pacific Islander                    5        13             2       22            7         15
 Native American/Alaska Native             3         8             0        0            3          6
 Unknown/Other                             0         0             0        0            0          0
 International                             0         0             0        0            0          0
 TOTAL                                     90     100.0%          25     100.0%         115      100.0%

Staff within the school are 39% male and 61% female. Forty four (44%) of the staff are minority
(28% African American, 2% Hispanic and 14% Asian/Pacific Islander).
4.3. b. Summary Demographic Data for Full Time Staff* (December 31, 2007)
                                                     Full-Time Staff                     TOTAL
 # / % Male                                             61 / 39%                          39%
 # / % African American                                  9 / 15%                          15%
 # / % Caucasian                                        38 / 62%                          62%
 # / % Hispanic/Latino                                       0                             0
 # / % Asian/Pacific Islander                           14 / 23%                          23%
 # / % Native American/Alaska Native                         0                             0
 # / % Unknown/Other/International                           0                             0
 # % Female                                             97 / 61%                          61%
 # / % African American                                 36 / 37%                          37%
 # / % Caucasian                                        51 / 53%                          53%
 # / % Hispanic/Latino                                    2 / 2%                          2%
 # / % Asian/Pacific Islander                             8 / 8%                          8%
 # / % Native American/Alaska Native                         0                             0
 # / % Unknown/Other/International                           0                             0
 TOTAL                                                 158/100%                            100%
* Staff includes individuals not defined as students or faculty (data as of December 31, 2007)


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4.3.c Policies and procedures regarding the School’s commitment to providing equitable
opportunities without regard to age, gender, race, disability, sexual orientation, religion or
national origin.

The School’s 2003-2010 Strategic Plan has as one of its five themes Outstanding Faculty, Staff
and Students with the related goal to attract and retain highly qualified faculty, staff and students
(Section 1.1.b). One of the objectives related to that goal is to attain maximum feasible diversity
within the faculty, staff and students, and one of the indicators of success is to increase the
presence and participation of racial/ethnic minorities and women under the guidance of the
School’s Diversity and Equity Program. Specifically, the Diversity and Equity Program of the UAB
SOPH complements and builds on the programs initiated through the UAB Vice President for
Equity and Diversity. For the purposes of this Program definitions for race/ethnicity and self-
identification are those developed by the UAB Office of Human Resources
(http://www.hrm.uab.edu/records/raceethnic_designations_current.pdf).

The UAB SOPH’s Diversity and Equity Program is guided by the Diversity and Equity Committee
and is staffed by a part-time program coordinator in the Dean’s Office. The responsibilities of the
Committee are to:
   1. annually review the diversity and equity goals;
   2. recommend programs and initiatives that advance the diversity and equity goals;
   3. design a diversity project or diversity plan for the next five years (2007-2012) to include
        annual evaluation of diversity efforts and identified benchmarks to measure success;
   4. facilitate dissemination and promotion of the UAB Diversity Plan in the School;
   5. assist in recruiting and retaining a diverse faculty, staff, and student population; and
   6. annually report the accomplishments of the Diversity and Equity Program to the Dean.

The goals of the SOPH Diversity and Equity Program are those developed originally by the
Minority and Underrepresented Faculty Development and Support Committee in 2002, expanded
to address contemporary issues of diversity and equity at UAB and the UAB SOPH. These goals
are:
        1. To recruit the most highly qualified and diverse faculty, staff, and students for open
        positions and/or admission at the UAB SOPH.

       2. To implement a set of activities that will allow the UAB SOPH to retain the most qualified
       diverse faculty, staff, and students.

Specific strategies are recommended to achieve each goal, such as recommended procedures
and composition for search committees, and developing mentoring and support for junior faculty.

4.3.d Description of recruitment and retention efforts to attract and retain a diverse faculty
and staff, along with information about how these efforts are evaluated and refined over
time.

In addition to the activities discussed in the previous sections, the School employs a range of
strategies to attract and retain a diverse work force, including:

•   Affirmative Action Officer (AAO). The School’s AAO is utilized to help ensure that policies and
    procedures regarding the recruitment and hiring of all employees are congruent with state and
    national equal opportunity guidelines. The role of the AAO in search committee activity has
    been recently reviewed and enhanced to ensure input and general oversight of all search
    committee activities.



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•   Advertising. The School follows University procedures for internal and external posting of
    vacant faculty and staff positions. Procedures for national searches are used, as appropriate.
    Advertising for faculty positions and senior administrative positions may include publication in
    professional journals, especially journals that are oriented toward minorities and women.
    Assessments of which journals and advertisements yield best results are used to determine
    future actions.

•   Networking. School faculty maintain working relationships with community organizations, as
    well as state and national organizations, that can be very helpful in recruiting faculty and staff.
    The School’s Advisory Committee (the Broad Street Committee) has significant minority and
    female representation that can be consulted to assist in identifying qualified applicants. The
    School also maintains relationships with the Historically Black Colleges and Universities in the
    area. For example, we are currently participating in a Public Health Pipeline program with
    Alabama State University to introduce minority students to public health and create a pool of
    applicants, while enhancing visibility between the SOPH and Alabama State University.

•   Recruitment Programs. The UAB Office of Equity and Diversity supports several Minority and
    Women Faculty Recruitment Programs in which the School has regularly participated. The
    Equity and Diversity Enhancement Program, the Comprehensive Minority Faculty and Student
    Development Program, and Title VI Black Faculty Recruitment Initiative of Black Faculty and
    Administrators Program assist departments with faculty and student recruitment. Minority
    tenure-track faculty may be awarded funds to assist with research and other efforts to gain
    tenure. The University also has a representative number of minority faculty to serve as
    mentors for new faculty.

•   Training. The UA system, UAB and the SOPH offer training in recruitment and retention. The
    UA First Annual Diversity Conference Summary (December 2007) is located in the Resource
    Room. [RR] UAB sponsors an annual “Searching for Excellence & Diversity” workshop that
    SOPH leadership attends. And each UAB employee is required to participate in the Diversity
    Awareness (DAE) Program. http://www.uab.edu/equityanddiversity/.


4.3. e. Description of efforts, other than the recruitment and retention of core faculty,
through which the school seeks to establish and maintain an environment that supports
diversity.

The School and the University are openly and strongly committed to a culture and an environment
that respects each member of the community and ensures provision of equal opportunities without
regard to age, gender, race, ability, religion or national origin. The University has established the
Office for Equity and Diversity which is responsible for providing effective leadership in the
development, coordination, implementation and assessment of a comprehensive array of programs
to promote diversity and the understanding of differences at UAB. As part of its commitment to
diversity, UAB has created a Strategic Diversity Plan (http://www.uab.edu/equityanddiversity/).

The purpose and objectives of the UAB Strategic Diversity Plan are: 1) to continue to establish
diversity as a core value at UAB; 2) to promote diversity in all aspects of university life; 3) to create
an environment in which its members are diverse, offering perspectives from which all can gain
knowledge and skills; and 4) to encourage all members of the community to listen to, understand
and learn from each other.
Some of the more noteworthy efforts in regard to diversity at the University level include the
following:

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    •   Senior UAB administrators shall be responsible for providing the leadership to create
        meaningful progress in diversity.
    •   A continuing collegial dialogue with African-American faculty and staff to establish a 5-year
        goal for African-American representation in the student body, faculty, and EEO-1 level staff.
    •   A commitment to continue to engage in strategic diversity initiatives that UAB deems
        appropriate in order to recruit, hire and retain African-American faculty and EEO-1 level
        administrators.
    •   A requirement that all search committees for presidents and all EEO-1 level administrative
        positions have African American representation.
    •   An agreement to send announcements of faculty and EEO-1 administrator level position
        searches to the UAB African-American Faculty and/or Staff Association with an invitation to
        identify possible recruits.
    •   An agreement to meet at least twice annually for the next five years with the elected
        leadership of the UAB African-American Faculty Association and African-American
        representatives from UAB’s staff to receive recommendations on best practices and policies
        for increasing diversity on the faculty and at the senior administrative levels of the Institution
        and on the retention of such faculty and administrators.
    •   A two-part training session on Diversity Awareness Education is regularly offered by the
        Office of Equity and Diversity and the Department of Human Resources for UAB faculty and
        staff. All SOPH faculty and staff are strongly encouraged to attend these training sessions.

4.3.f Identification of outcome measures by which the School may evaluate its
success in achieving a diverse faculty and staff, along with data regarding the performance
of the school against those measures for each of the last three years.
An evaluation of affirmative action efforts based primarily on recruitment and applicant data for
each faculty search is made by the School’s AAO and reported to the search committee with any
recommendations for further action. These reports are compiled in an Affirmative Action Annual
Activity Report which is submitted to the Vice President for Equity and Diversity in the Office of
Equity and Diversity. A summary for the last three years is contained in the table below.
Additional information can be found in Table 1.2.e.

Table 4.3.f Affirmative Action Annual Activity Report
                                                       2004-2005           2005-2006       2006-2007
                                                       P*     T*           P*     T*       P*     T*
 Total Number of Promotions and Tenures                3      4            2      2        3      2
 Total Number of Minorities Promoted and Tenured       2      2            1      1        2      1
 Total Number of African Americans Promoted & Tenured  1      1            0       0       0      0
 Total Number of Women Promoted and Tenured            1      1            1       1       2      1
 Proportion of Racially/Ethnically Diverse and        50%    25%          50%    50%      67%    67%
 Female/Male Faculty Respectively.
 Proportion of Racially and Ethnically Diverse and    N/A    N/A          N/A      N/A    N/A      N/A
 Female/Male Staff
*P=Promotions, T=Tenures

4.3.g Assessment of the extent to which this criterion is met.

This criterion is met.

Strengths
• The School and University have appropriate policies concerning commitment to equitable
   opportunities and nondiscrimination.


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•   These are fully implemented in all personnel practices, including searches for new faculty and
    staff.
•   The School is moving its Diversity plan forward with reformulation of the Diversity and Equity
    Committee and meetings to get feedback regarding diversity issues in the School.

Weaknesses
• Although the School has an AAO, a Diversity Committee, and a plan there have been no
  benchmarks established at the School level – though the University does have specific
  benchmarks in regard to issues of diversity.

Future
The School is committed to diversity and established a Diversity and Equity Committee and
program in July 2007. Benchmarks will be developed by April 2008. An annual report will be
provided each Fall to the Dean, Vice President of Diversity and Equity, and SOPH faculty.




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4.4 STUDENT RECRUITMENT AND ADMISSIONS

4.4.    Student Recruitment and Admissions. The school shall have student
        recruitment and admissions policies and procedures designed to locate and
        select qualified individuals capable of taking advantage of the school’s various
        learning activities, which will enable each of them to develop competence for a
        career in public health.

4.4.a   Recruitment Policies and Procedures

The student recruitment policy of the SOPH is intended to attract qualified individuals who would
contribute to the School’s vision of “being a community of scholars and professionals recognized
for improving the health of the citizens of Alabama and the world.” Specifically, emphasis is placed
on recruitment of: 1) active public health professionals lacking a graduate degree in public health;
2) undergraduates in the physical, biological and behavioral sciences who wish to pursue a career
in some aspect of public health; 3) experienced health practitioners such as physicians, flight
surgeons, nurses, veterinarians, pharmacists and nutritionists, who wish to earn a degree in order
to enhance or modify their careers; and 4) health professionals from foreign countries who want to
return to their native land and work to improve the health status of their fellow countrymen.

The task of recruitment is a shared responsibility, involving faculty, administrators, students, major
contributors, alumni and the academic units. The recruitment coordinator in the Office of Student
and Academic Services directs recruitment efforts and a Recruitment Management Plan is
developed each Summer (Appendix 4.4.a). The Admissions Coordinator, Alumni Director, Director
of Student Services, the Scholarship Coordinator, the Webmaster and each departmental program
coordinator participate in the recruitment planning and implementation. Since 1998 there has been
a recruitment allocation within the budget for the Office of Student and Academic Services to
support these activities. This allocation has been used to pay for the development of a unified
recruitment package for the School and the expenses for recruitment activities. The recruitment
package includes large and small displays, posters, school view books, departmental fact sheets,
and give-a-way items to reinforce the School’s name and vision. Samples of these materials are
included in the Resource Room. [RR]

Recruitment activities include staffed displays at national and regional colleges and universities,
including Historically Black Colleges and Universities. The SOPH sponsors a booth at the annual
meetings of the American Public Health Association and the Alabama Public Health Association, at
which recruitment materials are made available. The School has also provided a display at Public
Health Day at Auburn University College of Veterinary Medicine and at the Aerospace Medical
Association. In addition, the Department of Environmental Health Sciences has a recruitment
booth at the annual American Industrial Hygiene Conference and the Society of Toxicology
meeting and the Department of Biostatistics sponsors a booth at their national conference. The
SOPH also participates in undergraduate career symposia at regional colleges and universities.
Information on degrees, courses, certificates and seminars are provided to Alabama Department of
Public Health (ADPH) employees. Posters are in each staff lounge at the ADPH state office. Each
year the health advisors in Alabama, Tennessee, Georgia and Mississippi receive an information
packet which includes brochures, the School Handle magazine and promotional items.

An important aspect of this college visitation is participation in the State Circuits. The circuit is a
coordinated series of recruitment events over a one-week period in the Fall that involves the major
colleges and universities in Alabama, Mississippi, Georgia and Tennessee. Schools that
participate include the following:



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Alabama Schools                                    Florida Schools
Alabama A & M                                      University of Florida
Alabama State University
Athens State College                               Georgia Schools
Auburn University                                  Emory University
Auburn University at Montgomery                    University of Georgia
Birmingham Southern College
Faulkner College                                   Mississippi Schools
Huntington College                                 Jackson State University
Miles College                                      Millsaps College
Oakwood Collage                                    Tougaloo College
Samford University
Spring Hill College                                Tennessee Schools
Stillman College                                   Lambert University
Troy University                                    Middle Tennessee University
Troy University Dothan                             Rhodes College
Troy University Montgomery                         Tennessee State University
Tuskegee University                                University of Memphis
University of Alabama (at Tuscaloosa)              University of the South-Suwannee
University of Alabama at Birmingham
University of Alabama Huntsville
University of Montevallo
University of North Alabama
University of South Alabama

The SOPH has also worked to establish a strong relationship with undergraduate advisors. Each
year they are sent a packet of information (brochures, posters, the Handle) that can be used in
counseling their undergraduates regarding careers in public health. The undergraduate advisors in
Alabama, Mississippi, Georgia and Tennessee receive regular correspondence regarding the
activities of the School including the Handle. In addition to the print material, the SOPH hosts a
luncheon for the advisors in the state. The Associate Dean also serves as a speaker at the annual
Undergraduate Health Advisors Meeting.

In 2006, the SOPH began offering PUH 301 to undergraduates interested in exploring a career in
public health. To date we have had 64 students participate and, of those, 10% applied to the
program.

The School also updated its web site to better serve prospective and current students. All
applications are on-line and we utilize the Schools of Public Health Application Service (SOPHAS).

During the Fall of 2007 new students were surveyed to find out how they learned about the SOPH.
Students stated that they learned about the School through the web site, undergraduate advisors
and their friends.

4.4.b Statement of Admissions Policies and Procedures

Admission policies of the SOPH are described in the School’s catalog. Admission policies and
procedures for the MPH, MSPH and DrPH degrees are developed by the Admissions and
Graduation (A&G) Committee of the faculty, presented to the EPC and are approved by the faculty
assembly. The Office of Student and Academic Services is responsible for the administration of
the admissions process. The UAB Graduate School is responsible for policies, procedures, and


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administration of the MS and PhD degrees. The A&G Committee consists of a faculty
representative from each department and a student representative. The coordinator of student
admissions in the Office of Student and Academic Services staffs the Committee. The Bylaws of
the A&G Committee and Policies and Procedures of its meetings can be found in the Resource
Room. [RR] The required elements of an application package, criteria and deadlines for admission,
and processes for reviewing exceptions to these are developed, reviewed and monitored by this
Committee. Within these policies and procedures, departments review applications for their
academic programs and make admission decisions using mechanisms that they determine to be
the most appropriate for their department.

To be considered for admission, an applicant must submit a completed application form through
SOPHAS, including statement of career goals, transcripts from all colleges and universities
attended, three letters of recommendation, official scores from the Graduate Record Examination
(GRE) or other acceptable standardized test (e.g. MCAT, GMAT, etc), and a TOEFL score if
educated in a non-English speaking country. The application is compiled by SOPHAS and sent to
the Coordinator of Admissions, Office of Student and Academic Services at the SOPH and it is
then forwarded to the appropriate department for review and a decision on admission. Once a
department has made a decision (to admit, admit with contingencies, or reject) the
recommendation is reviewed by the Associate Dean to ensure compliance with the policies and
procedures established by the A&G Committee. In the case of a department recommending
admission below minimum standards, the Admission Coordinator forwards the application and the
department’s recommendation to the A&G Committee for review and a vote. Decisions of the A&G
Committee may be appealed, but the final decision by the Committee stands. The Associate Dean
notifies applicants of the decision. If the decision is to not admit, the Associate Dean may counsel
applicants as to steps that might be taken to strengthen their applications.

The School’s admission requirements reflect its desire to admit the most qualified applicants based
on their academic credentials, experience, and promise as public health professionals. Academic
credentials include undergraduate grade point average (GPA), and if applicable their Graduate
GPA, and performance in the verbal and quantitative sections of the GRE. Some departments
also consider the score in the analytical writing section of the GRE. In addition, employment
history and knowledge of public health are also taken into consideration. In keeping with the
University policy of equal opportunity and the desire to draw minority students into the public health
professions, the School has emphasized the recruitment of disadvantaged students. Departments
can consider possible limitations in the educational opportunities of the applicants when making
admission decisions.

4.4.c   Examples of Recruitment Materials

UAB SOPH Web Site. The School developed a web site that is a user-friendly, comprehensive
source of information for prospective students. Prospective students are able to view detailed
information regarding degree and course requirements, tuition and fees estimates, scholarship
information and information about the city of Birmingham. By clicking “apply now” the student is
taken to the SOPHAS portal and can apply through the centralized application system.

Print materials. The School produced a “recruitment package” to complement the web site which
includes a viewbook, posters, and promotional materials. These materials are available in the
Resource Room. [RR]

Promotional items. The School distributed promotional items which display the SOPH logo
including the “Join our Swat Team” t-shirt, condoms, mints, antibacterial gel, sunscreen, cups and
drink holders.


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4.4.d Number of applicants, acceptances and enrollment by program area.

Table 4.4.d Applicants, Acceptances, and Enrollments by Specialty Area for the last 3 years
                                          Academic Year                Academic Year                Academic Year
                                                                         2005-2006
                                             2004-2005                                                 2006-2007
 Biostatistics      Applied                     30                            26                          55
                    Accepted                    11                            11                          23
                    Enrolled                     7                             8                          11
 Environmental      Applied                     31                            37                          47
                    Accepted                    20                            27                          31
 Health             Enrolled                    12                            14                          10
 Sciences
 Epidemiology       Applied                     153                          200                          226
                    Accepted                     95                          158                          157
                    Enrolled                     55                           81                           72
 Health Care        Applied                      63                           56                           92
 Organization       Accepted                     51                           49                           80
 and Policy         Enrolled                     23                           27                           29
 Health Educ./      Applied                      59                           74                           90
                    Accepted                     35                           54                           61
 Behavioral         Enrolled                     17                           29                           21
 Sciences
 Maternal and       Applied                      54                           62                              68
 Child Health       Accepted                     31                           46                              47
                    Enrolled                     16                           23                              16
* Specialty area is defined as each degree and area of specialization contained in the instructional matrix




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4.4.e Quantitative information on the number of students enrolled in each specialty area identified in the instructional matrix.

                                                              2005                      2006                      2007
          Masters and Doctoral Degrees              FT   PT     HC   FTE     FT    PT      HC   FTE     FT   PT      HC    FTE
Department of Biostatistics
MPH                                                 2    1      3     2.33   1     2      3     1 .66   0     1      1      .66
MS                                                  3    1      4     3.44   3     0      3        3    5     6     11       8
MSPH                                                1    4      5     2.77   2     5      7        4    2     6      8      5.33
PhD                                                 19   2      21   20.33   19    7     26     21.77   8     6     24     20.66
Department of Environmental Health
MPH-Environmental Health/Toxicology                 1    1       2   1.55    8     0      8       8     0     4      4      3
MPH-Occupational Health & Safety                    1    1       2   1.44    1     1      2      1.55   0     0      0      0
MPH-Industrial Hygiene                              3    0       3     3     1     0      1       1     3     0      3      3
MPH-Industrial Hygiene/Hazardous Substance          0    1       1    .88    0     0      0       0     1     0      1      1
MPH-Accelerated Program in Industrial Hygiene       1    1       2   1.33    2     0      2       2     0     0      0      0
MPH-International Health & Global Studies           1    0       1     1     1     0      1       1     3     1      4     3.55
MSPH-Clinical Research                              1    0       1     1     0     0      0       0     0     0      0      0
MSPH-Environmental Health/Toxicology                3    0       3     3     2     0      2       2     3     1      4     3.44
DrPH- Environmental Health Sciences                 6    8      14   10.33   4     7      11    7.33    4     6     10     5.55
PhD- Environmental Health Sciences                  5    0       5     5     6     0       6      6     7     1      8     7.66
Department of Epidemiology
MPH                                                 55   10     65   61.66   84    9     93      89     99   10    109    106.22
MPH-International Health and Global Studies         13    2     15   13.66   10    1     11     10.77   17    2     19     18.44
MSPH-Clinical Research                               2   10     12    8.11    5   14     19     13.66    4   11     15      9.88
MSPH-Epidemiology                                   11    6     17   13.88   12    6     18     14.77    8    4     12       10
DrPH-International Health                           11    6     17   13.33    6    8     14      8.77    5    9     14        8
PhD                                                  6    8     14     9      6    7     13      8.77   10   10     20     12.55
Department of Health Behavior
MPH                                                 26    1     27   26.66   23    3     26     24.88   22   4      26      24
MPH-International Health and Global Studies          5    0      5      5     6    1      7      6.33    7   1       8      7.33
MSPH-Clinical Research                               1    1      2    1.66    1    1      2      1.33    1   0       1       1
PhD                                                  4   14     18   10.88    9   14     23     15.11   10   9      19     15.77
Department of Health Care Organization and Policy
MPH-Health Care Organization                        31   12     43   37.88   25   10      35    29.77   38   4      42     40.22
MPH-Preparedness Management and Policy               0   0       0     0      0    0      0       0      1   0       1       1
MPH-General Theory and Practice                      1   1       2    1.88    0    0      0       0      0   1       1      .33
MPH-Health Policy                                    6   2       8    6.88    1    0      1       1      1   0       1       1
MSPH-Outcomes Research                               4   4       8    6.33    8    1      9      8.66    6   2       8      7.33
DrPH-Public Health Management                        0   0       0     0      0    0      0       0      0   0       0       0


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4.4.e Quantitative information cont.


                                                                   2005                     2006                      2007
           Masters and Doctoral Degrees                  FT   PT     HC   FTE     FT   PT      HC   FTE     FT   PT      HC   FTE
Department of Maternal and Child Health
 MPH-Enhanced MCH Skills                                  8    0     8      8     15   0      15     15      9    2     11      10
 MPH-Advanced Leadership and Practice                     5    1     6     5.66    3   1       4     3.66    3    1      4     3.66
 MPH-International Health and Global Studies              4    0     4      4     10   1      11    10.66   14    1     15    14.77
 DrPH                                                     7   12    19    12.33    6   3      19    11.22    6   11     17    10.88
Instructional Matrix – Joint Degrees
MPH-Health Behavior/PhD Sociology                         0    1     1     .33    0    1       1     .33    0     0      0       0
MPH-Health Behavior/PhD Psychology                        0    0     0      0     0    0       0       0    0     0      0       0
MPH-Health Behavior/MSN                                   0    0     0      0     1    0       1       1    0     0      0       0
MPH-Health Care Org/MBA                                   2    0     2      2     2    0       2       2    1     2      3     2.33
MPH-Health Care Org/MPA                                   2    0     0      2     2    2       4     3.44   0     0      0       0
MPH-Health Care Org/OD                                    0    0     0      0     0    0       0       0    0     0      0       0
MPH-Health Care Org/JD                                    0    0     0      0     0    0       0       0    0     0      0       0
MSPH-Health Care Org/PhD Psychology                       0    0     0      0     0    0       0       0    0     0      0       0
MPH-Epidemiology-IH/MSN                                   0    0     0      0     0    0       0       0    0     0      0       0
MPH-Maternal and Child Health/MSN                         1    0     1      1     1    0       1       1    0     1      0      .66
MPH-Maternal and Child Health/MSW                         1    0     1      1     1    0       1       1    2     0      2       2
MPH/MD (general track MPH with 6 possible focus areas)    0    0     0      0     1    0       1       1    1     0      1       1
MPH/DVM from Auburn Univ. (general track MPH with
                                                          0    0     0      0     0    0       0      0     0     0      0      0
4 possible focus areas)




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4.4.f   Identification of outcome measures by which the school may evaluate its success in
        enrolling a qualified student body along with data regarding the performance of the
        school against those measures in the last three years.

Table 4.4.f Outcome Measures
Outcome Measure                    Target         2004-2005    2005-2006   2006-2007   2007-2008
Number of Applicants                500              474          391         461         578
Masters GRE                         1250            1138         1136        1129        1194
Doctoral GRE                        1290            1150         1164        1179        1102
Master GPA*                          3.3             3.44         3.41        3.37        3.29
Doctoral GPA*                        3.5             3.52         3.61        3.60        3.72
*International Students are not included in the GPA average.

4.4.g Assessment of the extent to which this criterion is met.

This criterion is met.

Strengths
• The SOPH has an active program to recruit qualified students and stated admissions policies
   and procedures to review the credentials by which consistently qualified students have been
   admitted into all of the degree programs in the School.
• The School has established rigorous policies and procedures for recruitment and admissions.
• The School sets high standards for admissions to ensure a distinguished student body and a
   high-caliber future public health workforce.
• The School has adopted the Schools of Public Health Application Service (SOPHAS), an online
   centralized application service to improve student access to applications.
• The School provides a user-friendly web site to answer questions regarding admission, degree
   programs, and tuition.
• The School provides comprehensive recruitment materials.
• The School’s coordinator of recruitment directs all recruitment efforts which provides a
   coordinated School-wide effort.
• As our major recruitment tool, the web site needs continual updating; however, recent updates
   to the web site and the hiring of a Communications Director will ensure that it is kept current
   and attractive to students.

Weakness
• UAB uses Banner for its student management system; a link between SOPHAS and Banner
  must be developed and maintained.

Future Plans
The School will continue to develop and revise the recruitment management plan. The self study
has revealed issues of concern that will be addressed in our process (e.g., the high number of
students who don’t complete programs and how we should address this issue at the time of
application). This might be remedied by ensuring that students are placed in appropriate degree
programs or tracks that better suit their interests and needs.




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4.5 STUDENT DIVERSITY

4.5     Student Diversity. Stated application, admission and degree-granting requirements
        and regulations shall be applied equitably to individual applicants and students
        regardless of age, gender, race, disability, sexual orientation, religion or national
        origin.

4.5.a   Policies, procedures and plans to achieve a diverse student population

The SOPH complies with the UAB policy of equal opportunity in education and employment. The
policy appears in Appendix 1.3.c(5). UAB is the only employer in the State that has added sexual
orientation as a protected right. In addition, the School has a strong commitment to diversity as
expanded in the School plan (Appendix 4.5.a). The School’s commitment to promote an open
learning environment is illustrated by its value of appreciation for diversity of individuals. As
indicated in 4.4.a, the SOPH places a high priority on recruiting from Historically Black Colleges
and Universities in the region. It also promotes diversity in the student population by considering
the limited educational opportunities of disadvantaged students in the admissions process. In the
past, a major constraint in enrolling disadvantaged students has been a lack of financial aid. The
School has received a gift from the William Randolph Hearst Foundation to establish an
endowment to provide financial aid to minority students.

4.5.b Recruitment efforts to attract a diverse student body: how these efforts are evaluated
and refined over time

The School is dedicated to recruiting intellectually vibrant students who are racially, ethnically, and
geographically diverse. The recruitment efforts, which involve the faculty, administrators, students,
staff, and alumni focus on ways to attract a diverse student body. Recruitment strategies include:
    • visits to Historically Black Colleges and Universities,
    • open houses for prospective students,
    • advertising in select publications,
    • travel assistance to top prospects,
    • undergraduate courses, and
    • participation in Carver High School Public Health Week (a predominantly African American
        school)
    • participation in Alabama State University (HBCU) “Pipeline” grant to recruit African
        American undergraduates who are interested in the field of public health.

In addition to our efforts, the Graduate School has a full time minority recruiter. Each year we meet
with Wanda Jordan (Graduate School Minority Recruitment Coordinator) and provide her with
viewbooks, promotional items, and information for potential students.

4.5c    Demographic characteristics of the student body

The demographic characteristics of the SOPH student body in the Fall term of 2007 indicate,
overall, that the School has achieved racial, nationality, and gender diversity. The racial
distribution closely approximates that of the southeastern US. The 2000 census found that 74% of
the population in Alabama was White and 25% was African American, with all other minorities
comprising 1%. In 2007, our student body population was 42% White, 18% African American, with
the other minorities comprising the remaining 7% (3% are unknown). International students
account for 30% of the student body.



                                                                                                   170
Table 4.5.c. Demographics of New Enrollees for each of the last 3 years
                                               2005                2006                  2007
                                           M          F       M           F          M           F
                         Applied             10        59       10         67         24           97
 African                 Accepted             7        22        6         39         15           46
 American                Enrolled             6        13        4         28          6           22
                         Applied             35        81       42        108         46          113
 Caucasian               Accepted            30        63       40         97         41           98
                         Enrolled            20        35       25         53         25           41
                         Applied              0         2        2          3          5           15
 Hispanic/Latino         Accepted             0         1        2          3          4           12
                         Enrolled             0         0        2          0          0            9
 Asian Pacific           Applied              7        18       11         20         11           14
 Islander                Accepted             4        14        9         14          5            9
                         Enrolled             2         8        6          9          1            1
 Native                  Applied              0         0        0          0          0            1
 American/Alaska         Accepted             0         0        0          0          0            1
 Native                  Enrolled             0         0        0          0          0            0
                         Applied              0         0        0          2          9           16
 Unknown/Other           Accepted             0         0        0          2          3            7
                         Enrolled             0         0        0          0          2            2
                         Applied             95        83      129         65        118           99
 International           Accepted            57        45       91         42         83           64
                         Enrolled            26        20       37         18         29           17
                         Applied            147       243      194        265        216          362
 TOTAL                   Accepted            98       145      148        197        157          242
                         Enrolled            54        76       74        108         67           92

4.5.d Measures to evaluate the success in achieving a demographically diverse student
body

The measures by which the School evaluates its success in achieving a demographically diverse
student body is to compare the composition of its student body with those of all schools of public
health and to compare the racial distribution of the student body to that of the State of Alabama.
ASPH compiles and publishes an annual data report of applications, new enrollments, and
students for all of the member schools. As a participating member, the UAB SOPH submits data
for that report.

Table 4.5.d Percentage of Minority Students: New Fall Enrollees
 Outcome Measure: Fall Admit             Target             2005              2006              2007
 African American                        >15%               15%               18%               18%
 Hispanic/Latino                          >5%                0%                1%                6%
 Asian                                    >5%                8%                8%                1%
 Native American                          >1%                0%                0%                0%
 International                            20%               35%               30%               30%
 Outcome Measure: Headcount
 Minority                                 >25%              27%               23%               21%

4.5.e   Assessment of the extent to which this criterion is met.

This criterion is met.



                                                                                                        171
Strength
• The School has clearly articulated application, admission, and degree-granting requirements
   that are applied equitably to all applicants and students and that promote a diverse student
   body.

Weaknesses
• This is an ongoing priority that needs continuous emphasis and improvement.
• The State’s historical treatment of minority groups is a challenge in recruiting a diverse student
  body.

Future plans
The School will continue to monitor, adapt, and evaluate the recruitment plan in an effort to recruit
a diverse student population. Efforts will be made to: 1) increase utilization of minority faculty,
alumni, and students in the recruitment process; 2) increase the number of scholarships available
to minority students; 3) establish benchmarks through the Diversity Committee; and 4) work closely
with the Graduate School’s minority recruiter.




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4.6 ADVISING AND CAREER COUNSELING

4.6     Advising and Career Counseling. There shall be available a clearly explained and
        accessible academic advising system for students, as well as readily available career
        and placement advice.

4.6.a   The School’s advising and career counseling services
At the time of admission to any SOPH degree program, students are assigned an academic
advisor by the chair of the department to which they have applied, and are notified as such in their
letter of admission. Academic advisors are members of the SOPH faculty and sends a letter to
each admitted student. Students admitted to degree programs are periodically sent material prior
to the time of matriculation and are encouraged to contact their academic advisor, the
departmental program coordinator, or the Office of Student and Academic Services with any
questions they may have. Every student must meet with his or her academic advisor prior to
registration each academic term. The registration system will deny students access if the academic
advisor has not directed that the registration “hold” be removed; such direction is not given until a
meeting between the student and the academic advisor has taken place. Each department in the
School also employs a program coordinator who is responsible for supporting the academic advising
provided by faculty members; these persons serve as the primary point of contact between the
Office of Student and Academic Services and the individual departments. They are typically the first
point of contact for students and often address the routine curriculum and registration activities.
Within each department, these staff persons assemble and distribute student handbooks and
maintain curriculum information and program expectations for all degree programs offered by the
departments; maintain student files; have available copies of all forms related to student academic
affairs; have read-only access to the University’s student data system for purposes of tracking
course enrollment for faculty, printing unofficial transcripts for advisors, and identifying registration
call numbers for courses and individual faculty; and assist in recruiting and application counseling
for prospective students.
Prior to the beginning of the Fall term each year, the SOPH holds a two-day orientation for all
incoming students. In addition to meeting collectively with School and University officials, time is
scheduled for students to meet as smaller groups within their respective departments and
individually with their departmental program coordinator and academic advisors. Most
departments provide their students with a Student Handbook (examples are provided in Resource
Room [RR]). Students may request a change in their academic advisor at any time, and some do
so, typically seeking a better alignment of educational, research or career goals. We believe that
academic advisors are mentors to students, guiding their careers and assisting in socialization to
the profession of public health, as well as sources of information on curricular issues. We also
believe that student advising is a partnership shared between individual faculty members and the
staff of the Office of Student and Academic Services and the Office of Alumni Relations and Career
Services. In that spirit, we work cooperatively to ensure that faculty are as informed as they can be
to assist students in achieving their educational and professional goals. Annual Faculty Advising
informational sessions have been revived as of Spring 2008. The manual may be found in the
[RR].
The School prepares its students for the internship and job search through its Office of Career
Services. Students are provided with a variety of information including the introductory career
primer Careers in Public Health - An Introduction for Masters Students, a seminar and workshop
series, an electronic distribution service of job and internship announcements, and other self-help
aids accessed from the School's web site. Careers in Public Health - An Introduction for Masters
Students serves as the introduction to the year-long series of programs designed to prepare
students for a public health career.

                                                                                                     173
The SOPH’s Career Seminar Series is designed to provide students with the information needed to
make good internship and career decisions. The Seminar Series focuses on the different types of
organizations that employ public health professionals and the special considerations attached to
each. This helps students decide what type of organization will serve as the best fit for them. The
seminars are offered on Wednesdays at noon and lunch is provided to students who pre-register.
The workshop series focuses on special skills that may not be covered in the classroom. In
addition to students, many alumni also attend. Separate, day-long workshops focus on topics such
as non-profit grant writing and career preparation, resume preparation, and interview and salary
negotiation skills. Since the workshops are day-long, they are offered on Saturdays.

As soon as students are registered in the School, they become part of the electronic Career
Distribution Service and begin receiving internship and employment information and
announcements from the Office of Career Services. Besides the obvious advantage of knowing
what current opportunities are available, additional benefits include an awareness of the variety of
jobs available, along with requirements, salaries, locations, etc.
Students can also access various public health employment web sites, including the collaborative
ASPH Employment site, by accessing links from our web site. In addition, our web site contains
links to various web sites that offer advice on subjects such as resumes, curriculum vitas,
interviewing, cover letters, and more. These sites are good supplements to what is covered in the
workshop and seminar series.

4.6.b Procedures by which students may communicate their concerns to officials

Please see Section 1.4.e.

4.6.c   Student satisfaction with advising and career counseling services

At the time of graduation, every student completes an “exit interview” survey. This survey includes
seven questions regarding advising and career counseling services. SOPH strategically expects
80% of the students to be satisfied with their advising experience and that 90% of the graduates
will be employed within 6 months of graduation. We have identified the need to improve guiding the
new student to the correct program, academic advising and career counseling.

Table 4.6.c UAB SOPH Graduate Exit Interview Worksheet (2004-05) (n-45)
 Question                                                             Good Average     Bad     Don’t
                                                                                               know
 Adequacy of guidance for selection of department and track           57%       24%     8%       11%
 Accessibility of faculty for academic advising                       72%       13%     6%        9%
 Quality of academic advising                                         73%        9%    14%        4%
 Willingness of faculty to discuss student concerns                   84%        5%     7%        4%
 Respect that faculty afforded you as a student                       87%        7%     2%        4%
 How well the faculty and administration helped you complete degree
 requirements in a timely manner                                      80%       11%     2%        7%
 Adequacy of career services (career workshops, seminars, access to
 employment information, etc.)                                        54%        9%     4%       33%




                                                                                                 174
Table 4.6.c(1) UAB SOPH Exit Interview Worksheet (2005-06) (n=22)
 Question                                                                   Good    Average     Bad
 Adequacy of guidance for selection of department and track                  82%        13%      5%
 Accessibility of faculty for academic advising                              77%        17%      5%
 Quality of academic advising                                                82%         5%     13%
 Willingness of faculty to discuss student concerns                          91%         9%      0%
 Respect that faculty afforded you as a student                              86%         9%      5%
 How well the faculty and administration helped you complete degree
 requirements in a timely manner                                             81%        14%      5%
 Adequacy of career services (career workshops, seminars, access to
 employment information, etc.)                                               45%        40%     15%

Table 4.6.c(2) UAB SOPH Exit Interview Worksheet (2006-07) (n=30)
 Question                                                                   Good    Average     Bad
 Adequacy of guidance for selection of department and track                  57%        27%     14%
 Accessibility of faculty for academic advising                              70%        20%     10%
 Quality of academic advising                                                60%        30%     10%
 Willingness of faculty to discuss student concerns                          72%        21%      7%
 Respect that faculty afforded you as a student                              83%        10%      7%
 How well the faculty and administration helped you complete degree
 requirements in a timely manner                                             83%          7%    10%
 Adequacy of career services (career workshops, seminars, access to
 employment information, etc.)                                               71%        14%     15%

4.6.d Assessment of the extent to which this criterion is met.

This criterion is met.

Strengths
• The SOPH takes seriously its role in providing quality academic advising services to students
   while they are enrolled.
• We prepare students for their eventual job search with a strong and well-organized program of
   career services.
• We track attendance to our career service offerings and find that it has increased dramatically
   over the past five years.

Weakness
• Traditionally we have e-mailed job announcements to students. Students have requested that
  all jobs be placed on the web site.
• Directing applicants to the appropriate degree program needs improvement.
• Academic Advising needs to be improved.

Future Plans
We have worked hard to improve the accessibility and quality of these services and to evaluate our
progress annually. SOPH strategically expects 80% of the students to be satisfied with their
advising experience and that 90% of the graduates will be employed within 6 months of graduation.
We will develop a job announcement web site as requested by the students. The School has been
working with the departmental program coordinators (often the first point of contact for students pre
and post enrollment) to enhance their role in helping individuals to transition to student life. They


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can do the preliminary advising, thus, allowing more time for the faculty academic advisor to
counsel the student regarding career choices and other more in-depth issues. We have
recommended to departments that all MPH students be assigned to the Departmental Program
Coordinator for academic advising and that the Faculty would be utilized for the mentoring role
during the internship and for career guidance. We conducted a Student Advising Training for
Faculty and Departmental Program Coordinators to go over roles and procedures.




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