Third Baseline 2011 12 by euch4U

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									                               Third Grade Imaginative Narrative Writing Assessment
                                                     Baseline
                                                     2011-12
Teacher Information: This is a cold write; no teacher instruction is to be provided. The purpose is to determine students’
writing abilities as they enter third grade. The goal is to obtain information to drive your instruction. At the end of the
year, students will complete an imaginative narrative year end assessment. Educational Services will provide pre and post
assessment comparison data which can be used to analyze growth.

Administration Timeline: 2 sittings
Materials Included:
    Teacher direction sheet including prompts
    Student assessment cover sheet (optional )
    Imaginative Narrative Scoring Guide
    Imaginative Narrative Essential Elements Flow Map (to be projected or copied for each student)
    Blank Imaginative Narrative Flow Map (optional )

*Students are permitted to generate their own graphic organizer or use the Flow Map provided.
*Teacher may not distribute any other black line masters other than what is provided.
*Students may use dictionaries and thesauruses

Day 1
   1. Tell students they will be writing an imaginative narrative.

    2. Teacher says, “An imaginative narrative is a make believe story with a beginning, middle, and end. In some stories,
       there is a problem that is solved after several attempts. Other stories just describe an interesting adventure.
       Decide which kind of imaginative narrative you will write by selecting one of the prompts.

    3. Write or project the prompts on the white board. *Prompts are also written on the cover sheet.

Choice #1
Problem/Solution
One day, Jimmy was walking home from school. He noticed a frog was following him. He was surprised. “Why would a
frog do that?” he thought. He was even more surprised when it started to speak to him! Write a story about Jimmy and
the talking frog. Be sure to include what the frog says and why it wants to talk to Jimmy. Be creative!

Choice #2
Intriguing Adventure
Imagine you woke up and found that you had become a super hero for a day. What happened? What powers did you
have? What did you do? Write a story about your day. Be creative!

    4. Read the prompts aloud to the students.

    5. Tell students to select ONE prompt to write about.

    6. TEACHER READS THE FOLLOWING DIRECTIONS TO THE CLASS:
    You are going to make a graphic organizer to help you plan your imaginative narrative story. You can use the Flow
    Map to help you remember what you need to include in your story. Write your story ideas on the blank Flow Map or
    you may use blank paper to make your own graphic organizer.
       Day 2
    7. TEACHER READS THE FOLLOWING DIRECTIONS TO THE CLASS:
       Yesterday, you planned your story using a graphic organizer. Today, you will use that graphic organizer to write
       your story. When you are finished, check your paper and make any corrections that will make your paper better.
       You may use a dictionary and a thesaurus.
    8. Students write stories on lined paper (whichever paper you prefer to use in your classroom.)

After the Assessment/ Scoring Information:
    9. Individually or in grade level teams, use the district Imaginative Narrative Scoring Guide to score students’ writing.
    10. On October 1st, an electronic file will be available for each teacher to enter student scores.
    11. By October 15th, the completed electronic file is due to Educational Services.
    12. Please do NOT send any student work to Educational Services.
    13. Reports to drive your writing instruction will be provided.
                                    VESD Writing Prompts




What is the scoring process?

*Grade level council has defined the scoring process that is to be used at each site among grade level
teams to score district writing assessments.




What’s the procedure?


   •   Scorers work in partners


   •   Person #1 scores Ideas, Organization, and Fluency.
   •   Person #1 circles the score for those three traits on the student scoring guide
   •         (using pencil).


   •   Person #2 scores Voice, Word Choice, Conventions and Spelling.
   •   Person #2 highlights Word Choice in blue as he/she reads
   •   Person #2 skims the paper highlighting spelling errors in yellow.
   •   Person #2 skims the paper highlighting convention errors in pink.
   •   Person #2 initiates a conversation with partner if there appears to be an inconsistency in scores.
   •   Person #2 highlights all 7 seven scores on the student scoring guide (in any color).


   •   Scorers enter student scores in electronic file to be sent back to Educational Services by the date
       defined in the directions for your grade level.
Ideas & Content Writing is clear and focused with a central problem/solution or an adventure theme. Details support the theme. ¶ = paragraph
 5 Entertaining problem/solution or intriguing adventure unfolds, holds interest, 4+ strong details per ¶, or tell-me-mores embedded, sensory details, feelings,
   and actions create vivid world for reader, shows not tells
 4 A sequenced problem/solution or adventure unfolds , 3 effective details per ¶, tell-me-mores which include sensory details, feelings, actions,
   shows most of the time instead of telling
 3 Focuses on a problem or adventure, 2 details per ¶, tell-me-mores which include details, feelings, or actions, tells vs. shows
 2 Attempts to focus on problem or adventure with 1 telling detail or tell-me-more
 1 Lacks a central purpose or idea, difficult to understand
Comments:



Organization Story has a clear sequence with a beginning, middle, and end and makes connections and transitions among sentences and paragraphs.
Includes a Title
 5 4+ transitions (some embedded) reflect time/connections, Beginning: 1st ¶ has strong hook, introduces character(s), setting, problem or adventurous
    situation Middle: 2+ ¶’s with lively descriptive details of actions, feelings, senses, builds excitement, problem solved Strong End: 1 ¶ clearly addresses
    lesson learned or reflects thoughts and feelings about the story
 4 3+ transitions (at least 1 embedded) show “when”, Beginning: 1 ¶ with opening hook, intros characters, setting, problem or adventurous situation with
   details Middle: 1 ¶ with details, actions, feelings, or senses, a rise in excitement, problem resolved, reader is satisfied, Ending: 1 ¶ clearly addresses lesson
   or reflects upon the story events
 3 Organization of 2-3 ¶’s demonstrate sequence, characters, setting, problem or adventure introduced in beginning, simple patterned transitions throughout,
    some details, a resolution, conclusion tells thoughts and feelings about story events
 2 Beginning to organize and sequence story events, may be like a list, redundant transitions, relationship of ideas may be unclear, attempts to paragraph (1)
 1 Random sentences, writing unclear, confusing even with rereading
Comments:



Sentence Fluency
Develops a smooth flow and rhythm in sentences and paragraphs.
Awkward areas include word endings, omissions, words that don’t belong or fit, choppiness in flow of text
 5 Natural, fluid sound, sentences and paragraphs flow effortlessly, 0-2 awkward areas where readers stumble over word endings, omissions, words that don’t
   belong, combination of simple, 5+ compound or complex sentences that begin in a variety of ways, includes telling, asking, exclamatory, and dialogue, no
   fragments or run-ons
 4 Paragraphs with extensive variation in sentence structure, length and beginning, flows easily, no more than 3 awkward areas (see above), sections have
   rhythm/flow, some simple sentences, 3-4 compound or complex sentences, includes asking, telling, exclamatory, dialogue, 1 fragment or run-on
 3 Good control over simple sentences and paragraphs. Variety of sentence beginnings, no more that 5 awkward areas, 1-2 compound or complex sentences,
   an example of telling, asking, exclamatory, or dialogue, 2 fragments and run-ons
 2 Control over simple sentences, no more than 6 awkward areas, some variety in sentence structure, length, beginning, may continue to use fragments or
   run-ons
 1 Difficult to follow or read, sentences incomplete, rambling, or awkward, fragments and run-ons throughout the text
Comments:
Voice Develop writing that is individual, sincere, and lively.
 5 Exceptionally engaging text entertains throughout text that addresses purpose, dialogue and/or monologue clearly expresses thoughts and feelings, reader
   identifies with characters
 4 In a least 3 places writer expresses thoughts and feelings are strong, reader identifies and understands characters with use of dialogue and/or monologue
 3 Writer communicates thoughts and feelings in at least 2 places, some dialogue
 2 Thoughts and feelings sound mechanical, unaware of reader
 1 Text lacks involvement, flat, lifeless
Comments:




Word Choice The writer uses words that capture the reader’s interest, create mental images, and convey meaning.
 5 5 or more different, accurate and specific words/phrases invoke strong images(precise nouns, strong verbs, adjectives, adverbs) figurative language
    (similes and metaphors, etc.)
 4 3-4 different, accurate and specific words/phrases that evoke strong images (precise nouns, adjectives, verbs, adverbs) may use figurative language
 3 Uses 2-3 different descriptive words and phrases (nouns, adjectives, verbs, adverbs) appropriate to the content
 2 Use of some common descriptive words (color, size) rarely captures interest of reader
 1 Over use of simple/common words
Comments:




Conventions Writer uses correct grammar, punctuation, capitalization, usage, and paragraphing Length of text should be considered 3rd grade proficient =
3-4 paragraphs
 3 Exceptional/Proficient: 0-6 errors in punctuation, capitalization, and grammar, multiple paragraphs with correct indentation, may manipulate conventions for
    stylistic effect throughout text, handwriting is legible
 2 Approaching Proficiency: 7-10 errors in punctuation, capitalization, and grammar, may manipulate conventions for stylistic effect in 1-2 areas, uses
    indentation, or may show a clear beginning, middle and end, handwriting may be illegible but does not interfere with readability
 1 Developing/Limited: 11+ errors in punctuation, capitalization, and grammar, handwriting is illegible and interferes with readability
Comments:




Spelling A repetitive misspelled word is only considered 1 error. Refer to HF Word List Length of text should be considered.
 2 Most words spelled correctly, HF spelled correctly, incorrectly spelled words are easily decipherable
 1 HF words may be spelled incorrectly, 1 or more incorrectly spelled words are not easily decipherable
 0 Developing: Many high frequency words are spelled incorrectly, and are not easily decipherable Limited: The majority of words are incorrectly spelled and
   are not decipherable
Comments:
                                                  Third Grade
                 Imaginative Narrative Baseline Writing Assessment
                                                  Cover Sheet




Directions: Select one of the following prompts. Create a graphic organizer to organize your story ideas. Use your
graphic organizer to write your story.

Choice #1
Problem/Solution
One day, Jimmy was walking home from school. He noticed a frog was following him. He was surprised. “Why would a
frog do that?” he thought. He was even more surprised when it started to speak to him! Write a story about Jimmy and
the talking frog. Be sure to include what the frog says and why it wants to talk to Jimmy. Be creative!

Choice #2
Intriguing Adventure
Imagine you woke up and found that you had become a super hero for a day. What happened? What powers did you
have? What did you do? Write a story about your day. Be creative!
                   Imaginative Narrative Flow Map




   Title:

    Beginning                   Middle                      End

1. Make the first         1. Write the attempts      1. Reflect by showing
sentence of your story    to solve the problem in    thoughts or feelings
exciting.                 order.                     about the story events.
                                   OR                        OR
2. Introduce the           Write the events of the   2. Explain the lesson
   characters.              adventure in order.         that was learned.
                          2. Describe how the
3. Describe the              characters act and
   setting.                  feel.
                          3. Add interesting
4. Explain the               details.
   problem.               4. Make it more
        OR                   exciting as you
                             write.
   Explain the
                          5. Show how the
   adventurous
                             problem is finally
   situation.
                             solved.
                                    OR
                             Show how the
                             adventure ends.
Day 1

Name:

Directions: Use the Imaginative Narrative Flow Map to plan your story.

        Beginning                               Middle                   End

								
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