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Graduate Catalog - Monmouth University

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					Graduate Catalog
     2010-2011
MONMOUTH UNIVERSITY
                                                                          Graduate Catalog

                                                                                 2010–2011




 Date of Publication: August 2010

 Applicability of Catalog:
 Monmouth University has provided the following information to the public. The information provided herein does not pro-
 vide an irrevocable contract between Monmouth University and the student. The University reserves the right to alter any
 policy, procedure, curricular information, facts, and/or fees without any prior notice or liability.
Mission Statement of Monmouth University



Monmouth University is an independent, comprehensive institution of higher education committed to excellence
and integrity in teaching, scholarship, and service. Through its offerings in liberal arts, science, and professional
programs, Monmouth University educates and prepares students to realize their potential as leaders and to
become engaged citizens in a diverse and increasingly interdependent world.
                                                                                                                                                          Contents
Contents
Responsibility and Policies of the University ...........................................................................................4

Directory in Brief ...................................................................................................................................5

The University........................................................................................................................................7

Admission............................................................................................................................................13

Tuition and Fees ..................................................................................................................................25

Financial Aid........................................................................................................................................31

Academic Programs, Support Services, and Regulations .......................................................................37

The Wayne D. McMurray School of Humanities and Social Sciences ......................................................53

School of Science ................................................................................................................................67

Leon Hess Business School..................................................................................................................75

School of Education .............................................................................................................................79

The Marjorie K. Unterberg School of Nursing and Health Studies...........................................................87

School of Social Work ..........................................................................................................................93

Student Services .................................................................................................................................99

Directories.........................................................................................................................................105

Academic Calendars ...................................................................................................................127-128

Map and Directions.....................................................................................................................129-130

Appendix A: Course Descriptions .........................................................................................................A1

Appendix B: Curriculum Charts ............................................................................................................B1

Appendix C: Index ...............................................................................................................................C1




                                                                                                                  Monmouth University 3
The University



Responsibility of the University                                                     •   Birthplace
           The programs and/or requirements set forth in this cat-                   •   Birth date
alog are subject to change without notice. Any modification in the                   •   Degree Candidacy
programs and/or requirements shall be made at the discretion of                      •   Degree Status
the administrative officers of Monmouth University whenever such                     •   Official Student Email Address
action is deemed necessary.                                                          •   Student I.D. Number

                                                                                    A copy of “Student Records Policies and Procedures for
Equal Opportunity Policy                                                  Monmouth University,” developed in support of the Family
           Monmouth University supports equal opportunity in              Educational Rights and Privacy Act, may be inspected at the
recruitment, admission, educational programs, and employment              Office of Registration and Records, Wilson Hall, Room 208; it is
practices regardless of race, color, age, sex, disability, veteran sta-   also available online at www.monmouth.edu/registrar/proce-
tus, marital status, religion, national origin, or sexual orientation.    dures/ferpa_policy.asp.
The University also complies with all major federal and state laws
and executive orders requiring equal employment opportunity
and/or affirmative action.                                                Americans with Disabilities Act and Section 504 of the
           Monmouth University affirms the right of its faculty, staff,   Rehabilitation Act of 1973
and students to work and learn in an environment free from dis-                       The Americans with Disabilities Act and Section 504 of
crimination and sexual harassment and has developed proce-                the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 provide that no otherwise qualified
dures to be used to resolve discrimination or sexual harassment           disabled person (student/employee/applicant) shall by reason of the
complaints. A copy of the University-wide policy on discrimination        disability be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefit of,
and sexual harassment, which describes the procedures for                 or be subjected to discrimination under any program or activity
resolving such complaints, may be obtained from the Office of             receiving federal financial assistance. An otherwise qualified individ-
Affirmative Action, Human Relations, and Compliance located in            ual with respect to postsecondary education is one who meets the
Wilson Hall, Room 304.                                                    essential academic requirements and, with respect to employment,
                                                                          is one who with reasonable accommodation can perform the essen-
                                                                          tial functions of the job in question. Monmouth University has com-
Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act                                 plied with these principles and intends to continue its compliance.
           The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974          The Director of Affirmative Action, Human Relations, and
(FERPA) establishes the right of all students to limited access to        Compliance has been designated by the University as the ADA/504
certain records and information; to review, gain correction of, and       Coordinator. Anyone having a complaint or observation about a pos-
add explanations to records; and to receive a hearing on allega-          sibly discriminatory act or practice should contact the ADA/504
tions of violations. The University may not require a waiver of           Coordinator (Wilson Hall, Room 304) for information concerning the
these rights in its admission, academic, or service requirements.         grievance procedure. A prompt investigation will be undertaken in an
           Information such as grades, financial records, and finan-      effort to resolve the matter and assure compliance.
cial aid records may be released to parent(s) of Monmouth
University students who are dependents of their parents as
defined by the Internal Revenue Service (IRS), provided that the          Human Relations Philosophy and Policy
parent(s) furnishes proof of such dependency, or the student com-                    Monmouth University affirms the inestimable worth and
pletes a “FERPA Waiver Release” form. The FERPA form is avail-            dignity of every individual, regardless of his or her condition of life.
able through WEBstudent.                                                  We affirm, further, the right of each person to develop to his or her
           Directory Information: Directory information may be            full potential and to be judged on the basis of personal accom-
released by the University without the student’s permission unless        plishments. Finally, we believe that the achievement of full human-
the student states, in writing, within the first two weeks of the fall    ity is enhanced by the experience of the human family.
semester (or within the first two weeks of the spring semester for                   We are committed to achieve and sustain a pluralistic envi-
students entering Monmouth in the spring semester), that he/she           ronment recognized for its racial, cultural, and ethnic diversity, and
does not want his/her directory information released. This request        which is characterized by genuine mutuality, acceptance, and affir-
should be submitted using the FERPA Do Not Disclose form which            mation of the strengths and contributions of differing individuals and
is accessible from WEBstudent. Student requests to keep direc-            groups, and a willingness to resolve disputes in a spirit of good will.
tory information confidential are permanent and therefore will                       Monmouth University, through this philosophy and policy
remain in effect unless rescinded by the student. Directory infor-        statement, seeks to create a pluralistic community in which people:
mation consists of the following information:                                        • are accepted and judged as individuals, independent
           • Student’s name                                                            of ancestry, social and economic background, sexual
           • Class level                                                               orientation, age, gender, physical characteristics, or
           • Registered credits for the current term                                   personal beliefs;
           • Major field of study                                                    • may freely engage in constructive academic dialogue
           • Participation in recognized activities and sports                         and debate in classrooms and public halls, and pursue
           • Biographical data for public relations purposes                           their social and private lives uninhibited by discrimina-
           • Dates of attendance at Monmouth University                                tion, disruption, or harassment in any form;
           • Degree and awards received at Monmouth University                       • and value, respect, and draw their intellectual strength
           • Photographs of student                                                    from the rich diversity of other people of different
           • Most recent previous educational institution attended                     races, cultures, religions, nationalities, and beliefs.
           • Veteran status                                                          This affirmation and commitment will guide us in the
           • Telephone number                                             challenging times ahead as we strive to achieve excellence in
           • Address                                                      service, teaching, and scholarship.




4 Monmouth University
                                                                                                                   Directory in Brief
Directory in Brief




                                                                                                             Course Descriptions
                  All officers listed in this directory may be contacted by writing to them at
                  Monmouth University, West Long Branch, NJ 07764-1898,
                                             or by telephoning them at
                          732-571-3400 or at the telephone numbers listed below.


Academic Foundations for General Education                  Career Services
   571-3683                                                     571-3471
   Judith Nye, Associate Vice President                         William F. Hill, Assistant Dean
Admission, Undergraduate                                    Cashier’s Office
   571-3456                                                     571-7540
   Victoria Bobik, Director                                     Marilyn Cusick, Manager
Admission, Graduate                                         Center for Student Success
   571-3561                                                     571-7522
   Kevin Roane, Director                                        Mercy Azeke, Dean
Athletics                                                   Cooperative Education
   571-3415                                                     571-3458
   Marilyn McNeil, Director                                     Kathleen Kennedy, Director
Bursar’s Office                                             Disability Services for Students
   571-3454                                                     571-3460
   Linda Pulcrano, Bursar                                       John Carey, Director
Campus Tours                                                Educational Opportunity Fund
   571-3456                                                     571-3462
   Victoria Bobik, Director                                     Colleen Johnson, Director
Career Planning                                             Financial Aid
   263-5281                                                     571-3463
   Danielle Schrama, Coordinator First Year                     Claire M. Alasio, Associate Vice President
   Advising




                                                                                    Monmouth University 5
Directory in Brief



Graduate Assistantships                     Residential Life
   571-7550                                     571-3585
   Datta Naik, Dean                             James Pillar, Assistant Vice President
Graduate School                             Service Learning & Community Programs
   571-7550                                     571-4411
   Datta Naik, Dean                             Marilyn Ward, Coordinator
Health Services                             Scholarships
   571-3464                                     571-3463
   Kathy Maloney, Director                      Claire M. Alasio, Associate Vice President
Help Desk (e-mail and WEBadvisor)           School of Education
   571-3539                                     571-3437
   Cathy Davison, Help Desk Supervisor          Lynn Romeo, Dean
Honors School                               School of Humanities and Social Sciences
   571-3620                                     571-3419
   William P. Mitchell, Interim Dean            Stanton Green, Dean
Housing                                     School of Nursing and Health Studies
   571-3465                                     571-3443
   James Pillar, Assistant Vice President       Janet Mahoney, Dean
International Student Services              School of Science
   571-3640                                     571-3421
   Barbara Nitzberg, Coordinator                Michael Palladino, Dean
Leon Hess Business School                   School of Social Work
   571-3423                                     571-3543
   Donald M. Moliver, Interim Dean              Robin Mama, Dean
Library                                     Student Activities
   571-3450                                     571-3586
   Ravindra Sharma, Dean                        Amy Bellina, Director
Mathematics Center                          Student Employment
   263-5305                                     571-3471
   Judith Toubin, Coordinator                   Aimee Parks, Assistant Director
Orientation, Undergraduate                  Student Services
   571-3591                                     571-3417
   Amy Bellina, Director                        Mary Anne Nagy, Vice President
Pre-Medical, & Pre-Dental Careers           Study Abroad
   571-3687                                     263-5377
   James Mack, Director                         Robin Asaro, Assistant Director
Psychological Services                      Undeclared Majors Advising Program
   571-7517                                     571-3588
   Franca Mancini, Director                     Jean Judge, Associate Dean
Registration and Records                    Writing Center
   571-3477                                     571-7543
   Laura Papa Babbin, Director                  Jane DeTullio, Director

                                            Please refer to the complete Directory in this catalog
                                            for a more complete list.



6 Monmouth University
                                                                                                                      The University
The University



          Monmouth University, as described in its         designed to complement the academic programs.
Mission Statement, is an independent, comprehen-           Master’s level programs include business adminis-
sive institution of higher education, emphasizing          tration, computer science, corporate and public com-
excellence and integrity in teaching, and scholar-         munication, criminal justice, education, English,
ship at the undergraduate and graduate levels.             financial mathematics, history, liberal arts, nursing,
Monmouth is dedicated to service in the public inter-      mental health counseling, psychological counseling,
est and, in particular, to the enhancement of the          public policy, social work, and software engineering.
quality of life. The University is committed to provid-              The undergraduate curriculum is built upon
ing a learning environment that enables men and            an innovative, interdisciplinary general education
women to pursue their educational goals, to reach          program and careful academic advising and career
their full potential as leaders, to determine the direc-   counseling. One of the University’s main goals is to
tion of their lives, and to contribute actively in order   prepare Monmouth undergraduates for active par-
to become engaged citizens in their community and          ticipation as leaders in the twenty-first century.
society in an increasingly interdependent world.           Accordingly, the University provides a learning envi-
          Eight schools within the University—the          ronment that enables all students to develop their
Wayne D. McMurray School of Humanities and                 capacities for leadership in a multicultural world.
Social Sciences; the School of Science; the Leon           Students are provided opportunities to develop
Hess Business School; the School of Education; the         information technology and collaborative problem-
Marjorie K. Unterberg School of Nursing and Health         solving skills and to develop a sense of social
Studies; the Honors School; the Graduate School;           responsibility as members of local, national, and
and the School of Social Work—provide a wide vari-         global communities. Small classes and course clus-
ety of academic programs at both the undergraduate         tering allow for individual attention, cooperative
and graduate levels. There are bachelor’s degree           learning, and interactive student-faculty exchange.
programs in the arts and sciences and in the profes-                 The University is located in a quiet, residen-
sional areas of business, computer science, criminal       tial area of an attractive community near the Atlantic
justice, education, nursing, social work, and software     Ocean, about an hour and thirty minutes from the
engineering. Co-curricular activities have been            metropolitan attractions of New York City and




                                                                                     Monmouth University 7
The University



Philadelphia. Monmouth enjoys the advantage of               older buildings that lend distinctive balance to the
proximity, within its home county, to many high-tech-        modern additions to the campus. Prominent among
nology firms, financial institutions, health care institu-   these newer buildings is the Stafford Student
tions, and a thriving business-industrial sector. These      Center that houses an open computer lab, a com-
provide employment possibilities for Monmouth                muter dining room and snack bar, student offices,
University graduates, as well as opportunities for           lounges, and a large combination banquet/perform-
undergraduates, to gain practical experience through         ance hall. In a first-floor suite is the Disability
internships and the Cooperative Education Program.           Services and Tutoring Center. On the lower level is
The surrounding communities also offer opportunities         the Center for Student Success which includes
for service activities in local schools and public agen-     Career Services, First-Year Advising (provides advis-
cies. Volunteer and service activity is encouraged and       ing support to freshmen students), the Writing
facilitated by the campus Office of Service Learning         Center, and a graduate student lounge. Other build-
and Community Programs.                                      ings include: the Magill Commons, a resident stu-
                                                             dent dining hall and conference center; the Thomas
CAMPUS FACILITIES                                            A. Edison Science Building (with nearby green-
         The University’s 156-acre campus, consid-           house); Howard Hall, housing the Pollak Theatre
ered to be one of the most beautiful in New Jersey,          and many academic computing labs, as well as a 24-
includes among its 56 buildings a harmonious blend-          hour open lab; Bey Hall, the Leon Hess Business
ing of historic and traditional architectural styles.        School building, which contains case study class-
         The      centerpiece     building—and        the    rooms, seminar rooms, and a computer laboratory;
University’s identifying landmark—is Woodrow                 McAllan Hall, which houses the School of
Wilson Hall, the administrative center. Completed in         Education, The Marjorie K. Unterberg School of
1931 on the precise site of President Woodrow                Nursing and Health Studies, The School of Social
Wilson’s summer White House, the 130-room man-               Work, and the department of Criminal Justice; the
sion—originally known as Shadow Lawn—began as                new state-of-the-art Jules Plangere Center, which
the private residence of Hubert T. Parson, a former          houses the department of Communication, Foreign
president of F.W. Woolworth Company. The mansion             Language Studies, and a Faculty Resource Center;
has been described in newspapers throughout the              William T. Boylan Gymnasium; eleven traditional
world, is featured in many books on architecture and         and suite-style, on-campus residence halls:
art, and has been used as a backdrop for innumer-            Beechwood, Birch, Cedar, Elmwood, Laurel,
able print ads and television commercials. In 1981, it       Mullaney, Oakwood, Pinewood, Redwood,
served as the setting for the film version of Annie. In      Spruce, and Willow; and three apartment-style facil-
1978, along with the University’s Library, another           ities: the Great Lawn Apartments, the Garden
architectural treasure that was the summer home of           Apartments, and Maplewood Hall.
Murray and Leonie Guggenheim, it was entered in
the National Register of Historic Places. In 1985,           HISTORY
Wilson Hall was designated a National Historic                        Monmouth University was founded in 1933
Landmark by the U.S. Department of the Interior.             with federal assistance as Monmouth Junior College,
         In fall 2009, Monmouth University opened a          largely to provide opportunity for higher education to
153,200 square foot Multipurpose Activity Center             area high school graduates who, in those Depression
(MAC) that seats approximately 4,000 people. The             days, could not afford to go away to college. It was a
building, which is located in the center of the cam-         two-year institution, holding classes only in the
pus, includes a multipurpose arena, 200-meter, six-          evening. For a time it appeared uncertain whether
lane indoor track, the University store, Leon Hess           the College would have adequate funds to continue.
Champions’ Hall, locker rooms for 19 athletic teams,         With support from students and the community, how-
box office, fitness center, and the University’s             ever, the fledgling College survived the economic cri-
Blue/White Club.                                             sis and quickly assumed its present private status. In
         The Lauren K. Woods Theatre, a former               1956, it was renamed Monmouth College and
carriage house that retains many of its original archi-      accredited by the state to offer four-year programs
tectural features, is just one of the many gracious          leading to the baccalaureate degree. Less than a



8 Monmouth University
                                                                                               The University



decade later, it was authorized to offer master’s                  The Monmouth faculty are respected schol-
degree programs. In March 1995, the New Jersey           ars, artists, scientists, and professionals. Students are
Commission on Higher Education designated                drawn into the ongoing scholarly and creative work of
Monmouth a teaching university pursuant to N.J.A.C.      the faculty through classroom demonstration,
9:1-3.1 et seq.                                          research assistantships, and attendance at profes-
        Today, Monmouth offers more than 70              sional meetings. Faculty also serve as advisors to stu-
undergraduate and graduate degree programs and           dents, some as designated freshman advisors who
concentrations. Within its student body, 32 states       work closely with new students during their first year.
and 48 foreign countries are represented. More than                In departments having graduate programs,
1,600 undergraduates are resident students.              certain faculty are appointed to the graduate faculty.
                                                         The graduate faculty provides the core of instruction
ACCREDITATION                                            in the graduate programs at Monmouth University.
         The University is licensed by the New Jersey    Recognized for their scholarly achievements by
Commission on Higher Education and accredited by         peers in their fields, the members of the graduate
the Middle States Commission on Higher Education.        faculty provide a challenging classroom environ-
In addition, the Leon Hess Business School is            ment. They bring insight from research and profes-
accredited by the AACSB International — the              sional experience into the classroom. Graduate stu-
Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of             dents are drawn into the ongoing, creative work of
Business; the chemistry program (with a concentra-       the faculty through classroom demonstration, as
tion in advanced chemistry) is on the Approved List      research assistants, and through attendance at pro-
of the American Chemical Society (ACS); the nursing      fessional meetings. The graduate faculty also serve
program is accredited by the Commission on               as advisors and mentors to students; in many cases,
Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE); the under-          contact is maintained after graduation.
graduate B.S.W. and graduate M.S.W. social work                    Working directly with senior faculty who are
programs are accredited by the Council on Social         engaged in research is a key element in graduate-
Work Education (CSWE); the undergraduate BSSE            level study. In recent interviews, a group of student
program is accredited by the Engineering                 leaders on campus unanimously agreed that the
Accreditation Commission of ABET, 111 Market             opportunity to work closely with faculty is the greatest
Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012 - tele-      single benefit of Monmouth’s small class size and
phone: (410) 347-7700, the School of Education is        engaged faculty. Students are able to achieve a com-
accredited by the National Council for Accreditation     fortable rapport with the professors.
of Teacher Education (NCATE) and has also                          Interviewed recently about their views of the
received accreditation from the Council for the          University, a group of student leaders on campus
Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational      unanimously agreed the greatest single appeal of the
Programs (CACREP) for the M.S.Ed. in School              institution was the opportunity it afforded them to
Counseling. The Department of Psychological              work closely with faculty, to achieve a comfortable
Counseling has also received CACREP accreditation        rapport in which they not only got to know their teach-
for its M.S. in Mental Health Counseling program.        ers, but also were known by them. “We are never
                                                         made to feel we are simply numbers,” one of the stu-
THE FACULTY                                              dent leaders states.
         The faculty at Monmouth University work                   A member of the anthropology faculty, who
together to provide challenging classroom environ-       regularly involves students in his research activities,
ments that encourage student involvement and             explains: “It gives them opportunity to meet important
ensure that Monmouth graduates leave the University      people in the field whom they otherwise would only
ready to exercise socially responsible leadership in     read about, and to engage in some of the personal
their professional and personal communities. The fac-    excitement of anthropology.” A biology professor,
ulty take teaching and student learning seriously. To    who provides opportunity for students in his major
enhance their effectiveness, most have participated in   field to participate in his environmental projects, also
faculty workshops on active learning techniques.         encourages them to write papers on their work and to
                                                         present them at scientific meetings. “For some,” he



                                                                                  Monmouth University 9
The University



reports, “this experience has been a determining fac-                Leonard Wollack, Marketing . . . . . . . . . . . . 1992
tor in gaining acceptance to graduate school or in                   Arie van Everdingen, Art. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1993
getting jobs in their major field. Being able to include             Mark Rodgers, Social Work . . . . . . . . . . . . 1994
published research in their resumes gives them a                     Kenneth Campbell, History. . . . . . . . . . . . . 1995
decided edge.” A psychology professor whose under-                   Margaret DelGuercio, English . . . . . . . . . . 1996
graduate students have presented papers at presti-                   Marilyn Parker, Chemistry . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1997
gious, professional psychology conferences is enthu-                 Gregory Coram, Criminal Justice . . . . . . . . 1998
siastic about their experiences. “They have truly                    Robyn Holmes, Psychology . . . . . . . . . . . . 1999
earned the recognition they received and are excited                 Robin Mama, Social Work . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2000
about pursuing advanced degrees.”                                    Brian Garvey, English . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2001
          Monmouth faculty are committed to helping                  John Morano, Communication . . . . . . . . . . 2002
students achieve their fullest potential. That they suc-             Rekha Datta, Political Science . . . . . . . . . . 2003
ceed is attested in the words of a graduate who is                   Judith Nye, Psychology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2004
now a successful physicist. “Any student who has                     Michael Palladino, Biology . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2005
anything on the ball, and who wants to learn and get                 Bruce Normandia, Curriculum & Instruction 2006
the finest education possible in his or her major field,             Richard Veit, History and Anthropology . . . 2007
can get it at Monmouth. The teachers are tops; they                  Kelly Ward, Social Work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2008
care about you as an individual, work right along with               Joseph Patten, Political Science . . . . . . . . 2009
you, and share the joy of your own successes. I was                  David Tripold, Music and Theatre Arts . . . . 2010
a science major. When they saw that I was serious
about my work, my professors gave me special                      AWARDS
encouragement, allowed me flexible lab privileges,
and even worked with me on research. I knew it was                Donald Warncke Award
a great experience then. Five years into my career                          The Faculty Association of Monmouth
field, I am even more appreciative of the solid kind of           (FAMCO) sponsors this award in memory of Donald
preparation provided me at Monmouth. Just show                    Warncke, first president of FAMCO. Any member of
the faculty you care, and you’ll have them on your                the University community who has distinguished him
team all the way.”                                                or herself through outstanding service over the years
          Each year at Commencement, the University               is eligible. Recipients through 2010 are:
cites one member of the faculty for distinguished                    Ann Nowick. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1980
teaching. Honorees are chosen by a committee of                      Carol Giroud . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1981
faculty, administrators, and students. Recipients                    Jack Christie and George Smith. . . . . . . . . 1982
since 1975, when the award was established, are:                     Richard Steadman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1983
    Rose Mary Miller, Mathematics . . . . . . . . . 1975             Alfred Brown . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1984
    William P. Mitchell, Anthropology . . . . . . . . 1976           Jane Freed and Della Garrabrant. . . . . . . . 1985
    Richard Benjamin, Electronic Engineering . 1977                  Philip C. Donahue. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1986
    Vernon Churchill, Biology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1978       William T. Boylan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1988
    Charles J. Lewis, Mathematics. . . . . . . . . . 1979            Mary Abate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1989
    J. Emmett Collins, Marketing . . . . . . . . . . . 1980          Aldean Davis. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1990
    Robert J. Sipos, English . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1981      Rose Iovino. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1991
    Harris Drucker, Electronic Engineering. . . . 1982               Demetrius Markov. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1992
    Alicia E. Portuondo, Foreign Languages . . 1983                  C. Dale Haase and Carol Neuer. . . . . . . . . 1993
    John A. Styslinger, English . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1984       Deanna Scherrer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1994
    Everett L. Rich, Communication . . . . . . . . . 1985            Sandra G. Epstein . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1995
    Doris K. Hiatt, Psychology . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1986        Gertrude Murphy and Marilyn Parker . . . . . 1996
    Eugene S. Simko, Management. . . . . . . . . 1987                Susan Kuykendall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1997
    Thomas S. Pearson, History. . . . . . . . . . . . 1988           John Bolton. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1998
    Datta V. Naik, Chemistry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1989        Debbie Mellish and James Mack . . . . . . . . 1999
    Donald M. Moliver, Economics . . . . . . . . . . 1990            Marianne Seitz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2000
    Robert S. Rouse, Chemistry. . . . . . . . . . . . 1991



10 Monmouth University
                                                                                                               The University



   Vernon Churchill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2001        ACADEMIC HONESTY
   Richard Guilfoyle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2002                  Monmouth University encourages its stu-
   Thomas Murtha. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2003          dents to grow intellectually as well as to become
   Koorleen Minton and                                                    responsible citizens in our complex society. In order
      Ella Elizabeth Boyington. . . . . . . . . . . . . 2004              to develop their skills and talents, students are asked
   Linda Silverstein . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2005       to do research, perform experiments, write research
   Franca Mancini . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2006        papers, work individually, and cooperate in group
   Annette Gough . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2007         activities. Academic dishonesty subverts the
   Doreen Brown and Sandy Villa. . . . . . . . . . 2008                   University’s mission and undermines the student’s
   William Mitchell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2009      intellectual growth. Therefore, Monmouth University
   Brian Garvey. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2010       will not tolerate violations of the code of academic
                                                                          honesty. The penalties for such violations include
Stafford Presidential Award of Excellence                                 suspension or dismissal and are elaborated in the
          Established in 2003, this award is presented                    Student Handbook.
annually to the outstanding member(s) of the                                       The University has an obligation as an edu-
Monmouth University staff or administration as recog-                     cational institution to be certain that each student’s
nition for his or her tireless efforts, dedication, creativ-              work is his/her own. Dishonesty in such academic
ity, and evident commitment to supporting and                             practices as assignments, examinations, or other
enhancing Monmouth University. The award is named                         academic work cannot be condoned. A student who
after Dr. Rebecca Stafford, who retired in 2003 after                     submits work that is not original violates the purpose
10 years of exceptional service as President.                             of Monmouth University and may forfeit his/her right
    Bertha Hughes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2003        and opportunity to continue at the University.
    Datta Naik . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2003
    Maureen Paparella . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2003
    Patricia L. Swannack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2004
    Samuel A. Weir . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2005
    Saliba Sarsar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2006
    Debbie Mellish . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2007
    Mary Anne Nagy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2007
    Colleen Johnson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2008
    Jean Judge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2009
    Sharon Smith . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2010




                                                                                                Monmouth University 11
12 Monmouth University
Graduate Admission




                                                                                                               Graduate Admission
NEW TO MONMOUTH STUDENTS’                              5.      Refer to descriptions of the individual grad-
REQUIREMENTS                                                   uate programs for additional procedures, if
         Graduates of accredited colleges and uni-             any, unique to the program.
versities with a baccalaureate degree, whose
records show evidence of ability to do graduate        APPLICATION DEADLINES
work, may apply for admission. Admission to gradu-            The application and all relevant official doc-
ate programs is based on the student’s undergrad-      uments must be received as follows:
uate record, particularly in the major; scores on             Fall Semester            July 15*
appropriate admission tests; and other supporting             Spring Semester          November 15
documentation as required. Graduate program                   Summer Session           May 1
directors determine admission decisions.
                                                               * Social Work deadline is March 15.
PROCEDURES
1.     Obtain an application for admission by visit-            Qualified applicants are given consideration
       ing www.monmouth.edu/apply or by con-           after these deadlines on a space-available basis.
       tacting the Graduate Admission Office at
       732-571-3452.                                   GRADUATE PROGRAM ADMISSION
2.     Complete and submit the application             REQUIREMENTS
       together with a nonrefundable $50 applica-
       tion fee to the Office of Admission             MASTER OF ARTS IN CORPORATE AND
       Processing.                                     PUBLIC COMMUNICATION (M.A.)
3.     Send official undergraduate transcripts from    COMMUNICATION CERTIFICATES
       all previously attended institutions to the
       Office of Admission Processing.                 1.      Possession of a baccalaureate degree with
4.     Send official graduate transcripts (if any)             a 2.75 overall GPA and a 3.0 GPA in the
       from other previously attended institutions             undergraduate major.
       to the Office of Admission Processing.          2.      Two letters of recommendation.




                                                                                Monmouth University 13
Graduate Admission



3.    Personal essay of not more than 750 words          MASTER OF ARTS IN LIBERAL ARTS (M.A)
      that describes your preparation for study in
      the program and personal objectives for            1.       Possession of a baccalaureate degree with a
      graduate study.                                             2.5 overall GPA and a 3.0 GPA in the under-
4.    Portfolio of experience that demonstrates a                 graduate major.
      record of independent initiative and achieve-      2.       Two letters of recommendation.
      ment in academic, career, and/or community         3.       An application essay of no fewer than 250
      settings. (Applicants who have earned an                    words emphasizing student’s career goals
      undergraduate degree the previous year                      as well as academic interests.
      must submit scores from the GRE.)
5.    Resume.                                            MASTER OF ARTS IN PSYCHOLOGICAL
                                                         COUNSELING (M.A.)
MASTER OF ARTS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE (M.A.)                MASTER OF SCIENCE IN MENTAL HEALTH
CRIMINAL JUSTICE CERTIFICATE                             COUNSELING (M.S.)
HOMELAND SECURITY CERTIFICATE
                                                         1.       Possession of a baccalaureate degree with a
1.    Possession of a baccalaureate degree with a                 3.0 overall GPA.
      minimum 2.5 overall GPA.                           2.       Two completed Monmouth University
2.    Two letters of recommendation.                              Psychological Counseling recommendation
3.    Personal essay of 250 to 300 words that                     forms.
      describes your preparation for study in the        3.       Twenty-four credits in Psychology (including
      program and personal objectives for gradu-                  courses in personality theory, statistics, abnor-
      ate study in criminal justice.                              mal psychology, and research methods).
                                                         4.       GRE scores may be required. Candidates
MASTER OF ARTS IN ENGLISH (M.A.)                                  who have not yet taken the GRE may be
                                                                  accepted conditionally pending satisfactory
1.    Possession of a baccalaureate degree with a                 completion of the requirement during the first
      minimum 2.75 overall GPA and at least 15                    nine (9) credits of study. Candidates with a
      credits in literary studies is strongly                     master’s degree in a related field are not
      recommended.                                                required to submit GRE scores.
2.    Two letters of recommendation from former
      professors, current colleagues, or a current       POST-MASTER’S CERTIFICATE IN
      or recent supervisor.                              PROFESSIONAL COUNSELING **
3.    An application essay of 500 words describing
      your personal objectives for graduate study in     1.       Possession of a master’s degree in counsel-
      a master of arts program, as well as research               ing or a related field (with ‘Counseling’ in the
      completed, in progress, or contemplated, or                 title) with a satisfactory cumulative GPA.
      an author or period of particular interest.        2.       Complete undergraduate and graduate tran-
                                                                  scripts must be submitted.
MASTER OF ARTS IN HISTORY (M.A.)                         3.       An interview with the program director may
                                                                  be requested.
1.    Possession of a baccalaureate degree with a        4.       Two letters of reference.
      2.5 overall GPA and a 3.0 GPA in the under-
      graduate major.                                    ** Note: No new students will be admitted to this program effec-
                                                            tive July 1, 2010
2.    Two letters of recommendation.
3.    Written statement that describes the historical
      areas the candidate wishes to study and details    MASTER OF ARTS IN PUBLIC POLICY (M.A.)
      how graduate study will contribute to the candi-
      date’s professional and academic goals.            1.       Possession of a baccalaureate degree with a
                                                                  2.75 overall GPA.



14 Monmouth University
                                                                                     Graduate Admission



2.    Two-page typewritten personal statement                   attend an interview as part of the admissions
      (approximately 500 words) highlighting per-               process.
      sonal and/or professional goals and objec-
      tives for wanting to pursue graduate study in       POST-MASTER’S CERTIFICATE: PLAY THERAPY
      the field of public policy and public affairs.
3.    Two letters of recommendation from persons          1.    A master’s degree in a medical or mental
      familiar with prospective student’s academic              health discipline (for example, M.S.N.,
      and/or professional competence.                           M.S.W., M.A.) and eligibility for licensure in
                                                                that discipline.
MASTER OF SOCIAL WORK (M.S.W.)
                                                          MASTER OF SCIENCE IN COMPUTER
1.    Possession of a baccalaureate degree with a         SCIENCE (M.S.)
      2.75 overall GPA and a 3.0 GPA in the under-        GRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN COMPUTER SCIENCE
      graduate major. Social Work is grounded in
      the liberal arts and contains a coherent, inte-     1.    Possession of a baccalaureate degree with a
      grated, professional foundation in social                 minimum 2.75 overall GPA, preferably in the
      work (CSWE Accreditation Standards).                      sciences or engineering.
      MSW applicants with a baccalaureate                 2.    Two letters of recommendation.
      degree are required to have a strong liberal        3.    Two semesters of Calculus (I and II) with
      arts background in English, Math, Biology,                grades of “C” or better.
      and Psychology (none of these courses can           4.    Two semesters of computer programming
      be a College Level Examination Program;                   courses within the past five years (equivalent
      they must be taken as college-level, credit-              to Monmouth’s CS175 and CS176) at a rec-
      bearing classes). The program also prefers                ognized institution with a grade of “B” or bet-
      courses in History, Sociology, Political                  ter. Applicants not meeting these require-
      Science, Anthropology, and Economics.                     ments for programming experience may be
2.    Three completed Monmouth University                       admitted conditionally and required to take
      Department of Social Work recommendation                  CS501A or its equivalent.
      forms. Recommendations must be from a
      professional source; it cannot be from              MASTER OF SCIENCE IN SOFTWARE
      friends and/or relatives.                           ENGINEERING (M.S.)
3.    Narrative (four to five pages, double spaced)       SOFTWARE ENGINEERING CERTIFICATE
      in response to the questions outlined on the        PROGRAMS
      Autobiographical Statement form which can
      be obtained by visiting www.monmouth.edu            1.    Possession of a baccalaureate degree in
      /admission/graduate/MSWAutobioStatement                   software engineering, computer science,
      .pdf.                                                     computer engineering, or another engineer-
4.    Candidates for Advanced Standing must                     ing-related discipline with a 2.5 overall GPA
      have a B.S.W. from an accredited program                  and a 3.0 GPA in the undergraduate major.
      within six years of the date of application, ful-         Candidates whose major is not computer
      fill GPA requirements, and submit the                     science or a related field may be admitted on
      Monmouth University Advanced Standing                     a case-by-case basis.
      Field Evaluation form.                              2.    Demonstrate completed course work in com-
5.    Candidates for Advanced standing must                     puter programming, data structures and
      have completed a course in statistics within              algorithms, operating systems, discrete
      the last six years.                                       mathematics, and software engineering.
6.    In instances where the admissions commit-                 Applicants who have not completed course
      tee has questions about an applicant’s refer-             work in these areas will be required to com-
      ences, personal statement, or academic                    plete preparatory/foundation courses as nec-
      record, the applicant may be required to                  essary. (Credits earned will not be applied



                                                                              Monmouth University 15
Graduate Admission



         toward the M.S. degree.) Students must                 3.      Possession of a Monmouth University bac-
         earn a grade of “B” or better in each of these                 calaureate degree in business with a mini-
         courses.                                                       mum GPA of 3.0, and a minimal SAT score
3.       Thesis track students must hold a bachelor’s                   (taken prior to attendance at Monmouth
         degree in software engineering from a col-                     University) of 1600 on the 2400 point scale,
         lege or university accredited by its regional                  or 1090 on the 1600 point scale.
         accrediting agency.
                                                                Exceptional or conditional acceptance may be
MASTER OF SCIENCE IN FINANCIAL                                  granted to a small number of qualified applicants at
MATHEMATICS (M.S.)                                              the discretion of the M.B.A. program director.

1.       Undergraduate degree in mathematics or in              POST-MASTERS’S CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS
         a related field that requires a substantial            IN ACCOUNTING OR IN HEALTH CARE
         component of mathematics such as physics,              MANAGEMENT
         computer engineering, or electrical engineer-
         ing. Business, computer science, or related            1.      Possession of a Master’s degree from an
         majors with a minor in mathematics are also                    accredited institution within the last seven
         acceptable. (Applicants who have not previ-                    years, including the six business core
         ously completed courses in calculus, linear                    courses.
         algebra, differential equations, or statistics
         will be evaluated on a case-by-case basis,             Exceptional admission may be granted at the discre-
         and may be required to complete a founda-              tion of the MBA Program Director.
         tion curriculum.)
2.       Must have completed Calculus, I, II, and III;          MASTER OF EDUCATION (M.Ed.)
         Linear Algebra; Differential Equations (with
         some exposure to partial differential equa-            1.      Possession of a baccalaureate degree with a
         tions); and a course in calculus-based                         2.5 overall GPA and a 3.0 GPA in the under-
         statistics.                                                    graduate major.
3.       Must have a minimum GPA of 3.0 in their                2.      Two letters of recommendation for graduate
         major, and a minimum 2.5 GPA or better                         study.
         overall.                                               3.      Essay (500 words or more) explaining why
                                                                        the applicant wishes to pursue this graduate
MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (M.B.A.)                              program.
or MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION                            4.      Resume.
WITH A CONCENTRATION IN HEALTH CARE
MANAGEMENT                                                      Note: Prior to student teaching, the appropriate
                                                                Praxis Test must be successfully completed, and all
1.       Possession of a four-year baccalaureate                content course work and/or conditions of acceptance
         degree and with a minimum GPA of 2.50 and              must be satisfied.
         either:
         a. GMAT* minimum score of 450, and a min-              MASTER OF ARTS IN TEACHING (M.A.T.)
             imum total of 1000 when the GMAT is
             added to 200 times the GPA, or                     1.      Possession of a baccalaureate degree with a
         b. CPA or CFA licensure.                                       2.75 overall GPA and a 3.0 GPA in the under-
                                                                        graduate major.
* The Graduate Record Exam (GRE) will be considered as a sub-   2.      Two letters of recommendation for graduate
  stitute for the GMAT on an equivalent basis.
                                                                        study.
                                                                3.      Resume.
2.       Possession of a Master’s or Doctoral degree            4.      Personal statement of not more than two
         (M.S., M.D., J.D., Ph.D., Ed.D., etc.)                         pages that describes your preparation for



16 Monmouth University
                                                                                         Graduate Admission



        study in the program and personal objectives         2.      A passing score for the Oral Proficiency
        for graduate study.                                          Interview (OPI) in the English Language for
5.      Prior to student teaching, the appropriate                   non-native speakers of English.
        Praxis Test must be successfully completed.
6.      Students interested in the MAT Initial               Graduate Certificate: Educational Technology:
        Certification K-12 in Chinese, must have a           1.    Applicant must be a certified teacher (does
        degree or 30 approved credits in the                       not apply to M.S.Ed. Educational Counseling
        Chinese language and culture.                              and Principal Concentrations).
7.      Admission into M.A.T. with an Endorsement in         2.    Possession of a baccalaureate degree with a
        K-12 Education in Health and Physical                      minimum 2.75 overall GPA and a 3.0 GPA in
        Education requires prior completion of 30                  the undergraduate major.
        undergraduate credits in a coherent sequence         3.    Two letters of recommendation related to the
        of courses in health and a minimum of 15                   applicant’s competence for this graduate
        undergraduate credits in physical education                program and professional work.
        OR 30 undergraduate credits in a coherent            4.    Essay (500 words or more) explaining why
        sequence in physical education and a mini-                 the applicant wishes to pursue this graduate
        mum 15 undergraduate credits in health.                    program.
        Study of individual, dual, and team sports must
        be part of the physical education credits.           Graduate Post-Master’s Certificate: Education:
                                                             1.    Applicants must have completed a Master’s
MASTER OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION (M.S.Ed.)                           degree in the field of education, or related
                                                                   field, with a 3.0 minimum cumulative GPA.
1.      Applicant must be a certified teacher. (Does
        not apply to M.S.Ed. School Counseling and           Note: Course credits earned in a previous degree
        Principal Concentrations.)                           program, at either Monmouth or another institution,
2.      Possession of a baccalaureate degree with a          may not be applied toward this certificate.
        minimum 2.75 overall GPA and a 3.0 GPA in
        the undergraduate major.                             Graduate Post-Master’s Certificate: Curriculum
3.      Two letters of recommendation related to the         Studies:
        applicant’s competence for this graduate             1.     Applicants must have completed a Master’s
        program and professional work.                              degree in the field of education, or related
4.      Essay (500 words or more) explaining why                    field, with a 3.0 minimum cumulative GPA.
        the applicant wishes to pursue this graduate
        program.                                             Graduate Endorsement:
                                                             Teacher of Students with Disabilities:
Note: Upon completion of the Principal Program, you          1.     Possess or be eligible for a standard or pro-
must provide documentation evidencing completion                    visional New Jersey instructional certificate
of five years of successful educational experience                  with an endorsement appropriate to the sub-
under a valid provisional or standard New Jersey or                 ject or grade level to be taught.
equivalent out-of-state certificate to be eligible for the   2.     Possession of a bachelor’s degree in a field
endorsement.                                                        leading to teacher licensure, health services,
                                                                    psychology, or social work from an accred-
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION CERTIFICATE AND                                 ited institution and have achieved a mini-
ENDORSEMENT PROGRAMS                                                mum 2.75 GPA.
                                                             3.     Applicant must submit two letters of recom-
Graduate Certificate:                                               mendation related to the applicant’s compe-
Teaching English to Speakers of Other                               tence for this graduate program and profes-
Languages:                                                          sional work.
 1.    Possession of a baccalaureate degree with a
       2.75 or above overall GPA;



                                                                                  Monmouth University 17
Graduate Admission



4.      Applicant must submit an essay of 500           Graduate Endorsement in Early Childhood:
        words or more explaining why applicant          1.    The same as those listed above for the
        wishes to pursue a Teacher of Students with           Master of Science in Education. (If the appli-
        Disabilities endorsement.                             cant is not a certified teacher, the applicant
5.      Official undergraduate and graduate tran-             must be enrolled in a specialized alternate
        scripts.                                              route program.)

Graduate Endorsement:                                   Post-Master’s Endorsement: Director of School
Substance Awareness Coordinator:                        Counseling Services:
1.    Hold a standard instructional certificate, or a   1.    Possession of a baccalaureate degree with a
      school psychologist, school social worker,              minimum 2.75 overall GPA and a minimum 3.0
      school counselor, director of school counsel-           GPA in the undergraduate major.
      ing services, or school nurse endorsement,        2.    Possession of a master’s degree.
      or a valid Licensed Clinical Alcohol and Drug     3.    Two letters of recommendation related to the
      Counselor credential issued by the New                  applicant’s competence for this graduate
      Jersey Alcohol and Drug Counselor commit-               program and professional work.
      tee of the Marriage and Family Board, or a        4.    Essay (500 words or more) explaining why
      valid Certified Prevention Specialist creden-           the applicant wishes to pursue this graduate
      tial issued by the Addiction Professionals              program.
      Certification Board of New Jersey, or hold a
      master’s or higher degree from a regionally       Note: Must hold a New Jersey school counselor or
      accredited college or university.                 student personnel services certificate or an equiva-
2.    Applicant must submit two letters of recom-       lent out-of-state certificate. Upon completion, provide
      mendation related to the applicant’s compe-       documentation evidencing completion of three years
      tence for this graduate program and profes-       of successful experience as a school counselor in
      sional work.                                      grades P-12 to be eligible for the endorsement.
3.    Applicant must submit an essay of 500
      words or more explaining why applicant            Post-Master’s Certification: Endorsement:
      wishes to pursue a Substance Awareness            Supervisor:
      Coordinator (SAC) endorsement.                    1.     Possession of a master’s degree in
4.    Possession of a bachelor’s degree in a field             Education.
      leading to teacher licensure, health services,    2.     See the M.S.Ed. admission requirements
      psychology, or social work from an accred-               above.
      ited institution and have achieved a mini-
      mum 2.75 GPA.                                     Note: The state code requires that an applicant for
5.    Official undergraduate and graduate tran-         the Supervisor certification must hold a standard
      scripts.                                          New Jersey instructional or educational services cer-
                                                        tificate or its out-of-state equivalent, and complete
English as a Second Language (ESL)                      three years of successful, full-time teaching and/or
Endorsement:                                            educational services experience. Teaching and/or
1.     A bachelor’s degree (BA or BS) with a mini-      educational services experience completed in a New
       mum 2.75 GPA.                                    Jersey public school must have been under an
2.     A standard New Jersey Instructional              appropriate New Jersey certificate.
       Certificate.
                                                        Post-Master’s Certification Endorsement:
As an added part of an initial certificate program:     Learning Disabilities Teacher-Consultant:
1.     Admission into any of the Monmouth               1.     Applicant must possess a master’s degree.
       University Initial Teaching Certification        2.     Applicant must hold a standard New Jersey
       Programs (MAT).                                         or out-of-state instructional certificate.




18 Monmouth University
                                                                                   Graduate Admission



3.     Applicant must have three years of success-    2.     GRE scores may be waived pending a mini-
       ful teaching experience.                              mum of a “B” (3.0) earned in each of the first
4.     Applicant must submit two letters of recom-           four courses of the program. Satisfactory
       mendation related to the applicant’s compe-           GRE courses will be required to continue if a
       tence for this graduate program and profes-           “B” or better is not earned in each of the first
       sional work.                                          four courses.
5.     Applicant must submit an essay of 500          3.     A personal statement (one to two pages) out-
       words or more explaining why applicant                lining professional goals.
       wishes to pursue a Learning Disabilities       4.     Two letters of recommendation. One year of
       Teacher Consultant endorsement.                       clinical experience is necessary to begin the
6.     Applicant must have a minimum 2.75 GPA.               clinical specialty.
7.     Official undergraduate and graduate tran-      5.     A college-level course in health assessment.
       scripts.                                              (An appropriate continuing education course
                                                             may be substituted at the program director’s
Post-Master’s Certification Endorsement:                     discretion.) This requirement does not apply
Principal:                                                   to the Nursing Administration concentration.
Post-Master’s Certification Endorsement:              6.     A current New Jersey R.N. license, a year of
Reading Specialist:                                          experience as a registered nurse, and proof
1.     Possession of a master’s degree with a min-           of a current $1,000,000 to $3,000,000 liabil-
       imum 3.0 GPA in the graduate major.                   ity and malpractice policy.
2.     Two letters of recommendation.                 7.     Resume.
3.     Essay (500 words or more) explaining why
       the applicant wishes to pursue the Principal   RN TO MSN DIRECT
       or Reading Specialist Endorsement program.            Students without a baccalaureate degree will
4.     Official undergraduate and graduate tran-      be accepted as conditional graduate students in the
       scripts.                                       RN to MSN Direct Program. Graduate tuition and
                                                      fees apply.
Post-Master’s Certification Endorsement:
Counseling:                                           1.     Possession of an associate’s degree in nurs-
1.    Possession of a master’s degree in educa-              ing or diploma in nursing from an accredited
      tional counseling, counseling, student per-            program with a minimum of a 2.75 GPA.
      sonnel services, or social work with a mini-    2.     GRE scores may be waived pending a mini-
      mum 3.0 GPA in the graduate major.                     mum of a “B” (3.0) earned in each of the first
2.    Two letters of recommendation related to the           four Nursing (NU) graduate courses of the
      applicant’s competence for this graduate               graduate program. Satisfactory GRE scores
      program and professional work as a school              will be required to continue if a “B” or better
      counselor.                                             is not earned in each of the first four courses.
3.    Essay (500 words or more) explaining why        3.     A personal statement (one or two pages)
      the applicant wishes to pursue the post-mas-           outlining professional goals.
      ter’s endorsement program.                      4.     Two letters of recommendation
4.    Official undergraduate and graduate tran-       5.     One year of clinical experience is necessary
      scripts.                                               to begin the clinical specialty. Students pur-
                                                             suing the RN to MSN Direct degree full time
MASTER OF SCIENCE IN NURSING (M.S.N.)                        will need to have at least two years of clinical
                                                             experience upon starting the nursing spe-
1.     Possession of a B.S.N. from an accredited             cialty courses in the MSN Program.
       program, with a minimum 2.75 GPA. R.N.         6.     Possession of an RN license or is eligible to
       students with a baccalaureate degree other            take the NCLEX examination to enroll in
       than nursing may be admitted into the                 Individual Health Assessment. A current New
       “bridge” program.                                     Jersey RN license and proof of current



                                                                           Monmouth University 19
Graduate Admission



        $1,000,000 to $3,000,000 liability and mal-      5.      A college-level course in health assessment.
        practice policy.                                         (An appropriate continuing education course
7.      Resume                                                   may be substituted at the program director’s
8.      After acceptance, prior to starting classes, a           discretion for the nursing practitioner tracks.)
        student must submit to the School of Nursing             This requirement does not apply to the
        and Health Studies a certificate of good                 Nursing Administration concentration.
        health from a primary care practitioner          6.      Resume.
        including a complete health history and
        physical exam. Before beginning clinical lab-    TRANSFER APPLICANTS
        oratory experiences students are required to               Students in the M.B.A. Program must com-
        have a physical examination, with associ-        plete a minimum of 30 credits or 10 courses in the
        ated laboratory studies, immunizations, and      required and elective core of courses at Monmouth
        criminal background checks, in accordance        University. Courses requested for transfer will be
        with the special requirements of affiliation     accepted at the discretion of officially designated
        contracts with clinical agencies.                evaluators for the program in the School of Business
9.      Transcript indicating successful completion      Administration. Transferred courses must be from
        of English Composition I and II, Anatomy and     institutions accredited to offer graduate courses and
        Physiology I and II, Microbiology, Chemistry,    must carry a minimum grade of “B.”
        Introduction to Psychology, and Introduction               Students in the 60-credit M.S.W. Program
        to Sociology. A grade of “C” or better is        will be able to transfer a maximum of 12 credits of
        required in order for these courses to trans-    graduate work from another CSWE accredited
        fer to Monmouth University.                      M.S.W. graduate school, provided that (a) the
                                                         courses requested for transfer were completed with
Please note: Students who do not meet the criteria       grades of “B” or better, (b) the courses are offered
to matriculate into the MSN program may complete         only for graduate credit at the previous institution, (c)
the BSN by fulfilling the baccalaureate requirements.    the courses are judged appropriate by the M.S.W.
                                                         Program Director, (d) the courses were completed
GRADUATE CERTIFICATES IN SCHOOL NURSING,                 within the six years prior to admission into the
SCHOOL NURSING – NON-INSTRUCTIONAL, AND                  M.S.W. Program at Monmouth University, (e) the
FORENSIC NURSING                                         courses are foundational courses and do not include
                                                         field placement or any of the Social Work practice
1.      Possession of a baccalaureate degree with a      sequence courses, and (f) the credits were earned at
        minimum 2.75 GPA.                                a Council on Social Work Education (CSWE) accred-
2.      A current New Jersey R.N. license, a year of     ited graduate program.
        experience as a registered nurse, and proof                Students transferring into certificate pro-
        of a current $1,000,000 to $3,000,000 liabil-    grams are allowed to apply no more than 30 percent
        ity and malpractice policy.                      of the transfer credits into the program. All other
                                                         restrictions stated above will apply.
POST-MASTER’S CERTIFICATES                                         Students in other master’s degree programs
                                                         may, with the permission of the student’s program
1.      Possession of a master’s degree in nursing.      director and the school dean, transfer a maximum of
2.      A current New Jersey R.N. license, a year of     nine (9) credits of graduate work from another
        experience as a registered nurse, and proof      accredited graduate school, provided (a) the courses
        of a current $1,000,000 to $3,000,000 liabil-    requested for transfer were completed with grades of
        ity and malpractice policy.                      “B” or better and were not applied toward another
3.      A personal statement (one or two pages)          degree, (b) the courses are offered only for graduate
        outlining professional goals.                    credit at the previous institution, and (c) the courses
4.      Two letters of recommendation. One year of       are judged appropriate by the program director for
        clinical experience is necessary to begin the    the degree program in which the student is matricu-
        advanced specialization clinical courses.        lated at Monmouth University. The grades of trans-



20 Monmouth University
                                                                                         Graduate Admission



ferred courses are not used in the computation of the      ADULT APPLICANTS
grade point average.                                                Monmouth University endeavors to support
         Final transcripts from previous institutions      lifelong learning by providing services and pro-
attended should be received by Monmouth                    grams—degree and nondegree, credit and non-
University prior to beginning enrollment. Students         credit—that enable nontraditional students to meet
who do not provide official transcripts will not be per-   their varied educational needs and goals.
mitted to continue at Monmouth. Please see previous                 Program 65 affords opportunity for persons
course work for information regarding the use of           65 years of age or older to enroll for study at
transfer credits.                                          Monmouth University at reduced tuition. Admission
                                                           requirements include the designated nonrefundable
FORMER STUDENTS APPLYING FOR                               application fee and proof of age. Enrollment is on a
READMISSION                                                space-available basis. Those interested in learning
Readmission to the University                              more about Program 65 may contact the Office of
         Former Monmouth University students not           Undergraduate or Graduate Admission.
on a Leave of Absence who have not attended the
University for at least one semester must submit an        APPLICANTS WITH DISABILITIES
application for readmission. Applications are avail-                Monmouth University welcomes applications
able in the Office of Admission. If the applicant has      from persons with disabilities, complying with the
attended another institution in the interim, the appli-    requirements of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the
cant must have an official transcript forwarded to the     Americans with Disabilities Act. Students who wish to
Office of Admission Processing.                            utilize available accommodations and services pro-
                                                           vided by the University must submit current and ade-
Readmission to the University after Academic               quate documentation related to their disability to the
Dismissal                                                  Department of Disability Services for Students.
         Students who have been academically dis-                   You are not required to disclose a disability.
missed may apply for readmission. Review of the            If information is provided, it is not used in admission
application and the ensuing decision is made by the        decisions. Monmouth University can also be con-
Academic Standards and Review Committee.                   tacted by using the New Jersey Telecommunications
Previously dismissed students seeking readmission          TTY Relay Services Operator at 800 852-7899. All
must have been away from the University for one full       students must meet University academic admission
semester. Students who have been dismissed twice           requirements.
may apply for readmission after a minimum of three
years. Application must be made through the Office         INTERNATIONAL APPLICANTS
of Admission Processing.                                            International applicants must meet three
                                                           basic criteria before acceptance: demonstration of
Application for Academic Amnesty                           academic ability, English language proficiency, and
        (See Academic Amnesty.)                            sufficient financial support.
                                                                    Applicants for admission whose native lan-
VISITING STUDENTS                                          guage is not English must demonstrate English lan-
         Students from other institutions must provide     guage proficiency. Such proficiency may be demon-
a letter of permission from, and be in good academic       strated by submitting an official score report from one
standing at, the home institution. Applications are        of the following standardized tests and meeting the
available from the Office of Admission. Admission as       minimum score requirements. Students who have
a visiting student does not constitute admission as a      completed the equivalent of a baccalaureate or mas-
matriculated student. Eligible rising high school sen-     ter’s degree at an accredited institution in a native,
iors may enroll in college-level course work at            English-speaking country may be exempt from these
Monmouth University. Eligibility will be determined by     standardized testing requirements.
the Office of Undergraduate Admission based on a
review of the student’s academic credentials.



                                                                                 Monmouth University 21
Graduate A: Course
Appendix Admission Descriptions



• TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language)*                              International undergraduate freshman appli-
       Minimum score requirements:                                   cants from English-speaking countries must take the
       • Paper-based version               550                       SAT and meet regular standards for admission. To
       • Computer-based version            213                       learn from which countries the SAT is required,
       • Internet-based version                    79                please visit http://www.monmouth.edu/admission/
• IELTS (International English Language Testing                      international/toefl.asp.
  System)*
       Minimum score requirement           6                         International Transfer Applicants
• MELAB (Michigan English Language                                             Credentials submitted from foreign institutions
  Assessment Battery)*                                               will be evaluated by the Transcript Evaluator. Official
       Minimum score requirement           77                        transcripts (mark sheets, diplomas, degrees, and/or
• ESOL (Cambridge University English for                             certificates) of all secondary and post-secondary aca-
  Speakers of Other Languages)*                                      demic records and examination results are required.
       Minimum score requirements                                    Transcripts are considered official when they are sent
          - Certificate of Advanced English – An A,                  from a secondary institution, college, or university
            B, or C constitutes a passing grade.                     directly to the Office of Admission Processing and bear
          - Certificate of Proficiency in English – An               official seals and signatures. Transcripts bearing the
            A, B, or C constitutes a passing grade.                  statement “issued to student” or transcripts submitted
                                                                     by the applicant are not considered official. All aca-
* Note that exceptions to minimum score requirements for gradu-      demic records that are not in English must be accom-
  ate programs may be made upon recommendation of the grad-
  uate program director within the student’s major department and
                                                                     panied by certified English translations.
  with approval from the dean of the graduate school. Monmouth                 The records should list all courses the stu-
  also requires a student’s academic profile to meet regular stan-   dent has taken and grades received in each subject.
  dards for admission.                                               Course descriptions and/or syllabi and the number of
                                                                     weeks and hours spent in lectures and laboratory
         Monmouth University will also accept inter-                 work for each course are required of transfer appli-
national students who meet Monmouth’s regular                        cants if transfer credit is expected. Only credits from
standards for admission and who have successfully                    recognized accredited institutions will be considered
completed the ELS Language Services program at                       for direct transfer into any degree program. All course
the master’s level of English proficiency, which is                  work is subject to approval by the department chair
completion of Level 112, in lieu of the TOEFL or other               of the specific program chosen; not all courses may
English proficiency exam. Conditional acceptance                     transfer. A maximum of 72 credits will be allowed for
may be issued by Monmouth University to those stu-                   undergraduates transferring from a two-year accred-
dents who elect to prove English proficiency by                      ited institution; a maximum of 96 credits will be
enrolling in and completing ELS Level 112.                           allowed when transferring from a four-year accred-
         In order to obtain the nonimmigrant                         ited institution.
Certificate of Eligibility (Form I-20), all accepted inter-                    Course work done through national exami-
national applicants are required to provide financial                nation may be considered for credit by department
documentation, such as bank statements, attesting                    evaluation, credit by examination, waiver, or portfolio
that sufficient funds are available to support the                   if results meet specific department and/or University
period of study for the degree at Monmouth. To                       requirements and standards.
obtain a copy of the Application for Form I-20 and                             Students may, upon request, be required to
instructions, visit http://www.monmouth.edu /stu-                    have previous academic work validated, at the stu-
dent/grad/FormI20.pdf. This completed document is                    dent’s expense, through an outside credential evalu-
required before the Form I-20 can be issued.                         ation service.
         Undergraduate applicants who have                                     Failure to declare and/or present all academic
attended school outside of the United States must                    work, or presentation of academic records that are
submit official evidence of secondary school comple-                 found to be altered or of a questionable nature, may
tion and certified original copies of national examina-              result in nonacceptance of student or dismissal of stu-
tions results where applicable.                                      dent from the University. Generally, international stu-



22 Monmouth University
                                                                                         Graduate Admission



dents currently studying in the United States who wish      Office of Registration and Records or the Financial
to transfer to Monmouth University should follow the        Aid Office. Monmouth University is approved by the
regular transfer admission process. The English profi-      New Jersey Department of Military and Veterans’
ciency/SAT requirement can be waived for interna-           Affairs for veterans’ benefits.
tional students who have completed at least 24 trans-
ferable credits of which at least three are in English at   MILITARY APPLICANTS
the 100 level or higher. See details referenced in the                Monmouth University has been designated
International Applicants section for English proficiency    as an institutional member of Service Members
requirements. An international student transferring         Opportunity Colleges (SOC), a group of over 400 col-
from an institution within the United States must pro-      leges and universities providing voluntary postsec-
vide the following documentation:                           ondary education to members of the military through-
                                                            out the world. As a SOC member, Monmouth
           • Admission application                          University recognizes the unique nature of the mili-
           • Nonrefundable application fee                  tary lifestyle and has committed itself to easing the
           • Official transcript(s)                         transfer of relevant course credit, providing flexible
           • Official test scores (as applicable)           academic residency requirements, and crediting
           • Monmouth University’s F-1 Transfer             learning from appropriate military training and expe-
             form if currently enrolled at a U.S. insti-    riences. SOC has been developed jointly by educa-
             tution (http://www.monmouth.edu/               tional representatives of each of the Armed Services,
             Student/grad/Transfer.pdf) or                  the Office of the Secretary of Defense, and a con-
             Monmouth University’s Application for          sortium of thirteen leading, national higher education
             Form I-20 if no longer enrolled at the         associations; it is sponsored by the American
             U.S. institution (http://www.monmouth.         Association of State Colleges and Universities
             edu/Student/grad/FormI20.pdf)                  (AASCU) and the American Association of
                                                            Community and Junior Colleges (AACJC).
        In addition, the transfer applicant should
request the previous institution to transfer his or her     NON-DISCLOSURE
SEVIS record.                                                       Failure to submit complete records of all pre-
        International transfer applicants must also         vious academic experiences will result in a student
provide financial support documentation (see details        being denied admission, or, in the case of nondisclo-
referenced in the International Applicants section).        sure or misrepresentation, the rescinding of admis-
                                                            sion previously granted.
VETERANS AND WAR ORPHANS
       Complete information regarding benefits and
procedures for applying may be obtained from the




                                                                                  Monmouth University 23
24 Monmouth University
                                                                                                                                   Tuition and Fees
Tuition and Fees




                                                                                                                          Course Descriptions
FINANCIAL INFORMATION                                    TUITION
         Tuition and fees are subject to annual
increases at the discretion of the Board of Trustees.    • UNDERGRADUATE
Tuition and fees charges listed below are in effect      12 - 18 credits ......................$12,864.00 ($314.00*)
as of May 17, 2010. Monmouth University reserves         Each credit in excess of 18...............$745.00/credit
the right to alter any and all charges and to do so      9 - 11.5 credits.................$745.00/credit ($314.00*)
within the academic year.                                Less than 9 credits ..........$745.00/credit ($157.00*)
                                                         Auditor Program ................................$248.00/credit
Monmouth University (on campus)                          Summer Session...............................$630.00/credit
TUITION AND FEES PER SEMESTER
May 17, 2010                                             • GRADUATE
        It should be noted that more than 80% of         9 or more credits .............$816.00/credit ($314.00*)
Monmouth University students are eligible for            Less than 9 credits ..........$816.00/credit ($157.00*)
Financial Aid. Depending upon family financial cir-      Auditor Program ................................$273.00/credit
cumstances—regardless of income—actual costs             Summer Session...............................$824.00/credit
could be considerably less than published student
charges. Inquiries should be directed to the Office of   • SENIOR CITIZENS (Undergraduate and Graduate)
Financial Aid.                                           9 or more credits .............$214.00/credit ($314.00*)
                                                         Less than 9 credits ..........$214.00/credit ($157.00*)
TUITION AND FEES PER SEMESTER
       Effective May 17, 2010, for the Summer            * The Comprehensive Fee includes services provided by:
                                                           Student Center, Student Activities, Health Center,
2010, Fall 2010, and Spring 2011 Semesters**
                                                           Intercollegiate and Intramural Athletics, Placement,
                                                           Counseling, and Registration.




                                                                                    Monmouth University 25
Tuition and Fees



• RESIDENCE HALLS                                                            Spain (Summer)
Spruce/Willow/Cedar/Laurel/Beechwood                                         Double room charge....................................1,274.00
    Single Room .........................................3,596.00
    Double Room ........................................2,827.00             CONTRACT CANCELLATION FEE ...............500.00
    Triple Room...........................................2,117.00
Elmwood/Pinewood                                                             • BOARD
    Single Room, small...............................2.827.00                105 Meals plus points plan .........................2,030.00
    Single Room .........................................3,596.00            195 Meals plus points plan .........................2,141.00
    Double Room ........................................2,852.00             225 Meals plus points plan .........................2,209.00
    Triple Room...........................................2,117.00           Carte Blanche meal plan.............................2,283.00
Oakwood/Redwood
    Double Room ........................................3,535.00             OTHER FEES
    Triple Room ..........................................2,584.00           (All fees are non-refundable unless otherwise noted.)
Garden Apartment .......................................4,025.00             Application Fee.................................................50.00
Great Lawn/Maplewood                                                         International Application Fee............................50.00
    Double Room ........................................3,674.00             Fall Orientation Fee
    Triple Room ..........................................2,901.00              (full-time, new undergraduate) ...................200.00
Birch Triple...................................................2,117.00      Spring Orientation Fee
Mullaney Hall                                                                   (full-time, new undergraduate) .....................75.00
    Double...................................................2,900.00        Late Registration Fee.......................................50.00
    Triple .....................................................2,290.00     Late Payment Fee............................................50.00
Fountain Gardens                                                             Physical Education Fee (refundable) ...............30.00
    Double Room ........................................3,797.00             Lab/Studio Fee A (refundable) ......................100.00
    Quad Room ..........................................3,400.00             Lab/Studio Fee B (refundable) ........................80.00
                                                                             Lab/Studio Fee C (refundable)........................60.00
• Pier Village                                                               Lab/Studio Fee D (refundable)........................40.00
Annual Contract.........................................10,002.00            Lab/Studio Fee E (refundable) ........................20.00
                                                                             Study Abroad Fee ..........................................135.00
• Diplomat Apartments                                                        Returned Check Fee ........................................25.00
Double - Per Semester................................3,940.00                Cooperative Education Fee..............................45.00
Double - Annual Rate ..................................9,167.00              Study Abroad Administration Fee –
                                                                                Fall or Spring..............................................250.00
• Intersession Housing                                                       Student Teacher Early Field Experience Fee...60.00
Residence Halls .............................................165.00          Student Teaching Field Experience Fee .......300.00
Apartments .....................................................267.00
                                                                             PORTFOLIO ASSESSMENT FEES (per course)
• Study Abroad:                                                              Workshop .........................................................30.00
Florence – Italy (room charge)                                               Assessment per academic area.....................225.00
Double – Fall ...............................................3,120.00
Double - Summer ...........................................950.00            CREDIT BY EXAMINATION FEES
Single – Summer.........................................1,150.00             (for undergraduate students only)
                                                                             Application Fee per course ..............................15.00
Regent’s College – London (room and board)                                   Undergraduate per credit .........................1/3 cr. rate
Single ..........................................................6,057.00    Graduate per credit ..................................1/3 cr. rate
Double .........................................................4,917.00
Triple............................................................4,561.00   SUMMER SESSION FEES
                                                                             Workshop Fee per hour (refundable) ...............35.00
Macquarie University- Australia                                              Study Abroad Administration Fee - Summer..125.00
Single ..........................................................3,916.00




26 Monmouth University
                                                                                                        Tuition and Fees



SUMMER ROOM RATES                                                    Center, Student Activities, Health Center,
Residence Hall - per week .............................165.00        Intercollegiate and Intramural Athletics, Placement,
Garden Apartment - per week........................206.00            Counseling, and Registration.
Great Lawn Apartment - per week .................206.00                       Application Fee: This non-refundable fee is
Diplomat Apartment – per week.....................223.00             for the cost of processing undergraduate and gradu-
                                                                     ate applications.
PARKING FEES                                                                  Acceptance Deposit: This deposit must be
Resident (per year)* .......................................350.00   paid by all new full-time undergraduate students (12
Resident (spring only) ....................................175.00    or more credits) prior to registration. Acceptance
Late Registration (per year) .............................50.00      deposits paid by transfer students are not refund-
                                                                     able. Acceptance deposits paid by freshmen for the
* Resident students who do not remain in on-campus housing in        fall semester are refundable until May 1.
  the spring may file a waiver requesting credit of 1/2 the annual            Orientation Fee: This fee is charged to new
  parking fee.
                                                                     students to cover the expenses of the orientation
                                                                     program.
Explanation of Tuition, Fees, and Deposits                                    Late Registration Fee: A fee is charged to
          Tuition Charges: Undergraduate students                    all continuing or former students who receive per-
are billed according to their status as matriculated full-           mission to register for course work after the close of
time or part-time students. Full-time undergraduate                  the regular registration period.
students will be billed, upon registering for a given                         Late Payment Fee: A fee is charged to all stu-
semester, for tuition at the full-time rate; those who               dents who have not properly made final financial
register for more than 18 credits will have an additional            arrangements with the Bursar by the payment due date.
charge for each credit over 18, billed at the part-time                       Parking Fee: This fee is charged to all resi-
rate. Part-time students are billed at the per-credit                dent students who register a motor vehicle with the
rate. Undergraduate students wishing to change sta-                  campus police. Failure to register vehicles will result
tus must process a Request to Change Enrollment                      in parking fines.
Status form with the Office of the Bursar. In addition,                       Return Check Fee: A fee is charged for
part-time, non-matriculated students must receive                    each uncollectible check issued to the University.
approval of the Office of Undergraduate Admission                             Residence Hall Room Reservation
before a change to full-time status can be processed.                Deposit: Students who wish to reserve space in the
          Under this policy, undergraduate students                  residence halls are required to forward a $150 room
whose status is full time will be billed at the full-time            reservation deposit and signed contract prior to
rate, regardless of the number of credits for which                  registration. The $150 is applied as a credit toward
they are registered, until a Request to Change                       room rent.
Enrollment Status form is processed. If a full-time stu-                      Residence Hall Contract Cancellation
dent fails to register for a full-time load by the end of            Fee: This fee is charged to students who have con-
the registration period, the University will adjust the              tracted to reserve space in the residence hall and fail
billing and change the student’s status accordingly.                 to cancel that contract prior to June 1st. This fee is in
An undergraduate student whose status is part-time                   addition to forfeiture of the room reservation deposit.
will be billed at the part-time per-credit rate, unless                       Physical Education Fee: This fee is for the
registered for 12 or more credits (then the student will             use of equipment required in the physical education
be billed at the full-time rate). Summer tuition will be             program.
billed at the per-credit rate regardless of status.                           Laboratory and Studio Fee: This fee is
          Financial Aid awards will be based on the                  charged in addition to the tuition for each laboratory
student’s status, and students should be aware that                  or studio course. It covers costs of additional class
change in status may affect Financial Aid eligibility.               hours and special materials.
          Graduate students are assessed tuition on a                         Credit by Examination Fee: (for undergrad-
per-credit basis.                                                    uate students only) This fee is for the administrative
          Comprehensive Fee: The Comprehensive                       and personnel costs for the Credit by Examination
Fee includes services provided by the Student                        program.



                                                                                            Monmouth University 27
Tuition and Fees



         Portfolio Assessment Fee: This fee is for            Tuition Payment Plan
the administrative and personnel costs for the                        To accommodate parents and students who
Portfolio Assessment program.                                 prefer to pay for educational expenses in monthly
         Study Abroad Fee: This fee is charged to             installments, the following plan is available as of April
Monmouth University students who have been                    1 for the upcoming school year. The University
granted permission to enroll in a Study Abroad pro-           reserves the right to alter the programs accepted
gram sponsored by another college or university.              from time to time.
         Student Teacher Early Field Experience                       The following organization is not affiliated
Fee: This fee is charged to education majors to off-          with Monmouth University, and any questions regard-
set the expense of the early field experience.                ing the tuition plans should be directed to the
         Student Teaching Field Experience Fee:               address below:
This fee is charged to education majors to offset the                 Tuition Management Systems
expense of student teaching.                                          P.O. Box 842722
                                                                      Boston, MA 02284-2722
Terms of Payment                                                      Phone: (800) 356-8329
          Payment of fall semester charges are due in                 Web site: www.afford.com
August, and spring semester charges are due in
December. Specific dates are set annually and can be          REFUND POLICY
viewed on the Bursar Web page under “Payment                  • Summer Sessions
Deadlines.” Cash and Debit Card: accepted in per-                    Refunds, upon withdrawal from summer
son at the Office of the Cashier located on the first         sessions, will be made according to the policy stated
floor of the Wilson Hall Annex. Call 732-571-7540.            below:
Check or Money Order: accepted in person, as                         • Students who withdraw from a four-
above, or mailed in the envelope that is enclosed with                 week or six-week summer session
your bill. The student’s ID number must be written on                  within the first week of the session will
all checks and money orders. Credit Cards: Visa,                       receive 100% refunds. Withdrawals after
MasterCard, Discover, and American Express are                         the first week are not eligible for refunds.
accepted. You may fill out the form included with your               • Students who withdraw from a nine-
bill and return it in the envelope, also provided. This                week or twelve-week summer session
form of payment is also accepted both in person and                    within the first week of the session will
over the phone. The person to whom the credit card                     receive 100% refunds. Fifty-percent
is issued must call. Online: by electronic check or                    refunds will be given if courses are with-
credit card by either logging into your WEBstudent                     drawn in the second week. Withdrawals
account and selecting “Account Summary” (if you                        after the second week are not eligible for
have a balance due, a button will appear at the bot-                   refunds.
tom of the screen to allow you to make an online pay-
ment), or accessing our Electronic Payment Gateway.           REFUND POLICY FOR COMPLETE WITHDRAWALS
Be prepared to fill in the student’s ID #, first name, last   • Fall and Spring Semesters
name, and then follow the remaining steps.                             Tuition and fees, including room and board
          A student who becomes delinquent in pay-            fees, will be refunded upon complete withdrawal from
ments due during the year may be barred from                  all semester courses according to the policy stated
classes. Financial clearance must be met for a stu-           below:
dent to graduate or receive transcripts, either official               Students who withdraw completely from the
or unofficial (student copy).                                 University after the opening of classes will receive
          If payment is not made as required, the stu-        100% refunds (less a $500 cancellation fee as
dent may not be allowed to register for future semes-         detailed in the Housing Contract) through the end of
ters/terms until the outstanding balance is satisfied.        the first week of the semester. Students who with-
In addition, all collection costs and fees, including,        draw completely after the first week of the semester
but not limited to, attorneys’ fees incurred by the           will receive pro-rata refunds (less a $500 cancellation
University, will be paid by the student.



28 Monmouth University
                                                                                              Tuition and Fees



fee as detailed in the Housing Contract) calculated        the amount available to be refunded. There will be no
on the basis of days enrolled through the sixtieth per-    refunding of moneys paid for health insurance,
cent point in the semester. Example: For a semester        books, supplies, damages, fines, or other fees not
consisting of 75 days, the sixtieth percent point would    mentioned above. Any amount available for refund
be the forty-fifth day. Note that weekends are not         will be returned to its sources. Federal Title IV aid,
included toward days counted. Please refer to the          State aid, and University aid will receive refunds prior
Course       Schedule        Information    online    at   to any refund being paid to the student.
http://www.monmouth.edu/academics/registrar/cours
e_schedule_booklet.asp for semester start and end          REFUND POLICY—COMPLETE WITHDRAWAL
dates. Withdrawals after the sixtieth percent point in     IMPORTANT NOTICE FOR STUDENTS WITH
the semester are not eligible for refunds.                 FEDERAL STUDENT FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE
         All refunds will be based on the official date              Under new regulations that implement the
of withdrawal, which is the date the completed with-       Higher Education Amendments of 1998, students
drawal form or an e-mail message (e-mail must be           who completely withdraw from the University are
from the student’s University hawkmail account and         responsible for repaying the unearned portion of
sent to registrar@monmouth.edu) is received by the         loans and grants received in excess of charges to
Office of Registration and Records (ORR). The              their student account directly to the Federal
University encourages students to make notification        Government. Failure to return unearned grant funds
of withdrawal in writing; however, verbal communica-       to the U.S. Department of Education may result in
tion in the form of a phone call to the ORR will be        the student becoming ineligible for financial aid in
accepted within the following guidelines:                  future academic years. Students who have been
         • The call must be made during business           advised that they have unearned grant funds should
            hours (Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to        contact the Office of Financial Aid, 732- 571-3463, for
            5 p.m.)                                        information regarding making repayment arrange-
         • The call must be communicated by the            ments with the U.S. Department of Education. Loans
            student (not a parent or designate)            are to be repaid by the student in accordance with
            directly to ORR personnel. Voice mes-          terms of their promissory note.
            sages will not be accepted.                              If the amount of aid credited to a student’s
         • The student must provide name, last four        account at the time of withdrawal is less than the
            digits of his or her social security number    amount of aid earned based on the proportion of the
            and his or her unique Monmouth student         semester that the student was enrolled, a post- with-
            ID number.                                     drawal disbursement of aid can be made. If there are
         • Telephone withdrawals will be confirmed         outstanding charges on the student’s account, the
            by the ORR.                                    University will make the post-withdrawal disburse-
         • The student is responsible for ensuring         ment to the student’s account. If there are no out-
            that the withdrawal is communicated to         standing charges on the student’s account, the
            the ORR.                                       University must notify the student regarding the avail-
         • International students cannot use e-mail        ability of the post-withdrawal disbursement. The stu-
            or telephone contact with the ORR.             dent must inform the University within 14 days of this
            International students must coordinate         notification as to whether the student wishes to
            registrations and withdrawals with the         receive the post-withdrawal disbursement. No post-
            Office of International Student Services.      withdrawal disbursement will be made unless the
                                                           University receives a response from the student
         Pro-rata percentages are applied against          within this timeframe.
tuition, comprehensive fee, lab fee, orientation fee,
and room and board fees (less a $500 cancellation          REFUND POLICY FOR PARTIAL WITHDRAWALS
fee for students who have contracted for housing).         • Fall and Spring Semesters
The resulting amount is then compared to any stu-                  All refunds will be based on the official date
dent payments that may have been made with the             of withdrawal, which is the date the completed with-
difference being the amount still due the University or



                                                                                  Monmouth University 29
Tuition and Fees



drawal form is received by the Office of Registration         the day following the first class meeting. Fifty-percent
and Records (ORR). E-mail or verbal communication             refunds will be given if the courses are withdrawn
will not be accepted for communicating partial with-          from during the second week. Withdrawals after the
drawals to ORR. Only the completed withdrawal form            second week are not eligible for refunds.
will be accepted.
         Full-time undergraduate students who are             HOUSING CONTRACT: REFUND SCHEDULE
registered for 12 to 18 credits in the semester are not                Students who change housing and/or board
entitled to any refund when withdrawing from one or           arrangements during the semester while continuing
more, but not all, courses after the first week of the        as students at Monmouth University are eligible only
semester. If the student drops below 12 credits prior to      for such refunds as (less a $500 cancellation fee as
the end of the first week of the semester, the student’s      detailed in the Housing Contract) as established by
status will be changed to part-time, and the student will     the Office of Residential Life. Further information on
be billed at the per- credit rate. Full-time undergradu-      this process is available from the Office of
ate students should note that enrolling for fewer than        Residential Life at 732-571-3465.
12 credits may affect eligibility for financial aid. Those
students who are registered for credits in excess of 18       APPEAL POLICY FOR REFUNDS
will be entitled to refunds for tuition paid for credits in           Appeals for exceptions to the Refund Policy
excess of 18 according to the partial withdrawal refund       should be made in writing to the Assistant to the Vice
schedule for part-time undergraduate students and             President for Student Financial Appeals within one
graduate students, which follows below.                       year of the beginning of the semester in question.
         Part-time undergraduate students and all             Information about this process is available from the
graduate students who withdraw from one or more               Office of the Vice President of Finance at 732- 571-
courses during the semester while remaining regis-            3427. Further information or explanation of the
tered for one or more courses are entitled to 100%            Refund Policy is available from the Office of the
refunds on the courses dropped if the courses are             Bursar or online at http://www.monmouth.edu/stu-
dropped during the first week of the semester or on           dent/bursar/refundappeal.asp.




30 Monmouth University
                                                                                                                               Financial Aid
Financial Aid

         Monmouth University believes that qualified      dents are encouraged to file as soon after January
students should not be denied an educational              1 as possible.
opportunity due to lack of financial resources, and                Financial data provided on the FAFSA will be
that financing a student’s education should be a          forwarded electronically to the University and will be




                                                                                                                      Course Descriptions
cooperative effort between the student and the insti-     the basis for the creation of the student’s financial aid
tution. To that end, the staff of the Financial Aid       package. The financial aid package will be communi-
Office is available to assist students in developing a    cated to the student via the Financial Aid Award Letter.
comprehensive educational financial plan. Students        The student is then expected to confirm acceptance of
are strongly encouraged to call or visit the Financial    the offer of financial aid by returning to the Financial
Aid Office to engage in this planning process; the        Aid Office a signed copy of the award letter; a copy is
office may be reached by phone at 732-571-3463 or         also provided for the student’s records.
via e-mail at finaid@monmouth.edu.                                 Generally, the initial offer of financial assis-
                                                          tance delineated in the award letter is non-nego-
APPLICATION PROCESS                                       tiable. The financial aid package may, however, be
         Monmouth University uses the Free                altered as a result of one or more of the following
Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) as its        conditions:
primary application for all federal and state financial            • Changes in the student’s housing status
aid programs; no supplementary applications are                    • Changes in the student’s enrollment
required. Students may apply online at                               (i.e., credit hours) status
www.fafsa.ed.gov.                                                  • Lack of satisfactory academic progress
         The FAFSA is completed using the stu-                     • Receipt of financial aid from an outside
dent’s and spouse’s (if applicable) federal income                   source
tax returns and should also include Monmouth                       • Discrepancies noted as a result of the
University’s Title IV School Code (002616).                          verification process
Completed FAFSAs may be submitted to the U.S.
Department of Education after January 1; the fed-                  (Note that the U.S. Department of
eral processor will not accept applications that have     Education randomly selects one in three applica-
been dated or postmarked prior to January 1.              tions for verification. The verification process entails
Students are encouraged to retain a copy of the           the comparison of actual financial data to that sup-
completed FAFSA for their records.                        plied on the FAFSA. Students selected for this
         Monmouth University does not have dead-          process will be notified by the Financial Aid Office
lines for applying for financial aid. However, stu-       and will be asked to supply copies of federal tax




                                                                                   Monmouth University 31
Financial Aid



returns and a completed verification worksheet; addi-     University to matriculate for a second master’s
tional documents may also be requested.)                  degree or certificate.
                                                                   Award amounts vary as a function of tuition and
FUNDING SOURCES                                           the number of credits for which a student enrolls.
        The student’s financial aid package may be        Scholarships are available during the fall, spring, and
comprised of a combination of grant, scholarship,         summer terms. All applicants for admission are auto-
and loan funding. Grants and scholarships are forms       matically evaluated for scholarship eligibility; the student
of assistance that do not have to be repaid, while        need not complete a separate scholarship application.
loans must be repaid with interest. The following         Scholarships are renewable throughout the duration of
paragraphs identify and describe the types of funding     the student’s enrollment, provided that the student
available at Monmouth University.                         maintains a minimum grade point average of 3.0.

GRANTS AND SCHOLARSHIPS                                   • Math/Science Educator Scholarship
• Graduate Fellowships                                              The University is committed to providing
         Monmouth University established the              support for graduate degree candidates who intend
Graduate Fellowship program to provide scholarship        to become teachers in math and science. Graduate
assistance to students who have demonstrated out-         students who hold a teaching certificate in any sub-
standing academic achievement in the completion of        ject area may take course work toward an additional
the baccalaureate degree. Partial-tuition scholar-        certification in math and/or science and qualify for a
ships are awarded to matriculated students by the         scholarship. Those who do not hold a teaching cer-
Office of Graduate Admission and are made on the          tificate, but who are interested in pursuing certifica-
basis of the student’s cumulative undergraduate           tion in math and/or science, are also eligible.
grade point average. Award amounts vary as a func-        However, in addition to the subject- area courses, the
tion of the student’s cumulative grade point average      student must also complete the Master of Arts in
and the number of registered credits each term.           Teaching (M.A.T.) program. Scholarships are avail-
International candidates’ undergraduate grade point       able during the fall, spring, and summer terms. All
averages are converted to the American grading sys-       applicants for admission are automatically evaluated
tem. All applicants for admission are automatically       for scholarship eligibility; the student need not com-
evaluated for scholarship eligibility; the student need   plete a separate scholarship application.
not complete a separate scholarship application.          Scholarships are renewable throughout the duration
Awards are not made in combination with the follow-       of the student’s enrollment, provided that the student
ing forms of assistance: tuition remission, Post-         maintains a minimum grade point average of 3.00.
Master’s Scholarships, and Math/Science Educator
Scholarships. However, the Graduate Fellowship            • Federal TEACH Grant
may be combined with the following, as long as it                 Through the College Cost Reduction and
does not exceed tuition and fees (fees do not include     Access Act of 2007, Congress created the Teacher
books): senior citizen tuition discount, graduate         Education Assistance for College and Higher
assistantships, and employer tuition reimbursement.       Education (TEACH) Grant program that provides
Scholarships are renewable throughout the duration        grants of up to $4,000 per year (including the sum-
of the student’s enrollment, provided that the student    mer term) to students who intend to teach in a public
maintains a minimum cumulative grade point aver-          or private elementary or secondary school that
age of 3.0. Graduate fellowships are available in the     serves students from low-income families. Students
summer term provided the student enrolls in at least      may receive a maximum of $8,000 in TEACH Grants
six credits throughout the summer.                        for graduate studies. In exchange for receiving a
                                                          TEACH Grant, you must agree to serve as a full-time
• Post-Master’s Scholarship                               teacher in a high-need field (e.g., bilingual education
        Partial-tuition scholarships are available to     and English language acquisition, foreign language,
students who have completed a master’s degree pro-        mathematics, reading specialist, science, special
gram at Monmouth University and who return to the         education, or other identified teacher shortage areas)
                                                          in a public or private elementary or secondary school



32 Monmouth University
                                                                                                  Financial Aid



that serves low-income students. As a recipient of a      • Graduate Endowed Scholarships
TEACH Grant, you must teach for at least four aca-                 The University offers a small number of
demic years within eight calendar years of complet-       sponsored and endowed scholarships to graduate
ing the program of study for which you received a         students, which have been made possible through
TEACH Grant. IMPORTANT: If you fail to complete           the generosity of friends of the University. All enrolled
this service obligation, all TEACH Grants that you        students receive consideration for these awards, and
received will be converted to a Federal Direct            there is no student-initiated application process. The
Unsubsidized Stafford Loan. You must then repay           Financial Aid Office, except where stipulated by the
this loan to the U.S. Department of Education. You        donor, will select the candidate that most closely
will be charged interest from the date the grant(s)       matches the donor-established criteria. (Note that
was disbursed. Note: TEACH Grant recipients will be       students in the M.S.N. program must complete the
given a 6-month grace period prior to entering repay-     FAFSA and a scholarship application available from
ment if a TEACH Grant is converted to a Direct            the School of Nursing. Scholarship recipients will be
Unsubsidized Loan.                                        selected by the faculty of the School of Nursing and
                                                          Health Studies.) Scholarship recipients will be noti-
Eligibility Requirements                                  fied via the financial aid award letter.
To receive a TEACH Grant you must meet the fol-
lowing criteria:                                          LOANS
          • Complete the Free Application for Federal     • Federal Direct Subsidized Stafford Loan
             Student Aid (FAFSA), although you do                   This is a federally funded loan program that
             not have to demonstrate financial need;      is available to any graduate student who has com-
          • Be a U.S. citizen or eligible non-citizen;    pleted the FAFSA, demonstrated financial need,
          • Be enrolled as a graduate student in a        enrolled for at least six credit hours in the term for
             postsecondary educational institution that   which the loan will be disbursed, is a United States
             has chosen to participate in the TEACH       citizen or permanent resident, and who is not in
             Grant Program;                               default on a prior student loan; credit worthiness is
          • Be enrolled in course work that is neces-     not a requirement for the Stafford Loan. A graduate
             sary to begin a career in teaching or plan   student may borrow up to $8,500 annually. The inter-
             to complete such course work. Such           est rate is fixed at 6.8% for loans disbursed between
             course work may include subject-area         July 1, 2010, and June 30, 2011. Interest does not
             courses (e.g., math courses for a student    accrue while the student is enrolled for at least six
             who intends to be a math teacher);           credit hours. Borrowers are charged, by the federal
          • Meet certain academic achievement             government, an up-front origination fee of 1.5% of
             requirements (generally, scoring above       the principal amount of the loan. The U.S.
             the 75th percentile on a college admis-      Department of Education’s Direct Loan program
             sions test or maintaining a cumulative       offers an up-front rebate of 1%. This rebate is main-
             grade point average of at least 3.25);       tained as long as the student makes the first 12 con-
          • Sign a TEACH Grant Agreement to Serve         secutive, on-time payments when the loan goes into
             and complete an entrance counseling          repayment. These fees are deducted proportionally
             session.                                     from each disbursement of the student’s loan. The
                                                          student will begin repayment of the loan six months
• Educational Opportunity Fund (EOF) Grant                after graduation or cessation of half-time enrollment.
        The EOF program, funded by the state of           Subsidized Stafford Loans are available during the
New Jersey, is designed to provide access to gradu-       regular academic year (i.e., fall and spring semes-
ate education for students who participated in the        ters) and may be available during the summer term.
EOF program at the undergraduate level. Funding is,                 Monmouth University is a Direct Lending
however, limited. Students who believe they might         institution, meaning that the University’s Financial Aid
qualify are encouraged to contact the University’s        Office will provide the student with a promissory note
EOF Office at 732-571-3462.                               for the Stafford Loan and will arrange to have the
                                                          funds electronically transferred to the student’s



                                                                                 Monmouth University 33
Financial Aid



account. The student need not seek a loan applica-           nation fee of 2.5% is deducted proportionally from each
tion from a private banking institution.                     disbursement of the loan. For loans disbursed after July
                                                             1, 2008, the interest rate is fixed at 7.9%. Unless the
• Federal Direct Unsubsidized Stafford Loan                  borrower requests an in-school deferment, the first pay-
         The Federal Direct Unsubsidized Stafford            ment is due 60 days after the loan is fully disbursed.
Loan is a low interest rate loan with eligibility require-   Repayment lasts between 10 and 25 years based on
ments, terms, and conditions similar to those of the         the total amount borrowed and the repayment option
Subsidized Stafford Loan. The primary difference is          chosen. A promissory note for the PLUS loan will be
that interest does accrue on the loan while the stu-         supplied by the Financial Aid Office. Graduate PLUS
dent is enrolled. For graduate students, the annual          Loans are available during the regular academic year
borrowing limit is $12,000 and cannot exceed the             (i.e., fall and spring semesters) and may be available
student’s budgeted cost of attendance in combina-            during the summer term.
tion with all other aid. The interest rate is fixed at
6.8%. Borrowers are charged, by the federal govern-          ALTERNATIVE LOANS
ment, an up-front origination fee of 1.5% of the prin-                Alternative financing sources are available
cipal amount of the loan. The U.S. Department of             from private banking concerns and are ideal for stu-
Education’s Direct Loan program offers an up-front           dents who either do not meet the eligibility criteria for
rebate of 1%. This rebate is maintained as long as           the Stafford Loan programs, or who have exceeded
the student makes the first 12 consecutive, on-time          the borrowing limits for those programs. As the loan
payments when the loan goes into repayment. These            terms and eligibility criteria vary widely, interested
fees are deducted proportionally from each disburse-         students are encouraged to contact the Financial Aid
ment of the student’s loan. A promissory note for the        Office at 732-571-3463 or visit the University’s Web
Unsubsidized Stafford Loan will be supplied by the           site at www.monmouth.edu/alternative for assistance
Financial Aid Office. Unsubsidized Stafford Loans            in selecting the loan that best suits their needs.
are available during the regular academic year (i.e.,
fall and spring semesters) and may be available dur-         EMPLOYMENT
ing the summer term.                                         • Graduate Assistantships
                                                                      This program provides on-campus employ-
• Federal Direct Parent Loan for Graduate                    ment in a variety of settings to eligible graduate stu-
  Students (PLUS)                                            dents. Assistantships are generally awarded to out-
         Graduate students are now eligible to borrow        standing graduate students who have completed at
under the PLUS Loan program. The terms and condi-            least the first semester of enrollment. Recipients may
tions applicable to the Parent PLUS loans also apply to      attend either part-time or full-time. The total amount
Graduate PLUS Loans; however, with the Graduate              of an assistantship combined with a fellowship (or
PLUS Loan, the student is the borrower, not the parent.      scholarship) will not exceed the cost of tuition and
These requirements include completion of the FAFSA           fees in any semester. Interested students may apply
and a determination that the applicant does not have an      for an assistantship using e-FORMS, which is acces-
adverse credit history. Applicants may borrow up to their    sible from the WEBstudent menu.
cost of attendance, less other financial aid. Students
must also have applied for the annual loan maximums
in the Federal Subsidized and Unsubsidized Stafford
                                                             SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC PROGRESS
                                                                      Federal regulations require institutions to
Loan programs before applying for a Graduate PLUS
                                                             establish minimum standards of satisfactory aca-
Loan. Students must be enrolled at least half time (six
                                                             demic progress for students receiving federal, state,
credit hours). Borrowers are charged, by the federal
                                                             and/or institutional financial aid. In the determination
government, an up-front origination fee of 4% of the
                                                             of satisfactory academic progress, all course work is
principal amount of the loan. The U.S. Department of
                                                             considered, whether or not the student received
Education’s Direct Loan program offers an up-front
                                                             financial aid at the time the work was completed.
rebate of 1.5%. This rebate is maintained as long as the
                                                                      Financial aid at Monmouth University is
student makes the first 12 consecutive payments on
                                                             awarded to students for the entire academic year or
time when the loan goes into repayment. The net origi-



34 Monmouth University
                                                                                                     Financial Aid



summer session. Academic progress for all aid recip-                  ents who have not completed their degree,
ients is reviewed at the conclusion of the spring                     certificate, or endorsement within the max-
semester. If a student has not met all of the requisite               imum number of credits will no longer be
standards, the student will be placed on financial aid                eligible for federal or state funds.
probation during the subsequent academic year; dur-
ing the probationary period the student will, however,     Appeals Process
remain eligible to receive federal, state, and/or insti-             When a student is deemed ineligible for
tutional funds. If, at the conclusion of the probation-    financial aid (e.g., failing to meet the standards of
ary year, the student has still not achieved the           progress at the conclusion of the probation semes-
required level of progress, the student will be            ter), the student will be provided with written notifica-
deemed ineligible to receive financial aid during the      tion of ineligibility. The student will have the opportu-
following year. If, at the conclusion of the probation-    nity to submit a written appeal for review. All such
ary year, the student has successfully met the stan-       appeals should be forwarded to the Director of
dards of progress, the student will return to “good        Financial Aid and will be reviewed by the Financial
standing” and will remain eligible for financial aid.      Aid Appeals Committee. Membership in the Financial
Students who are deemed ineligible will be offered         Aid Appeals Committee is as follows: the Director of
the opportunity to submit an appeal; refer to the          Financial Aid, the Dean of the Center for Student
Appeals section below for the appropriate procedure.       Success (or his/her designee), the Vice President for
         The standards for determining satisfactory        Student Services (or his/her designee), and the
academic progress at Monmouth University for fed-          Registrar (or his/her designee). The Committee will
eral and state funding are measured along three            review the appeal and may elect to return the student
dimensions: cumulative grade point average, number         to good standing, continue the student’s financial aid
of credits attempted and completed, and total number       probationary period, reduce the student’s financial
of credits completed. To remain in good standing, a        aid award, or uphold the determination of ineligibility
student must meet each of the three requirements:          (e.g., cancel the student’s financial aid). Students
                                                           submitting an appeal will be provided written notifica-
        • Cumulative Grade Point Average:                  tion of the Committee’s decision.
          Consistent with the general academic                       Circumstances which might merit an appeal
          requirements of the University, graduate         include, but are not limited to, the following: serious ill-
          students must maintain a minimum cumu-           ness or injury to the student or a member of the stu-
          lative grade point average of 3.00 to            dent’s immediate family, a death in the immediate
          remain eligible for institutional and/or fed-    family, or divorce. Generally, the Financial Aid
          eral funding.                                    Appeals Committee will consider appeals that involve
        • Credit Hours Completed: All students             circumstances beyond the student’s control which
          must successfully complete at least 67%          have had an impact upon the student’s academic per-
          of the credit hours for which they enroll.       formance. Students who have been deemed ineligible
          Note that repeated courses and course            in a prior semester, but who have since improved their
          work assigned a grade of “W” “WF”, “F”,          performance to the required level, are also encour-
          or “I” will not be counted as hours com-         aged to submit an appeal for the reinstatement of
          pleted toward graduation but will be count       their aid; the Financial Aid Appeals Committee will not
          as an attempted course.                          automatically reinstate a student’s aid.
        • Total Number of Credits Completed:
          Students must also meet the maximum              RETURN OF FINANCIAL AID WHEN A STUDENT
          time frame component of satisfactory aca-        WITHDRAWS
          demic progress. The maximum number of                     The federal government mandates that stu-
          credits a graduate student may attempt           dents who withdraw from all classes may only keep
          and receive funding for is 150% of the           the financial aid they have “earned” up to the time of
          published number of credits required to          withdrawal. Title IV funds that have been disbursed in
          complete the degree, certificate, or             excess of the earned amount must be returned by
          endorsement program. Financial aid recipi-



                                                                                   Monmouth University 35
Financial Aid



the University and/or the student to the federal gov-        3.      Federal Perkins Loan
ernment. Thus, the student could owe aid funds to            4.      Federal Direct Graduate PLUS Loan
the University, the government, or both.                     5.      Other Federal Loan or Grant Assistance
          A student is considered to have officially
withdrawn when (s)he notifies the University of his or                It is also possible that the student may have
her intent to withdraw from all classes. The date of         “earned” the aid, but it was not yet disbursed to the
the official notice is considered the last date of atten-    student’s account. Post-withdrawal disbursement
dance and will be the date used for calculating the          occurs when the student receives less federal student
amount of financial aid to be returned. A student who        aid than the amount earned (based on withdrawal
receives a combination of “F” and/or “W” grades at           date). The FAO will determine if the student is entitled
the end of a semester is considered unofficially with-       to a post-withdrawal disbursement and will then offer,
drawn. Instructors report the last recorded date of          in writing, a disbursement of the earned aid that was
attendance for the student. This will be the date used       not received. All post-withdrawal disbursement offers
for calculating the amount of financial aid to be            will be made within 30 days of the date Monmouth
returned to the federal government. Please refer to          determined that the student withdrew. The student
the section entitled Course Withdrawals within this          must respond within 14 days from the date that the
catalog for the withdrawal policies and procedures.          University sends the notification to be eligible to
          To determine the amount of aid the student         receive the post-withdrawal disbursement. If the stu-
has earned up to the time of withdrawal (either official     dent does not respond to the University’s notice, no
or unofficial), the Financial Aid Office (FAO) divides the   portion of the post-withdrawal disbursement that is
number of calendar days the student has attended             not credited to the student’s account may be dis-
classes by the total number of calendar days in the          bursed. The student may accept or decline some or
semester (minus any scheduled breaks of 5 days or            all of the post-withdrawal disbursement. Accepted
more). The resulting percentage is then multiplied by        post-withdrawal disbursements will be made from aid
the total federal funds that were disbursed for the          programs in the following order:
semester; institutional funds, state funds, and alterna-
tive loans will be prorated in the same manner. (Note        1.      Federal Subsidized Stafford Loan
that If the student remains enrolled and attends class       2.      Federal Unsubsidized Stafford Loan
beyond the 60% mark of the semester in which aid is          3.      Federal Direct Graduate PLUS Loan
received, all federal aid is considered earned and not
subject to a refund calculation.)                                       Students whose circumstances require
          This calculation determines the amount of aid      that they withdraw from all classes are strongly
earned by the student that he or she may keep (for           encouraged to contact the FAO and their aca-
example, if the student attended 25% of the term, the        demic advisor before doing so. At that time, the
student will have earned 25% of the aid disbursed).          consequences of withdrawing from all classes can be
The unearned amount (total aid disbursed minus the           explained and clearly illustrated. Financial aid coun-
earned amount) must be returned to the federal gov-          selors can provide refund examples and further
ernment by the University and/or the student. The            explain this policy to students.
FAO will notify and provide instructions to students                    Students who withdraw from the University
who are required to return funds to the government.          may also be entitled to a refund of a portion of their
          Funds that are returned to the federal govern-     tuition, fees, and room/board charges, dependent upon
ment are used to reimburse the individual federal pro-       the point in time at which the student withdraws. See
grams from which the student received the aid.               Refund Policy for detailed information on the
Financial aid returned (by the University and/or the stu-    University’s tuition, fee, and room/board refund policies.
dent or parent) must be allocated, in the following order,
up to the net amount disbursed from each source:

1.      Federal Unsubsidized Direct Loan
2.      Federal Subsidized Direct Loan




36 Monmouth University
Graduate Academic Programs,




                                                                                                                    Programs, Services, and Regulations
Support Services and Regulations




                                                                                                            Course Descriptions
The Graduate School                                     process. The Office of the Graduate School also
DEAN: Datta V. Naik, Ph.D.                              manages the graduate assistantship program.

         The Graduate School administers the gradu-     DEGREE PROGRAMS
ate programs through six academic schools: the Leon            Monmouth University offers a variety of
Hess Business School, the School of Education, the      courses and programs at the graduate level.
Wayne D. McMurray School of Humanities and Social
Sciences, the Marjorie K. Unterberg School of           WAYNE D. McMURRAY SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES
Nursing and Health Studies, the School of Science,      AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
and the School of Social Work. These programs are       DEAN: Stanton W. Green, Ph.D.
designed to meet the educational needs of post-bac-
calaureate students who wish to acquire advanced        Completion of the following programs leads to a
knowledge and skills in their chosen fields of study    Master of Arts (M.A.):
and to engage in research and other scholarly activi-          • Corporate and Public Communication
ties. Classes are offered year-round and are sched-            • Criminal Justice
uled predominantly in the evening. The exception is            • English with a Concentration in Creative
the M.S.W. program, which offers a full-time program              Writing
during the day and part-time in the evening.                   • English with a Concentration in
         The Graduate School oversees the devel-                  Literature
opment and evaluation of graduate programs, and                • English with a Concentration in New
the teaching and research activity of graduate fac-               Jersey Studies
ulty. The responsibilities of the Dean of the                  • English with a Concentration in Rhetoric
Graduate School include monitoring the graduate                   and Writing
admission process, coordinating the production of              • History
promotional materials for graduate programs, and               • Liberal Arts
overseeing program curricula, general academic                 • Psychological Counseling
standards, and the graduate student advising                   • Public Policy




                                                                             Monmouth University 37
Programs, Services, and Regulations



Completion of the following program leads to a                               • Graduate Certificate in Software
Master of Science (M.S.):                                                      Engineering
       • Mental Health Counseling
                                                                     LEON HESS BUSINESS SCHOOL
Completion of these certificate programs leads to the                INTERIM DEAN: Donald M. Moliver, Ph.D.
following:
        • Graduate Certificate in Criminal Justice                   Completion of the following programs leads to the
           Administration                                            Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.):
        • Graduate Certificate in Homeland Security                         • Business Administration
        • Graduate Certificate in Human Resources                           • Business Administration with a
           Communication Specialist                                            Concentration in Health Care Management
        • Graduate Certificate in Public Relations
           Specialist                                                Completion of these post-master’s certificate pro-
        • Graduate Certificate in Public Service                     grams leads to the following:
           Communication                                                     • Post-Master’s Certificate in Accounting
                                                                             • Post-Master’s Certificate in Health Care
Completion of this post-master’s certificate program                           Management
leads to the following:
        • Post-Master’s Certificate in Psychological                 SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
           Counseling*                                               DEAN: Lynn Romeo, Ed.D.

* Note: No new students will be admitted to this program effective   Completion of the following program leads to the
  July 1, 2010                                                       Master of Education (M.Ed.):
                                                                            • Master of Education
SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK
DEAN: Robin Mama, Ph.D.                                              Completion of the following program leads to the
                                                                     Master of Arts in Teaching (M.A.T.):
Completion of the following program leads to a                              • Master of Arts in Teaching
Master of Social Work (M.S.W.):
       • Social Work                                                 Completion of the following programs leads to the
                                                                     Master of Science in Education (M.S.Ed.):
Completion of this post-master’s certificate program                        • Principal
leads to the following:                                                     • Reading Specialist
        • Post-Master’s Certificate in Play Therapy                         • School Counseling
                                                                            • Special Education
SCHOOL OF SCIENCE
DEAN: Michael A. Palladino, Ph.D.                                    Completion of these certificate programs leads to the
                                                                     following:
Completion of the following programs leads to a                              • Graduate Certificate in Educational
Master of Science (M.S.):                                                       Technology
       • Computer Science                                                    • Graduate Certificate in Teaching English
       • Financial Mathematics                                                  to Speakers of Other Languages
       • Software Engineering                                                   (TESOL)

Completion of these certificate programs leads to the                Completion the following post-master’s certificate
following:                                                           programs leads to the following:
        • Graduate Certificate in Computer Science                          • Post-Master’s Certificate in Curriculum
           – Software Design and Development                                  Studies
        • Graduate Certificate in Software                                  • Post-Master’s Certificate in Education
           Development



38 Monmouth University
                                                                 Programs, Services, and Regulations



Completion of the subject endorsement program in                • Post-Master’s Certificate: Family Nurse
Chinese leads to the following:                                   Practitioner
       • Subject Endorsement in Chinese –                       • Post-Master’s Certificate: Nursing
          Certificate of Eligibility with Advanced                Administration
          Standing (CEAS)                                       • Post-Master’s Certificate: Nursing
                                                                  Education
Completion of these New Jersey Department of
Education endorsement programs leads to the fol-        ACADEMIC SUPPORT SERVICES
lowing:
        • Endorsement in Early Childhood                The Center for Student Success
        • Endorsement in English as a Second                     The Center for Student Success (CSS)
          Language                                      provides academic and career counseling for all stu-
        • Endorsement in Substance Awareness            dents. Academic advising for transfer and adult
          Coordinator                                   learners is coordinated in the CSS. The center
        • Endorsement in Teacher of Students with       administers the MEWS—Monmouth’s Early Warning
          Disabilities                                  System for freshmen and undeclared sophomores.
                                                        Advising for undeclared sophomores is designed to
Completion of these New Jersey Department of            help with exploration of different majors while taking
Education post-master’s endorsement programs            courses that satisfy degree requirements. Students
leads to the following:                                 are required to declare a major no later than the end
        • Post-Master’s Endorsement – Counseling        of sophomore year. Additionally, throughout the year,
        • Post-Master’s Endorsement – Director of       the CSS offers numerous workshops related to aca-
           School Counseling Services                   demic, personal, and career topics.
        • • Post-Master’s Endorsement – Learning                 Many services and resources are available
           Disabilities Teacher-Consultant              in the CSS to assist students with career exploration,
        • Post-Master’s Endorsement – Principal         career planning, part-time employment, cooperative
        • Post-Master’s Endorsement – Reading           education, internships, service learning opportuni-
           Specialist                                   ties, experiential education, and job placement.
        • Post-Master’s Endorsement – Supervisor        Students are provided assistance in exploring their
                                                        career values, interests, and skills.
SCHOOL OF NURSING AND HEALTH STUDIES                             During their senior year, students have the
DEAN: Janet Mahoney, Ph.D.                              opportunity to attend career fairs and meet with many
                                                        prospective employers who visit the University at the
Completion of the following program leads to the        invitation of Career Services. In preparation, stu-
Master of Science in Nursing (M.S.N.):                  dents are given professional assistance in writing
       • Nursing                                        effective resumes and in acquiring interviewing skills
                                                        to make the fullest possible use of these opportuni-
Completion of these certificate programs leads to the   ties. In order to maintain close ties between the
following:                                              University and its students after graduation,
        • Graduate Certificate in Forensic Nursing      Monmouth continues to offer these services to
        • Graduate Certificate in School Nursing        alumni. Job opportunities are also sent to students
        • Graduate Certificate in School Nursing –      frequently via University e-mail.
           Non-Instructional                                     The Service Learning and Community
                                                        Programs Office provides students with information
Completion of these post-master’s certificate pro-      about volunteer opportunities in non-profit agencies,
grams leads to the following:                           schools, and governmental organizations. Through
        • Post-Master’s Certificate: Adult Nurse        Experiential Education and volunteering, students can
          Practitioner                                  explore their personal, career, and intellectual potential
        • Post-Master’s Certificate: Adult              while increasing their knowledge of community needs.
          Psychiatric and Mental Health Practitioner



                                                                               Monmouth University 39
Programs, Services, and Regulations



         The CSS provides administrative support for      please contact the Tutoring Center at 732-263-5721
the Experiential Education requirement. Please            or visit the Tutoring Center Web site at
refer to the Experiential Education Requirements          http://www.monmouth.edu/academics/CSS/tutor-
section of this catalog for a complete description of     ing_center/default.asp.
the requirement and the related Web site. One way
to satisfy Experiential Education is through participa-   Disability Services
tion in the Cooperative Education Program.                          Accommodations and support services are
Through Co-op, students are given the opportunity to      available to students with learning, psychological/
integrate their academic study with relevant paid         psychiatric, mental/health, and physical disabilities.
work experience.                                          Students with documented disabilities may request
                                                          reasonable accommodations, and/or auxiliary aids
Academic Skills Services                                  that will enable them to participate in programs and
          Academic Skills Services, including the Math    activities at Monmouth University. The Department of
Learning Center, the Writing Center, and the Tutoring     Disability Services for Students works with students
Center, provide personalized academic assistance.         who choose to register with that office in order to
Students may be referred by professors, may be            seek accommodations and services.
required to attend as a result of placement testing, or             A variety of accommodations and services
may come voluntarily.                                     are available to Monmouth University students with
          The Math Learning Center, located in            disabilities. These include, but are not limited to,
Howard Hall, provides students with assistance in all     assistance with advocacy on campus, self-disclosure
levels of mathematics. Peer tutors are available to       to professors, learning strategy training, time man-
help students solve problems and to review con-           agement assistance, academic planning and moni-
cepts. In addition, students may use the Center to do     toring, preferential registration for continuing stu-
homework assignments or to study for tests while          dents, an adaptive test center to assist faculty with
having a student tutor available.                         exam administration and students with test-taking
          The Writing Center, located in the Rebecca      needs, and assistive technology for students who
Stafford Student Center, provides writing assistance      require this accommodation.
for all undergraduate and graduate-level students.                  In order to be eligible for accommodations
Writers may seek assistance during any stage of           and services, adequate and updated documentation
their writing process, from the initial drafting of the   of a student’s disability must be submitted to the
assignment through the final stages of editing and        Department of Disability Services for Students.
proofreading. Additionally, Writing Assistants are able   Documentation must include a specific diagnosis of a
to assist with resumes, cover letters, personal state-    disability and support the particular academic
ments, the discipline of literature, and the specific     accommodations being requested. Students should
challenges faced by English Language Learners.            contact the department for particular documentation
          Writing Assistants, peer and professional,      requirements.
are available Monday through Friday. Appointments
may be scheduled with them electronically through         Monmouth University Library
TutorTrac: https://tutortrac.monmouth.edu, by phone                The mission of the Monmouth University
(732) 571-7542, or by visiting the Writing Center.        Library is to serve the faculty and students of the
          The Writing Center Web site also offers         University by providing, as far as practicable, all
online resources for students. Visit http://www.mon-      library materials needed to support the curriculum
mouth.edu/writing_center/resources.asp for assis-         and research needs of all students, faculty, and other
tance with grammar and punctuation skills, research       users. The Monmouth University Library is the center
strategies, documentation styles, and discipline-spe-     of learning and research at Monmouth University and
cific writing guidelines.                                 has a core collection reflecting cultural achievement
          The Tutoring Center, located in the             throughout the ages, which provides a well-rounded
Rebecca Stafford Student Center, provides assis-          perspective of contemporary civilization. In addition
tance by both student peer tutors and faculty master      to the 303,000 print and electronic volumes, the col-
tutors in most academic areas. For more information,



40 Monmouth University
                                                                     Programs, Services, and Regulations



lection includes subscriptions to approximately             University Library catalog and digital databases are
39,300 periodicals, both print and electronic, with         available online, as are many instructional materials
extensive back files on microfilm and in bound vol-         used in individual courses.
umes. The Library is also a selective depository for                 The University has a fully networked campus
publications of the United States government and            that includes all computer labs, all campus resi-
houses a special collection of material pertaining to       dences, laptop ports, and wireless hotspots. There
New Jersey. In addition, the personal book collection       are over 900 computer desktops available to stu-
of Lewis Mumford (1895–1990), a prominent                   dents in various lab configurations. These include
American architectural critic and urban planner, is         Windows, Macintosh, and Unix/Linux platforms that
available by appointment for scholarly research.            are all connected to a variety of servers and the
         Public networked computers in the                  World Wide Web. A full complement of software is
Monmouth University Library provide full Internet           available throughout campus in the computer labs,
access. The Library was the first department on cam-        including word processing, spreadsheet, database,
pus to have its own Web page, which is also the             presentation, World Wide Web authoring, and pro-
University’s gateway to:                                    gramming tools. Course-specific software is also dis-
         • Monmouth University online catalog;              tributed in departmental computing labs, including
         • Web-based databases of scholarly jour-           statistical packages, art creation programs, desktop
           nal articles and book titles;                    publishing, and interactive learning software.
         • full-text databases from newspapers and                   For the encouragement of open communica-
           general periodicals;                             tion, every student is given an e-mail account and
         • e-mail delivery of interlibrary loan articles;   space on the server to store course-related files and
         • government and legislation information;          Web pages.
         • business information and full-text images                 The Center for Instructional Technology
           of articles on the Web.                          (ITS) group, located in the lower level of the Library,
         The renovation of the University Library has       provides faculty with professional development
been completed with an addition of 19,575 square            opportunities, web-based resources and tools,
feet of new space. Three group study rooms have             instructional design services, training, and support.
been added to the library with connection facilities to     The group collaborates with faculty and students in
the Internet, plus the number of computers has been         the design of effective learning environments that
increased in the building for the benefit of all library    seamlessly integrate existing and emerging tech-
patrons. The world of higher learning, including mil-       nologies to enhance teaching and promote learning.
lions of resources from all over the globe, is now          In addition, the Multimedia Center, a branch of
available online to all users from the library,             Network Computing Services, is located in the
University offices, student dorms, and homes,               Plangere Center and provides support for classroom
twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week.                 instruction. The staff is able to assist students and
         The Monmouth University Library’s dedica-          faculty with the appropriate media for projects.
tion to service and continued awareness and imple-                   The Student Technology Assistant Program
mentation of emerging technologies allow it to con-         (STAP) provides students with the opportunity to
tinue as the central site on campus where students          learn about current technology, while earning money
acquire a vast amount of information in both print and      and boosting their resume. Each semester, approxi-
electronic form.                                            mately sixty (60) undergraduate and graduate stu-
                                                            dents from all majors join the program in one of sev-
Instructional Technology Resources                          eral different positions. STAP members can be
        Monmouth University fully supports the use          found working in the University’s open computer
of technology in teaching/learning. Many classes            labs, at the Student Help Desk, with multimedia
integrate technology into the course structure and          equipment, creating Web sites and troubleshooting
make use of a variety of technologies. These include:       problems with computer hardware and software.
computer presentation, video and audio, interactive         Members of STAP are dedicated to assisting the stu-
CD/DVDs, e-Campus learning management system,               dents of Monmouth University with many of their
and the World Wide Web. In addition, the Monmouth           technical needs. Many students begin working for



                                                                                  Monmouth University 41
Programs, Services, and Regulations



STAP during their freshman year and continue                ter for one credit, Continuation of Thesis/Project
throughout their undergraduate career at Monmouth           course (REG 500) in subsequent semesters until
University. For further information on the Student          completion of the project.
Technology Assistant Program, please contact Lynn                   NR: No Report. This temporary grade is
Stipick at 732-263-5108.                                    given by the Registrar when no grade has been
                                                            received from the instructor at the time that the grade
GRADUATE GRADES                                             reports are printed.
The graduate grading system is as follows:                          P: Pass. This grade is given for satisfactory
         A, A-            Excellent                         completion of a course that is graded on a Pass/Fail
         B+, B, B-        Average                           basis. This grade is not used in computing a stu-
         C+, C, C-        Poor                              dent’s cumulative grade point average (GPA).
         F: Failing. This grade is given for failure in a           X: Credit by exam, Portfolio Credit.
course; for withdrawal from a course after the dead-
line (see “W” grade); or for failure to remove an           Graduate Grade Point Averages
Incomplete by the end of the next regular semester.                   Grade points are awarded for each credit on
         AU: Audit. This grade is given to a student        the basis of grades as follows: A = 4.0; A- = 3.7; B+
who attends a class for the purpose of acquiring            = 3.3; B = 3.0; B- = 2.7; C+ = 2.3; C = 2.0; C- = 1.7;
knowledge, but not to earn credits. The auditor is          P = 0.00; F = 0.00. Thus, if a student completes a
expected to attend classes, do assigned reading,            three-credit course with a grade of A, 12 grade points
and participate in class discussions, but is not            are awarded. To calculate the grade point average
required to take examinations.                              (GPA) for a given semester, a student should divide
         W: Withdrawal. This grade is given for with-       the number of grade points awarded by the number
drawal from a course or courses up to five weeks            of credits attempted (excluding withdrawals). The
before the last day of classes in a regular semester        official GPA is rounded to two decimal places.
or its equivalent in a shorter term. See the academic                 To calculate the cumulative graduate GPA,
calendar for the last date to withdraw without penalty.     the total number of grade points awarded is divided
The official date of withdrawal is the date the com-        by the total number of graduate credits attempted in
pleted withdrawal form is received by the Office of         all sessions at Monmouth University. Calculation of a
Registration and Records.                                   major GPA includes all courses taken within the
         I: Incomplete. This grade is given in cases        major and courses cross-listed within a major. All
where permission has been granted by the instructor         graduate courses are included with the GPA calcula-
to postpone completion of specific required work,           tion, regardless of repeats.
such as a laboratory project or report or a missed
final examination. This grade is not intended for situ-     Grade Reports
ations where, in the judgment of the instructor, the                 A grade report is e-mailed to each student
student must retake the course for an entire semes-         approximately ten days after the end of each semes-
ter in order to earn a passing grade. The Incomplete        ter. Final grades are recorded on the student’s official
grade, therefore, should not be used in cases where         academic record. The Office of Registration and
a grade of “W” or “F” would be appropriate. The stu-        Records does not respond to individual requests for
dent must complete the work within the time granted         grades until after the grade reports have been gen-
by the professor and no later than the end of the next      erated. All students are provided with a WEBstudent
regular semester. If the unfinished work is not com-        account that enables them to view their grade reports
pleted within the specified time, an “F” grade will be      online. Undergraduate midterm grades are only pro-
recorded, unless the instructor indicates otherwise at      vided online.
the time the Incomplete was originally approved.
         S: Satisfactory Progress. This grade is            Student Complaints about Grades
given at the end of the first semester when satisfac-               A student who wishes to file a complaint
tory progress has been made in a graduate course,           about a course grade should attempt first to resolve
which may take more than one semester to com-               the matter through a discussion with the faculty
plete. Students who receive an S grade must regis-



42 Monmouth University
                                                                   Programs, Services, and Regulations



member who taught the course in question. If the fac-     ited from enrolling in graduate business courses
ulty member is unable to resolve the matter, the stu-     and/or graduate education courses pertaining to the
dent may contact the department chair in writing,         Master of Arts in Teaching.
stating the basis of the complaint. Such complaints
should be sent to the appropriate department chair        • Full-Time/Part-Time
within six weeks following the receipt of final grades.            Full-time graduate students, excluding MSW
A student who is not satisfied with the decision of the   students, carry at least nine credits in a regular
department chair may appeal the decision in writing       semester. Full-time MSW students carry 15 credits
to the dean of the school housing the course. The         per semester, which includes a field internship expe-
decision of the academic dean is final.                   rience. Regular full-time MSW students can com-
                                                          plete the MSW degree requirements in two calendar
Change of Grade Requests                                  years. Students admitted to the Advanced Standing
        In those rare cases where a faculty member        MSW program as full-time students can complete the
determines that a change of grade is warranted, the       MSW degree in one calendar year.
request must be submitted and approved by the                      Part-time graduate students, excluding MSW
department chair and school dean. All changes must        students, carry fewer than nine credits per semester.
include specific reasons that support the proposed        Part-time MSW students carry fewer than 15 credits
change. Changes beyond one year require the addi-         per semester. Regular part-time MSW students can
tional approval of the Academic Standards and             complete the MSW degree in four calendar years.
Review Committee. Students are not permitted to           Students admitted to the Advanced Standing MSW
complete or submit additional work after a                program as part-time students can complete the
term/semester concludes in an effort to improve a         MSW degree in two calendar years.
grade, unless the original grade was an Incomplete.
Changes to grades after a student has graduated will      Auditor Classification
not be considered.                                                  An auditor is a student who attends a class
                                                          for the purpose of attaining knowledge but not to earn
ACADEMIC DEFINITIONS                                      credits. The auditor is expected to attend classes, do
Graduate Student Classification                           assigned readings, and participate in class discus-
• Matriculated/Non-Matriculated                           sions but is not required to take examinations.
         All graduate students are classified as either             Students who wish to audit a class must
matriculated or non-matriculated.                         complete a “Permission to Audit a Class” e-FORM,
         I. Matriculated graduate students are:           which is available from the student’s WEBstudent
             a. Degree-seeking;                           account. This application must be received prior to
             b. Regular admits;                           the third class meeting. Auditor registration is sub-
             c. Conditional admits in a degree pro-       ject to course section availability. No more than two
                gram or certificate program of at least   (2) courses may be audited per semester. Students
                18 credits.                               may not change the status of their registration in a
         II. Non-matriculated graduate students are:      course to ‘audit’ or to ‘for credit’ during the term.
             a. Non-degree-seeking students;              Auditors may be removed from classes after regis-
             b. Certificate students not falling in       tering if seats are needed for matriculating students.
                Category I.                                         Part-time students who audit classes will be
         Non-matriculated graduate students must          charged at the audit rate regardless of their status
meet basic graduate admission requirements, pos-          (matriculated or non-matriculated); the audit rate is
sess a baccalaureate degree with a minimum under-         one-third of the regular per-credit tuition rate.
graduate GPA of 2.50, and may take up to two                        Full-time undergraduates whose total semes-
courses in a program.                                     ter credits (including those in audited classes) are in
         Attendance as a non-matriculated student         the 12–18 range will be billed at the full-time tuition
does not guarantee future admission as a matricu-         rate. If a full-time undergraduate audits a class whose
lated student. Non-matriculated students are prohib-      credits put the total credit load in excess of 18 credits,
                                                          the credits beyond 18 will be billed at the audit rate.



                                                                                 Monmouth University 43
Programs, Services, and Regulations



          The transcripts of auditors who, in the judg-        nent record or excluded from any transcript sent from
ment of faculty members, do not attend class or par-           Monmouth University.
ticipate sufficiently, will not reflect the audited courses.            Courses that receive no credit under the
                                                               grant of amnesty will not be applied later for fulfill-
CURRICULUM OF RECORD                                           ment of any degree or certificate requirement. The
         A student’s curriculum of record is the set of        University shall not use a grade point average
degree requirements associated with the student’s              adjusted by amnesty to determine the eligibility of a
particular major that is in effect at the time that major      student for any honors that may be awarded.
is declared. If major requirements are changed, stu-                    The Graduate Academic Standards and
dents may elect to update to the newer version of the          Review Committee of the Graduate School shall eval-
major requirements by sending written notification to          uate each application for academic amnesty based
both the major department and the Office of                    on recommendation by the director of the graduate
Registration and Records.                                      program. The Committee will inform the Registrar of
         The official curriculum of record is main-            its decision and of courses affected by the granting of
tained in the Office of Registration and Records.              amnesty. Students may submit an application for
Students are provided with a WEBstudent account                Academic Amnesty via e-FORMS, which are accessi-
which details all curriculum requirements under the            ble from the student’s WEBstudent account.
‘academic audit’ section.
                                                               Academic Honesty
ACADEMIC REGULATIONS                                                    Monmouth University encourages its stu-
Graduate Academic Amnesty                                      dents to grow intellectually as well as to become
         Academic amnesty provides former gradu-               responsible citizens in our complex society. In order
ate students of Monmouth University an opportunity             to develop their skills and talents, students are asked
to improve their program grade point average. A for-           to do research, perform experiments, write research
mer graduate student of Monmouth University must               papers, work individually, and cooperate in group
be away from the University for at least two (2) cal-          activities. Academic dishonesty subverts the
endar years to be eligible to apply for academic               University’s mission and undermines the student’s
amnesty. The student may apply for academic                    intellectual growth. Therefore, Monmouth University
amnesty with a stated plan approved by the graduate            will not tolerate violations of the code of academic
program director. If academic amnesty is granted,              honesty. The penalties for such violations include
the student will be readmitted under the current cat-          suspension or dismissal and are explained more fully
alog of record, and amnesty will be recorded upon              in the Student Handbook.
his/her re-enrollment. In addition, credit will be given                The University has an obligation as an edu-
for all Monmouth University courses with grades of             cational institution to be certain that each student’s
“B” or better and as many courses with grades of               work is his/her own. Dishonesty in such academic
“B-” as possible while maintaining a program grade             practices as assignments, examinations, or other
point average of 3.00 or better. Courses that are              academic work cannot be condoned. A student who
older than seven (7) years may not be used to satisfy          submits work that is not original violates the purpose
curriculum requirements unless specifically approved           of Monmouth University and may forfeit his/her right
by the appropriate academic program director.                  and opportunity to continue at the University.
         Students who receive veterans’ educational
benefits who are approved for academic amnesty                 Graduate Academic Standing
should be aware that they will not be entitled to VA                     Graduate students are required to maintain
benefits when repeating courses that satisfy require-          an average of 3.0 or better in all courses in the
ments that were satisfied prior to academic amnesty.           degree or certificate program in which they are
         Academic amnesty may be granted to a                  enrolled at Monmouth University.
graduate student only once. Under no circumstances                       Students who fail to maintain a 3.0 or better
will grades earned by a student at Monmouth                    average or who accumulate as many as three credits
University be expunged from the student’s perma-               of “B-”, “C+”, “C”, “C-”, or “F” grades will be subject to




44 Monmouth University
                                                                                 Programs, Services, and Regulations



review by the Academic Standards and Review                           2nd grade of “B-”, “C+”, “C”, or “C-” with a GPA of
Committee. Students who accumulate as many as                            3.00 & above . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Warning
nine credits of “C+”, “C”, “C-” grades or two “F”s will               2nd grade of “B-”, “C+”, “C”, or “C-” with a GPA
be subject to dismissal by the Academic Standards                        below 3.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Probation
and Review Committee. Under no circumstances will                     3rd grade of “B-”, “C+”, “C”, or “C-” with a GPA of
more than six credits of “C+”, “C”, and “C-” grades                      3.00 & above . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Probation
accumulate toward degree credit. Students will not                    3rd grade of “B-”, “C+”, “C”, or “C-” with a GPA
receive their degrees until the policies on the number                   below 3.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dismissal
of “C” grades and GPA are met. Students who have                      4th grade of “B-”, “C+”, “C”, or “C-” with
maintained an average of 3.0 or better and who have                      any GPA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dismissal
met the grade requirements as stated above are con-
sidered to be in good academic standing.                              Students with three credits of “F”
                                                                      1st grade of “F” . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Probation
Graduate Academic Dismissal                                           2nd grade below “B” . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dismissal
       A student shall become subject to academic
dismissal for any of the following conditions:                        Attendance
1.     For failing to earn in three continuous                                 Monmouth University believes that atten-
       semesters a cumulative grade point average                     dance is essential to success in academic courses.
       of at least 3.00;                                              Therefore, class attendance is required. The
2.     For accumulating nine credits of “C+”, “C”,                    University believes that learning is an interactive
       “C-”;                                                          process dependent in part on the student and is not
3.     For accumulating six credits of “F” or three                   just a matter of the passive absorption of information.
       credits of “F” and three credits of “B-”, “C+”,                The University also believes that to benefit fully from
       “C”, “C-”;                                                     their respective courses, students need to participate
4.     For excessive course withdrawals. (A stu-                      in, and contribute constructively to, the classroom
       dent is considered to have withdrawn exces-                    experience, and, secondly, that the success of any
       sively if credits for those courses in which                   course depends as much on what students contribute
       “W” grades have been received total more                       to the class as on what the instructor presents.
       than 25% of the total number of credits                                 Grades in courses are normally based on
       attempted at Monmouth University. This pol-                    academic performance (participation, contribution,
       icy affects all students after they have                       and examination). However, individual faculty mem-
       attempted at least 12 credits at Monmouth                      bers may adopt reasonable regulations that addition-
       University.)                                                   ally relate grades to class attendance. All professors
                                                                      must state their specific attendance policies in a writ-
       Students who have been academically dis-                       ten statement containing the pertinent course
missed have the right to appeal that decision in writ-                requirements and give it to the students during the
ing to the Academic Standards and Review                              first week of the semester. A student who, for any
Committee.                                                            reason, may not be present at a particular class or
                                                                      laboratory is, nevertheless, responsible for adhering
Graduate Warning/Probation/Dismissal Criteria                         to the attendance requirements of the course.
Students with GPA below 3.00                                                   Students are not permitted to attend classes
1st semester below 3.00 GPA . . . . . . . . . . Warning               for which they have not officially registered (as deter-
2nd semester below 3.00 GPA . . . . . . . . Probation                 mined by the Office of Registration and Records). If
3rd semester below 3.00 GPA . . . . . . . . . Dismissal               students attend without prior registration, they are
                                                                      subject to disciplinary actions, inclusive of suspen-
Students with three or more credits of “B-”, “C+”, “C”,               sion and/or dismissal, and will not be permitted to
or “C-”                                                               “retroactively” enroll.
1st grade of “B-”, “C+”, “C”, or “C-” with a GPA
   below 3.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Warning




                                                                                                  Monmouth University 45
Programs, Services, and Regulations



Course Withdrawals                                                 A student who has three final examinations
          Students are expected to complete the            scheduled on one day may request that one of the
courses for which they register. On occasion, how-         examinations be rescheduled; it is normally the mid-
ever, withdrawals are warranted. (See section enti-        dle one of the three that is rescheduled. Rescheduled
tled “GRADING” for a description of the “W” grade          examinations are to be given at a time agreed upon
and associated procedures.) Students who do not            by both the student and the faculty member on or
intend to complete any course for which they are offi-     before the last day of the examination period.
cially registered should execute an official withdrawal            It is the right of a student to review any
prior to the “W” deadline.                                 graded examination in the presence of the instructor.
          The official date of a withdrawal form is the    Final examination grades may represent no more
date it is received in the Office of Registration and      than one-third of the term grade.
Records. The student is responsible for completing
the e-FORMS request prior to the deadline date.            Graduation
          Students withdrawing from some courses                     All undergraduate students are required to
while remaining registered for one or more courses         complete a minimum of 128 credits. Some academic
are required to complete a “Withdraw from Course           programs require more credits; see the individual
Form”, available from e-FORMS. The official date of a      curriculum charts located in Appendix “B” of this
withdrawal form is the date the completed form is          Catalog for program details. Additionally, all under-
received in the Office of Registration and Records and     graduates must meet a minimum 2.00 overall grade
must be received prior to the Withdraw (“W”) deadline      point average (GPA), a minimum major GPA of 2.10
date as published in the Academic Calendar.                (except for Education majors who are held to a 2.75
          Students who are withdrawing from all            minimum GPA), and, if applicable, a minimum 2.10
their courses are encouraged to make notification of       minor GPA. Calculation of a major GPA includes all
withdrawal in writing; however, verbal or e-mail noti-     courses taken within the major and courses cross-
fication is acceptable under the guidelines set forth in   listed within a major.
“Refund Policy for Complete Withdrawals—Fall and                     To qualify for graduation, all graduate stu-
Spring Semester.”                                          dents must complete all program requirements with a
          Except under unusual circumstances, such         minimum GPA of 3.00.
as prolonged illness, a student will not be permitted                Diplomas are mailed to students approxi-
to withdraw from course work any later than five           mately three weeks after the actual date of graduation.
weeks prior to the last day of classes of the semes-                 In those rare instances when a student has not
ter or its equivalent in a shorter term. In these excep-   met all degree requirements, but for whom a change to
tional cases, students will be withdrawn from all          the academic record is received by the Office of
coursework in the term.                                    Registration and Records within one week following
          Students who do not complete courses and         the graduation, the student will be considered for the
who have not executed an official withdrawal prior to      earlier graduation. The effective date of the change
the deadline indicated will receive “F” grades for such    must be on or before the actual date of the graduation.
courses.                                                   Changes received later than one week beyond gradu-
          Students wishing to withdraw from classes        ation will not be considered for prior graduation, but will
after the specified withdrawal deadline must provide       be part of the next graduation cycle.
documentation of serious extenuating circum-                         Only students who have completed all grad-
stances; the documentation will be reviewed by the         uation requirements, including, but not limited to,
appropriate faculty members teaching the courses,          course work, credit requirements, GPA minimums,
the department chairs, the deans of the schools in         residency requirements, and the like, will be allowed
which the course(s) are housed, and the Registrar.         to participate in Commencement.

Final Examinations                                         Independent Study
        Final examinations shall be held during a                  Independent Study courses permit a student
time scheduled by the University. Class time shall not     to pursue a research project or guided readings in a
be devoted to final examinations.



46 Monmouth University
                                                                   Programs, Services, and Regulations



subject area not substantially covered in the curricu-    undergraduate/graduate plan (see Integrated
lum. Normally, no more than one Independent Study         Undergraduate/Graduate Degree Programs for more
course may be scheduled during a single academic          information). Students in a five-year undergradu-
term. A student must complete the independent study       ate/graduate plan who maintain an undergraduate
e-FORM, available from the WEBstudent menu. The           major GPA of 3.00 and an overall GPA of 2.75, and
student will not be registered for the course until all   are within 36 credits of graduation, can take the pre-
approvals have been received. Generally, students         scribed number of graduate credits not to exceed 18.
are expected to complete no more than 6 credits of        The number of graduate credits that will be applied
independent study. Any exceptions must be approved        toward both the undergraduate and graduate
by the dean of the school in which the student’s major    degrees is indicated in the five-year plan’s sequence
is housed. Failure to process the Independent             chart. Further details are available in the Office of
Study Application within the required timeframe           Registration and Records.
may impact financial aid status and may jeopard-
ize participation in Commencement.                        Submission of the Same Paper or Computer
                                                          Program for Two Courses
Student (Biographical) Data                                        The submission of the same (or essentially
         Any currently enrolled student whose biogra-     the same) paper or computer program for two sepa-
phical data (e.g., name, address, and Social Security     rate courses without the expressed permission of all
number) has changed must inform the Office of             faculty members involved is against University policy.
Registration and Records in writing. Requests for
name or Social Security number changes must be            Graduate: Time Limitation for Completion of
accompanied by legal documentation. Biographical          Requirements
information is not changed for previously enrolled                  The requirements of a particular master’s
students; alumni should contact the Office of Alumni      program must be satisfied within a period not
Affairs to report biographical changes.                   exceeding five calendar years and not including a
                                                          period of service in the Armed Forces. The graduate
Graduates: Taking Courses at Another Institution          catalog in effect at the time of admission, readmis-
         Students who are accepted for graduate           sion, or change of major (whichever is later) shall
work at Monmouth University are expected to com-          normally be the student’s official catalog of record.
plete all remaining course work at Monmouth               However, faculty and curriculum changes may
University. They may not take courses elsewhere for       require related changes in a student’s program. If
transfer credit without specific prior approval by the    after following a curriculum of record for five calendar
graduate program director, the dean of the graduate       years a student has not completed the requirements
school, and the Registrar. If permission is granted, in   of the curriculum, the student must update the cur-
order to accept the credits as transfer, the grade        riculum of record (including all requirements) to the
must be no less than a “B”.                               most recent one that exists. Requests for exceptions
                                                          to a curriculum update should be made to the
Graduate Courses for Undergraduates                       respective program director. The director’s recom-
         An undergraduate student at Monmouth             mendation is then forwarded to the academic school
University who has completed 92 credits and has an        dean and graduate school dean for final approval.
undergraduate major GPA of 3.25 and an overall            The acceptance of graduate courses taken at
GPA of 2.75 may apply for permission to the gradu-        Monmouth or elsewhere beyond five years is at the
ate program director to take up to nine (9) graduate      discretion of the program director and is made on a
credits while completing the work for an undergradu-      case-by-case basis.
ate degree. Permission to take such credits is at the
discretion of the respective program director. These      Graduate: Continuation of Matriculation
credits may count toward an undergraduate or grad-                A “continuation of matriculation” is required of
uate degree, but not toward both degrees, unless the      graduate students who do not complete their
student has been formally admitted into a five-year       practicum, portfolio, project, or thesis in the registered




                                                                                 Monmouth University 47
Programs, Services, and Regulations



term and will/have receive(d) an “S” grade. The contin-      required and elective core of courses at Monmouth
uation of matriculation is intended to keep the student      University. Courses requested for transfer will be
pursuing his or her practicum, portfolio, project, or the-   accepted at the discretion of officially designated
sis in compliance with University policy. Students in this   evaluators for the program in the Leon Hess
category must complete and submit an “Application for        Business School. Transferred courses must be from
Thesis Continuation” e-FORM which is available on            institutions accredited to offer graduate courses and
WEBstudent each semester until the practicum, portfo-        must carry a minimum grade of “B.”
lio, project, or thesis is complete and the final grade is             Students in the 60-credit M.S.W. Program will
submitted to the Office of Registration and Records.         be able to transfer a maximum of 12 credits of gradu-
The student will then be registered for “REG-500”, a         ate work from another Council on Social Work
one-credit course that permits the student use of            Education (CSWE)- accredited M.S.W. graduate
University facilities to complete this work.                 school, provided that (a) the courses requested for
                                                             transfer were completed with grades of “B” or better, (b)
Substitution of Requirements                                 the courses are offered only for graduate credit at the
          Students seeking course substitutions or any       previous institution, (c) the courses are judged appro-
deviations from the stated degree requirements of an         priate by the M.S.W. Program Director, (d) the courses
academic program should first consult with their aca-        were completed within the six years prior to admission
demic advisors. If the advisor recommends a substitu-        into the M.S.W. Program at Monmouth University, (e)
tion, the “Substitution of Undergraduate or Graduate         the courses are foundational courses and not to
Program Requirement” e-FORM should be submitted              include field placement or any of the Social Work prac-
to their respective department for review. The depart-       tice sequence courses, and (f) the credits were earned
ment will forward their decision to the Office of            at a CSWE-accredited graduate program.
Registration and Records for processing. Students will                 Students in other master’s degree programs
receive an e-mail to their student accounts after the        may, with the permission of the student’s program
substitution request has been completed. If the depart-      director and the school dean, transfer a maximum of
ment chair does not approve the substitution, the stu-       nine credits of graduate work from another accred-
dent may appeal that decision to the school dean. If         ited graduate school, provided (a) the courses
the school dean does not approve the substitution, the       requested for transfer were completed with grades of
student may appeal that decision to the Provost. The         “B” or better and were not applied toward another
Provost has final authority concerning the substitution.     degree, (b) the courses are offered only for graduate
          Students should avoid processing substitu-         credit at the previous institution, and (c) the courses
tion forms close to the time of graduation; instead,         are judged appropriate by the program director for
substitutions should be effected as warranted in aca-        the degree program in which the student is matricu-
demic planning sessions with academic advisors.              lated at Monmouth University. The grades of trans-
Deadlines to submit substitutions for graduating stu-        ferred courses are not used in the computation of the
dents are provided on the “Registration Information”         grade point average.
page of the Monmouth University Web site.                              Final transcripts from previous institutions
                                                             attended should be received by Monmouth
Graduate: Use of Other Credits towards                       University prior to beginning enrollment. Students
Certificates (Previous Coursework)                           who do not provide official transcripts will not be per-
         Students pursuing a certificate are allowed         mitted to continue at Monmouth.
to apply no more than 30% of other credits (i.e.,
transfer credits or waived classes or credit by exam)        ACADEMIC PROCEDURES
towards the certificate program.                             Application for Graduation
                                                                     An “Application for Graduation” e-FORM
Graduate: Use of Coursework towards Degree                   should be filed with the Office of Registration and
Programs                                                     Records no later than the deadline date, as outlined on
        Students in the M.B.A. Program must com-             the “Registration Information” page of the Monmouth
plete a minimum of 30 credits or 10 courses in the           University Web site. It is the student’s responsibility to
                                                             see that all requirements for graduation are met. After



48 Monmouth University
                                                                      Programs, Services, and Regulations



applying for graduation, the student will receive an offi-   dent will follow all curricular requirements in effect at
cial degree audit from the Office of Registration and        the time of admission as a regular student.
Records. Official audits are updated during the last                  Courses taken in the non-matriculated status
semester. Students can review their academic audits at       will be considered for applicability toward degree
any time by using their WEBstudent account.                  requirements in the same way that courses taken in
                                                             the    matriculated        status    are   considered.
Participation in Commencement                                Undergraduate students wishing to change from
         Only students who have completed all                non-matriculated to regular status should contact the
degree requirements are permitted to participate in          Office of Undergraduate Admission.
Commencement exercises. All application deadlines                     A graduate student accepted to Monmouth
for graduation, substitutions of program require-            University as a non-matriculated (non-degree seek-
ments, grade changes, waivers, transfer credits, and         ing) student may request to matriculate (seek a
the like are outlined on the “Registration Information”      degree) by applying for admission as a matriculated
page of the Monmouth University Web site. Failure to         student in a particular graduate program. See
meet any of the deadlines may impact inclusion in            Graduate Admission for details.
Commencement–related activities.
                                                             Course Changes (Add/Drop)
Graduate: Change of Degree or Certificate                             Students can add or drop classes at any time
Program                                                      during the open registration period or until the con-
         Students who wish to change their major             clusion of the Add/Drop period (as outlined in the
should seek the advice of the program director of the        Academic Calendar) using WEBregistration or with
proposed new graduate program and make them-                 the assistance of their academic advisor/department.
selves familiar with requirements of the new major.                   Students who want to petition to add a closed
Once the student decides which program they would            class, or who want to add a class after the Add/Drop
like to change to, he or she should apply for admis-         Period has concluded, must complete a “Registration:
sion to the new graduate program, being sure to              Add Course Form”, available from their WEBstudent
include all of the appropriate or required documents         menu under “Registrar Forms.” This form must be
with their application. Students must follow the cur-        printed and approved by the instructor, department,
riculum of the new major that is in effect at the time       and/ or dean. Students attempting to add a class after
of the change of major.                                      the Add/Drop Period has ended must also obtain a
                                                             “Retroactive Registration Form” from the Bursar. All
Changing From Non-Matriculated to Regular                    forms must be brought to the Office of Registration
(Matriculated) Status                                        and Records for processing before the term con-
        An undergraduate student accepted to                 cludes. It is the responsibility of the student to see that
Monmouth University as a non-matriculated (non-              all forms reach the appropriate office.
degree-seeking) student may request to matriculate                    Students simultaneously adding and drop-
(seek a degree) by applying for admission as a reg-          ping a course (e.g., same course, different section)
ular (matriculated) student. If accepted as a regular        should use e-FORMS and select “Swap Course
student, he or she may declare a major (provided             Registration.” Approvals for this action will be done
admission criteria, if any, of the particular major are      electronically, and since there is no credit change.
met) or choose the undeclared status.                        Bursar approval is not required.
        A non-matriculated undergraduate student
who did not meet regular admission requirements              Leave of Absence – Matriculated
when accepted in the provisional non-matriculated            (degree-seeking) Students
status must complete a minimum of 12 credits and a                    Students may apply for a leave of absence
maximum of 18 credits of college-level course work           (LOA) if they intend to be away from the University
with a minimum grade point average of 2.00 before            for a full semester. A leave of absence enables stu-
applying for admission as a regular student. The stu-        dents to maintain the same curriculum of record.




                                                                                     Monmouth University 49
Programs, Services, and Regulations



Interested students complete the LOA request form            the obligation, registration privileges are restored.
available on e-FORMS. All applications for leaves of         Course prerequisites are updated periodically.
absence must be processed by the conclusion of the           Students should confer with their advisors concern-
course change (add/drop) period. All degree require-         ing the most recent prerequisites on record for
ments must be completed as specified in the “Time            courses they wish to take. Students should also con-
Limitation” section. Students on a LOA may not               fer with their advisors when they want to register for
attend another institution and transfer credits into         more than 18 credits per semester. Students must
Monmouth University.                                         fulfill the most current prerequisite requirements prior
                                                             to taking courses at Monmouth University.
Registration
          All current Monmouth University students and       Transcript Requests
deposited “Applicants” are provided with access to the                 Current student requests for transcripts must
University’s WEBstudent. Each student is provided            be made by submitting a “Request for Transcript” e-
with a unique User ID and password, which allows him         FORM to the Office of Registration and Records.
or her access to personal information via the WEB.           Former students and alumni may print and submit a
          Continuing students who have met with their        “Request for Transcript” form available from the Office
academic advisor and received permission to do so            of Registration and Records “Forms” page. All tran-
may self-register using WEBstudent. Specific infor-          script requests should be made at least two weeks
mation for dates and times to register online will be        prior to the time they are to be sent; hard-copy requests
distributed prior to registration dates and will be avail-   must bear the signature of the student whose record is
able online in the “Registration Information.” Online        being requested. Issuance of transcripts must be first
registration is not available to students who are on         cleared by the Bursar’s Office or any other University
academic probation or whose current admission sta-           office to ensure that there are no outstanding obliga-
tus is conditional.                                          tions. The University may withhold transcripts, or infor-
          Continuing students are strongly urged to          mation related thereto, if an outstanding balance exists,
complete “early registration” for upcoming semesters         or if repayment of a loan granted either by or through
and terms. Early registration for the fall, spring, and      the University is in arrears.
summer semesters usually begins in April and con-                      During a period of approximately two weeks
cludes in August. Late registration is conducted dur-        when grades are being recorded and processed at
ing the first week of the fall and spring semesters;         the conclusion of a semester, transcripts cannot be
students are required to pay the “late registration” fee     issued for currently enrolled students.
when registering during the late registration period.                  Monmouth University releases only the
Registration after the conclusion of the late registra-      Monmouth University transcript; it does not release
tion period requires the written approval of the appro-      the transcripts from institutions previously attended
priate faculty and department chairs. Students are           by the student.
not permitted to attend classes for which they are not
officially registered (as determined by the Office of        SCHEDULING INFORMATION
Registration and Records). If students attend without        Fall and Spring Semesters
prior registration, they are subject to disciplinary                  Monmouth University schedules on-campus
action, including suspension and dismissal, and will         classes year-round. During the fall and spring
not be permitted to “retroactively” enroll.                  semesters, in addition to the traditional schedule of
          New students are invited to register during        daytime classes, Monmouth also offers non-tradi-
special programs during the summer and in January            tional students other scheduling options. Courses
as part of their orientation to the University. Late reg-    are available in the evening and on weekends.
istration is available to new students, although less
desirable than the mode described above.                     Summer Sessions
          Registration privileges are not extended to               Summer sessions provide a comprehensive
students who have significant unresolved financial or        program of day and evening courses and special
other obligations to the University. “Holds” are placed      workshops for Monmouth students and students in
on the records of such students. Upon resolution of          good standing at other colleges and universities.


50 Monmouth University
                                                                  Programs, Services, and Regulations



Summer session programming also provides a taste          95.9    WRAT Pt. Pleasant
of college life and a head start for high school stu-     98.5    WJLK Ocean County
dents who have completed either the junior or senior      101.5   WKXW Trenton
year. Because of Monmouth’s location near the             107.1   The Breeze
shore, summer sessions are well attended by visiting
students as well as Monmouth’s own students.              AM
         The University offers five regular summer        1010    WINS New York
sessions. The maximum course load for summer              1310    WJLK Monmouth and Ocean Counties
school is 12 credits.                                     1450    WCTC New Brunswick
         Students enrolled at other institutions should
receive approval from that institution for courses for    TV
which credit is desired. Students must meet all           News 12 New Jersey
course prerequisites. Admission into the summer           Channel 4 WNBC news
program does not constitute acceptance into the
University’s regular programs.                            UNIVERSITY E-MAIL
         Campus recreational and dining facilities are            Monmouth University provides all students
available to summer students. Residence halls will        with a Monmouth University
be open to resident students during the summer.            e-mail account. Some student notices are sent
Inquiries regarding summer sessions and applica-          exclusively to the Monmouth University e-mail
tions for admission should be addressed to the            account, such as:
Director of Admission.
                                                                  •   Grade reports
UNIVERSITY EMERGENCY CLOSING                                      •   Semester schedules
         Monmouth University has established a                    •   Registration information
Weather Emergency Information Line: (732) 263-                    •   Academic announcements
5900. During emergencies, including weather-related               •   Graduation deadlines
situations when the University may need to close or               •   Change of class notifications
delay the start of the workday, this line will have a             •   Academic standings
prerecorded message with necessary information for
students and staff. If the University must close or               Additionally, administrative offices have
cancel classes, a broadcast message will also be          established e-mail accounts for student use; how-
sent to all employees and resident students via the       ever, the student e-mail must be generated from the
campus voice-mail system. You may also find out           Monmouth University account. Students are encour-
about weather-related cancellations and closings by       aged to communicate with University offices using
e-mail messages, the Monmouth University Web              their Monmouth University e-mail account:
page (http://www.monmouth.edu), or from one of the
local radio stations or TV channels listed below:                 •   admission@monmouth.edu
                                                                  •   bursar@monmouth.edu
FM                                                                •   finaid@monmouth.edu
88.9    WMCX Monmouth University                                  •   graduateschool@monmouth.edu
92.7    WOBM Ocean County                                         •   fyseminar@monmouth.edu
94.3    WJLK Monmouth County                                      •   registrar@monmouth.edu




                                                                                 Monmouth University 51
Programs, Services, and Regulations



WEBstudent and e-FORMS                                and is accessible to all users. Monmouth University
         All currently registered Monmouth students   provides a menu selection accessible from
have established WEBstudent accounts for use in       WEBstudent that allows currently enrolled students
schedule preparation, grade and transcript look-up,   to electronically submit academic requests to the
and academic audits. Students are encouraged to       department and to the Office of Registration and
utilize WEBstudent for retrieval of their academic    Records.
information. Questions concerning the account can             Current students initiate requests with the
be answered by the Help Desk (732-571-3539), or       Academic Affairs Division by utilizing the e-FORMS
documentation can be obtained from the                selection available from their WEBstudent menu.
WEBstudent site. Information obtainable online                Instructions on how to use WEBstudent and
includes:                                             e-FORMS are posted under “Instructions” on the
                                                      WEBstudent main menu.
       •   Grades (midterm and final)
       •   Grade Point Average (GPA)                  WITHDRAW FROM THE UNIVERSITY
       •   Academic audit                                     Students who intend to withdraw from
       •   Student schedule                           Monmouth University and plan not to return are
       •   WEBregistration                            requested to notify the University by completing a
       •   e-FORMS                                    “Total Withdraw from the University” e-FORM.
                                                      Provided the e-FORM is received by the “W” deadline
        WEBstudent is available for general use to    date (see academic calendar), students will be with-
view the Schedule of Course Offerings. “Search for    drawn from the current term; otherwise the total with-
Courses” is not restricted by User ID and password    draw will not be effective until the next regular term.




52 Monmouth University
The Wayne D. McMurray School of




                                                                                                                            Humanities and Social Sciences
Humanities and Social Sciences




                                                                                                                    Course Descriptions
DEAN: Stanton W. Green, Ph.D.                                       Within the School of Humanities and Social
ASSOCIATE DEAN: Golam Mathbor, Ph.D.                       Sciences are the Freed Chair in Social Science
ASSISTANT DEAN: Michael Thomas, M.F.A.                     endowed through a gift from the Gerald Freed
                                                           Foundation and the Jules Plangere, Jr. Chair in
          The Wayne D. McMurray School of                  American Social History endowed through a gift of
Humanities and Social Sciences offers eight mas-           Life Trustee Jules Plangere, Jr. Professor William
ter’s degree programs (Corporate and Public                Mitchell, an anthropologist, occupies the Freed
Communication, Criminal Justice, English, History,         Chair; and Professor Brian Greenberg of the History
Liberal Arts,        Mental     Health   Counseling,       Department occupies the Plangere Chair.
Psychological Counseling, and Public Policy), as
well as 21 undergraduate degree programs.                  ANTHROPOLOGY
Graduate certificates are offered in criminal justice,     Frederick L. McKitrick, Chair, Department of History
homeland security, three specific areas of commu-            and Anthropology
nication, and professional counseling (a post-mas-         Richard Veit, Coordinator of Anthropology
ter’s certificate program). All programs of study are
directed toward preparing students for working and         Aaron Ansell, Assistant Professor of Anthropology.
living in a global environment.                                Ph.D., University of Chicago. Research inter-
          Study in the humanities and social sciences          ests include money and value, hunger and
and related professional fields provides valuable              development policy, patron-client exchange,
perspectives and skills necessary for both the job             and democratization in Northeast Brazil.
market and community life. Among our academic                  Teaching areas include anthropological theory,
goals are proficiency in all forms of communication,           Brazilian history and culture, food culture, soci-
such as scientific literacy; an appreciation for the           olinguistics, and global development.
diversity of people and ideas and the ability to col-      Stanton W. Green, Professor and Dean of the
laborate with others; stimulation of aesthetic sensi-          Wayne D. McMurray School of Humanities and
tivity and creative expression; and the ability to think       Social Sciences. Ph.D., University of
and react critically.                                          Massachusetts, Amherst. Professor Green is a




                                                                                  Monmouth University 53
Humanities and Social Sciences



    specialist in Baseball and American Culture,            Professional work includes all aspects of
    Archaeology, and Ireland. His research and              graphic design including print and related collat-
    teaching interests include questions of diversity       eral design. Also working as a digital artist
    in the United States, Archeological Methods             whose work has been shown in national and
    and Theory, and the application of Geographic           international competitions and exhibitions.
    Information Systems.                                Andrew L. Cohen, Professor and Chair. Ph.D.,
Steven Kosiba, Assistant Professor, Ph.D.,                  University of Chicago, History of Art. Research
    University of Chicago. Research interests               spans from Medieval India to Contemporary
    include ancient empires, the Incas, Colonial            South Asian art. Author of Temple Architecture
    Politics in Latin America, and indigenous cul-          and Sculpture of the Nolambas (9th-10th
    tural identity and sovereignty within the contem-       Centuries).
    porary Americas. Theoretical and methodologi-       Pat Hill Cresson, Professor. M.F.A., Pratt Institute.
    cal specializations include archaeological the-         Specialization includes computer graphics and
    ory, Geographic Information Systems, and polit-         graphic design. Her professional experience
    ical anthropology.                                      includes art direction and design from concept
William P. Mitchell, Professor, Interim Dean of the         through print in the areas of publishing, corpo-
    Honors School, and Freed Professor in the               rate design, and computer illustration. Her fine
    Social Sciences. Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh.       art work is represented in a New York City
    Conducts research on peasant society, migra-            gallery and has been shown nationally and
    tion, and the Shining Path guerilla war in Peru.        internationally.
    Publications include: Peasants on the Edge,         Vincent DiMattio, Professor. M.F.A., Southern
    Picturing Faith, and Voices from the Global             Illinois University. Practicing artist who has
    Margin. Co-chair of the Anthropology Section of         exhibited his work in New York City and
    the New York Academy of Sciences.                       throughout the United States, Spain, and
Richard Veit, Associate Professor of Anthropology.          Mexico. Teaches drawing, painting, basic
    Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania. Teaching             design, and several lecture courses. Started the
    areas include archaeology, historic preserva-           gallery program at Monmouth University. He is
    tion, North American Indians, and New Jersey            a co-author of the book The Drawings and
    history. Research interests include historical          Watercolors of Lewis Mumford.
    archaeology, industrial archaeology, and early      Edward Johnston, Specialist Professor. B.A.,
    American Material Culture. Author of Digging            M.Ed., University of Notre Dame; M.F.A.,
    New Jersey’s Past: Historical Archaeology in            University of Michigan.
    the Garden State.                                   Anne Massoni, Specialist Professor. M.F.A., Ohio
                                                            University. Photography and digital art.
ART AND DESIGN                                          Michael Richison, Specialist Professor. M.F.A.,
Andrew L. Cohen, Chair, Department of Art and               Cranbrook Academy of Art. Motion graphics
  Design                                                    and graphic design.
Mark Ludak, Compliance Officer/Technical                Jing Zhou, Associate Professor. B.F.A., Sichuan
  Specialist                                                Fine Arts Institute, China; M.F.A., Georgia
Scott Knauer, Director of Galleries and Collections         Southern University. Interests include graphic
                                                            design, Web design, digital media art, flash ani-
Tom Baker, Associate Professor. M.F.A., University          mation, art direction, and fine arts.
   of Wisconsin-Madison. Professional experience
   includes work at collaborative print shops:          COMMUNICATION
   Tandem Press and Winstone Press. A council           Chad Dell, Chair, Department of Communication
   member of the Society of American Graphic
   Artists in New York, his prints have been shown      Chad Dell, Associate Professor and Chair. Ph.D.,
   and collected nationally and internationally.           University of Wisconsin-Madison. Primary fields
Karen T. Bright, Associate Professor. M.F.A.,              are broadcasting and cultural studies. Special
   Cranbrook Academy of Art. Specialization                interests include television production and
   includes graphic design and computer graphics.          analysis, broadcast history, and media policy.


54 Monmouth University
                                                                      Humanities and Social Sciences



    Research interests focus on an analysis of the          and Public Relations special topics. Advisor to
    exercise of power at the intersection of broad-         Public Relations Student Society of America.
    cast industries and audiences. Serves as fac-           APR, Public Relations Society of America.
    ulty advisor to the student-operated TV station,    John Morano, Professor. M.A., Pennsylvania State
    Hawk TV.                                                University. Primary fields are print journalism
Andrew Demirjian, Specialist Professor. M.F.A.,             and media studies. Special interests include
    Hunter College. Introduction to Media Literacy,         start-up publications, magazine journalism, and
    Introduction to TV Production, and Media                freelance journalism. Research interests
    Special Topics.                                         include environmental journalism, publishing a
Donna Montanaro Dolphin, Associate Professor.               fourth novel in his Eco-Adventure Book Series,
    M.F.A., Mason Gross School of the Arts,                 entertainment journalism, film criticism, and
    Rutgers University. Primary fields are TV pro-          journalism ethics. Advisor to the student-oper-
    duction, communication, and media theory.               ated newspaper, The Outlook.
    Special interests include being an independent      Eleanor M. Novek, Associate Professor. Ph.D.,
    producer of documentaries. Research interest            Annenberg School for Communication, University
    in the construction of femininity in the screen         of Pennsylvania. Specialties are journalism, gen-
    arts. Serves as faculty advisor to the student-         der studies, research methods, and social justice
    operated TV station, Hawk TV.                           research. Research interests in racial discrimina-
Aaron Furgason, Associate Professor. Ph.D.,                 tion, prison issues, and service learning.
    Rutgers University. Introduction to Radio           Michael Phillips-Anderson, Assistant Professor.
    Production, Introduction to Screen Studies,             Ph.D., University of Maryland. Political
    Media Ethics, Radio in the Music Industry,              Communication, Critical Discourse, Senior
    Radio Programming and Promotions, Talk                  Seminar, and Introduction to Communication.
    Radio, Radio in America, and Generation ‘X’         Rebecca Sanford, Associate Professor. Ph.D.,
    Film Directors. Research interests include radio        Temple University. Interests include interper-
    and recording industries and film studies.              sonal communication, intercultural communica-
    Faculty advisor to the 1000-watt FM University          tion, family communication, nonverbal commu-
    radio station, WMCX.                                    nication, and communication theory. Serves as
Sophia Fuka, Specialist Professor. B.A., University         faculty advisor to Lambda Pi Eta, the National
    of North Dakota; M.A., Arizona State University.        Communication Honor Society.
Christy Hetzel, Lecturer. J.D., Rutgers University      Robert Scott, Specialist Professor. M.F.A.,
    School of Law, Camden. Licensed NJ Attorney             University of Miami. Primary fields are television
    bringing entrepreneurial experience to student-         production and broadcast news, film and video
    focused, practical application courses in Media         production, screenwriting, and media studies.
    Law, Public Speaking, Argument and Debate,              Special interests include media technology, web
    Critical Discourse, Business Organizational and         publishing, film history, creative writing, corpo-
    Small Group Communication, and Mediation.               rate communication, and management. Serves
    Special interests include constitutional law and        as faculty advisor for the student-operated
    ADR methods.                                            Hawk TV News.
Shannon Hokanson, Lecturer. M.A., Monmouth              Jennifer Shamrock, Lecturer. Ph.D., Hugh Downs
    University. Areas of interest include interper-         School of Communication, Arizona State
    sonal, intercultural, and organizational commu-         University. Primary fields of study and research
    nication.                                               include ethnographic, narrative, and textual forms
Robin Kampf, Specialist Professor. B.A, Seton Hall          of inquiry from a feminist critical perspective.
    University.                                         Deanna Shoemaker, Assistant Professor. Ph.D.,
Sheila McAllister-Spooner, Assistant Professor.             The University of Texas at Austin. Primary fields
    Ph.D., Rutgers University. Introduction to Public       are Performance and Theater Studies,
    Relations, Professional Communication, Crisis           Communication Studies, and Gender Studies.
    and Issues Management, Public Relations                 Special interests include feminist performance
    Writing, Nonprofit Fundraising, Strategic Public        practices, performance of literature, perform-
    Relations Planning, Principles of Fundraising.          ance ethnography, and critical race theory.


                                                                              Monmouth University 55
Humanities and Social Sciences



    Research interests include cultural and aes-              assessment, and adjunct faculty issues in higher
    thetic performances of femininity and critical            education. Director of the Master’s Program in
    staging of race/ethnicity and sexuality. Faculty          Corporate and Public Communication.
    advisor to Comm Works, Students Committed
    to Performance.                                                 The Master of Arts in Corporate and Public
Kristine M. Simoes, Specialist Professor. M.A.,           Communication prepares students to become effective
    Rowan University. Teaching focus on field appli-      communication specialists in a number of fields, with
    cable curriculum that prepares students for           skills that range from interpersonal communication to
    careers in public relations profession. Courses       mass media. It is the goal of this program to provide
    developed include Public Relations Writing/           education that combines broad theoretical knowledge
    Layout and Design, Public Relations Campaigns,        with practical application in public relations, human
    and Public Relations Trends and Analysis. APR,        resources communication, and public service. The pro-
    Public Relations Society of America.                  gram serves students who wish to pursue a career in
Don R. Swanson, Professor and Chair of                    the burgeoning field of communication, as well as pro-
    Philosophy, Religion and Interdisciplinary            fessionals who wish to improve their communication
    Studies. Ed.D., University of Northern Colorado.      skills to enhance performance. The program includes a
    Primary fields are organizational, intercultural,     19-credit core and elective courses selected by stu-
    and political communication. Special interests in     dents to fit their unique interests.
    corporate communication consulting, training,
    and dispute resolution. Research interests in         Please refer to the curriculum chart in the appendix
    executive communication, management com-              for program requirements. All curriculum charts are
    munication applied in multicultural organiza-         detailed and displayed in Appendix “B”.
    tions, and political communication.                           • M.A. in Corporate and Public
Claude E. Taylor, Lecturer. M.A., West Chester                      Communication
    University. Primary areas of interest are media
    studies, communication theory, and political          SPECIALIST CERTIFICATES
    communication. Research interests include                      A specialist certificate as a Human Resources
    explorations of the relationship between con-         Communication Specialist, Public Relations Specialist,
    temporary media in the United States and politi-      or a Public Service Communication Specialist provides
    cal participation across identity categories, such    12 credits of focused study for the student who wishes
    as race, class, and gender; the relationship          to study a specialized field in communication.
    between social class, the media, and demo-
    cratic citizenship; and the intersection of popu-     Please refer to the curriculum charts in the appendix
    lar culture and contemporary U.S. politics.           for program requirements. All curriculum charts are
Marina Vujnovic, Assistant Professor. Ph.D.,              detailed and displayed in Appendix “B”.
    University of Iowa. Primary fields of research                • Human Resources Communication
    are participatory journalism and new media                      Specialist
    studies, media history and gender, critical politi-           • Public Relations Specialist
    cal economy, and cultural studies. Research                   • Public Service Communication Specialist
    interests focus on international communication
    and global flow of information; journalism stud-      CRIMINAL JUSTICE
    ies; and explorations of the historical, political-   Peter Liu, Chair, Department of Criminal Justice
    economic, and cultural impact on media, gen-          Gregory Coram, Associate Chair, Department
    der, and ethnicity.                                     of Criminal Justice
Sherry Wien, Associate Professor. Ph.D., Rutgers
    University. Primary fields are organizational and     Gregory J. Coram, Associate Professor. Psy.D.,
    interpersonal communication. Special interests           Indiana State University. Areas of interest
    are interpersonal relationships at work and              include psychology, criminal pathology, and cor-
    socialization within organizations. Research             rections. Current research projects include the
    interests include mentoring, organizational              biology of violent criminals.



56 Monmouth University
                                                                            Humanities and Social Sciences



Albert Gorman, Specialist Professor. M.A., John Jay         CRIMINAL JUSTICE CERTIFICATES
    College of Criminal Justice. Interests include                    The 12-credit Certificate in Criminal Justice
    police professionalism, community policing, and         Administration offers a student the opportunity to
    security/loss prevention. Current research              expand his or her education and obtain a solid foun-
    includes the police socialization process.              dation in the principles of administration. This admin-
Michele Grillo, Assistant Professor. B.S., M.A.,            istration certificate will prepare criminal justice profes-
    University of Massachusetts; M.A., Ph.D.,               sionals or pre-career students for future supervisory
    Rutgers University, Criminology.                        and administrative roles. The Certificate Program will
Peter Liu, Professor. Ph.D., Indiana University of          offer these supervisors advanced skills for more
    Pennsylvania. Areas of interest include research        effective supervising and mentoring of their staff.
    methods, criminology, comparative criminal justice
    systems, and criminal justice organizations admin-      Please refer to the curriculum chart in the appendix
    istration and management. Current research proj-        for program requirements. All curriculum charts are
    ects include comparative delinquency, Chinese           detailed and displayed in Appendix “B”.
    justice system, and environmental crime.                        • Certificate in Criminal Justice
Brian Lockwood, Assistant Professor. B.A., College                    Administration
    of New Jersey; M.A., ABD, Temple University.                    • Certificate in Homeland Security
Ronald Reisner, Associate Professor. Ph.D.,
    Columbia University; J.D., Rutgers University           ENGLISH
    School of Law. Areas of interest include victims’       Sue Starke, Chair, Department of English
    rights, juvenile law, and Fourth Amendment              David Tietge, Associate Director of the Writing Office
    rights. Current research projects include State         Heide Estes, Graduate Program Director
    constitutional activities in victims’ rights and pol-   Susan Goulding, Undergraduate Program Coordinator
    icy development in the criminal justice system.
Brion Sever, Associate Professor. Ph.D., Florida            G. Oty Agbajoh-Laoye, Associate Professor and
    State University. Areas of interest include crimi-          Director of the African-American Studies
    nal justice public policy, crime and policing, and          Program. Ph.D., University of Ibadan, Nigeria.
    corrections. Current research projects include              Specialty is African Diaspora (African-American
    juvenile delinquency, police training, and minori-          and Afro-Caribbean literature in English) and
    ties in the criminal justice system.                        African Postcolonial literature. Additional inter-
                                                                ests and current research include Black
MASTER OF ARTS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE (M.A.)                       women’s fiction and criticism, the Slave
          The Master of Arts in Criminal Justice at             Narrative and Oral tradition.
Monmouth University offers a broad perspective on           Mary Kate Azcuy, Assistant Professor. D.Litt., Drew
the criminal justice system, its various institutions and       University. Specialty is contemporary American
processes, and develops the quantitative, critical, and         literature with an emphasis on women poets,
research skills necessary for problem solving and pol-          mythology and feminism, as well as creative
icy-making. The program includes a set of courses               writing.
that will focus on research procedures, the use of psy-     Noel Belinski, Lecturer. M.A., Monmouth
chosocial variables, systems thinking, and the devel-           University. Specialties are composition peda-
opment of policy. In addition, there are courses in law,        gogy and General Education literature courses
policy, and criminal justice management.                    Stanley Blair, Associate Professor. Ph.D., Duke
                                                                University. Specialty is American literature.
Please refer to the curriculum charts in the appendix           Other interests are New Jersey literature,
for program requirements. All curriculum charts are             poetry, history of rhetoric, and popular culture.
detailed and displayed in Appendix “B”.                     Kristin Bluemel, Professor. Ph.D., Rutgers
        • M.A. in Criminal Justice–Thesis Track                 University. Specialty is twentieth-century British
        • M.A. in Criminal Justice–Non-Thesis Track             literature. Additional interests include literary
        • M.A. in Criminal Justice–Homeland                     criticism and theory, the novel, children’s litera-
          Security Track                                        ture, and World War II and the end of empire.



                                                                                    Monmouth University 57
Humanities and Social Sciences



Liora Brosh, Lecturer. Ph.D., New York University.        Richard Paris, Associate Professor. Ph.D.,
    Specialties include nineteenth-century British lit-       University of California-Berkeley. Specialty is
    erature and film studies.                                 rhetoric and nineteenth-century American litera-
Heather Brown, Assistant Professor. Ph.D.,                    ture. Current research is on Walt Whitman.
    University of Maryland. Specialty is rhetoric and         Interested in playwriting.
    composition with an emphasis on the rhetoric          Abha Patel, Lecturer. Ph.D., Indian Institute of
    medicine.                                                 Technology. Areas of interest include twentieth-
Margaret Del Guercio, Associate Professor. Ph.D.,             century American fiction, popular literature, and
    New York University. Specialty is the novel in the        Victorian literature.
    eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Major inter-     Christine Severson, Lecturer. Ph.D., Indiana
    ests are Shakespeare, poetry, and prose fiction.          University of Pennsylvania. Specialty is nine-
Heide Estes, Associate Professor. Ph.D., New York             teenth-century American literature and the arts,
    University. Specialty is Old English language             with an emphasis on women writers and artists.
    and literature, and additional interests include      Sue Starke, Associate Professor. Ph.D., Rutgers
    Middle English literature, feminist theory, and           University. Specialty is Renaissance literature
    representations of Jews in early English texts.           and culture, medieval literature, and genre theory.
    Current research is in ecocriticism.                  David Tietge, Associate Professor. Ph.D., Southern
Josh Emmons, Assistant Professor. B.A., Oberlin               Illinois University at Carbondale. Areas of inter-
    College; M.F.A., The University of Iowa.                  est include rhetoric and composition, literary
Prescott Evarts, Professor. Ph.D., Columbia                   theory, rhetorical theory, and popular culture.
    University. Specialty is contemporary English and         Current research is in science rhetoric.
    American literature. Recent interest is poetry.       Lisa Vetere, Assistant Professor. Ph.D., Lehigh
Frank Fury, Lecturer. Ph.D., Drew University.                 University. Specialty is Antebellum American lit-
    Specialty is nineteenth- and twentieth-century            erature and culture, with an emphasis on cul-
    American literature with particular emphasis on           tural studies and feminist and psychoanalytic
    representations of sport in American culture.             theory.
    Additional interests include the short story and      Michael Waters, Associate Professor. Ph.D.,Ohio
    Shakespeare.                                              University. Specialties are creative writing,
Brian Garvey, Associate Professor. Ph.D.,                     poetry, and American literature.
    University of Bradford, England. Specialties are
    Utopian literature, History of Science and            MASTER OF ARTS IN ENGLISH (M.A.)
    Technology, and the History of War in the                      The Master of Arts in English is a flexible pro-
    Twentieth Century.                                    gram which allows various types of students to pur-
Elizabeth Gilmartin, Lecturer. Ph.D., New York            sue a course of study meeting their own interests
    University. Areas of interest include the Irish       and goals. For those interested in the challenge of
    language and Victorian Ireland.                       graduate study and considering going on to a doc-
Susan Goulding, Associate Professor. Ph.D., New           toral program at another institution, the courses at
    York University. Specialties are eighteenth-cen-      Monmouth provide a broad education in English liter-
    tury British literature, women’s studies, British     ature and a sound foundation for further graduate
    history, and reception history.                       study. Secondary school teachers can fulfill their con-
Neil Graves, Lecturer. Ph.D., Oxford University.          tinuing education requirement and accrue credits
    Specialties are 17th-century English poetry,          toward salary increases by taking courses in the pro-
    English Renaissance drama, Shakespeare, and           gram. Those interested in personal enrichment or
    Milton.                                               career advancement will find that the program
Linda Littman, Lecturer. Ed.D., Teachers College,         requirements improve critical thinking abilities along
    Columbia University. Areas of interest include        with reading, speaking, and writing skills. The cur-
    creative nonfiction, American literature, and cul-    riculum, appropriate for recent college graduates as
    ture. Current research is in composition theory       well as returning students, is designed to allow stu-
    and pedagogy.                                         dents to finish the degree in two to two-and-a-half
                                                          years by taking two to three courses per semester,



58 Monmouth University
                                                                       Humanities and Social Sciences



with the additional option of summer study. Part-time   HISTORY
students are also welcome to attend. Course offer-      Frederick L. McKitrick, Chair, Department of History
ings allow students to take courses in a variety of       and Anthropology
fields to obtain a broad knowledge of literature in
English or to focus on areas of specific interest.      Julius O. Adekunle, Professor. Ph.D., Dalhousie
                                                            University, Canada. Teaching fields include
Please refer to the curriculum chart in the appendix        African history, Africa and its Diaspora, and
for program requirements. All curriculum charts are         Western Civilization. Recent research on
detailed and displayed in Appendix “B”.                     Nigerian history and society.
        • M.A. in English: Literature Concentration     Aaron Ansell, Assistant Professor. Ph.D.,
        • M.A. in English: Creative Writing                 University of Chicago. Research interests
          Concentration                                     include money and value, hunger and develop-
        • M.A. in English: Rhetoric and Writing             ment policy, patron-client exchange, and
          Concentration                                     democratization in Northeast Brazil. Teaching
        • M.A. in English: New Jersey Studies               areas include anthropological theory, Brazilian
          Concentration                                     history and culture, food culture, sociolinguis-
                                                            tics, and global development.
FOREIGN LANGUAGE STUDIES                                Kenneth L. Campbell, Associate Professor. Ph.D.,
Alison Maginn, Chair, Department of Foreign                 University of Delaware. Teaching fields include
   Language Studies                                         English history, Medieval and Early Modern
                                                            Europe, and history of witchcraft. Recent
Priscilla Gac-Artigas, Associate Professor of               research on the English Reformation and reli-
    Foreign Languages. Ph.D., University of                 gious nonconformity in sixteenth- and seven-
    Franche-Comte, France. Specialty areas are              teenth-century England.
    Latin American literature, culture, and civiliza-   Christopher DeRosa, Associate Professor. Ph.D.,
    tion; Spanish-American women writers; and               Temple University. Fields include military history
    new trends in Latino writers’ literature in the         and American political history. Recent research
    United States. Current research is in interdisci-       concerns the political indoctrination of American
    plinary studies on Latin America in five main           soldiers.
    directions: history, anthropology, culture,         Maureen Dorment, Lecturer. Ph.D. candidate, Drew
    geopolitics, and economics.                             University. M.A., Monmouth University. Research
Mirta Barrea-Marlys, Associate Professor. Ph.D.,            interests include the history of print culture and
    Romance Languages/Literature, University of             intellectual history. Teaching areas include
    Pennsylvania. Areas of specialization include           Western Civilization, propaganda, and censorship.
    medieval through eighteenth-century Spanish         Susan Douglass, Specialist Professor. M.S., City
    literature, Latin-American theatre, and Latin-          University of New York. Areas of interest
    American women authors. Teaching interests              include U.S. history, the Holocaust, and the
    include linguistics, methodology of foreign lan-        Vietnam War.
    guage teaching, oral proficiency acquisition,       Brian Greenberg, Professor and Jules L. Plangere,
    and Spanish and Italian language culture.               Jr. Endowed Chair in American Social History.
Alison Maginn, Associate Professor of Spanish.              Ph.D., Princeton University. Primary fields are
    Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison. Teaching        the history of American workers, American
    interests include proficiency-oriented language         social history, and the history of public policy in
    and contemporary Spanish literature and culture.        America. Current research is on U.S. social his-
    Primary interest is in the narrative, poetry, and       tory in the early twentieth century.
    film of twentieth-century Spain. Current research   Frederick L. McKitrick, Associate Professor. Ph.D.,
    focuses on women writers of post-dictatorship           Columbia University. Teaching areas include
    Spain and Spanish Cultural Studies.                     German history, French history, and modern
                                                            European history. Current research is on German
                                                            artisans of the Nazi and post-Nazi periods.



                                                                              Monmouth University 59
Humanities and Social Sciences



William P. Mitchell, Professor, Interim Dean of the         Civil Rights Movement, African Diaspora, and
    Honors School, and Freed Professor in the               Race and Identity.
    Social Sciences. Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh.
    Conducts research on peasant society, migra-        MASTER OF ARTS IN HISTORY (M.A.)
    tion, and the Shining Path guerilla war in Peru.             This program is designed to accommodate
    Publications include: Peasants on the Edge,         various types of students. Those who wish to spe-
    Picturing Faith, and Voices from the Global         cialize in European History, the History of United
    Margin. Co-chair of the Anthropology Section of     States, or the program’s new specialization, World
    the New York Academy of Sciences.                   History, and those who may wish to pursue a doctoral
Katherine Parkin, Associate Professor. Ph.D.,           degree may elect to concentrate in any of those
    Temple University. Major areas of interest          areas and to complete a master’s thesis. Others with
    include U.S. history and American women.            a more general interest in the subject of history may
Thomas S. Pearson, Vice President for Academic          elect to pursue a more broad-based program with the
    Affairs and Provost; Professor. Ph.D., University   option of taking a comprehensive exam instead of
    of North Carolina. Teaching fields include          writing a master’s thesis. The program is designed
    Russian history, Soviet and Russian foreign pol-    not only for recent college graduates, but also for
    icy, comparative revolutions, nineteenth-century    secondary school teachers of history and social stud-
    Europe, and modern Eastern Europe. His most         ies, and professionals in government, the military,
    recent research has focused on government           and business.
    and peasantry in modern Russian history.                     Of the 30 credits required for this program,
Maryanne Rhett, Assistant Professor. B.A.,              up to six graduate credits may be transferred from
    University of South Carolina; M.A., University of   another institution.
    Arizona; Ph.D., Washington State University.
    Areas of teaching are Islam and the Middle          Please refer to the curriculum charts in the appendix
    East. Research focuses on the Balfour               for program requirements. All curriculum charts are
    Declaration of 1917.                                detailed and displayed in Appendix “B”.
Karen Schmelzkopf, Associate Professor. Ph.D.,                  • M.A. in History
    Pennsylvania State University. Interests include            • M.A. in History, European Specialization
    Geographic Information Systems, land use pol-               • M.A. in History, United States
    icy, community organizations, and urban redevel-              Specialization
    opment. Current research projects include com-              • M.A. in History, World Specialization
    munity activism, politics of public space, and
    urban redevelopment issues in Asbury Park.          MASTER OF ARTS IN LIBERAL ARTS (M.A)
Kenneth R. Stunkel, Professor. Ph.D., University of              This program is specifically designed for stu-
    Maryland. Primary fields are the Far East, the      dents seeking a flexible, interdisciplinary alternative to
    history of science and western thought, and         traditional and specialized master’s degrees. The pro-
    technology and western culture. Current             gram allows students, with the help of a faculty advi-
    research on concepts of change in Chinese and       sor, to fashion their own unique program of study, in
    western science and skepticism in early modern      support of their personal and professional goals, to
    European thought.                                   prepare for and enter new careers, and to experience
Richard Veit, Associate Professor. Ph.D., University    exciting academic challenges. Broad in its intellectual
    of Pennsylvania. Teaching areas include archae-     and professional scope, the Liberal Arts program
    ology, historic preservation, North American        offers three different curriculum concentrations,
    Indians, and New Jersey history. Research inter-    Applied Studies, Professional Studies, and Liberal
    ests include historical archaeology, industrial     Studies, to help those students who aspire to learn
    archaeology, and early American Material            and succeed in multifaceted careers as well as those
    Culture. Author of Digging New Jersey’s Past:       who wish to reach sophisticated, new levels of per-
    Historical Archaeology in the Garden State.         sonal achievement and intellectual development.
Hettie Williams, Lecturer. M.A., Monmouth
    University. History of African Americans and



60 Monmouth University
                                                                       Humanities and Social Sciences



Please refer to the curriculum charts in the appendix       Major which grants students the opportunity to be
for program requirements. All curriculum charts are         both Theatre and Music majors.
detailed and displayed in Appendix “B”.                 Ferdinando Del Guercio, Designer/Technical
        • M.A. in Liberal Arts, Applied Studies Track       Director. B.F.A., Maryland Institute College of Art.
        • M.A. in Liberal Arts, Liberal Studies Track       He is a visual artist and an architectural interior
        • M.A. in Liberal Arts, Professional Studies        designer. He has worked as an adjunct professor
          Track                                             in the Art Department at Monmouth University
                                                            since 1993. He also designs and builds the sets
MUSIC AND THEATRE ARTS                                      for all the performances of the Department of
David Tripold, Chair, Department of Music and               Music and Theatre Arts and the Shadow Lawn
  Theatre Arts                                              Stage in the Lauren K. Woods Theatre.
                                                        Ronald G. Frangipane, Assistant Professor of
Sheri Anderson, Specialist Professor, Theatre,              Music. M.F.A., Goddard College. Professor
   Stage Management. M.F.A., University of                  Frangipane attended and assisted Master
   California, San Diego. Sheri Anderson has                classes with Igor Stravinsky and Aaron Copland
   extensive Broadway experience as both a direc-           and studied with Paul Creston. Received over
   tor and stage manager. To date, she has done             30 gold and platinum albums as an arranger-
   thirteen Broadway productions, two national              producer in the record industry. Received an
   tours, and numerous regional and off-Broadway            Emmy award for his musical score “This Was
   shows. Highlights include the Broadway produc-           America” created for the NBC series with
   tions of Phantom of the Opera, Little Me, and            William Shatner. Arranged or produced record-
   The Full Monty. She has been privileged to work          ings for such notable artists as John Lennon,
   with such theatrical legends as Neil Simon, Cy           Diana Ross, Kiss, the Monkees, the Rolling
   Coleman, Jerry Herman, Marvin Hamlisch,                  Stones, Janis Ian, Neil Diamond, Dusty
   Terence McNally, John Guare, Chita Rivera,               Springfield, Grace Slick (Jefferson Starship),
   Rob Marshall, and Horton Foote, as well as               etc. He specializes in music in American cul-
   Hollywood heavyweights Martin Short, John                ture—Blues, Jazz, Rock & Roll, American
   Lithgow, John Ritter, Henry Winkler, Kevin               Musical Theatre, and Performance.
   Spacey, and Madeline Kahn. She spent much of         Michael Gillette, Instructor, Music/Violin, Director of
   2003 at Oxford University studying Shakespeare           the Chamber Orchestra. Master of Music, Yale
   in performance. Fields of interest include theatre       University. For thirty years, Michael Gillette has
   history, post-colonial drama, and musical the-           been a professional violinist in New York City
   atre. She is a member of Actors’ Equity                  and is currently a member of the Radio City
   Association and Mensa.                                   Music Hall Orchestra, the American Ballet
John J. Burke, Associate Professor of Theatre.              Theatre Orchestra, the Mostly Mozart Festival
   Ph.D., Michigan State University.                        Orchestra at Lincoln Center, and is principal
   Producer/Artistic Director, Shadow Lawn Stage.           second violin of the Little Orchestra Society. He
   Dr. Burke is a theatre generalist, who teaches a         has played for many Broadway productions,
   wide variety of theatre and improvisation courses.       including Les Miserables, Beauty and the
   His specialties include directing, theatre manage-       Beast, Damn Yankees, Crazy for You, Guys
   ment, and theatre education. His research inter-         and Dolls, Annie, Sunset Boulevard, Phantom
   ests are Irish Theatre, creative dramatics, and          of the Opera, and Into the Woods. Professor
   incorporating theatre methods in all areas of            Gillette has toured in Japan, the United
   teaching. Dr. Burke has been the Executive               Kingdom, Italy, and Venezuela and has per-
   Director of the Monmouth County Arts Council             formed with such diverse talents as Wynton
   and Arts Center, the Director of the Theatre pro-        Marsalis, Tony Bennett, Sammy Davis, Jr.,
   gram at Point Pleasant Boro High School, and an          Johnny Mathis, Yo-Yo Ma, André Watts, Jimmy
   adjunct at CCNY, Jersey City State College,              Page, Itzhak Perleman, The Modern Jazz
   Trenton State College, and Olivet College. Dr.           Quartet, Perry Como, and the rapper P Diddy.
   Burke developed the Department’s new Theatre



                                                                               Monmouth University 61
Humanities and Social Sciences



Nicole Ricciardi, Assistant Professor of Theatre.            degree program and directs the concert chorus
    M.F.A., Carnegie Mellon University, B.F.A.,              and chamber choir. For over thirty years he has
    Drew University. Specialization includes all             been engaged as a church organist and choir
    areas of acting and directing with a particular          director and has performed as a baritone soloist
    interest in Shakespeare and Early Modern                 and organist in the United States and Europe.
    English Drama. Professor Ricciardi is a profes-          His present scholarship focuses on American
    sional theatre actress and director. She was for-        church music, especially pertaining to the origins
    mally the head of the Acting Program for the             of church choirs, church music collections known
    New York Film Academy and an Assistant                   as tune books, and patterns and developments
    Professor of Drama for Syracuse University,              in contemporary American worship.
    where she coordinated the study abroad pro-           George Wurzbach, Specialist Professor of Music.
    gram at Shakespeare’s Globe in London. She               M.A. Music Composition, Hunter College.
    has taught workshops and classes around the              Professor Wurzbach is an award-winning com-
    world and locally at Drew University, Eastern            poser, performer, and producer. Through collab-
    Connecticut State University, and Shakespeare            oration with folk music legend Tom Paxton, he
    and Company in Lenox, Massachusetts. Nicole              contributed to the album “Comedians &
    is the director of “Old Face New,” a company of          Angels”, which earned a 2008 Grammy Award
    New York City theatre and music artists whose            nomination. He received a 2003 Backstage
    goal is to take old stories and present them in a        Magazine Bistro Award and a Metropolitan
    new way. She is a proud member of Actors                 Association of Cabarets MAC Award nomina-
    Equity Association and the Circle East Theatre           tion for his original musical comedy work with
    Company in New York City.                                the trio Modern Man. Recent composition cred-
Gloria A. Rotella, Specialist Professor of Music             its include theme and segment music for the
    (Piano, Music Education). Ed.D., Rutgers                 PBS series Real Simple and electronic music
    University. Dr. Rotella was nominated for                elements for Jon Deak and Bill Gordh’s “The
    Outstanding Music Educator in 1986 by                    Roaring Mountain,” premiered by the New York
    Westminster Choir College, received Teacher of           Philharmonic at Avery Fisher Hall. Currently he
    the Year Recognition from Long Branch School             is sketching a choral work based on transcripts
    District in 1991, and most recently was the              from the trial of Joan of Arc. He also directs
    recipient of the Outstanding Adjunct of the Year         Music Industry students through their business
    at Brookdale Community College for 2005-                 internships, conducts first semester Record
    2006. She has been a motivational speaker for            Production, and teaches American Music
    the New Teacher Institute at Rider University,           Traditions and Jazz in America.
    and an educational consultant for the New
    Jersey Department of Education as a                   PHILOSOPHY, RELIGION, AND
    Collaborative Assessment and Planning for             INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES
    Achievement (CAPA) team member. Dr. Rotella           Don R. Swanson, Chair, Department of Philosophy,
    was inducted into the School Masters                    Religion, and Interdisciplinary Studies
    Association of N.J. in February 2007. For the
    past two years, Dr. Rotella has facilitated a Job     Stuart Dalton, Lecturer of Philosophy. Ph.D., Emory
    Shadowing Mentor program between Long                     University. Teaching fields include the history of
    Branch High School and Monmouth University’s              philosophy, aesthetics, philosophy of literature
    Department of Music and Theatre Arts.                     and film, existentialism, social and political phi-
David M. Tripold, Associate Professor. Ph.D., Drew            losophy, and the philosophy of religion. Current
    University. Field of interest is American sacred          research includes Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, and
    music. He is a composer, choral director, vocal           contemporary, continental philosophy.
    teacher, and organist. Dr. Tripold is a nationally    Golam Mathbor, Associate Dean of the Wayne D.
    recognized choral conductor, singer, voice                McMurray School of Humanities and Social
    teacher, organist, and liturgical scholar who over-       Sciences, Professor. Ph.D., The University of
    sees Monmouth University’s music education                Calgary. Areas of interest include development



62 Monmouth University
                                                                        Humanities and Social Sciences



    and analysis of social policies and services,         Vincenzo Mele, Lecturer of Sociology. Ph.D.,
    community organizing and social action, social            Bielefeld University. Specializations are in clas-
    planning, community development and commu-                sical and contemporary social theory; history of
    nity participation, and international social work.        sociology; cultural studies; urban studies; and
    Current research interests include sustainable            lifestyle, sport, and health studies. Author of
    development of coastal communities, interna-              Walter Benjamin e l’esperienza della metropoli
    tional development, and interdisciplinary studies.        (Walter Benjamin and the Experience of the
Alan Schwerin, Associate Professor. Ph.D., Rice               Metropolis; 2002) and editor of Estetica e soci-
    University. Alan Schwerin has research inter-             ologia. Lo stile della vita moderna, (Aesthetics
    ests in David Hume’s philosophy of mind and               and Sociology, The Style of Modern Life; 2006)
    Bertrand Russell’s epistemology.                          and Le forme del moderno L’attualita di Georg
Pasquale Simonelli, Lecturer of Philosophy. Ph.D.,            Simmel (The Forms of Modernity, Actuality of
    Universita di Napoli, Italy. Research interests           Georg Simmel; 2007).”]
    focus on religions and philosophies of India,         Nancy J. Mezey, Associate Professor of Sociology.
    comparative religions, and western civilizations          Ph.D., Michigan State University. Sociology
    in a world perspective.                                   Program Coordinator; Gender Studies
                                                              Curriculum Coordinator. Specializations are in
POLITICAL SCIENCE AND SOCIOLOGY                               family sociology, race-class-gender studies, gen-
Joseph Patten, Chair, Department of                           der studies, sociology of sexualities, and African
  Political Science and Sociology                             Studies. Current interests focus on the formation
Kathryn Kloby, Public Policy Program Director                 and experiences of diverse family forms. Author
Nancy Mezey, Sociology Program Director                       of New Choices, New Families: How Lesbians
                                                              Decide about Motherhood (2008).
Rekha Datta, Professor. Ph.D., University of              Kenneth E. Mitchell, Assistant Professor. D.Phil.,
   Connecticut. Specialization in political theory,           University of Oxford. Specializes in Latin-
   international relations, and comparative politics          American and Caribbean politics and policy
   of South Asia, East Asia, and developing areas.            (public sector reform, democratization, and
   Research interests focus on issues of gender               state-society relations); and international politi-
   and development, traditional and human secu-               cal economy (capacity building in public sector,
   rity issues, and child labor. Author of: Beyond            community development, and politics of market-
   Realism: Human Security in India and Pakistan              based reform). Faculty advisor to the Pre-Law
   in the Twenty-First Century (2008); Why                    Honors Society, Phi Alpha Delta.
   Alliances Endure: The United States-Pakistan           Enoch Nappen, Associate Professor. Ph.D., New
   Alliance, 1954-1971 (1994); Co-editor, with                York University. Specializes in Constitutional
   Judith Kornberg, Women in Developing                       law and civil rights. Interested in the historic
   Countries: Assessing Strategies for                        development and use of election campaign
   Empowerment (2002).                                        material. He also directs both the undergradu-
Kevin Dooley, Assistant Professor. Ph.D, Rutgers              ate and graduate intern program.
   University. Research interests focus on global-        Joseph Patten, Associate Professor. Ph.D., West
   ization, comparative public policy, the politics of        Virginia University. Specialization in public pol-
   language, and comparative European govern-                 icy; political campaigns at national, state, and
   ments. Author: Politics Still Matter:                      local levels; the United States Congress; the
   Globalization, Governance, and the Revival of              American Presidency; and media law. Author of
   Regional Minorities (2008).                                Warman’s Political Collectibles (2008), a fully
Kathryn Kloby, Assistant Professor. Ph.D., Rutgers            illustrated description of political memorabilia’s
   University. Specialties are public sector                  historic role in the American presidential election
   accounting, performance measurement and                    process. His primary research interests include
   reporting, citizen participation, public policy, and       the United States Congress and American
   research methods. Her most current research                Politics. He is currently co-authoring a textbook
   focuses on accountability in public education.             entitled Introduction to Political Science:
                                                              Bridging the Gap Between Theory and Practice.


                                                                                Monmouth University 63
Humanities and Social Sciences



Saliba Sarsar, Associate Vice President for Global         refer to the chart located in the Social Work section
    Initiatives and Professor. Ph.D., Rutgers              of this catalog for additional details.
    University. Specialties are international relations,
    international organizations, comparative govern-       PSYCHOLOGY
    ment (Middle East), and American foreign policy.       Janice C. Stapley, Chair, Department of Psychology
    Co-author of Ideology, Values, and Technology
    in Political Life (1994) and World Politics: An        Jack Demarest, Professor. Ph.D., State University
    Interdisciplinary Perspective (1995). He is also           of New York at Stony Brook. Primary field of
    the co-editor of Principles and Pragmatism: Key            interest is evolutionary psychology; especially
    Documents from the American Task Force on                  mate choice, parental investment, game theory,
    Palestine (2006), and Patriarch Michel Sabbah              and behavioral ecology. Teaching and research
    – Faithful Witness: On Reconciliation and Peace            interests also include a feminist approach to
    in the Holy Land (2008).                                   sex role stereotyping, especially as it relates to
                                                               male roles.
MASTER OF ARTS IN PUBLIC POLICY (M.A.)                     Lisa M. Dinella, Assistant Professor. Ph.D., Arizona
         The Master of Arts in Public Policy is a 30-          State University. Licensed Marriage and Family
credit degree program that prepares students for               Counselor. Interests include how gender devel-
careers in the field of policy analysis. Career opportu-       opment impacts individuals’ life decisions and
nities in public policy span a wide range of areas in          development, particularly in terms of education
government, nonprofit agencies, and the public and             and career trajectories.
private sectors. Ideal for graduates of all disciplines,   Christine Hatchard, Specialist Professor. B.A.,
the program enhances student skills in policy analysis,        Monmouth University; M.S., Psy.D., Chestnut
overall critical thinking, effective communication, data       Hill College.
analysis, and survey research. The program gives           Doris Klein Hiatt, Associate Professor. Ph.D., City
special emphasis to public ethics, public opinion              University of New York. Specialties are normal
polling, the public policy process, and practicum              and abnormal personality in cultural, develop-
opportunities in public agencies. It is also designed to       mental, and gender-specific perspectives.
accommodate the lifestyles of both career profession-          Teaching, research, and clinical interests focus
als and full-time graduate students. Some courses are          on relationships in their manifold complexities,
offered in a hybrid model, combining in-class seminars         the development and nurturing of healthy self-
with online instruction. The program is primarily part-        esteem, developmental sequelae of childhood
time, with opportunity for full-time study as well.            trauma, and the impact of gender on mental
                                                               health and illness.
Please refer to the curriculum chart in the appendix       Robyn M. Holmes, Professor. Ph.D., Rutgers
for program requirements. All curriculum charts are            University. Specialization is in child develop-
detailed and displayed in Appendix “B”.                        ment and behavior with a primary interest in
        • M.A. in Public Policy                                children’s play. Current research focuses on
                                                               children’s play, recess, learning environments,
Joint Degree Program                                           and social cognition. Teaching and research
Dual Master’s Degrees in Social Work (MSW) and                 interests include interdisciplinary and cross-cul-
Public Policy (MA-PP)                                          tural approaches.
        The MSW program offers interested stu-             Gary Lewandowski, Assistant Professor. Ph.D., State
dents an opportunity to earn a second master’s                 University of New York at Stony Brook. General
degree in Public Policy (MA), after all of the MSW             area of interest is social psychology. Within social
requirements have been completed. Students who                 psychology, specializes in close romantic relation-
complete the 60-credit MSW can use up to 12 cred-              ships, involving such topics as interpersonal
its from the MSW courses toward the MA in Public               attraction, love, relationship maintenance, and
Policy. Students who complete the Advanced                     relationship dissolution. Specifically, research
Standing (30-credit) MSW can use up to six credits of          focuses on how entering, maintaining, and losing
MSW courses toward the MA in Public Policy. Please             romantic relationships influences the self.



64 Monmouth University
                                                                       Humanities and Social Sciences



Judith L. Nye, Associate Professor and Associate            counseling with children and adolescents.
    Vice President, Academic Foundations –                  Areas of interest include career counseling, stu-
    General Education. Ph.D., Virginia                      dent retention, spirituality, legal and ethical
    Commonwealth University. Specialization is in           issues in therapy, and multicultural issues.
    the area of experimental social psychology with     Alan A. Cavaiola, Professor. Ph.D., Hofstra
    a primary interest in social cognition. Current         University. Specialization in the area of counsel-
    research focuses on group processes, specifi-           ing issues related to mental health and psychol-
    cally impression formation and the relationship         ogy, with a primary interest in alcoholism, sub-
    between leaders and followers. Of additional            stance abuse and other addictive behaviors, and
    and related interest are sex role stereotypes.          their impact on individuals, couples, and families.
David E. Payne, Associate Professor. Ph.D.,                 Teaching, research, and counseling interests
    Columbia University. Interested in the relation         focus on adolescent development, sequelae of
    between knowledge and the meaningful context            trauma, abnormal personality development, DUI
    in which it is acquired. Research examines the          offenders, and workplace dynamics.
    cognitive processes involved in learning and        Stephanie Hall, Assistant Professor. Ph.D.,
    memory in humans and animals. Current work              University of New Orleans. Specialization in the
    involves interaction of perceptual and conceptual       area of mental health counseling with primary
    processes in learning, memory, and judgments.           interests in multicultural counseling, women’s
Janice C. Stapley, Associate Professor. Ph.D.,              issues, trauma, and group work.
    Rutgers University. Special areas of interest are   Gary J. Handler, Field Placement Coordinator.
    developmental psychology and emotion.                   Ph.D., New York University. M.A., Monmouth
    Research program is focused on gender differ-           University. Specialization is in psychological
    ences in normal and pathological emotion and            counseling, focusing on cognitive and behav-
    emotional development during adolescence.               ioral approaches. Areas of teaching interest
David B. Strohmetz, Professor, Associate Vice               include art therapy and alternative therapies, as
    President, Academic and Institutional                   well as cognitive and behavioral techniques.
    Assessment. Ph.D., Temple University.                   Current emphasis is on supporting students in
    Specialization in social psychology with an             field placement and supervising to support
    emphasis on methodological and quantitative             development of mature counseling skills.
    issues. Current areas of research include the       Joanne Jodry, Specialist Professor. DMH, Drew
    social psychology of the experiment, particularly       University. M.A., Monmouth University.
    the nature of the volunteer subject, and social         Specializations in professional mental health
    influences on tipping in restaurants.                   counseling with primary clinical interests in
Michele Van Volkom, Lecturer. Ph.D.,State                   women’s issues throughout the life span, life
    University of New York at Albany. Current               crisis, and existential issues. Areas of interest in
    research interests include risky health-related         research include the interplay of counseling and
    behaviors among college students, with an               religion (through a world religion perspective);
    emphasis on the prevalence of cigarette smok-           the impact of therapeutic relationships on the
    ing and its impact on major life decisions.             counselor; and integrating feminist concepts
    Research interests include family relationships,        into counseling.
    especially the relationship between siblings, as    George Kapalka, Associate Professor and Chair.
    well as the link between tomboyism in child-            Ph.D., Fairleigh Dickinson University.
    hood and gender roles in adulthood.                     Specialization in the areas of counseling, clini-
                                                            cal, and school psychology with emphasis on
PSYCHOLOGICAL COUNSELING                                    child and adolescent counseling and assess-
George Kapalka, Chair, Department of Psychological          ment, learning disabilities, school consultation,
  Counseling                                                and legal/forensic issues. Current research pro-
                                                            gram is focused on the education, counseling,
David Burkholder, Assistant Professor. Ph.D., Kent          and management of children with behavioral
   State University. Specialization in mental health        problems (including ADHD) in school and at



                                                                               Monmouth University 65
Humanities and Social Sciences



    home, as well as researching the benefits of           licensing to engage in private practice as a
    nutritional and herbal therapies.                      Professional Counselor. Courses are designed to
Solomon Z. Schuck, Associate Professor, Ph.D.,             satisfy criteria prescribed by the New Jersey State
    New York University. Specialization in Crisis          Board of Professional Counselor Examiners.
    Intervention and Family Therapy with a bias            (However, it is the student’s responsibility to ensure
    towards prevention. Areas of interest include          acceptability by the licensing agency.) In addition,
    the utilization of culturally consonant                because this 60-credit degree is a CACREP-accred-
    approaches to primary prevention. Research             ited program in Mental Health Counseling, it may sat-
    interests include a study of the impact of culture     isfy the educational requirements for counselor licen-
    and personality of the therapeutic process and         sure in other states.
    on attitudes towards social issues.
Frances Trotman, Professor. Ph.D., Columbia                Please refer to the curriculum chart in the appendix
    University. Areas of interest include child devel-     for program requirements. All curriculum charts are
    opment, racism, and minority issues; stress            detailed and displayed in Appendix “B”.
    management; divorce mediation; aging; aca-                     • M.S. in Mental Health Counseling
    demic resilience; women’s issues; feminist
    counseling; and counseling with African-               POST-MASTER’S CERTIFICATE IN
    American women.                                        PROFESSIONAL COUNSELING**
                                                                    The Post-Master’s Certificate in Professional
MASTER OF ARTS IN PSYCHOLOGICAL                            Counseling, a 30 credit post-master’s program, is
COUNSELING (M.A.)                                          designed to academically prepare students for the
        The Master of Arts in Psychological                Professional Counselor Licensure Examination.
Counseling is a 30-credit program that focuses on          Courses may supplement the student’s master’s to
counseling techniques, assessment methods, and             satisfy criteria prescribed by the New Jersey State
diagnosis and treatment. The curriculum is structured      Board of Professional Counselor Examiners.
so that students receive a solid foundation in coun-       (However, it is the student’s responsibility to ensure
seling procedure provided by the core courses and          acceptability by the licensing agency.) The curriculum
enables students to explore the current practices in       concentrates on developing the basic course areas,
the counseling field through elective credits. By com-     specialty areas, research and evaluation skills, and
bining academic course work with experiential study,       practical experiences. Following the New Jersey
the Master of Arts in Psychological Counseling             State requirements for a 60-credit program (counting
equips the student with proficiencies in the traditional   the student’s master’s courses), 45 credits comprise
counseling field, as well as in emerging areas.            the core, along with a 900-hour internship (nine cred-
                                                           its) and up to six credits of related electives.
Please refer to the curriculum chart in the appendix
for program requirements. All curriculum charts are        Please refer to the curriculum chart in the appendix
detailed and displayed in Appendix “B”.                    for program requirements. All curriculum charts are
        • M.A. in Psychological Counseling                 detailed and displayed in Appendix “B”.
                                                                   • Post-Master’s Certificate in Professional
MASTER OF SCIENCE IN MENTAL HEALTH                                   Counseling**
COUNSELING (M.S.)
        The Master of Science in Mental Health                      ** Note: No new students will be admitted to
Counseling is a 60-credit program designed to pro-         this program effective July 1, 2010
vide students with the courses necessary to sit for




66 Monmouth University
The School of Science




                                                                                                                      Course Descriptions
DEAN: Michael A. Palladino, Ph.D.                            well as minors in Biology, Chemistry, Computer
ASSOCIATE DEAN: Catherine N. Duckett, Ph.D.                  Science, Information Technology, Mathematics, and
ASSISTANT DEAN: John A. Tiedemann, M.S.                      Physics, and concentrations in Molecular Cell
                                                             Physiology, Advanced Chemistry, Biochemistry,
         Monmouth University’s School of Science is          Chemical Physics, Cytotechnology, and Medical




                                                                                                                             School of Science
a community of teacher-scholars actively fostering           Laboratory Science.
learning, quantitative reasoning, and scientific                      The School of Science also offers master’s
inquiry among its majors and among all students. A           degrees in Computer Science, Software
goal of the School is to lead in the innovative devel-       Engineering, and Financial Mathematics. The under-
opment and delivery of curricula and in providing            graduate BSSE program in Software Engineering is
creative solutions to problems that include significant      accredited by the Engineering Accreditation
technical components. Educational programs pro-              Commission of ABET, 111 Market Place, Suite 1050,
vide a student-centered learning environment that            Baltimore, MD 21202-4012 - telephone: (410) 347-
builds a foundation for lifelong learning, critical think-   7700. The Chemistry, Medical Technology, and
ing, and collaborative, technical problem solving.           Physics Department is approved by the American
Faculty scholarship interests include: original basic        Chemical Society (ACS). All qualified advanced
and applied research in a range of disciplines and           chemistry, biochemistry, and chemical physics
scholarly work on science education and pedagogy.            degree recipients are eligible to receive ACS certifi-
Undergraduate and graduate students are encour-              cation of their degrees. The degrees in Clinical
aged to participate in student-faculty collaborative         Laboratory Science and Medical Technology are
research projects leading to the acquisition and dis-        accredited by the National Accrediting Agency for
semination of new knowledge in the sciences.                 Clinical Laboratory Sciences (NAACLS). All pro-
         The School of Science offers undergradu-            grams of study are directed toward preparing stu-
ate degree programs in Biology, Chemistry, Clinical          dents for working and living in a multicultural, tech-
Laboratory Science, Computer Science, Marine and             nologically complex, global environment.
Environmental Biology and Policy, Mathematics,                        Studies in the School of Science provide
Medical Technology, and Software Engineering, as             students with a solid background in the technical




                                                                                    Monmouth University 67
School of Science



aspects of their chosen scientific or engineering field,       gies into useful applications; RFID, large scale
sufficient to prepare them for further study in gradu-         systems architecture and integration; work in all
ate or professional programs, or to compete for                phases of technology development from the lab
access to employment opportunities in industry or              to customer support; operations, administration,
education. Core courses for the non-major stress the           and maintenance (OA&M) of complex com-
nature of the scientific enterprise and the benefits           puter/communications environments; cus-
and risks that scientific advances present to society          tomer/client and vendor relationship manage-
rather than the digestion of large doses of content            ment especially outsourcing; and processes for
from the discipline. Both major and non-major                  quality technology realization and support.
courses emphasize the importance of critical thinking
and cooperative learning, clarify working to the sci-                The Rapid Response Institute (RRI) provides
entific method in posing and answering questions           research opportunities in support of Homeland
concerning the natural world, and explore the nature       Security and Homeland Defense for School of Science
of human problems for which technology may pro-            faculty and adjuncts as well as high school teachers
vide solutions.                                            and students, undergraduate and graduate students,
                                                           and contracted or visiting scientists. This software
RAPID RESPONSE INSTITUTE                                   engineering-based institute aims to develop decision-
                                                           enhancing aids that enable early and enhanced threat
Barbara T. Reagor, Ph.D. Director, Rapid                   identification and appropriate response in the support
    Response Institute. A Bellcore Fellow and for-         of the chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and
    mer Telcordia VP of Homeland Security, Dr.             explosive events. These same techniques can be
    Reagor worked for the past thirty-four years in        applicable to homeland security/counter-terrorism,
    the fields of National Security Emergency              natural disaster, environmental crisis, and pandemic
    Preparedness, Disaster Prevention and                  scenarios, and this duality provides an open, accessi-
    Recovery, Crisis Management, Chemical                  ble, and reasonably inexpensive test bed for the
    Contamination, and Network Risk Assessment             development of prototypes being designed to meet
    associated with telecommunications and infor-          both domestic and military needs.
    mation technology systems.
William Tepfenhart, Ph.D. Chief Technology Officer         URBAN COAST INSTITUTE
    for the Rapid Response Institute and Associate
    Professor in the Department of Computer                Anthony B. MacDonald, Director. Mr. MacDonald
    Science and Software Engineering. Dr.                      brings over twenty-five years of executive and pol-
    Tepfenhart’s experience ranges across a broad              icy experience in coastal and ocean law and pol-
    spectrum of activities (government, AT&T, and              icy at the local, state, and federal level to the UCI.
    Monmouth University). He has performed in the          James Nickels, Marine Scientist, Urban Coast
    role of instructor, researcher, software devel-            Institute. Mr. Nickels has worked for over
    oper, and author. He is trained as a physicist,            twenty-five years on marine research, monitor-
    and his areas of expertise include object-ori-             ing, surveying, and field operations in both the
    ented software development, artificial intelli-            public and private sectors.
    gence, and software engineering.
James Hammill, Research Scientist for the Rapid                     The Urban Coast Institute (UCI) serves the
    Response Institute and a Certified Disaster            public interest as a forum for research, education,
    Recovery Planner. He was co-chair for the              and collaboration that fosters the application of the
    Response and Recovery Chapter with Dr.                 best available science and policy to support healthy
    Reagor for the MIPT publication “Project First         and productive coastal ecosystems and a sustain-
    Responder.” He has also held positions at              able and economically vibrant future for coastal com-
    FEMA and AT&T.                                         munities. The UCI efforts focus on the following pro-
Robert M. Kelly Jr., MSEE Stanford University.             gram areas:
    Adjunct Professor Monmouth University.                          • Coastal Law and Policy
    Synthesis of emerging and existing technolo-                    • Coastal Watershed Management



68 Monmouth University
                                                                                         School of Science



        • Coastal Communities and Economies                  Virginia. Specializes in male reproductive biol-
        • Regional Ecosystem Management                      ogy and cell and molecular biology. Current
                                                             research includes antimicrobial properties of
BIOLOGY                                                      male reproductive organs, and cellular and
Ivan Gepner, Chair, Department of Biology                    molecular responses to ischemia and hypoxia
                                                             in the mammalian testis.
Pedram Patrick Daneshgar, Assistant Professor.            Karen Pesce, Lecturer. Ph.D., Rutgers University.
    B.A., University of Delaware; M.S., Saint                Specializes in environmental microbiology.
    Joseph’s University; Ph.D., University of Florida.       Current research interests include microbial
Ellen Doss-Pepe, Lecturer. Ph.D., Rensselaer                 community analysis and characterization of
    Polytechnic Institute. Specializes in biochemistry,      novel biodegradative genes from a polluted
    protein folding and misfolding, and protein degra-       environment.
    dation. Current interests include the relationship    Dennis E. Rhoads, Professor. Ph.D., University of
    of protein misfolding and degradation as underly-        Cincinnati. Specializes in biochemistry and neu-
    ing causes of neurodegenerative diseases.                roscience. Current research on neurobiology of
Ivan A. Gepner, Associate Professor. Ph.D.,                  alcohol and drug abuse.
    Princeton University. Specializes in genetics         John A. Tiedemann, Assistant Dean of the School
    and developmental biology. Current interests             of Science and Director of the Marine and
    include computer applications in biology, espe-          Environmental Biology and Policy Program.
    cially computer modeling and simulation of nat-          M.S., Florida Institute of Technology.
    ural phenomena.                                          Specializes in marine ecology, coastal zone
Ursula A. Howson, Assistant Professor. Ph.D.,                management, environmental science, and
    University of Delaware. Specializes in marine            marine and environmental education. Current
    ecology, ichthyology, and invertebrate zoology.          applied research involves watershed manage-
    Current research includes physiological ecology          ment strategies and best management prac-
    and behavior of larval and juvenile fishes, and          tices for coastal nonpoint source pollution.
    image-based analyses of ontogenetic changes
    in their morphology.                                  CHEMISTRY, MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY,
Kathryn A. Lionetti, Associate Professor. Ph.D.,          AND PHYSICS
    State University of New York at Stony Brook.          William Schreiber, Interim Chair, Department of
    Specializes in microbiology and molecular biol-         Chemistry, Medical Technology, and Physics
    ogy. Current interests include recombinant DNA
    technology, apoptosis, and applications of            Azzam S. Elayan, Lecturer. Ph.D., Wesleyan
    molecular biology in clinical diagnostic proce-          University. Organometallic chemistry. Synthesis
    dures and emerging viral diseases.                       and characterization of hybrid (organic-inor-
Dorothy Lobo, Associate Professor. Ph.D., The                ganic) polymers and catalytically active
    Catholic University of America. Specializes in           organometallic complexes; mechanisms of
    cell and molecular biology, and signal transduc-         metal-catalyzed processes, particularly those
    tion pathways. Current research includes the             involving carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions.
    regulation of stress signaling pathways during        Bradley J. Ingebrethsen, Lecturer. Ph.D., Clarkson
    cell proliferation and programmed cell death.            University. Physical chemistry. Mass transport
James P. Mack, Professor. Ed.D., Teachers                    in aerosol systems, the fate of aerosols in the
    College, Columbia University. Specializes in             environment and in the respiratory tract, and
    anatomy and physiology, vitamin A, and mem-              the physical chemistry of cigarette smoke.
    branes. Current research includes antibiotic          Louis J. Kijewski, Professor. Ph.D., New York
    screening of plants from Belize, spread of               University. Fields of interest are electromag-
    human pathogens by migratory birds, and                  netic theory, mechanics, and quantum mechan-
    antimicrobial activity of essential oils.                ics. Most recent interests include many-body
Michael A. Palladino, Dean, School of Science and            problem, optical fibers, computer calculations in
    Associate Professor. Ph.D., University of                atomic physics, and group theory.



                                                                               Monmouth University 69
School of Science



Robin R. Kucharczyk, Lecturer. Ph.D., Yale                  pounds from drinking water, and analytical
    University. Inorganic chemistry. Organometallic         method development.
    chemistry of molybdenum and approaches to
    teaching introductory chemistry.                    COMPUTER SCIENCE AND SOFTWARE
Massimilliano Lamberto, Assistant Professor.            ENGINEERING
    Ph.D., University of Southampton (U.K.).            Jiacun Wang, Chair, Department of Computer
    Organic chemistry. Small molecule synthesis for        Science and Software Engineering
    the inhibition of telomerase by G-quadruplex        Joseph Chung, Unix Administrator and Teacher
    DNA stabilization; synthesis of novel chro-         Maureen Paparella, Director of Information Technology
    mophoric systems for dye-sensitized solar cells
    and sensor applications; synthetic methodology.     Michiko Kosaka, Associate Professor. Ph.D., New
S. Mallikarjun, Professor. Ph.D., University of             York University. Interests include natural lan-
    London, U.K. Primary field is liquid state              guage processing and artificial intelligence.
    physics. Current interests include study of crys-   Francis C. Lutz, Professor. Ph.D., New York
    tals and international education.                       University. Interests include environmental engi-
Kanchana Mudalige, Lecturer. Ph.D., University of           neering and curricular innovation. Active in edu-
    Illinois. Analytical chemistry and electronic           cational issues through the American Society
    engineering.                                            for Engineering Education and the National
Datta V. Naik, Dean of the Graduate School and              Society of Professional Engineers.
    Professor. Ph.D., University of Notre Dame.         James McDonald, Associate Professor. Ph.D., New
    Analytical-inorganic chemistry. Research inter-         York University. Interests include software verifi-
    ests are detection and control of process               cation and validation, project management, and
    gases, air quality, and spectroscopic methods           empirical software engineering.
    of analysis.                                        Allen Milewski, Associate Professor. Ph.D., Brown
William L. Schreiber, Lecturer. Ph.D., University of        University. Areas of interest include human-com-
    Rochester. Organic chemistry. Organic synthe-           puter interactions, contextual communication and
    sis, process research, organic photochemistry,          awareness, and global software development.
    odor perception, and chemical education.            Mohammed S. Obaidat, Professor. Ph.D., Ohio
Carolyn Supplee, Assistant Professor. Ph.D., The            State University. Interests include wireless com-
    Ohio State University. Inorganic and analytical         munications and networks, telecommunications
    chemistry. Syntheses and reactivity of transition       and networking systems, security of network,
    metal complexes for the development of envi-            information and computer systems, security of
    ronmentally benign processes and techniques             e-based systems, performance evaluation of
    (“green chemistry”) to conduct C-H activation           computer systems, algorithms and networks,
    and oxidation chemistry. Characterization of            modeling and simulation, high performance and
    metal complexes and their reaction chemistry            parallel computing/computers, applied neural
    utilizing physical and analytical methods.              networks and pattern recognition, adaptive
Danuta Szwajkajzer, Lecturer. Ph.D., Rutgers                learning, and speech processing.
    University. Biophysical chemistry. Chemistry of     Daniela Rosca, Associate Professor. Ph.D., Old
    proteins and nucleic acids, thermodynamics of           Dominion University. Interests include require-
    drugs binding to DNA, mechanisms of recogni-            ments elicitation, analysis and specification,
    tion for biomolecules, and studies of structure         and methodologies for the development and
    and thermodynamic changes of nucleic acids              use of business rules.
    oligomers.                                          Richard Scherl, Associate Professor. Ph.D.,
Tsanangurayi Tongesayi, Assistant Professor.                University of Illinois. Interests include artificial
    Ph.D., West Virginia University. Analytical             intelligence (especially knowledge representa-
    chemistry. Speciation, geochemical cycling, and         tion, automated reasoning, and natural lan-
    bioavailability of heavy metals in the environ-         guage processing), cognitive science, and infor-
    ment, technologies and methods for the                  mation systems.
    removal of toxic heavy metals and their com-



70 Monmouth University
                                                                                           School of Science



William Tepfenhart, Associate Professor. Ph.D.,                    • M.S. Computer Science, Security of
    University of Texas. Interests include artificial                Information Systems and Networks (Track
    intelligence, software architecture, and software                “A” or Track “B”)
    design.
Jack M. Van Arsdale, Associate Professor.                  GRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN COMPUTER
    M.S.E.E., Polytechnic Institute of New York.           SCIENCE
    Interests include digital and microcomputer-           (Please refer to the curriculum charts in appendix “B”
    based design, digital phase-lock loop frequency        for program requirements.)
    synthesis, and digital synthesis.                              The Graduate Certificate Program in
Jiacun Wang, Associate Professor. Ph.D., Nanjing           Computer Science, Software Systems Design and
    University of Science and Technology, China.           Development, is specifically designed to provide
    Interests include software architecture, Petri         essential software development skills, including com-
    nets, real-time systems, discrete event sys-           puter programming, data structures, algorithms, and
    tems, telecommunications, and networking.              operating systems for graduates of programs with
Cui Yu, Associate Professor. Ph.D., National               minimal or no computer science training. Those stu-
    University of Singapore. Interests include data-       dents receiving the certificate will be:
    base management systems, spatial databases,                    • Knowledgeable of and competent in the
    and information storage and retrieval.                            use of object-oriented programming lan-
                                                                      guages and techniques, including
MASTER OF SCIENCE IN COMPUTER                                         advanced features of C++ and efficient
SCIENCE (M.S.)                                                        code design;
         The Master of Science in Computer Science                 • Knowledgeable of fundamental data
provides a broad background in graduate-level com-                    structures and computing algorithms;
puter science study. The 32- to 45-credit program                  • Knowledgeable of operating system
allows the student to choose a thesis option (Track “A”)              concepts, design, development, and
or a non-thesis option (Track “B”). Students may also                 applications;
choose to specialize in Computer Networks,                         • Able to design and develop computer pro-
Databases and Intelligent Information Systems, or                     grams of realistic and practical complexity,
Security of Information Systems and Networks. When                    either as individuals or as part of a team.
the applicant has a strong background in computer sci-
ence, such as a bachelor’s degree in computer science                The certificate program will generally be a
with excellent standing, up to 15 credits (CS501B-         three- to five-course sequence, depending on the
CS509) may be waived. Other science and engineer-          prior programming skills of the applicant. A student
ing majors may be required to take some or all of these    can be admitted to the certificate program with
courses. These foundation courses must be completed        “advanced standing,” having been given credit for rel-
with a minimum GPA of 3.0, and all prerequisite            evant experience or courses taken previously.
courses must be passed with a grade of “B-“ or better.     However, a student must take at least three courses
                                                           in the sequence at Monmouth in order to receive the
Please refer to the curriculum charts in the appendix      certificate. If the applicant has some programming
for program requirements. All curriculum charts are        background, but insufficient or non-recent training
detailed and displayed in Appendix “B”.                    with modern programming languages, he or she can
                                                           be conditionally admitted and required to take a sixth
        • M.S. Computer Science, General                   course, CS501A, as an alternative to delaying admis-
          (Track “A” or Track “B”)                         sion while the programming prerequisite is being met.
        • M.S. Computer Science, Computer                            The certificate program is intended to serve
          Networks (Track “A” or Track “B”)                primarily part-time students employed by area busi-
        • M.S. Computer Science, Databases and             ness, education, and government organizations. It
          Intelligent Information Systems (Track “A”       may also be an opportunity for professional develop-
          or Track “B”)                                    ment, career change, or career enhancement in situ-
                                                           ations where computer programming is a valued skill.



                                                                                 Monmouth University 71
School of Science



Upon completion of the program with a GPA of 3.00          4.      Work effectively as part of a team, including
or better, the student will receive a certificate and              teams that may be international and geo-
guaranteed admission to the Computer Science                       graphically distributed, to develop quality
Graduate Program at Monmouth University. However,                  software artifacts, and to lead in one area of
none of the certificate courses can be applied to the              project development, such as project man-
main 11-course master’s degree requirement.                        agement, requirements analysis, architec-
                                                                   ture, construction, or quality assurance;
Please refer to the curriculum chart in the appendix       5.      Reconcile conflicting project objectives, find-
for program requirements. All curriculum charts are                ing acceptable compromises within limita-
detailed and displayed in Appendix “B”.                            tions of cost, time, knowledge, existing sys-
                                                                   tems, and organizations;
        • Software Systems Design and                      6.      Design appropriate software engineering
          Development                                              solutions that address ethical, social, legal,
        • Graduate Certificate in Computer Science                 and economic concerns;
                                                           7.      Understand and appreciate the importance
MASTER OF SCIENCE IN SOFTWARE                                      of feasibility analysis, negotiation, effective
ENGINEERING (M.S.)                                                 work habits, leadership, and good communi-
          Monmouth University was one of the first                 cation with stakeholders in a typical software
institutions in the United States to recognize the                 development environment;
newly emerging discipline of Software Engineering          8.      Learn new models, techniques, and tech-
by establishing a separate department to specialize                nologies as they emerge, and appreciate the
in this strategic engineering discipline. The depart-              necessity of such continuing professional
ment offers a Master of Science Degree in Software                 development;
Engineering and two graduate certificate programs:         9.      Analyze a current significant software tech-
the Certificate in Software Development and the                    nology, be able to articulate its strengths and
Certificate in Software Engineering.                               weaknesses, and be able to specify and pro-
          The objective of the master’s degree pro-                mote improvements or extensions to that
gram is for the student to master the necessary skills             knowledge.
and knowledge that allow him or her to be an effec-
tive member of a software development team. The                      All classes are held in the late afternoon, and
program’s educational objectives are to prepare stu-       most of our students are from New Jersey’s premier
dents so that upon graduation they will:                   software industries. The department offers the entire
1.        Show mastery of the software engineering         program at the main campus of Monmouth
          knowledge and skills and professional issues     University. The Master of Science in Software
          necessary to practice as a software engineer     Engineering degree is a 36-credit curriculum, with
          in a variety of application domains with         five core courses, five advanced elective courses,
          demonstrated performance in at least one         and a six-credit thesis or practicum. The core
          application domain;                              courses provide the student with the foundations of
2.        Understand the relationship between soft-        modern software engineering. Two of those courses
          ware engineering and systems engineering         will be waived for students who have a bachelor’s
          and be able to apply systems engineering         degree in software engineering and who choose to
          principles and practices in the engineering of   complete a thesis.
          software;                                                  The Software Engineering Master’s Degree
3.        Show mastery of software engineering in at       Program offers six interdisciplinary tracks. Students
          least one specialty, such as embedded            take fifteen credits of electives, which may focus on
          devices, safety critical systems, highly dis-    one of the following tracks: the Organizational
          tributed systems, software engineering eco-      Management track, which prepares students to
          nomics, or one of the knowledge areas of the     become software development managers or special-
          Graduate Software Engineering Reference          ists in software process improvement; the
          Curriculum (GSWERC) body of knowledge;           Telecommunications track, which prepares students



72 Monmouth University
                                                                                           School of Science



to become specialists in telecommunications soft-          Requirements include the 15 credits of core courses
ware development; the Embedded Systems track,              needed for the Master of Science in Software
which prepares students to become specialists in           Engineering, as well as a course (3 credits) in soft-
real-time embedded systems development; the                ware project management. (Up to 15 credits of foun-
Information Management Track, which prepares stu-          dation courses may also be required.) Upon comple-
dents to be chief information officers or specialists in   tion of this program, students will have the ability to
information systems integration and development;           design software that solves practical problems, a crit-
the Management of Software Technology track,               ical skill for career success and advancement.
which prepares students to be chief technology offi-
cers or specialists in the acquisition of software sys-    Please refer to the curriculum charts in the Appendix
tems for businesses; or the Thesis Track, which pre-       “B” for program requirements.
pares students who enter the program with a BSSE                    • Certificate in Software Development
degree to specialize in two of the fields associated                • Certificate in Software Engineering
with the tracks outlined above.
                                                           MATHEMATICS
Please refer to the curriculum charts in the appendix      David Marshall, Chair, Department of Mathematics
for program requirements. All curriculum charts are
detailed and displayed in Appendix “B”.                    Richard Bastian, Lecturer. Ph.D., Johns Hopkins
                                                               University. Interests include applied mathemat-
        • M.S. in Software Engineering                         ics, mathematics and culture, and philosophy of
        • M.S. in Software Engineering, Embedded               mathematics.
          Systems Track                                    Barbara Lynn Bodner, Professor. Ed.D., Rutgers
        • M.S. in Software Engineering, Information            University. Interests include heuristic process
          Management Track                                     use in problem-solving, integration of computer
        • M.S. in Software Engineering,                        technology, and applications into the curricu-
          Management of Software Technology Track              lum, as well as the study of mathematics from
        • M.S. in Software Engineering,                        historical and artistic perspectives.
          Organizational Management Track                  Suneal Chaudhary, Assistant Professor. Ph.D.,
        • M.S. in Software Engineering,                        UCLA. Interests include mathematical and com-
          Telecommunications Track                             putational finance, economics, and Monte Carlo
        • M.S. in Software Engineering, Thesis Track           methods.
                                                           Micah Chrisman, Assistant Professor. Ph.D.,
SOFTWARE ENGINEERING CERTIFICATE                               University of Hawaii. Interests include algebraic
PROGRAMS                                                       topology, low-dimensional topology, and knot
         The certificate in Software Development,              theory.
which includes fifteen credits of foundation courses       Joseph Coyle, Associate Professor. Ph.D.,
plus a three-credit project course, prepares students          University of Delaware. Interests include
to become proficient software developers. It also              numerical analysis and inverse problems.
serves as a foundation for those who do not have the       Bonnie Gold, Professor. Ph.D., Cornell University.
necessary background but hope to enter the master’s            Interests include philosophy of mathematics
degree program. It is the ideal starting point for those       and innovation in undergraduate mathematics
holding bachelor’s degrees in disciplines other than           education.
software engineering or computer science who are           Betty Liu, Professor. Ph.D., University of Maryland.
interested in a career in software engineering or who          Interests include numerical solution of differen-
hope to do software development in their chosen field.         tial equations and mathematical modeling.
         The certificate in Software Engineering is an     David C. Marshall, Associate Professor, Ph.D.,
18-credit program that prepares graduates to                   University of Arizona. Interests include number
become effective members of a software develop-                theory, bilinear and quadratic forms, and under-
ment team. Students gain an understanding of team              graduate mathematics curriculum.
capability,     dynamics,       and      performance.



                                                                                 Monmouth University 73
School of Science



Susan H. Marshall, Assistant Professor. Ph.D.,                  The goals of the program are to prepare
    University of Arizona. Interests include number    quantitative financial analysts for successful employ-
    theory, arithmetic geometry, and the learning      ment, produce scholarship in the area of financial
    and teaching of proof.                             mathematics, and provide the surrounding commu-
Emanuel Palsu-Andriescu, Lecturer. Ph.D.,              nity with a viable opportunity to augment current
    University of Rochester. Interests include         financial skills with new and analytical knowledge.
    microlocal analysis, Colombeau generalized                  The MSFM requires applicants to have
    functions, and Fourier integral operators.         earned an undergraduate degree in mathematics, or
Wai K. Pang, Assistant Professor. Ph.D., Texas         majored in a related field that requires a substantial
    Tech University. Interests include functional      component of mathematics such as physics, electri-
    data analysis, image analysis, and multi-sample    cal engineering, or computer engineering. Business,
    problems in Hilbert spaces                         computer science, or related majors with a minor in
Bruce Ralli, Lecturer. M.S., Georgian Court            mathematics are also acceptable. Applicants must
    University. Interests include teaching mathemat-   have completed Calculus I,II, and III, Linear Algebra,
    ics and technology in the classroom.               Differential Equations (with some exposure to partial
G. Boyd Swartz, Professor. Ph.D., New York             differential equations), and a course in Calculus-
    University. Interests include computer modeling,   based Statistics. Applicants must have a minimum
    object- oriented programming, and integration      overall GPA of 3.0 in their major and 2.5 overall.
    of computer technology into the curriculum.        Applicants who have not previously completed
                                                       courses in the areas of Calculus, Linear Algebra,
MASTER OF SCIENCE IN FINANCIAL                         Differential Equations, or Statistics will be evaluated
MATHEMATICS (M.S.)                                     on a case-by-case basis. They may be required to
         The Master of Science in Financial            complete a foundation curriculum before entering the
Mathematics (MSFM) provides a degree that inte-        master’s program.
grates mathematics and financial applications at the
graduate level in order to develop well-trained stu-   Please refer to the curriculum charts in the appendix
dents who can enter and be successful in the local     for program requirements. All curriculum charts are
financial sector.                                      detailed and displayed in Appendix “B”.
                                                               • Master of Science in Financial
                                                                 Mathematics




74 Monmouth University
Leon Hess Business School




                                                                                                                        Leon Hess Business School
                                                                                                                 Course Descriptions
NTERIM DEAN: Donald M. Moliver, Ph.D                     Social Policy, which has been endowed through gen-
INTERIM ASSOCIATE DEAN: Gilda Agacer, Ph.D.              erous gifts in the name of Jack T. Kvernland, a late
ASSISTANT DEAN: Noah Hart, Jr., Ed.D.                    trustee of the University. Professor Guy Oakes of the
MBA PROGRAM DIRECTOR: Douglas Stives,                    Management and Marketing Department currently
  MBA, CPA                                               occupies this chair. Professor Oakes is studying
                                                         problems concerning the relationship between cor-
          The Leon Hess Business School is dedi-         porate, public, and private values in American life.
cated to providing an education that qualifies its       The School also administers the Kislak Real Estate
graduates for positions of leadership. Curricula are     Institute, which is directed by Professor Donald
developed, taught, and regularly updated by a fac-       Moliver of the Economics and Finance Department.
ulty with strong academic and business experience.       Dr. Moliver also holds the Steven and Elaine Pozycki
Critical thinking, effective communication skills, and   Endowed Professor Chair in Real Estate. Also within
a flexible managerial perspective are emphasized.        the Leon Hess School of Business is the Monmouth
The Leon Hess Business School is accredited by           University Center for Entrepreneurship.
AACSB – the International Association to Advance                   The top 20% of MBA graduates and 10% of
Collegiate Schools of Business.                          undergraduate junior and senior students are eligi-
          The MBA program is designed to develop a       ble for election to Beta Gamma Sigma, the
comprehensive background in the theory and prac-         International Honor Society for AACSB-accredited
tice of business management decision-making and          business schools.
concentrates on contemporary managerial respon-
sibilities in a dynamic environment. All curricula       Student Honor Society: Beta Gamma Sigma
underscore the complexity and diversity of manage-
rial decisions in the global economy. Instruction in     ACCOUNTING
small class sizes stresses close contact with faculty    Linda Flaming, Chair, Department of Accounting
and promotes collaborative work.
          Within the Leon Hess Business School is        Gilda Agacer, Associate Professor. Ph.D.,
the Kvernland Chair in Philosophy and Corporate              University of South Carolina. Teaching interests




                                                                                Monmouth University 75
Leon Hess Business School



    include financial and management accounting,              ests include pricing of capital assets, invest-
    advanced accounting topics, cost accounting,              ments, fixed income securities, and interna-
    and international accounting. Research interests          tional finance. Additional interests include deriv-
    include the areas of auditor’s independence and           atives and econometrics.
    ethics, and total quality management.                 Y. Lal Mahajan, Associate Professor. Ph.D., Rutgers
Linda Flaming, Associate Professor. Ph.D.,                    University. Research interests include economet-
    University of Oklahoma. Teaching and research             ric models for credit unions, corporate finance,
    interests are in auditing and decision-making.            portfolio analysis, and investment theory. Other
Yihong He, Associate Professor. Ph.D., Cleveland              interests include monetary policy effects on inter-
    State University. Teaching interests include finan-       est rates, inflation, and stock market.
    cial and managerial accounting, auditing, and         Donald M. Moliver, Professor, the Steven and
    international accounting. Research interests are          Elaine Pozycki Endowed Professorship and
    in the areas of capital markets accounting and            Director of the Kislak Real Estate Institute.
    international accounting in the emerging markets.         Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute, CRE, and
Paul J. Savoth, Associate Professor. J.D., Seton              MAI designations. Research interests include
    Hall University; L.L.M., Villanova University;            real estate finance and valuation.
    CPA, New Jersey. Interests include various            Patrick O’Halloran, Associate Professor. Ph.D.,
    areas of accounting, especially federal taxation          University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee. Principal
    and legal environment of business.                        research interests are in labor economics, dis-
Douglas Stives, Specialist Professor and MBA                  crimination, payment scheme, and econometrics.
    Program Director. MBA, Lehigh University. CPA;        Steven Pressman, Professor. Ph.D., New School
    New Jersey. Teaching interests are in the areas           for Social Research. Associate editor and book
    of taxation.                                              review editor of the Eastern Economic Journal,
Nancy Uddin, Associate Professor. Ph.D., Rutgers              treasurer of the Eastern Economic Association,
    University. Research and teaching interests               and co-editor of the Review of Political
    include the areas of auditing and accounting              Economy, an international journal of post-
    information systems.                                      Keynesian economics. Primary fields of interest
Minna Yu, Assistant Professor. B.A., M.S., Dongbei            are macroeconomics, poverty and income dis-
    University, China; Ph.D., Kent State University.          tribution, public finance, and the history of eco-
Ronald Zhao, Associate Professor. Ph.D., Texas                nomic thought.
    Tech University. Teaching and research inter-         Benedicte Reyes, Associate Professor. Ph.D.,
    ests are in the areas of cost and management              Columbia University. Research interests include
    accounting, international accounting, and cor-            international corporate finance and capital mar-
    porate finance.                                           kets deregulation.
                                                          Robert H. Scott, III, Associate Professor. Ph.D.,
ECONOMICS, FINANCE, AND REAL ESTATE                           University of Missouri at Kansas City. Research
Benedicte Reyes, Chair, Department of Economics,              interests include credit cards, financial literacy,
  Finance, and Real Estate                                    econometrics, and ecological economics.
                                                          Ying (Clement) Zhang, Assistant Professor. Ph.D.,
Nahid Aslanbeigui, Professor. Ph.D., University of            University of Texas. Research interests include
    Michigan. Specializes in globalization, economic          international equity diversification.
    development, and the history of economic
    thought. Additional interests include economics       MANAGEMENT AND MARKETING
    education and the economic status of women.           David P. Paul III, Chair, Department of Management
Barrie Bailey, Associate Professor. Ph.D.,                  and Marketing
    University of Central Florida. Research interests
    include international mutual fund performance         Gwendolyn Y. Alexis, Assistant Professor. Ph.D.,
    and finance education.                                   New School for Social Research; J.D., Harvard
Andreas C. Christofi, Associate Professor. Ph.D.,            University. Teaching interests in the areas of busi-
    Pennsylvania State University. Research inter-           ness ethics, diversity, and social responsibility.



76 Monmouth University
                                                                            Leon Hess Business School



Daniel Ball, Assistant Professor. Ph.D., University         tics management and management course
    of Massachusetts. Research interests include            development, particularly in quantitative content.
    risk and system uncertainty.                            Author of four books on the shipping industry
John S. Buzza, Specialist Professor. M.A.,                  and on the application of computer simulation to
    University of Phoenix. Teaching interests in the        business decision-making, forecasting business
    areas of entrepreneurship and business organi-          cycles, and financial risk management.
    zation. Director, Monmouth University Center of     Guy Oakes, Professor of Philosophy and Corporate
    Entrepreneurship.                                       Values and Kvernland Endowed Chair in
Edward W. Christensen, Associate Professor and              Philosophy and Corporate Social Policy. Ph.D.,
    Vice President for Information Management,              Cornell University. Primary fields of interest are
    Ph.D., Rutgers University. Special interests            the philosophy of the social sciences and, more
    include the management of organizations and             recently, the sociology of culture and the sociol-
    information technology in relation to strategy,         ogy of ethics. Author of The Imaginary War: Civil
    decision-making, and information acquisition.           Defense and American Cold War Culture (1994).
    Current focus is on the Internet.                   David P. Paul III, Associate Professor. Ph.D., Old
Susan Forquer Gupta, Assistant Professor. Ph.D.,            Dominion University; D.D.S., Virginia
    University of Tennessee. Specializes in market-         Commonwealth University; Medical College of
    ing and international business. Current focus on        Virginia. Primary interests are in marketing and
    independent economies of Central and Eastern            health care management. Co-editor of Health
    Europe. Member of American Marketing                    Marketing Quarterly.
    Association, Academy of International               Joseph Rocereto, Assistant Professor. Ph.D.,
    Business, and Vice President of the Women in            Drexel University. Specializes in customer loy-
    the Academy of International Business.                  alty, particular to brands and retail stores. Other
Amy Handlin, Associate Professor. Ph.D., New                interests include sales management and moti-
    York University. Primary interests are in decep-        vation, international marketing, and consumer
    tive advertising litigation and applications of         behavior.
    marketing to public policy.                         Stuart Rosenberg, Associate Professor. B.A.,
Scott A. Jeffrey, Assistant Professor, BSC, MBA,            Marquette University; M.A., University of
    Santa Clara University, Ph.D., University of            Wisconsin-Madison; MBA, Ph.D., Fordham
    Chicago. His current research interests revolve         University.
    around the use of incentives in organizations,      Eugene S. Simko, Associate Professor. Ph.D., Baruch
    both for employees and for customers. In par-           College of the City University of New York.
    ticular, he is interested in tangible incentives;       Specialty is in strategic planning. Recent research
    high-end merchandise and travel. His most cur-          deals with the role of argumentation in managerial
    rent project is leading up a research team              decision-making and the incorporation of dialecti-
    exploring the motivational events industry.             cal materialism into the planning process.
Min Hua Lu, Associate Professor. D.B.A., George         Michaeline Skiba, Associate Professor. Ed.D.,
    Washington University. Primary interests are in         Columbia University. Research interests include
    strategic marketing management, international           healthcare education, management, and pro-
    marketing management, and                               fessional development within managed care
    multinational/global business management.               settings; strategic readiness and its impact on
    Additional interests include marketing of serv-         organization-wide and behavioral change; and
    ices and consumer behavior.                             social and behavioral issues associated with
Joseph B. Mosca, Associate Professor. Ed.D., New            pharmaceutical promotions and marketing
    York University. Specializes in human resources         strategy.
    management and organizational behavior.             Donald R. Smith, Associate Professor. Ph.D.,
    Current research interests involve the effects of       University of California, Berkeley. Research inter-
    organizational change.                                  ests include applied operations research and
Roy Nersesian, Associate Professor. M.B.A.,                 management science, growth of economic sys-
    Harvard Business School. Interests lie in logis-        tems, and inventory decision support systems.



                                                                              Monmouth University 77
Leon Hess Business School



Charles Willow, Associate Professor. Ph.D.,             integrative capstone course, and elective courses
   University of Houston. Principal research and        where applicable. After admission, permission is
   teaching interests are in e-commerce and tech-       required to take courses at another institution.
   nology management.
                                                        Please refer to the curriculum charts in the appendix
MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (MBA)                 for program requirements. All curriculum charts are
         The mission of the MBA Program is to serve     detailed and displayed in Appendix “B”.
well-qualified graduate students who are committed              • MBA
to the pursuit of more professional responsibilities,           • MBA Accounting Track
the enhancement of their competencies, and an                   • MBA Finance Track
improvement in their value to the organizations they            • MBA Real Estate Track
serve. The graduate program combines manage-                    • MBA with a Concentration in Healthcare
ment practice and theory in a contemporary mana-                  Management
gerial context. The curriculum underscores the com-
plexity and diversity of managerial decisions in both            Candidates desiring to sit for the CPA exam-
the national and international economy. The MBA         ination in New Jersey are required to complete a
student learns in small classes that promote close      minimum of 150 credit hours of education, which
interaction with our business faculty and benefits      would include the minimum of a bachelor’s degree
from special contributions by visiting lecturers.       with required courses in accounting and business.
         The MBA program includes five options: an      The MBA Accounting Track addresses the additional
MBA (which may be pursued either in a regular or        credits needed to comply with the 150-credit hour
accelerated mode), an MBA Accounting Track, an          requirement while giving the student advanced
MBA Real Estate Track, an MBA Finance Track, and        courses in areas required for the CPA exam.
an MBA with a concentration in Healthcare
Management. The Program also offers a Post-MBA          Please refer to the curriculum charts in the appendix
Certificate in Accounting and a Post-MBA Certificate    for program requirements. All curriculum charts are
in Healthcare Management.                               detailed and displayed in Appendix “B”.
         A student must complete a minimum of 30
credits in the MBA program, 33 credits in the                   • Post-MBA Certificate in Accounting
accounting and real estate programs, and 36 credits             • Post-MBA Certificate in Healthcare
in the healthcare concentration. Each program                     Management
includes core courses, beyond the core courses, the




78 Monmouth University
School of Education




                                                                                                                         Education
                                                                                                                 Course Descriptions
DEAN: Lynn Romeo, Ed.D.                                   degree, as well as a Master of Arts in Teaching
ASSOCIATE DEAN: Terri Rothman, Ph.D.                      degree, that leads to an initial certification
                                                          (Elementary Track, Secondary Track, K-12 Track for
         The School of Education (SOE) was estab-         Art, Health and Physical Education, Music, Chinese,
lished in 1995 to broaden and increase support for        Spanish, and Early Childhood Elementary Track)
Monmouth University’s education programs. The             with options of blending various endorsements,
goal of the School is to provide highly effective pro-    such as Teachers of English as a Second Language
grams to prepare practitioners who can help all stu-      (ESL), Teachers of Students with Disabilities (TSD),
dents to learn in diverse school settings. Candidates     Middle School Teachers, and Teachers of
are mentored by a diverse faculty that models best        Supplemental Reading and Mathematics. A Subject
practices grounded in research. The School seeks          Endorsement in Chinese – Certificate of Eligibility
to foster collaboration and partnerships among            with Advanced Standing (CEAS) and a post-mas-
University faculty, students, staff, school practition-   ter’s certificate in Curriculum Studies or Education
ers, and community representatives to improve stu-        are also available. The Department of Educational
dent achievement. Programs are rooted in the belief       Leadership, School Counseling, and Special
that all students can learn and are guided by four        Education offers a Master of Science in Education
key themes: (1) the importance of both pedagogical        degree in the areas of Principal (with an option for
and content knowledge and a commitment to life-           Principal/School Administrator Track), School
long learning, (2) an emphasis on collaboration and       Counseling (with an option for Student Affairs and
partnerships with schools and local communities,          College Counseling Track), Reading Specialist, and
(3) the important role played by cultural diversity       Special Education (with an option for Teacher of
and individual differences in the teaching/learning       Students with Disabilities, Autism, Teaching in
process, and (4) the need to develop educational          Inclusive Settings, or Learning Disabilities Teacher
leadership skills consistent with professional ethics.    – Consultant Tracks); graduate endorsements in
         The School of Education consists of two          Early Childhood, English as a Second Language,
departments. The Department of Curriculum and             Teacher of Students with Disabilities, and
Instruction offers a Master of Education (M.Ed.)          Substance Awareness Coordinator; and post-mas-




                                                                                Monmouth University 79
Education



ter’s endorsements in Reading Specialist, Principal,     Jingzi Huang, Associate Professor. Ph.D., University
Supervisor, Learning Disabilities Teacher Consultant,         of British Columbia. Professional interests
Director of School Counseling Services, and                   include English as a Second Language, foreign
Counseling. A certificate in Educational Technology           language education, and content literacy.
is also available.                                       Jiwon Kim, Lecturer. B.A., M.A., Korea University,
         The SOE programs emphasize state and                 Seoul, South Korea; Ph.D., Purdue University.
national curriculum standards and research-based         Bruce A. Normandia, Associate Professor. Ed.D.,
best practice designed to improve student learning            Rutgers University. Professional interests
and to prepare P-12 students to be successful in the          include equity and access to important mathe-
21st century global economy. Programs are                     matics for all learners.
designed to improve a candidate’s critical thinking,     William Stanley, Professor. Ed.D., Rutgers
communication, and problem-solving skills as these            University. Professional interests include founda-
apply to K-12 student learning. The School’s pro-             tions, curriculum development, and social studies.
grams also integrate state-of-the-art computer tech-     Dorothy Varygiannes, Lecturer. Ed.D., Seton Hall
nologies that can be applied in K-12 classrooms,              University. Specialty is mathematics education.
school administration, and student counseling. The
School has its own computer lab and offers its own       MASTER OF EDUCATION (M.Ed.)
online and Web-enhanced courses.
         The School’s graduate faculty members are       Please refer to the curriculum chart in the appendix
experienced practitioner-scholars whose teaching         for program requirements. All curriculum charts are
reflects the most recent theory and research that        detailed and displayed in Appendix “B”.
candidates can apply as best practice in diverse                 • M.Ed. Master of Education
classroom and school settings to develop effective
schools and improve student learning. All programs       MASTER OF ARTS IN TEACHING (M.A.T.)
incorporate integrated field experiences to enable
candidates to work with students in actual school set-            M.A.T. students are expected to have com-
tings and encourage interaction with teachers,           pleted the content discipline prior to beginning the
administrators, and community representatives.           graduate program. Some Monmouth University stu-
                                                         dents are admitted to graduate study before a coher-
CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION                               ent sequence of at least 30 credits in a recognized
Jingzi Huang, Chair, Department of Curriculum            liberal arts discipline (e.g., art, English, mathematics)
   and Instruction                                       has been completed. These students are expected to
                                                         do all remaining undergraduate coursework at
Sheila Baldwin, Associate Professor. Ph.D., Texas        Monmouth. In cases where the student is unable to
    A&M University. Professional interests include       take the appropriate classes at Monmouth due to
    secondary education, multicultural education,        time conflicts, the students may be given permission
    literacy development, and action research.           to take one or all of these discipline-specific courses
Judith Bazler, Professor. Ed.D., University of           at a two-year institution. In these limited cases, the
    Montana. Specialty is curriculum design and          Monmouth University M.A.T. students who obtain
    science education and informal science, (e.g.,       permission to enroll at two-year institutions while in
    museums). Founder of the Smart Discovery             the M.A.T. program may transfer the credits to
    Center, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania.                     Monmouth during their last semester in the M.A.T.
Laurel Chehayl, Assistant Professor. Ph.D., Kent         program. These credits will be posted to a Monmouth
    State University. Curriculum and Instruction:        University undergraduate transcript after completion
    Teacher Education, Secondary Literacy,               of their M.A.T. program so as to comply with New
    Curriculum Studies.                                  Jersey Code Section 6A:9-5.11.
Letitia Graybill, Lecturer. Ed.D. Rutgers University.
    Professional interests include issues in science     Please refer to the curriculum charts in the appendix
    and society and applications of computer tech-       for program requirements. All curriculum charts are
    nology to classroom teaching.                        detailed and displayed in Appendix “B”.



80 Monmouth University
                                                                                         Education



• M.A.T. Initial Certification, Early                 • M.A.T. Initial Certification, Spanish or
  Childhood Elementary Track (P-3 Early                 Chinese K-12 Subject Specific with
  Childhood Certification with Elementary               Endorsement in English as a Second
  K-5 Certification)                                    Language (ESL)
• M.A.T. Initial Certification, Elementary
  Track (K-5 Elementary Certification)        EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP, SCHOOL
• M.A.T. Initial Certification, Elementary    COUNSELING, AND SPECIAL EDUCATION
  Track (K-5 Elementary Certification) with   Jason Barr, Chair, Department of Educational
  Endorsement in Teacher of Students with       Leadership, School Counseling, and
  Disabilities                                  Special Education
• M.A.T. Initial Certification, Elementary
  Track (K-5 Elementary Certification) with   Harvey Allen, Assistant Professor. Ed.D., Rutgers
  Endorsement in English as a Second              University. Areas of professional interest include
  Language (ESL)                                  mathematics, interdisciplinary teaming, and
• M.A.T. Initial Certification, Elementary        middle school design.
  Track (K-5 Elementary Certification) and    Jason Barr, Assistant Professor and Chair. Ph.D.,
  Teacher of Supplemental Instruction in          Fordham University. Trained in developmental
  Reading and Mathematics Endorsements            theory with specific emphasis on the application
• M.A.T. Initial Certification, Elementary        of developmental theory. Areas of interest
  Track and Middle School Endorsement             include empathy in adolescence and children’s
  Track, (K-5 Certification with Content          task persistence.
  Specialization Endorsement 5-8);            Mary Lee Bass, Lecturer. Ed.D., Rutgers
  Elementary Track and Middle School              University. Areas of interest include strategy
  Endorsement in: English, Social Studies,        instruction, content literacy, early literacy, adult
  Science, or Mathematics                         literacy instruction, pre-service teacher training,
• M.A.T. Initial Certification, Secondary         and developmental reading instruction.
  Track with 9-12 Certification and Subject   Mary Brennan, Specialist Professor. M.S., Lehman
  Endorsement in English, Social Studies,         College. Areas of interest include learning dis-
  Mathematics, Biology, Chemistry, and            abilities assessment and education, student
  Physical Science.                               advocacy, and in-service training.
• M.A.T. Initial Certification, Secondary     Joseph Corriero, Assistant Professor. Ed.D.,
  Track with 9-12 Certification and Subject       Fordham University. Areas of professional interest
  Endorsement in English, Social Studies,         include public school administration and organi-
  Mathematics, Biology, Chemistry, and            zation; community relations; professional devel-
  Physical Science with Endorsement in            opment workshops, and new teacher mentoring.
  English as a Second Language (ESL)          Carolyn Groff, Assistant Professor. Ph.D., Rutgers
• M.A.T. Initial Certification, Secondary         University. Specialty is literacy/language arts
  Track with 9-12 Certification and Subject       and elementary education.
  Endorsement in: English, Social Studies,    Wendy Harriott, Associate Professor. Ph.D.,
  Mathematics, Biology, Chemistry, and            Pennsylvania State University. Professional inter-
  Physical Science with Endorsement in            ests include special education, behavior manage-
  Teacher of Students with Disabilities           ment, pre-service and in-service teacher training.
• M.A.T. Initial Certification, K-12          Jose M. Maldonado, Assistant Professor. Ph.D.,
  (Certification K-12 Track and Subject           University of Arkansas. Areas of interest include
  Endorsement); K-12 Certification in: Art,       multicultural counseling and school counseling.
  Health and Physical Education, and Music    Tina Paone, Assistant Professor. Ph.D., University
• M.A.T. Initial Certification, K-12              of Nevada, Reno. Areas of professional interest
  (Certification K-12 Track and Subject           include school counselor, education and super-
  Endorsement); K-12 Certification in:            vision, group counseling, substance abuse
  Spanish or Chinese                              awareness programs, and play therapies.



                                                                     Monmouth University 81
Education



Lynn Romeo, Dean and Associate Professor.                 TESOL training. This training enables them to teach
     Ed.D., Rutgers University. Areas of professional     English as a Second Language in adult communities
     interest include literacy, comprehension instruc-    or abroad.
     tion, mentoring, and electronic dialoguing.                   The Educational Technology Certificate is a
Terri Rothman, Associate Dean and Associate               12-credit, completely online program designed for
     Professor. Ph.D., University of Albany, State        practicing K-12 teachers. The main goal of the pro-
     University of New York. Areas of interest            gram is to provide opportunities to learn the practical
     include factors that promote success for at-risk     application of technologies to classroom learning and
     children (including children with disabilities and   to embrace technology integration as an efficient,
     chronic health problems) multicultural               engaging, and effective strategy to maximize the
     approaches to child development, social and          learning of all students.
     psychological foundations of education, and                   The School of Education also offers two post-
     applied research.                                    master’s certificate programs: Curriculum Studies
Lilly Steiner, Assistant Professor. B.A., University      and Education. The Curriculum Studies program is a
     of Wisconsin; M.A., University of North Dakota;      15-credit, highly personalized program, designed to
     Ed.D, Boston University.                             meet the professional interests and individual goals of
Sheila Witherspoon, Assistant Professor. Ph.D.,           the candidates. All of the courses in this program are
     University of South Carolina. Areas of interest      hybrid courses that mix both classroom and online
     include school counseling and career develop-        learning. This certificate provides candidates with a
     ment of African-American males, career devel-        comprehensive examination of the field, authentic
     opment of African-American girls, STEM-based         experience working in their field of expertise, and a
     fields, education law, school exclusion, and         critical exploration of their role as leaders. The
     substance awareness programs.                        Certificate in Education accommodates candidates’
                                                          diverse needs for courses in a variety of fields and
MASTER OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION (M.S.Ed.)                  areas of interest. The program offers a unique oppor-
                                                          tunity to engage in a concerted course of study that
Please refer to the curriculum charts in the appendix     offers a purposeful examination of issues significant
for program requirements. All curriculum charts are       in education today. A critical examination of the role of
detailed and displayed in Appendix “B”.                   the classroom teacher is also offered.
        • M.S.Ed. Principal                                        The School of Education at Monmouth
        • M.S.Ed. Principal/School Administrator          University offers a subject endorsement in Chinese,
          Track                                           Certificate of Eligibility with Advanced Standing
        • M.S.Ed. Reading Specialist                      (CEAS). This is a 24-credit non-degree program (15
        • M.S.Ed. School Counseling                       credits of course work and 9 credits of student teach-
        • M.S.Ed. School Counseling - Student             ing) that prepares teachers for K-12 Chinese class-
          Affairs and College Counseling Track            rooms. Students may apply directly to the program
        • M.S.Ed. Special Education - Teacher of          after earning a bachelor’s degree in the Chinese lan-
          Students with Disabilities Track                guage and culture or equivalent. Students with a
        • M.S.Ed. Special Education - Teaching in         strong Chinese language and culture background
          Inclusive Settings Track                        who are seeking a career change to become a first-
        • M.S.Ed. Special Education - Learning            time teacher may also apply.
          Disabilities Teacher-Consultant Track
        • M.S.Ed. Special Education - Autism Track
                                                          • Subject Endorsement in Chinese –
CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS                                        Certificate of Eligibility with Advanced
         The School of Education at Monmouth                Standing (CEAS)
University also offers certificate programs. The post-      ED510       Foundations of
baccalaureate TESOL Certificate program provides                        Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.0 credits
training to those who are not certified K-12 classroom      ED550       Teaching Diverse
teachers but are interested in receiving formal                         Populations . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.0 credits



82 Monmouth University
                                                                                                                  Education



  ED582       World Language                                        EDL575      Methods of Teaching Language Arts
              Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.0 credits                   and Content Literacy at the
  FO599       Independent Study in the Teaching of                              Elementary Level
              World Languages . . . . . . . 3.0 credits             or
  ED599       NCATE for Chinese. . . . . . 0.0 credits              ED529       Content Literacy . . . . . . . . 3.0 credits
  FO-                                                               ED550       Teaching Diverse
  LTIOPI      Oral Proficiency Chinese                                          Populations . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.0 credits
              (a) (b) (Interim High) . . . . . 3.0 credits          ED583       Theories and Practice of ESL
  ED593       Student Teaching                                                  Instruction, Part I. . . . . . . . 3.0 credits
  or                                                                ED584       Theories and Practice of ESL
  ED594       Supervised Teaching. . . . . 9.0 credits                          Instruction, Part II . . . . . . . 3.0 credits
              TOTAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24.0 credits                    TOTAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18.0 credits

* Subject certification in Chinese requires a mini-               • Graduate Endorsement: Early Childhood
  mum of 30 credits in a coherent sequence in the                   EDL502      Development and
  language and cultures of China.                                               Learning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.0 credits
     a) LTI-OPI taken with Language Testing                         EDL521      Early Childhood Family . . . 3.0 credits
        International at www.languagetesting.com                    EDL522      Early Literacy and Language
     b) Passing      score    required   prior   to                             Development . . . . . . . . . . . 3.0 credits
        student/supervised teaching                                 EDL560      Early Childhood Assessment
                                                                                Curriculum. . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.0 credits
ENDORSEMENTS                                                                    TOTAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13.0 credits
        The School of Education at Monmouth
University also offers four graduate endorsements:                • Graduate Endorsement: Substance
English as a Second Language (ESL), Early                           Awareness Coordinator
Childhood, Teacher of Students with Disabilities, and               EDC570 Alcohol and Drug Abuse Programs
Substance Awareness Coordinator; and six post-                             and Services . . . . . . . . . . . 3.0 credits
master’s endorsements: Supervisor, Reading                          EDC604 Clinical Practice in Addiction
Specialist, Director of School Counseling Services,                 or
Learning Disabilities Teacher-Consultant, Principal,                PC540  Introduction to Alcohol and
and Counseling. These programs are for teachers                            Drug Abuse . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.0 credits
and counselors who wish to change specialties or                    EDC515 Risk and Resiliency in Children and
enhance their skills in dealing effectively with diverse                   Adolescents . . . . . . . . . . . 3.0 credits
populations in the schools. Students may earn grad-                 EDC575 Alcohol and Drug Abuse Assessment
uate endorsements without matriculating into a mas-                        and Counseling . . . . . . . . . 3.0 credits
ter’s degree program. Post-master’s endorsements                    EDC550 Counseling At-Risk Children and
require a master’s degree as a prerequisite. All pro-                      Families. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.0 credits
grams are approved by the New Jersey State                          EDC605 Clinical Practice with Families
Department of Education.                                                   and Children
        New Jersey education endorsements can be                    or
obtained after the completion of a program if the stu-              PC542  Treatment of Alcohol and
dent takes the following course work:                                      Drug Abuse . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.0 credits
                                                                    EDC505 Counseling and Ethical Practice in
• English as a Second Language (ESL)                                       School and Community
  Endorsement                                                       or
  EN563       Language and                                          SW698 Special Topics in Social Work:
              Linguistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.0 credits            School Social Work. . . . . . 3.0 credits
  ED606       Human and Intercultural Relations                     EDC610 SAC Internship . . . . . . . . . 3.0 credits
              (for M.Ed. students) . . . . . 3.0 credits                   TOTAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24.0 credits




                                                                                          Monmouth University 83
Education



• Graduate Endorsement: Teacher of Students                      • Post-Master’s Endorsement: Supervisor
  with Disabilities                                                EDL536     Instructional Theory and Curriculum
  EDL515    Advanced Literacy                                                 Design P-12 . . . . . . . . . . . 3.0 credits
            Instruction . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.0 credits      EDL569     Public School
  EDS535    Technology and Students with                                      Supervision . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.0 credits
            Disabilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.0 credits     EDL582     Practicum in Supervision and
  EDS537    Collaborating with Families, Students,                            Curriculum, P-12 . . . . . . . . 3.0 credits
            and Professionals in Community and                     EDL593     Administration, Supervision, and
            Educational Settings . . . . . 3.0 credits                        Consultation in Literacy . . 3.0 credits
  EDS500    Integrated Approach to Foundations of                             TOTAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12.0 credits
            Special Education . . . . . . . 3.0 credits
  EDS534    Classroom Management in Inclusive                    • Post-Master’s Endorsement: Director of
            Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.0 credits     School Counseling Services
  EDS552    Methods of Teaching Students                           EDL530 School Law . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.0 credits
            with Disabilities . . . . . . . . . 3.0 credits        EDC565 Supervision
  EDS572    Assessment Strategies and Application                         of Counselors . . . . . . . . . . 3.0 credits
            in the Classroom . . . . . . . . 3.0 credits           EDL536 Curriculum Development
            TOTAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21.0 credits                and Design . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.0 credits
                                                                          TOTAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.0 credits
• Post-Master’s Endorsement: Learning
  Disabilities Teacher-Consultant                                • Post-Master’s Endorsement: Reading Specialist
  EDL515    Advanced Literacy                                      EDL515     Advanced Literacy
            Instruction . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.0 credits                 Instruction . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.0 credits
  EDS532    Physiological Aspects of                               EDL516     Literacy Strategies for
            Learning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.0 credits                  All Learners I. . . . . . . . . . . 3.0 credits
  EDS550    Learning Theories and Applications in                  EDL517     Literacy Strategies for
            Inclusive Settings . . . . . . . 3.0 credits                      All Learners II . . . . . . . . . . 3.0 credits
  EDS537    Collaborating with Families, Students,                 EDL527     Literacy Trends
            and Professionals in Community and                                and Issues. . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.0 credits
            Educational Settings . . . . . 3.0 credits             EDL525     Multicultural Literature
  EDS568    Advanced Instructional Methods in                                 and Literacy . . . . . . . . . . . 3.0 credits
            Special Education . . . . . . . 3.0 credits            EDL526     Strategies for Teaching
  EDS570    Assessment and Curricula Interventions                            Writing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.0 credits
             and Strategies . . . . . . . . . . 3.0 credits        EDL564     Assessment and Instruction in
  EDS590    Diagnosis and Correction of Learning                              Literacy I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.0 credits
            Disabilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.0 credits     EDL565     Assessment and Instruction in
  EDS610    Internship in Learning Disabilities                               Literacy II . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.0 credits
            Teacher-Consultant . . . . . . 3.0 credits             EDL585     Practicum in Literacy . . . . 3.0 credits
            TOTAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24.0 credits         EDL593     Administration and Supervision of
                                                                              Literacy Practices . . . . . . . 3.0 credits
                                                                              TOTAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30.0 credits




84 Monmouth University
                                                                                                           Education



• Post-Master’s Endorsement: Principal                         • Post-Master’s Certification Endorsement:
  EDL504   Introduction to Educational                           Counseling
           Leadership P-12 . . . . . . . . 3.0 credits           EDC500 Introduction to Professional School
  EDL530   School Law and Policy . . . 3.0 credits                      Counseling . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.0 credits
  EDL532   Human Resources Management and                        EDC545 Career Development and
           School Finance . . . . . . . . . 3.0 credits                 Counseling for the School
  EDL533   Community Relations . . . . 3.0 credits                      Environment . . . . . . . . . . . 3.0 credits
  EDL536   Curriculum Development                                EDC525 Assessment for the School
           and Design . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.0 credits               Environment . . . . . . . . . . . 3.0 credits
  EDL537   Technology for School                                 EDC505 Counseling and
           Leaders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.0 credits            Ethical Practice . . . . . . . . . 3.0 credits
  EDL569   Public School                                         EDC600 Practicum in School
           Supervision, P-12 . . . . . . . 3.0 credits                  Counseling . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.0 credits
  EDL588   Practicum in School                                   EDC555 School Counseling Program Planning
           Leadership I, P-12 . . . . . . 3.0 credits                   and Practice . . . . . . . . . . . 3.0 credits
  EDL589   Practicum in School                                   EDC601 Internship in School
           Leadership II, P-12 . . . . . . 3.0 credits                  Counseling I . . . . . . . . . . . 3.0 credits
  EDL606   Research Based Program Evaluation                     EDC602 Internship in School
           and Decision Making . . . . 3.0 credits                      Counseling II . . . . . . . . . . . 3.0 credits
           TOTAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30.0 credits               TOTAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24.0 credits




                                                                                      Monmouth University 85
86 Monmouth University
The Marjorie K. Unterberg School of
Nursing and Health Studies




                                                                                                                            Nursing and Health Studies
                                                                                                                     Course Descriptions
DEAN: Janet Mahoney, Ph.D.                                 only three upper-division nursing courses prior to
ASSOCIATE DEAN: Sharon W. Stark, Ph.D.                     matriculating in the M.S.N. program of his or her
                                                           choice. Students are allowed to take those under-
         The Marjorie K. Unterberg School of Nursing       graduate nursing courses concurrently with gradu-
and Health Studies was established in 1998. The            ate courses when scheduling allows. The school
school offers an upper-division Bachelor of Science in     also houses the Lambda Delta Chapter of Sigma
Nursing (B.S.N.) program for registered nurses, an         Theta Tau, the International Nursing Honor Society.
RN to MSN Direct Program for registered nurses, a                   The School of Nursing and Health Studies
Master of Science in Nursing (M.S.N.) degree for           reflects in its philosophy the mission of Monmouth
nurses seeking preparation as an adult or family           University: to provide a learning process and envi-
nurse practitioner, nurse administrator, nurse educa-      ronment that enables students to realize their full
tor, school nurse, adult psychiatric and mental health     potential and enhance the quality of life for individu-
advanced practice nurse, or forensic nurse. Five post-     als, families, groups, and the community. Advanced
master’s certificates are available for master’s           nursing practice facilitates cost-effective consumer
degree-prepared nurses seeking preparation as an           access to healthcare services of high quality and
adult or family nurse practitioner; nurse administrator,   fosters consumer responsibility for informed deci-
adult psychiatric and mental health advanced practice      sion-making with respect to self care.
nurse, or nurse educator. Graduate certificates are                 The mission of the B.S.N. program at
also available to prepare school nurses and forensic       Monmouth University is to prepare registered
nurses; a health studies major for non-nursing majors;     nurses for professional practice through integration
a health studies/physical education major; a health        of a general, liberal education with professional
studies/physical education and education major; a          learning and activity. The professional component of
health studies minor for non-nursing majors; and an        this education is designed to prepare professional
interdisciplinary certificate in gerontology.              nurses to promote, restore, and maintain health for
         A bridge program is offered for registered        individuals, families, groups, and the community.
nurses with a bachelor’s degree in a field other than               The faculty believes that nursing is a
nursing. This program requires the student to take         learned profession with a unique body of knowl-




                                                                                   Monmouth University 87
Nursing and Health Studies



edge. Nursing is not only a science arrived at through        encompasses an understanding of the past, the
scientific research but also an art which reflects the        present, and the emerging roles of the professional
performance of skilled tasks and human interaction.           nurse. To fulfill the expanding role of professional
Such breadth of professional knowledge can only be            nursing, baccalaureate education is essential.
attained within the system of higher education. The                    The M.S.N. program was established in
baccalaureate is the first professional degree in nurs-       1995 and was designed to meet the needs of clients
ing. It prepares a generalist and is the basis for grad-      in the Central New Jersey area for nurses with
uate study and continuing education in nursing.               advanced nursing degrees and/or certifications. In
          Professional nursing education focuses on           addition, it strives to serve the needs of nurses seek-
the development of an accountable practitioner and            ing advanced education. Specializations are offered
responsible citizen. Professional nurses need knowl-          in: Adult Nurse Practitioner, Family Nurse
edge of the liberal arts and sciences in order to             Practitioner, Adult Psychiatric and Mental Health
understand the interrelating factors that influence the       Advanced Practice Nursing, Nursing Administration,
health of individuals and society. This knowledge             Nursing Education, School Nursing, and Forensic
facilitates their special obligation to promote a             Nursing. Graduates of the program are prepared to
healthy environment for all persons. Further, this            take the appropriate certification exam.
knowledge enriches the conceptual base that sup-
ports both critical thinking and ethical decision-mak-        Student Honor Society: Sigma Theta Tau,
ing expected of the professional nurse.                       Lambda Delta Chapter - Theta Tau, the
          Education for nursing is idealistic and future-     International Nursing Honor Society.
oriented yet sufficiently realistic to provide students
with an opportunity to develop justifiable confidence         Bojana Beric, Assistant Professor. M.D., University
in their intellectual, as well as clinical, proficiency in        of Novi Sad, medical faculty; Ph.D., New York
the practice of nursing. This preparation can occur               University. Specialty areas and interests include
only within an environment that allows for individual             methods of communication of health informa-
differences and fosters personal integration, healthy             tion, health promotion and disease prevention,
self-esteem, vital social awareness, enjoyment of                 global health issues, and teaching.
leisure, and a sense of commitment to the attitudes           Tresa Dusaj, Assistant Professor. B.S., Johns
and values of the nursing profession.                             Hopkins University; M.S., New York University;
          The faculty believes that education is an active,       Ph.D., Rutgers University. Specialty areas include
ongoing process involving student-teacher collabora-              nursing education, technology, and pediatrics.
tion and that learning is an experiential activity. They      Cira Fraser, Associate Professor and Coordinator of
believe that the teaching-learning process involves not           the B.S.N. program. Ph.D., Adelphi University.
only the teacher and the student but also the social sys-         Specialty interest areas include nursing
tem within a framework of dynamic relationships that              research, chronic illness, and multiple sclerosis.
promotes the change and growth of individuals. It is rec-     Christopher A. Hirschler, Assistant Professor.
ognized that students have the ultimate responsibility            Ph.D., Cleveland State University. Specialty
for their own learning and professional growth.                   area interests include health studies topics,
          Students are viewed as unique individuals               vegan beliefs, and environmental issues.
with varying learning styles. Therefore, a variety of         Andrea Hope, Assistant Professor. Ed.D., CHES,
experiences and teaching strategies are used within               Teachers College, Columbia University.
the program to enhance the development of cognitive,              Specialty areas and interests include physical
affective, and psychomotor abilities within the student.          activity and nutrition, childhood obesity preven-
          In the belief that professional nurses must             tion, development of worksite health promotion
possess the capacity to modify their roles and                    programming, and women’s health.
responsibilities as health care continues to change,          Laura T. Jannone, Associate Professor and Director
the faculty looks to baccalaureate education to pro-              of the MSN Program. Ed.D, Teachers College,
vide students with knowledge of nursing science,                  Columbia University. Certified School Nurse.
enabling them to develop their personal philosophy                Specialty areas and interests are tobacco pre-
and framework for nursing practice. This framework                vention and cessation, school nursing.



88 Monmouth University
                                                                               Nursing and Health Studies



Barbara Johnston, Professor and Hess Chair.              to the nurse prepared at the graduate level. The func-
    Ph.D., RN, CNE, Hoftstra University. Specialty       tion of the graduate is to promote, restore, and main-
    areas and interests include gerontological top-      tain health and/or allow for a peaceful, dignified
    ics, pharmacology, and distance education.           death. Advanced nursing practice requires master’s
Laura Kelly, Associate Professor. Ph.D., Rutgers         preparation and, where available, certification in a
    University. Psychiatric Clinical Nurse Specialist.   specialty area of practice by a recognized nursing
    Specialty areas include sexually transmitted         certification program. Advanced nursing practice is
    diseases and lesbian health concerns.                based on a unique body of knowledge derived from
Rose Knapp, Assistant Professor. DNP, University         scientific research and clinical practice. This knowl-
    of Miami. Specialty interest areas include acute     edge base enhances the graduate’s ability to synthe-
    care issues, disaster preparedness and primary       size interrelating factors that influence the health of
    care issues.                                         individuals and populations in their environment. The
James F. Konopack, Assistant Professor and               faculty believes that the nurse in advanced practice
    Coordinator of Health Studies. Ph.D., University     is proficient in a defined body of knowledge and a
    of Illinois, Health Studies. Specialty interest      selected area of nursing practice. The nurse in
    areas include physical activity, aging, and          advanced practice may work in an independent set-
    health problems.                                     ting or in collaborative practice with others.
Janet Mahoney, Professor and Dean. Ph.D., New                      The nurse in advanced practice implements
    York University. Specialty areas and interests       the roles of educator, researcher, advocate, clinician,
    include nursing research, nursing administra-        consultant, collaborator, and manager of systems
    tion, and gerontological nursing.                    through independent nursing assessment, diagnosis,
Marta Neumann, Lecturer. B.A., M.A., College of          treatment, referral, and evaluation of individuals,
    Physical Education, Wroclaw, Poland; Ph.D.,          families, groups, communities, and healthcare sys-
    Academy of Physical Education, Wroclaw, Poland.      tems in a variety of settings.
Sue Polito, Specialist Professor. M.S.N., Monmouth                 The M.S.N. program is composed of three
    University. Adult and Gerontology Nurse              major areas:
    Practitioner. Specialty areas include healthy        1.        A graduate nursing core that provides the
    aging and palliative care.                                     theoretical and research foundation neces-
Patricia Sciscione, Specialist Professor. M.S.N.,                  sary for advanced nursing practice;
    Kean University. Certified School Nurse.             2.        An advanced nursing practice concentration
    Specialty areas and interests include school                   that provides the student with the skills neces-
    nursing and emergency nursing.                                 sary to have a positive impact on healthcare;
Sharon W. Stark, Associate Professor and                 3.        Detailed study and practice in the selected
    Associate Dean. Ph.D., Widener University.                     area of specialization.
    Adult Nurse Practitioner. Specialty areas and
    interests are adult nursing, health education,                 The faculty believe that education for the
    and forensic nursing.                                nurse in advanced practice must be a realistic, ideal-
Mary Ann Troiano, Assistant Professor. M.S.N.,           istic, future-oriented, teaching-learning process that
    Wagner College; DNP, Waynesburg University.          promotes the development of the cognitive, affective,
    Family Nurse Practitioner. Child Care Health         and psychomotor abilities contributing to profes-
    Consultant. Specialty areas include women’s          sional growth and ultimate personal responsibility for
    health, adolescents, and child care.                 continued learning. This education helps the gradu-
                                                         ate to develop justifiable confidence in the intellectual
MASTER OF SCIENCE IN NURSING (M.S.N.)                    and clinical proficiency necessary for advanced prac-
        The faculty of the School of Nursing and         tice. This process enriches the conceptual base that
Health Studies believe that the Monmouth University      supports both the critical thinking and ethical deci-
graduate programs in nursing prepare the graduate        sion-making expected of the nurse in advanced prac-
for advanced nursing practice and extend the values      tice. It strengthens the sense of commitment to the
of autonomy, leadership, and professionalism that        attitudes and values of the nursing profession.
are stressed in the undergraduate nursing program



                                                                                Monmouth University 89
Nursing and Health Studies



           The faculty believe that education at the       Please refer to the curriculum charts in the appendix
graduate level is essential to provide students with an    for program requirements. All curriculum charts are
expanded and enhanced knowledge of nursing sci-            detailed and displayed in Appendix “B”.
ence. This level of education enables students to per-             • M.S.N.: Adult Nurse Practitioner
fect their personal philosophy for advanced nursing                • M.S.N.: Adult Nurse Practitioner (RN to
practice, to understand the emerging roles of the pro-               MSN Direct)
fessional nurse, and to modify their roles and respon-             • M.S.N.: Family Nurse Practitioner
sibilities as healthcare continues to change. Students             • M.S.N.: Family Nurse Practitioner (RN to
may transfer a maximum of nine credits to be applied                 MSN Direct)
toward the master’s degree, provided the courses                   • M.S.N.: Nursing Administration
were completed with a grade of “B” or better and that              • M.S.N.: Nursing Administration (RN to
the courses are appropriate for the graduate track.                  MSN Direct)
                                                                   • M.S.N.: School Nursing
RN to MSN Direct Program                                           • M.S.N.: School Nursing (RN to MSN
         The RN to MSN Direct Program is designed                    Direct)
to allow nurses to more quickly attain a Master of                 • M.S.N.: Nursing Education
Science in Nursing degree. Registered nurses who                   • M.S.N.: Nursing Education (RN to MSN
presently hold an associate degree or diploma in                     Direct)
nursing will be able to earn an MSN degree without                 • M.S.N.: Forensic Nursing
earning a baccalaureate degree after completing a                  • M.S.N.: Forensic Nursing (RN to MSN
combination of undergraduate and graduate courses                    Direct)
totaling 150 credits. Through full time or part time               • M.S.N.: Adult Psychiatric and Mental
study, RNs are provided the opportunity to advance                   Health Advanced Practice Nursing
their professional careers.                                        • M.S.N.: Adult Psychiatric and Mental
         Students are accepted into the RN to MSN                    Health Advanced Practice Nursing (RN to
Direct Program on a conditional basis. Successful                    MSN Direct)
completion of 30 credits of preparatory RN graduate
courses (RN500 A-I) is a prerequisite for taking nurs-     GRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN SCHOOL NURSING,
ing graduate (NU) courses. Students need a mini-           SCHOOL NURSING NON-INSTRUCTIONAL, AND
mum GPA of 2.75 in RN courses.                             FORENSIC NURSING
         Prior to acceptance into the RN to MSN Direct               The Monmouth University Graduate
Program registered nurse applicants must complete all      Certificate in School Nursing is intended for regis-
required undergraduate course work which includes:         tered nurses interested in completing the require-
English Composition I and II, Microbiology, Anatomy        ments for the New Jersey School Nurse Certificate
and Physiology I and II, Chemistry, Introduction to        and/or the New Jersey School Nurse Certificate Non-
Psychology, and an additional three credits of an intro-   Instructional. The program includes 11 foundation
ductory social science course. A grade of “C” or better    credits (three undergraduate courses: NU 312, NU
is required in order for these courses to transfer to      413, NU 414) that are usually included as part of a
Monmouth University. Additionally, students must pro-      B.S.N. program. (Students with a baccalaureate
vide an undergraduate transcript confirming their          degree in nursing will generally receive transfer cred-
attainment of at least 51 undergraduate credits.           its for the foundation courses.)
         Students are required to complete 30 gradu-                 The Monmouth University Graduate
ate RN credits and 38 to 45 graduate nursing credits       Certificate in Forensic Nursing is intended for regis-
depending on the selected MSN track. In order to           tered nurses interested in providing direct services to
earn a Master of Science in Nursing degree, as stip-       individuals and consultation to healthcare and law-
ulated by the State of New Jersey, students must doc-      related agencies. The program will prepare graduates
ument completion of at least 150 credits combined          to work in a variety of areas, including child/elder
between undergraduate and graduate programs.               abuse assessment and evaluation, domestic violence
Please note that graduate tuition and fees apply.          intervention, sexual assault examination, mass disas-
                                                           ter response, and death investigation.



90 Monmouth University
                                                                             Nursing and Health Studies



Please refer to the curriculum charts in the appendix              Students may transfer a maximum of six
for program requirements. All curriculum charts are      credits to be applied toward the certificate, provided
detailed and displayed in Appendix “B”.                  the courses were completed with a grade of “B” or
        • Forensic Nursing                               better and that the courses are appropriate for the
        • School Nursing                                 certificate program. Students may select to special-
        • School Nursing-Non-Instructional               ize in the following clinical areas: Adult Nurse
                                                         Practitioner, Family Nurse Practitioner, Nursing
POST-MASTER’S CERTIFICATES                               Administration, Nursing Education, and Adult
         Monmouth’s post-master’s certificates are       Psychiatric and Mental Health Advanced Practice
designed for nurses who have already completed a         Nursing.
master’s degree in nursing. The 26-credit nursing
practitioner certificate program places advanced         Please refer to the curriculum charts in the appendix
practice nurses in primary care or other relevant set-   for program requirements. All curriculum charts are
tings to work with persons in their environment          detailed and displayed in Appendix “B”.
through independent nursing assessment, diagnosis,               • Adult Nurse Practitioner
and treatment or referral to another practitioner when           • Family Nurse Practitioner
necessary. The 21-credit Administration certificate              • Nursing Administration
program prepares nurses to function in management                • Nursing Education
and executive positions. The 19-credit Nurse                     • Adult Psychiatric and Mental Health
Educator certificate program prepares nurses to                    Advanced Practice Nursing
teach in the clinical or academic setting.




                                                                               Monmouth University 91
92 Monmouth University
The School of Social Work



DEAN: Robin Mama, Ph.D.                                            • Clinical Practice with Families and
DIRECTOR OF THE BSW PROGRAM:                                         Children
  Kelly Ward, Ph.D.                                                • International and Community
DIRECTOR OF THE MSW PROGRAM:                                         Development
  Nora Smith, Ph.D.
                                                                    On the foundation of a liberal arts tradition,




                                                                                                                     Social Work
          Social workers are concerned with improving      students are engaged to broaden and challenge
the health and quality of life of persons who are dis-     their understanding, analysis, and evaluation of
connected or excluded from larger society. Social          human experiences and societies in the past and in
workers engage in practice at all levels, from working     the contemporary world, and of families and individ-
with children to working with communities and gov-         uals of varied cultural and social contexts.
ernments. The profession and the program at                         The curriculum supports this mission
Monmouth are particularly concerned with human             through three perspectives: social and economic
rights and social and economic justice, the represen-      justice through the advancement of human rights,
tation and support of vulnerable or oppressed seg-         strengths-based empowerment, and practice with
ments of the population, and direct-action strategies      families within a global context. Families within a
to bring about positive change for the disenfranchised.    global context define the initial focal social unit for
          The central mission of the School of Social      all social work practice at Monmouth University.
Work at Monmouth University is to prepare its grad-                 Our three perspectives inform both our
uates for professional social work practice that           B.S.W. and M.S.W. Programs as they contribute to
strives to secure social and economic justice,             the development of students’ knowledge, values,
advance human rights, and improve the quality of           and skills:
life of vulnerable families, individuals, organizations,   1.       To conceptualize and contribute to social
communities, and nations on the local, national, and                work theory, knowledge, values, and skills
global levels.                                                      on a generalist level for B.S.W. students,
          The M.S.W. Program at Monmouth                            and on an advanced, concentration-specific
University prepares graduates for advanced social                   level for M.S.W. students through three
work practice in one of two unique concentrations:                  interrelated perspectives: social and eco-




                                                                                   Monmouth University 93
Social Work



        nomic justice through the advancement of          Robin Mama, Professor and Dean. Ph.D., Bryn
        human rights, strengths-based empower-                Mawr College. Areas of interest include occupa-
        ment, and practice with families within a             tional safety and health, field education, and
        global context;                                       culturally competent social work practice.
2.      To develop the skills to understand, analyze,         Current research projects include international
        and evaluate the quality of life and well-being       social work and human rights.
        of vulnerable families, individuals, organiza-    Golam Mathbor, Associate Dean of the Wayne D.
        tions, communities, and nations that is               McMurray School of Humanities and Social
        grounded in a strengths-based empower-                Sciences, Professor. Ph.D., University of
        ment approach for social and economic jus-            Calgary. Areas of interest include development
        tice and human rights;                                and analysis of social policies and services,
3.      To prepare social work practitioners to               community organizing and social action, social
        develop and systematically apply knowledge,           planning, community development and commu-
        values, skills, and ethics in their work with         nity participation, and international social work.
        families, individuals, organizations, communi-        Current research interests include sustainable
        ties, and nations of diverse cultural contexts        development of coastal communities, interna-
        in working collaboratively toward the preven-         tional development, and multicultural social work.
        tion and solution of social problems;             Elena Mazza, Assistant Professor. MSW, Fordham
4.      To think critically, analyze, produce, and dis-       University. Areas of interest are mental health,
        seminate research that informs theory, pol-           children’s mental health, and community-based
        icy, practice, and evaluation in social work;         mental health. Current research is on gatekeep-
5.      To collaborate with and support vulnerable            ing in social work education and mental illness
        populations through advocacy, social action,          and school integration.
        volunteerism, service, education, and con-        Rebecca McCloskey, Specialist Professor. B.A.,
        sultation, working from a strengths-based             Seton Hall University; MSW, Ohio State
        empowerment approach for social and eco-              University.
        nomic justice and human rights.                   Helen O’Brien, Assistant Professor. Ph.D., New York
                                                              University. Areas of interest are health and men-
Rosemary Barbera, Assistant Professor. Ph.D.,                 tal health, HIV/AIDS, and child maltreatment.
   Bryn Mawr College. Areas of interest are human         Michelle Ann Scott, Assistant Professor. B.A.,
   rights and social justice, participatory action            Clark University; M.S.W., Ph.D., University of
   research, and community organizing. Current                California, Berkeley. Areas of interest include
   research is on the effects of human rights viola-          adolescent depression, adolescent suicide pre-
   tions on collective participation and community            vention, school-based screening, mental health
   organizing with diverse communities.                       services and financing, college mental health,
Carolyn Bradley, Assistant Professor. Ph.D.,                  and initiation of alcohol use by adolescents.
   Fordham University. Areas of interest are addic-           Current research includes evaluation of the
   tions, spirituality, gay/lesbian/bisexual/transgen-        preparation of high school students with mental
   der issues. Current research is on spirituality            health problems and the transition to college.
   and social work practice.                              Nora Smith, Associate Professor. Ph.D., State
Kimberly Hanbury, Specialist Professor. B.A.,                 University of New York at Albany. Areas of inter-
   Loyola College; M.S.W, Monmouth University.                est include child welfare, substance abuse, and
   Areas of interest include child welfare.                   families. Current research includes family reunifi-
   Professional experience is in the area of child            cation for substance-affected families, the
   welfare including child abuse/neglect and adop-            Adoption and Safe Families Act, and child welfare
   tion services.                                             consumer and service provider perspectives.
Michael Cronin, Assistant Professor. B.A.,                Mary E. Swigonski, Associate Professor. Ph.D.,
   Northeastern University; MSW., Colombia                    Rutgers University. Areas of interest include
   University; Ph.D., Yeshiva University.                     human behavior and the social environment,
                                                              epistemology/human rights, diversity, sexual



94 Monmouth University
                                                                                                      Social Work



    and affectional orientation, and feminist studies.        of Social Workers and the declarations of the United
    Current scholarship addresses understanding               Nations.
    the human condition within the context of jus-
    tice and care.                                            Please refer to the curriculum charts in the appendix
Kelly Ward, Associate Professor. Ph.D., Fordham               for program requirements. All curriculum charts are
    University. Areas of interest include addictions,         detailed and displayed in Appendix “B”.
    substance abuse populations, and the impact of                    • M.S.W. Clinical Practice with Families
    addiction on families. Current research includes                    and Children Concentration
    all aspects of addiction.                                         • M.S.W. International and Community
                                                                        Development Concentration
Master of Social Work Concentrations
         There are two concentrations offered at              POST-MASTER’S CERTIFICATE: PLAY THERAPY
Monmouth University at the graduate level: Clinical                    The Post-Master’s Certificate in Play Therapy
Practice with Families and Children (PFC) and                 is an 18-credit program and provides the 150- course
International and Community Development (ICD).                hour requirement, in addition to the 500 experiential
Common to both concentrations is a commitment to              learning hours, as outlined by the Association for Play
the mission of the Department of Social Work at               Therapy (APT), Inc. This program will fulfill the
Monmouth University: improving the quality of life of         Registered Play Therapist (RPT) certification require-
vulnerable individuals, families, groups, and commu-          ments. Students completing the certificate program
nities on the local, national, and international levels.      will be eligible for RPT certification.
         The courses in the Clinical Practice with
Families and Children (PFC) concentration prepares            Please refer to the curriculum chart in the appendix
students for advanced social work practice with indi-         for program requirements. All curriculum charts are
viduals, couples, families, and groups. It builds on the      detailed and displayed in Appendix “B”.
foundation-year course work where the full comple-                    • Post-Master’s Certificate: Play Therapy
ment of social work roles was explored. The advanced
year, however, focuses primarily on clinical counseling       Addiction Professionals Certification Board of
skills and culturally competent use of self in complex        New Jersey, Inc.
working relationships with clients and client groups.                   Since the fall of 2000, the Department of
While the emphasis is on clients’ strengths, and work-        Social Work at Monmouth University, in cooperation
ing together toward their empowerment is continued,           with the Addiction Professionals Certification Board of
students learn about and apply clinical skills to family,     New Jersey, Inc., has offered the course work needed
children, and mental-health agency settings; child wel-       for the Certified Alcohol and Drug Counselor (CADC)
fare, criminal justice, and host settings in which clinical   certification. In the summer of 2004, the certification
social work most often takes place.                           became a license. The Department of Social Work
         The       International     and      Community       continues to work with the State of New Jersey,
Development concentration (ICD) primarily uses                Department of Law and Public Safety, Division of
community development theory and practice to                  Consumer Affairs, Board of Marriage and Family
address developing-world social and economic jus-             Therapists, Drug and Alcohol Committee to provide
tice, inequality, oppression, and discrimination issues       the course work needed for the state-issued Licensed
in developed and developing countries. Culturally             Certified Alcohol and Drug Counselor (LCADC).
competent community development respects the                            The Department of Social Work recognizes
integrity and worth of individuals and communities            the need for addictions training to serve the sub-
with diverse backgrounds. ICD focuses the practice            stance abuse affected population and their families.
of social work at mezzo and macro levels with agen-           In order to serve this special population, the State
cies and client populations within the context of             Board requires that proper certifications be in place
global interdependence of social problems. Courses            or in process.
stress the knowledge, values, skills, and ethics of                     Any M.S.W. student (in the PFC concentra-
practice at the mezzo and macro levels, with specific         tion) who takes the elective course SW 604 and four
content on the ethics of the International Federation         additional workshops that are offered each summer



                                                                                    Monmouth University 95
Social Work



here at Monmouth University will have completed the       toward the MA in Public Policy. Please use the fol-
necessary course work towards his or her LCADC.           lowing table as a guide:
Students who are completing their internship hours in
a drug and alcohol placement may count those hours        Master’s in Social Work (Clinical)
towards the required field hours for the LCADC as         SW503:   Practice with Individuals and Families
well as their M.S.W. degree. The course work and          SW505:   Social Welfare Policy and Services I
field hours are good for five years after they have       SW507:   Social Work Research
been taken, and students are required to keep their       SW509:   Human Behavior I
own records. All other requirements towards the           SW510:   Field Practicum I
LCADC will need to be met by the student on his or        SW513:   Social Work Practice with Groups
her own, according to the State of New Jersey,            SW515:   Social Welfare Policy and Services II
Department of Law and Public Safety, Division of          SW518:   Global Community Practice
Consumer Affairs, Board of Marriage and Family            SW519:   Human Behavior II
Therapists, Drug and Alcohol Committee. For addi-         SW520:   Field Practicum II
tional information regarding the requirements for the     SW627:   Implications of Social Justice and Human
LCADC, please contact:                                             Rights for Social Work
                                                          SW669:   Applications of Social Justice and Human
        State Board of Marriage and Family Therapy                 Rights in Social Work
        Examiners                                         SW605:   Advanced Clinical Practice with Families
        Alcohol and Drug Counselor Committee              SW626:   Evaluation of Practice Effectiveness
        PO Box 45040                                      SW645:   Clinical Seminar in Advanced Family
        124 Halsey Street, 12th Floor                              Practice
        Newark, NJ 07101                                  SW665:   Advanced Clinical Practice with Children
        (973) 504-6582                                    SW630:   Field Practicum III-FC
                                                          SW640:   Field Practicum IV-FC
Master of Social Work/Master of Divinity Dual             SW618:   Social Work Administration
Degree Program:
        Monmouth University’s Department of Social        Electives – choose 2 of the 4 classes listed below:
Work and the Theological School of Drew University        SW614: Grant Writing
have entered into an agreement in which students          SW618: Social Work Administration
can pursue a Master of Social Work and Master of          SW619: Social Work Supervision
Divinity degree, which shall be known as the              SW624: Issues in International Health Care
M.S.W./M.Div. degree program. This program will           SW652: Civil Society, NGO’s, and Social Work
allow accepted social work candidates to complete
the Master of Divinity degree at Drew University, and     Master’s in Social Work (ICD)
accepted divinity candidates to complete the Master       SW503: Practice with Individuals and Families
of Social Work degree in a 4-year period.                 SW505: Social Welfare Policy and Services I
                                                          SW507: Social Work Research
Joint Degree Program: Dual Master’s Degrees in            SW509: Human Behavior I
Social Work (MSW) and Public Policy (MA-PP)               SW510: Field Practicum I
                                                          SW513: Social Work Practice with Groups
        The MSW program offers interested stu-            SW515: Social Welfare Policy and Services II
dents an opportunity to earn a second master’s            SW518: Global Community Practice
degree in Public Policy (MA), after completion of their   SW519: Human Behavior II
MSW requirements. Students who complete the 60-           SW520: Field Practicum II
credit MSW can use up to 12 credits from the MSW          SW627: Implications of Social Justice and Human
courses toward the MA in Public Policy. Students                 Rights for Social Work
who complete the Advanced Standing (30-credit)            SW669: Applications of Social Justice and Human
MSW can use up to six credits of MSW courses                     Rights in Social Work




96 Monmouth University
                                                                                             Social Work



SW617: Advanced Practice in Planning and Social       PS563: Global Policy and Issues (which can be
       Policy                                                substituted with SW518)
SW625: Evaluation of Programs and Services            OR
SW615: Issues in International Development            PS566: Comparative Public Policy
SW655: Comparative International Social
       Development                                    PS589:   Practicum
SW631: Field Practicum III-CL                         PS618:   Social Work Administration
SW641: Field Practicum IV-CL                          PS514:   Public Opinion and Polling
SW618: Social Work Administration                     PS524:   Public Opinion and the Media
                                                      PS525:   Political Communication
Electives – choose 2 of the 4 classes listed below:   PS522:   History of Urbanization in America
SW614: Grant Writing                                  PS553:   Gender, Family, and Policy
SW618: Social Work Administration                     PS530:   Environmental Policy
SW619: Social Work Supervision                        PS582:   Global Organizations
SW624: Issues in International Health Care            PS585:   American Foreign Policy
SW652: Civil Society, NGO’s and Social Work           PS598:   Special Topics/Special Projects
                                                      PS599:   Readings and Research
Master’s in Public Policy
PS510:   Policy Analysis                              Notes:
PS516:   Research Methods                             1.     Plain text = required course
PS589:   Public Policy Practicum (Internship)         2.     Italicized text = course is specific to concen-
PS563:   Global Policy and Issues                            tration for the MSW program
PS595:   Research Proposal                            3.     Bold text = electives
PS596:   Research Project
PS518:   Theory, Policy, and Ethics                   Public Policy must have a minimum of 12 credits
PS596:   Public Policy Research Project               Social Work (both concentrations) must have a
PS597:   Portfolio                                    minimum of 6 credits
PS617:   Social Planning




                                                                            Monmouth University 97
98 Monmouth University
Student Services




                                                                                                                        Student Services
                                                                                                                 Course Descriptions
         The Division of Student Services at            Monmouth and to give students opportunities to
Monmouth University offers many important student       meet and interact with other new students.
services for resident and commuter students. Staff      Students will take a mathematics placement test
members promote personal and intellectual growth,       and attend an advising/registration program during
while aiding students in resolving problems and         which they will work with a First-Year Advisor to
helping them adapt to the college experience. The       develop a schedule for the fall semester. They will
Student Handbook provides a more in-depth               also meet faculty, staff and students with whom
description of these services and all the regulations   they’ll be interacting during the first year.
relevant to student life. Students should become                 Families of first-year students have at least
familiar with the handbook at the start of every aca-   three opportunities to come to campus to learn
demic year.                                             about life at Monmouth University during their stu-
                                                        dent’s first year on campus. The first is a Family
SERVICES FOR STUDENTS:                                  Program, offered in late spring, well before New
ORIENTATION                                             Student Orientation. Families will receive important
       A student’s introduction to student life at      information about their student’s upcoming transi-
Monmouth begins even before classes start. All new      tion into life as a university student and meet repre-
students participate in orientation programs            sentatives from across campus who can provide
designed specifically for their needs.                  information during our Resource Fair. Another fam-
                                                        ily session is held on Move-In Day (the weekend
First-year students                                     before classes start), and all are invited back to
        All new first-year students, commuters and      campus again for Family Weekend, which usually
residents, are expected to take part in an intensive    takes place in October.
two-day, one-night New Student Orientation
Program during the month of July. This structured       Transfer Students (including Adult Learners)
program includes educational and social activities               The Center for Student Success (CSS)
designed to ease the transition to college life at      coordinates the connections between full-time
                                                        transfer students (with 18 or more credits) and their




                                                                               Monmouth University 99
Student Services



academic departments to ensure a smooth transition                   Cars are unnecessary, as everything gener-
to Monmouth University. The Associate Dean for              ally is within walking distance of campus. Many stu-
CSS Support Services and Articulation and Student           dents use bicycles. While students are not prohibited
Development Counselors are available to assist              from bringing cars (parking is extremely limited and a
transfer students with their personal adjustment and        parking decal is required), they are discouraged from
educational plans. These services are also available        having cars on campus so that they may fully experi-
for all part-time students.                                 ence University life and all that it has to offer.
         At the beginning of each semester, all new
transfer students are welcomed to the University at         Commuters
specially designed orientation programs.                             There are traditional, non-traditional, full-
                                                            time, part-time, graduate and undergraduate stu-
HOUSING OPTIONS                                             dents who commute to campus every year.
Residents                                                   Monmouth University recognizes that its commuter
           The University offers a variety of housing       students are unique and that they have a variety of
options in its 17 locations: Beechwood, Birch, Cedar,       needs which the University attempts to address each
Mullaney, Spruce, Willow, Laurel, Elmwood,                  semester. As such, the Office of Off-Campus and
Pinewood, Oakwood, Redwood, and Maplewood                   Commuter Services (OCCS) is available to provide
Halls; the Garden, Great Lawn, Fountain Garden,             support and guidance to all of the commuter students
Diplomat apartment complexes; and Pier Village.             who attend Monmouth University. Commuter stu-
Living styles include traditional room arrangements,        dents are identified as early as summer orientation,
usually for first-year students; suite style, usually for   where information sessions are offered and they can
first-year and upper-class students; and apartments         hear from student leaders as well as find out how to
for juniors and seniors. Residence halls are typically      navigate the programs and services that are avail-
co-ed by floor, and the majority of students share          able on campus. Students who have an interest in
double rooms. In an effort to make a comfortable            getting involved are encouraged to contact the Office
match, new students are asked to complete a ques-           of Student Activities or any of the 80 recognized
tionnaire before room assignments are made.                 clubs and organizations that exist at Monmouth.
Housing is not guaranteed.                                           There are a wide range of extra-curricular
           Each residential area is staffed by profes-      events and leadership opportunities that take place,
sional Hall Directors, and each hall is staffed by          and programs are planned so that commuters can
Resident Assistants, all of whom are intensively            participate during the day. Furthermore, commuter
trained in providing assistance, information, activi-       students may choose from a number of dining
ties, and programs for resident students. The               options that include a la carte and meal plan services
Assistant Vice President for Student Services, the          in the Student Center Cafeteria, Java City, the
Associate Director of Residential Life, and two             Einstein Bagel shop, or the Magill Commons Dining
Assistant Directors of Residential Life reside near         Hall. Commuter students will find parking at any time
campus and provide additional, professional support         of the day or night. For more information, contact
for the Residence Life program.                             OCCS at 732-263-5651 or refer to the Office’s Web
           All on-campus halls provide laundry facilities   site at www.monmouth.edu/commuter.
that utilize vending cards, which can be purchased on
campus. All resident students not living in a University-   STUDENT SERVICES
owned or sponsored apartment are required to be on                   Health Services is open to all students
the meal plan of the Residence Dining Hall. Students        whether they live on or off campus. All matriculating
may choose either a carte blanche plan, which allows        students born after 1956 must show proof of two
you unlimited access to the Residential Dining Hall, or     measles, two mumps, and one rubella immunization.
one of three “block” meal plans, which provides stu-        Students taking nine (9) or more credits must show
dents with a set number of meals for the semester.          proof of having completed the Hepatitis B series.
First-year students may not select a “block” lower than     Resident students are required to receive the meningi-
195 their first semester.                                   tis vaccine. There is no fee for medical consultation or




100 Monmouth University
                                                                                            Student Services



physical examination. Students are responsible for any     and mentoring as well as advising the Monmouth
costs that may be incurred for outside referrals, pre-     University Veterans’ Association. The Office of Veteran
scriptions, special services, laboratory, and diagnostic   Services in located on the first floor of the Rebecca
procedures. Students are seen on a walk-in basis.          Stafford Student Center. The office hours are Monday
Appointments are required for Women’s Clinic, physi-       through Friday 8:45 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
cals, and psychiatric evaluations. Services include:
diagnosis and treatment of common ambulatory ill-          CO-CURRICULAR PROGRAMS
nesses and injuries, immunizations, allergy injections,    Athletics
physicals, GYN services, drug and alcohol screening,                 Athletics constitute an integral part of a
psychiatric evaluation, and medication titration.          Monmouth University education. The Division I ath-
         The Health Center hours are: Monday               letic program offers excellent opportunities for quali-
through Thursday, 8:45 am to 7:00 pm, and Friday,          fied athletes who wish to participate and a special
8:45 am to 5:00 pm.                                        level of enthusiasm and excitement for the entire
         Health Services is staffed with three nurse       University community.
practitioners, a nurse practitioner/director, a licensed             The athletics program fields men’s varsity
drug and alcohol counselor, a part-time general prac-      teams in baseball, basketball, cross-country, football,
titioner physician, and a part-time psychiatrist.          golf, indoor track and field, soccer, tennis, and out-
Monmouth Medical Center, a community teaching              door track and field. Women’s varsity teams partici-
hospital, offers complete medical and psychiatric serv-    pate in basketball, bowling, cross-country, field
ices and is within a mile and a half of the University.    hockey, golf, indoor track and field, lacrosse, soccer,
         The Department of Counseling and                  softball, tennis, and outdoor track and field.
Psychological Services provides free, confidential
psychological counseling to Monmouth University            Student Activities
students on a “first come, first serve” basis. The pro-             The Office of Student Activities and Student
fessional staff of licensed psychological counselors       Center Operations provides a variety of programs
supports students in addressing a variety of personal      and opportunities that are intended to assist in the
issues, including general mental health, anxiety and       social, cultural, and intellectual development of our
stress management, depression, emotional crises,           students. The office is responsible for the coordina-
family issues, interpersonal conflicts, and more.          tion of cultural and social activities reflecting the
Mental health hotlines connect students to both on         diverse population of the University, encourages stu-
and off-campus assistance on a 24-hour basis. The          dent participation in clubs and organizations, is
Counseling Center is located on the third floor of the     involved in the coordination of campus and multicul-
Rebecca Stafford Student Center and is open from           tural activities, provides leadership trainings, over-
8:45am to 5:00pm, Monday through Friday. Contact           sees Fraternity and Sorority Life and the operation of
us by e-mail at mucounseling@monmouth.edu or by            the Student Center.
calling 732-571-7517.          Additional information
regarding clinical counseling services and a list of
                                                           Leadership Programs
web-based resources may be found on the
                                                                   The Office of Student Activities and Student
University Web site.
                                                           Center Operations coordinates a variety of leader-
         The Office of International Student
                                                           ship programs and initiatives for the campus com-
Services assists students from other countries with
                                                           munity. There are various leadership workshops,
their adjustment to life in the United States and
                                                           conferences, and trainings; student involvement
Monmouth University. A part-time International
                                                           fairs; and student group and leader recognition
Student Services Coordinator is available to provide
                                                           events, societies, and awards. For more information,
personal and immigration advising and cross-cultural
                                                           please contact the office at 732-571-3586.
counseling.
         The Office of Veteran Services is a one-stop,
point-of-contact for all of our veteran students, active   STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS
duty and reserve personnel, and dependents of military             There are more than 80 different clubs and
personnel. This office provides assistance, advocacy,      organizations on campus. Active involvement in a



                                                                                Monmouth University 101
Student Services



club or organization helps a student develop new          Cultural Activities
leadership skills and meet new friends. Students can               The Lauren K. Woods Theatre is the home of
select from clubs related to their majors or take the     the Department of Music and Theatre Arts, offering a
opportunity to join something related to a special        schedule of student productions during the academic
interest or hobby. Each year the Office of Student        year, and the professional theatre, The Shadow
Activities and Student Center Operations hosts an         Lawn Stage, in the summer. Participation in all
Involvement Fair to assist students in getting con-       department performance ensembles from theatrical
nected to a club or organization. Students should         productions, chorus, chamber choir, chamber
read the bulletin boards, table tents, e-mail, elec-      orchestra and others is open to all students. Private
tronic boards, and the student newspaper, The             instrumental and vocal lessons are available to all
Outlook, to learn more about club activities through-     students regardless of their major. Backstage assis-
out the year.                                             tance is always welcome during the academic year
                                                          as well as during the summer season.
Student Center                                                     The “in-concert” series features world-
         An integral part of Monmouth’s overall cam-      renowned musicians in classical and jazz perform-
pus life program, the Student Center serves as a          ances. The dance program provides regional and
gathering area for all segments of the University         professional dance companies for student enjoy-
community. It is an area where students meet infor-       ment. Other cultural events include a poetry reading
mally and formally to share common interests and          series, Global Understanding Week, guest lectures
develop friendships. The Student Center includes          throughout the year, and various multicultural and
dining facilities, lounges, Wachovia/Wells Fargo          diversity activities. The University maintains two art
Bank office and ATM, computer lab, meeting rooms,         galleries with an ongoing schedule of exhibits.
and is the site of many campus and community                       While Monmouth has no religious affiliation,
events. The facility also houses the Student              it does recognize the important place that religion
Government Association, the Student Activities            has in the lives of many of its students. The Christian
Board, and many student organization offices.             Ambassadors, the Catholic Centre, Hillel, and the
         The Student Center is the site of the Division   Muslim Student Association are all active on campus.
of Student Services, the Center for Student Success,      In addition, churches and synagogues representing
the Office of Career Services, Student                    the major religious faiths are within convenient reach
Activities/Operations, Judicial Affairs, International    of the campus and are available for services and per-
Student Services, Central Scheduling, the Office of       sonal counseling. A listing of area places of worship
Off-Campus and Commuter Services, Conference              is available at the Office of Student Services.
and Program Services, the Study Abroad Office, the
Academic Foundations Office, the Office for Disability    Recreation
Services, and the Office of Veteran Services.                       The William T. Boylan Gymnasium provides
                                                          facilities to support varsity competition and recre-
Student Activities Board                                  ation, including a swimming pool (non-competition),
          The Student Activities Board (SAB) is a stu-    three full basketball courts, a fitness center, and the
dent organization advised by the Office of Student        Sports Medicine Department. Outdoor facilities avail-
Activities and Student Center Operations. Concerts,       able to students for their recreational use and varsity
speakers, comedians, bus trips, novelty programs, and     competition include: tennis courts, an eight-lane track,
festivals are among the many events sponsored. The        a Field Turf football/lacrosse field, and grass soccer,
SAB presents numerous opportunities for students to       baseball, and softball fields. There is a year-round
get involved both as spectators and as active board       Intramural Sports Program, which includes games
members. Students can join eight committees, which        and sports, such as badminton, basketball, dodge
include: Novelty, Awareness, Diversity Programs,          ball, flag football, softball, volleyball, dorm wars,
Major Events, Comedy, Concerts, Festivals, and Travel     poker, home run derby, and 3-point contest.
and Tour. Involvement in SAB may relate to a student’s
major or may just be something enjoyable.




102 Monmouth University
                                                                                             Student Services



SOCIETIES                                                   AWARDS
Greek Letter Organizations                                         Students are eligible for non-academic
        Currently there are five social fraternities, six   awards that are given annually.
social sororities and one professional fraternity on
campus. The fraternities include: Phi Kappa Psi, Phi,       Outstanding Student Award
Tau Kappa Epsilon, Sigma Pi, Theta Xi, and Sigma                     The Student Government Association spon-
Tau Gamma. The sororities include: Alpha Sigma              sors this award given to the graduating senior who,
Tau, Alpha Xi Delta, Delta Phi Epsilon, Lambda Theta        through creative leadership and ability, has made a
Alpha Latin Sorority, Inc., Phi Sigma Sigma, and Zeta       contribution of lasting value to the future of
Tau Alpha. The one professional fraternity is Alpha         Monmouth University. The name of the winner is
Kappa Psi, a business fraternity.                           announced at Commencement.

Honor Societies                                             STUDENT CODE OF CONDUCT
          Academic departments sponsor honor soci-                   Monmouth University offers its students the
eties to give recognition to outstanding scholarship in     opportunity for maximum intellectual and personal
a particular area. Student Services does not oversee        growth by providing a variety of experiences, activi-
academic honor societies.                                   ties, and services that are designed to complement
          Membership in Lambda Sigma Tau (the               classroom work and provide opportunities for individ-
University-wide honor society) is the highest aca-          ual maturation.
demic honor at Monmouth University and is awarded                    The University recognizes and respects the
to upper-class students on the basis of outstanding         students’ personal freedom and assures maximum
scholarship.                                                individual liberty within the limits necessary for the
          Omicron Delta Kappa, national leadership          orderly operation of the University. In response, stu-
society, recognizes upperclass students who have            dents must observe rules and regulations necessary
demonstrated leadership on campus. Phi Eta Sigma            for the proper functioning of the institution.
is a freshman leadership honor society acknowledg-                   Each individual has the right and responsibil-
ing academic excellence and involvement in student          ity to bring to the attention of an administrative or
activities.                                                 Student Government official any violations of per-
          The Gamma Sigma Alpha, National Greek             sonal freedom or the regulations of the University.
Academic Honor Society, recognizes fraternity and                    Additional information regarding the Student
sorority members who have achieved high levels of           Code of Conduct is contained in the Student
academic success. The order of Omega National               Handbook. The Student Handbook is available
Greek Honor Society recognizes leaders within the           online at www.monmouth.edu/studenthandbook.
fraternity and sorority community. Rho Lambda
Panhellnic Honor Society recognizes those women
affiliated with NPC sororities for achieving high levels
of Panhellnic Life.




                                                                                 Monmouth University 103
104 Monmouth University
Directories




                                                                                                                      Directories
OFFICERS                                 Rosa Chaviano-Moran, DMD (2006)        Marianne Hesse (2007)
                                         Director of Multicultural Affairs      The Hesse Companies
Robert B. Sculthorpe ’63, Chairman       UMDNJ/NJDS                             Atlantic Highlands, NJ
Marcia Sue Clever, M.D., Vice Chairman   Newark, NJ
John R. Garbarino, Treasurer                                                    Kenneth W. Hitchner, III (2007)
Michael A. Plodwick ’82, Secretary       Marcia Sue Clever, M.D. (2003)         Partner and Managing Director
                                         Red Bank, NJ                           Goldman, Sachs and Company
TRUSTEES                                                                        New York, NY
                                         Dennis M. Coleman, Esq. (2008)
Jerome P. Amedeo ’90 (2007)              Partner                                Frederick J. Kaeli, Jr. ’61 (2010)
Owner/Director                           Ropes and Gray                         Atlantic Highlands, NJ
Camp Harmony, Inc.                       Boston, MA
Warren, NJ                                                                      Robert E. McAllan ’69 (2003)
                                         William P. Dioguardi, Jr. ’80 (2006)   Chief Executive Officer
Virginia S. Bauer (2009)                 Chairman and CEO                       Press Communications, LLC
Senior Vice President of Development     Four Springs Capital, LLC              Neptune, NJ
Covenant House                           Avon-By-The-Sea, NJ
New York, NY                                                                    Thomas J. Michelli (2006)
                                         Marti S. Egger ’81 (2002)              President
Francis V. Bonello, Esq. (2010)          Account Manager                        Michelli Associates, Inc.
Wilentz, Goldman and Spitzer, P.A.       IMS, Inc.                              Wayside, NJ
Eatontown, NJ                            Parsippany, NJ
                                                                                H. William Mullaney (2006)
Rudolph J. Borneo ’64 (2003)             Paul G. Gaffney II (ex-officio)        Ocean, NJ
Former Vice Chairman and Director        President
  of Stores                              Monmouth University                    Tavit O. Najarian, Sc. D. (2005)
Macy’s West                              West Long Branch, NJ                   President
San Francisco, CA                                                               Najarian & Associates, Inc.
                                         John R. Garbarino (2004)               Eatontown, NJ
A. David Brown, Jr. ’65 (2009)           Chairman and CEO
Executive Vice President/Human           Ocean First Bank                       Jeana M. Piscatelli ’01, ’02 (2010)
  Resources                              Toms River, NJ                         Vice President North East Region
Urban Brands                                                                      International Correspondent
Secaucus, NJ                             John A. Greco, Jr. ’74 (2009)          Wells Fargo Bank
                                         Greco Associates                       New York, NY
Peter R. Bruckmann ’70 (ex officio)      Berkeley Heights, NJ
Exclusive Financial Specialist                                                  Michael A. Plodwick ’82 (2009)
Allstate Financial Services, LLC         Jan Greenwood, Ph.D. (2001)            Middletown, NJ
Middletown, NJ                           Greenwood/Ashur Associates, Inc.
                                         Miramar Beach, FL




                                                                                  Monmouth University 105
Directories



Thomas A. Porskievies ’82 ’86 (1998)   LIFE TRUSTEES EMERITI                         Robert D. Mc Caig (2005)
Vice President Strategic Planning/                                                   Vice President for Enrollment Management
  Development                          Paul S. Doherty, Jr. ’67 (1995)               B.A., Penn State University; M.A., Arcadia
L-3 Communications ILEXSystems, Inc.   Chairman and President                          University; Ed.D, Temple University
Eatontown, NJ                          Arrowpac, Inc.
                                       North Bergen, NJ                              Marilyn McNeil (1994)
Steven J. Pozycki ’73 (2003)                                                         Vice President and Director of Athletics
President                              Thomas P. Kiely, HN ’98                       B.R.E., The University of Calgary; M.A.,
SJP Properties                         Rumson, NJ                                      McGill University, Ed.D., Washington
Parsippany, NJ                         Charles T. Parton, HN ’01                       State University
Alfred J. Schiavetti, Jr. (1997)       Chairman of the Board                         Jeffery N. Mills, Ph.D. (2005)
President                              Two River Community Bank                      Vice President for University Advancement
Navesink Associates, LLC               Tinton Falls, NJ                              B.S., University of Maine; M.Ed., Ph.D.,
Red Bank, NJ                           Jules L. Plangere, Jr., HN ’86                  Arizona State University
Robert B. Sculthorpe ’63 (2003)        Spring Lake, NJ                               Mary Anne Nagy (1986)
New York, NY                           Richard S. Sambol                             Vice President for Student Services
                                       Chairman of the Board                         B.S., Springfield College; M.S.Ed.,
M. Monica Sweeney, M.D., M.P.H.                                                        Monmouth College; M.B.A., Monmouth
                                       The Sambol Companies
  (2006)                               Toms River, NJ                                  University
Assistant Commissioner New York City
  Department of Health and Mental      FORMER PRESIDENTS                             Patricia Swannack (1975)
  Hygiene                                                                            Vice President for Administrative Services
Director of the Bureau of HIV/Aids     Edward G. Schlaefer (1933-1956)               B.S., Monmouth University
  Prevention and Control               President Emeritus
                                                                                     Edward Christensen (1996)
New York, NY                           Eugene H. Lehman (1956-1957)                  Vice President for Information Management
Ann Unterberg (2004)                   President Emeritus                            A.S., George Washington University; B.S.,
New York, NY                                                                           Southern Illinois University; M.B.A.,
                                       Edward G. Schlaefer (1957-1962)
                                                                                       Ph.D., Rutgers University
LIFE TRUSTEES                          President Emeritus
                                       William G. Van Note (1962-1971)               OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT
Paul W. Corliss (2000)
President and CEO                      President Emeritus                            Paul G. Gaffney II (2003)
The Silver Fox Club                                                                  President
                                       Richard J. Stonesifer (1971-1979)
Manasquan, NJ                                                                        B.S., U.S. Naval Academy; M.S.E.,
                                       President Emeritus
                                                                                       Catholic University of America; M.B.A.,
Alan E. Davis, Esq. (1995)             Samuel H. Magill, Ph.D. (1980-1993)             Jacksonville University
Partner                                President Emeritus
Greenbaum, Rowe, Smith, & Davis, LLP                                                 Annette Gough (1989)
Woodbridge, NJ                         Rebecca Stafford, Ph.D. (1993-2003)           Executive Assistant to the President
                                       President Emerita                             A.A., Monmouth University
W. Cary Edwards, Esq.
Of Counsel                             ADMINISTRATION                                Janet Fell (1987)
Warters, McPherson, McNeill, P.C.                                                    Special Assistant to the Board of Trustees
Secaucus, NJ
                                       OFFICERS                                      B.A., Thomas Edison State College

Judith Ann Eisenberg                   Paul G. Gaffney II (2003)                     PUBLIC AFFAIRS
                                       President
Vero Beach, FL                                                                       Paul Dement (2005)
                                       B.S., U.S. Naval Academy; M.S.E.,
Alfred L. Ferguson, Esq. (1998)          Catholic University of America; M.B.A.,     Director of Government and Community
Of Counsel                               Jacksonville University                       Relations
McCarter and English                                                                 B.A., Pennsylvania State University
Newark, NJ
                                       Thomas Pearson (1978)
                                       Provost/Vice President for Academic Affairs   Petra Ludwig (2003)
Harold L. Hodes ’65 (1997)             B.A., Santa Clara University; M.A., Ph.D.,    Director of Public Affairs
Senior Partner                           University of North Carolina                B.A., Clark University
Public Strategies Impact, LLC                                                        OFFICE OF THE GENERAL COUNSEL
Trenton, NJ
                                       William G. Craig (1981)
                                       Vice President for Finance
                                       B.S., Seton Hall University; CPA, NJ
                                                                                     Grey J. Dimenna, Esq. (1995)
John H. Kessler ’69 (1997)                                                           Vice President and General Counsel
Senior Vice President                                                                B.A., State University of New York at
RBC Wealth Management
                                       Grey J. Dimenna, Esq. (1995)
                                       Vice President and General Counsel              Binghamton; J.D., Syracuse University
West Palm Beach, FL                                                                    College of Law
                                       B.A., State University of New York at
Stephen M. Parks ’68 (1998)              Binghamton; J.D., Syracuse University
Jupiter, FL                              College of Law




106 Monmouth University
                                                                                                                       Directories



Raymond Rodriguez (1990)                        William P. Mitchell (1968)                     David B. Strohmetz (1996)
Director of Affirmative Action, Human           Interim Dean of the Honors School;             Associate Vice President for
  Relations and Compliance                        Freed Foundation Endowed Chair                 Academic and Institutional
B.A., Queens College; M.P.A., Golden              in Social Science                              Assessment
  Gate University                               A.B., Brooklyn College; Ph.D.,                 B.A., Dickinson College; M.A., Ph.D.,
                                                  University of Pittsburgh                       Temple University
Rhonda M. Rehm, Esq. (2002)
Assistant General Counsel                       Donald M. Moliver (1982)                  Leon Hess Business School
B.A., Rutgers University; M.B.A., Rutgers       Interim Dean of the Leon Hess
  University, School of Business; J.D.,           Business School                         Donald M. Moliver (1982)
  Rutgers University, School of Law             B.A., Fairleigh Dickinson University;     Interim Dean of the Leon Hess Business
                                                  M.A., Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic          School
Charlene K. Diana, Esq. (2005)                    Institute and State University. State   B.A., Fairleigh Dickinson University; M.A.,
Assistant General Counsel                         Certified General Real Estate              Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and
B.A., John Jay College of Criminal Justice;       Appraiser for New Jersey and New           State University. State Certified General
  J.D., Roger Williams University School          York                                       Real Estate Appraiser for New Jersey
  of Law                                                                                     and New York
                                                Datta V. Naik (1977)
Antonia M. Berbrick (2008)                      Vice Provost and Dean of the                   Gilda M. Agacer (1998)
Director of Internal Audit                        Graduate School and Continuing               Interim Associate Dean of the Leon
B.S., Monmouth University                         Education                                      Hess Business School
                                                B.Sc., St. Xavier’s College, University        B.A., University of the East
Robert E. Shea (2006)                                                                            Philippines; M.I.B.S., Ph.D.,
Assistant Director of Internal Audit              of Bombay, Goa, India; Ph.D.,
                                                  University of Notre Dame                       University of South Carolina
B.A., Glassboro State College
                                                Judith L. Nye (1987)                           Vacant
ACADEMIC AFFAIRS                                                                               Assistant to the Dean
                                                Associate Vice President for
Thomas Pearson (1978)                             Academic Foundations – General               Theresa Guyer (2001)
Provost/Vice President for Academic Affairs       Education                                    Associate Director of the Kislak Real
B.A., Santa Clara University; M.A., Ph.D.,      B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Virginia                      Estate Institute
  University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill     Commonwealth University
                                                                                               Noah Hart (2004)
     Mercy O. Azeke (2009)                      Susan J. O’Keefe (1981)                        Assistant Dean of the Leon Hess
     Dean of the Center for Student             Associate Vice President for Academic            Business School
       Success                                    Administration and Registrar                 B.A., Livingston College, Rutgers
     B.S., University of Nigeria; M.Ed.,        A.B., Douglass College; M.S.,                    University; M.Ed., The College of
       Ed.D., Temple University                   Rutgers University                             New Jersey; M.Div., Eastern
     Jacqueline-Ann Ferguson (2004)             Michael A. Palladino (1999)                      Baptist Theological Seminary;
     Assistant Vice President for Academic      Dean of the School of Science                    Ed.D. Rutgers University
       Budgets and Financial Analysis           B.S., The College of New Jersey                Gertrude Murphy (1982)
     B.S., Brooklyn College; M.B.A.,              (Trenton State College); Ph.D.,              Administrative Coordinator
       Monmouth University                        University of Virginia
                                                                                               Douglas Stives (2006)
     Stanton W. Green (2004)                    Lynn Romeo (1994)                              Director of the MBA Program;
     Dean of the Wayne D. McMurray              Dean of the School of Education                  Specialist Professor, Accounting
       School of Humanities and Social          B.A., Glassboro State College; M.A.,           B.S., M.B.A., Lehigh University
       Sciences                                   Kean University; Ed.D, Rutgers
     B.A., University of New York at Stony        University                              School of Education
       Brook; M.A., Ph.D., University of
       Massachusetts, Amherst                   Saliba Sarsar (1985)                      Lynn Romeo (1994)
                                                Associate Vice President for Global       Dean of the School of Education
     Janet Mahoney (1995)                         Initiatives                             B.A., Glassboro State College; M.A., Kean
     Dean of the Marjorie K. Unterberg          B.A., Monmouth College; Ph.D.,              University; Ed.D, Rutgers University
       School of Nursing and Health               Rutgers University
       Studies                                                                                 Christine Borlan (2003)
     R.N., St. Mary’s Hospital; B.S.N.,         Ravindra N. Sharma (2006)                      Credential Officer
       Monmouth College; M.S.N., Seton          Dean of the University Library
                                                                                               Carrie Digironimo (2005)
       Hall University; Ph.D., New York         B.A., M.A., Delhi University, India;
                                                                                               Program Advisor
       University                                 M.L.S., University of North Texas;
                                                                                               B.A., Adams State College; M.A.T.,
                                                  Ph.D., State University of New York
     Robin Mama (1992)                                                                           M.Ed., Monmouth University
                                                  at Buffalo
     Dean of the School of Social Work                                                         Patricia Heaney (2007)
     B.S.W., College of Misericordia;           Kathleen Snedden (1986)                        Director of Field Placements
       M.S.S., Ph.D., Bryn Mawr College         Assistant to the Provost
                                                                                               B.A., St. Peter’s College; M.Ed.,
                                                                                                 William Paterson University




                                                                                            Monmouth University 107
Directories



    Marta Jahn (2007)                             Patrick Murray (2005)                          Sharon W. Stark (1996)
    Coordinator of Early Field Placements         Director of the Polling Institute                Associate Dean of the Marjorie K.
    A.A.S., Bergen Community College              A.B., Lafayette College; M.A.,                   Unterberg School of Nursing and
                                                    Rutgers University                             Health Studies
    Jenifer Joyce ’87, ’97 (1999)                                                                B.S., Thomas Edison State College;
    Program Advisor                               Vaune Peck (1987)                                M.S.N., Rutgers University; Ph.D.,
    B.S., M.A.T., Monmouth University             Counselor and Coordinator of Arts                Widener University
                                                   Programming and Promotion
    Janis Marcus (2000)                                                                      School of Science
    Program Advisor                               Barbara Powderly (1999)
    B.S.W., Ohio State University; M.S.           Marketing Coordinator for the Arts         Michael A. Palladino (1999)
      Ed., Northeastern University                B.F.A., Rhode Island School of             Dean of the School of Science
                                                    Design, M.A., Monmouth University        B.S., The College of New Jersey (Trenton
    Sarah Moore (2004)                                                                         State College); Ph.D., University of
    Graduate Advising Coordinator                 Eric Reisher (2002)                          Virginia
    B.A., Siena College; M.A., Georgian           Broadcast Technical Assistant
      Court College                               B.A., Monmouth University                      Joseph Chung (2001)
                                                                                                 UNIX Administrator and Teacher
    Terri Rothman (2001)                          Lorna Schmidt (1999)                           B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of
    Associate Dean of the School of               Director of Advising, Department of              Illinois at Chicago
      Education                                     Communication
    B.A., M.S., Ph.D., State University of        B.A., Eastern Illinois University; M.A.,       Catherine N. Duckett (2009)
      New York at Albany                            Emerson College                              Associate Dean of the School of
                                                                                                   Science
    Carol Salomon (2007)                          Michael Thomas (1997)                          B.A., Brown University; M.A.,
    Professional Development School               Assistant Dean of the Wayne D.                   University of Texas at Austin;
      Administrator                                 McMurray School of Humanities                  Ph.D., Cornell University
    B.A., Queens College; M.A. Kean                 and Social Sciences
      University                                  B.A., Hamilton College; M.F.A.,                Merrily Ervin (1997)
                                                    Syracuse University                          Coordinator of SC 100
School of Humanities and                                                                         B.A., University of California-Davis;
Social Sciences                               School of Nursing and Health Studies                 M.S., Ph.D., Rutgers University
Stanton W. Green (2004)                       Janet Mahoney (1995)                               Rigoberto Garcia (2005)
Dean of the Wayne D. McMurray School          Dean of the Marjorie K. Unterberg School           Chemistry Technician/Chemical
  of Humanities and Social Sciences             of Nursing and Health Studies                      Hygiene Officer
B.A., University of New York at Stony         R.N., St. Mary’s Hospital; B.S.N.,                 B.A., Thomas Edison State College
  Brook; M.A., Ph.D., University of             Monmouth College; M.S.N., Seton Hall
  Massachusetts, Amherst                        University; Ph.D., New York University           Anne Marie Lavin (1996)
                                                                                                 Biology-Chemistry Lab Supervisor/
    Chris Cavallaro (1992)                        Cira Fraser (1996)                               Compliance Officer
    Director of Broadcast Engineering             Coordinator of the B.S.N. Program              B.S., Kean College
    B.A., Monmouth University                     R.N., St. Vincent’s Medical Center;
                                                    B.S.N., The College of Staten                Anthony MacDonald (2005)
    Eileen Chapman (2006)                           Island; M.S., Rutgers University;            Director of the Urban Coast Institute
    Assistant Director of Performing Arts           Ph.D., Adelphi University                    B.A., Middlebury College; J.D.,
      Series                                                                                       Fordham University
                                                  Laura Jannone (2000)
    Jane DeTullio (2001)                          Director of the M.S.N. Program                 James Nickels (2007)
    Writing Center Director                       R.N., Christ Hospital; B.S.N., Jersey          Marine Scientist, Urban Coast Institute
    B.A., Georgia State University; M.A.,           City State College; M.S., Jersey             M.S., Montclair State University
      Seton Hall University                         City University; Ed.D., Teachers
                                                    College Columbia                             Maureen Paparella (1994)
    Mark Ludak (2007)                                                                            Director of Information Technology
    Compliance Officer/Technical Specialist       James Konopack (2006)                          B.A., St. Thomas University; M.B.A.,
    B.A., Monmouth University, M.F.A.,            Coordinator of Health Studies                    Barry University
      Hunter College                              B.A., Cornell University; Ed.M.,
    Parsons School of Design                        Boston University; Ph.D.,                    Barbara Reagor (2004)
                                                    University of Illinois                       Director of the Rapid Response
    Scott Knauer (2005)                                                                            Institute
    Director of Galleries and Collections         Barbara Paskewich (2001)                       B.S., Monmouth University; M.S.,
    B.F.A., University of Wisconsin;              Special Projects Coordinator                     Ph.D., Seton Hall University
      M.F.A., Ohio University                     B.A., Monmouth University; M.A.,
                                                    Montclair State University; R.N.,            John A. Tiedemann (1998)
    Golam Mathbor (1999)                                                                         Assistant Dean of the School of
                                                    Anne May School of Nursing
    Associate Dean of the Wayne D.                                                                 Science
      McMurray School of Humanities                                                              Director of the Marine and
      and Social Sciences                                                                          Environmental Biology and Policy
    B.S.S., M.S.S., LL.B., University of                                                           Program
      Dhaka; M.S.W., McGill University;                                                          B.S., Upsala College; M.S., Florida
      Ph.D., The University of Calgary                                                             Institute of Technology




108 Monmouth University
                                                                                                                      Directories



     Judith Toubin (1990)                          Rachel Gardner (1989)                    Academic and Institutional Assessment
     Coordinator of the Math Center                Associate Librarian; Coordinator of
     B.S., Monmouth College; M.A.,                   Information Services and Collection    David B. Strohmetz (1996)
       Georgian Court College                        Development                            Associate Vice President for Academic
                                                   B.A., Vassar College; M.A., Middlebury     and Institutional Assessment
School of Social Work                                College; M.L.S., Rutgers University    B.A., Dickinson College; M.A., Ph.D.,
                                                                                              Temple University
Robin Mama (1992)                                  George Germek (2006)
Dean of the School of Social Work                  Assistant Librarian – Reference              Eleanor C. Swanson (1994)
B.S.W., College of Misericordia; M.S.S.,             Coordinator                                Director of Institutional Research
  Ph.D., Bryn Mawr College                         B.S. Kean University; M.A. Rutgers           B.A., University of Arizona; M.A.,
                                                     University; M.L.I.S. Rutgers                 Ph.D., University of Connecticut
     Leah Lazzaro (2006)
     Field Placement Coordinator, School             University                             Global Initiatives
       of Social Work                              Aurora Ioanid (1996)
     B.A., Penn State University; M.S.W.,                                                   Saliba Sarsar (1985)
                                                   Associate Librarian; Head of             Associate Vice President for Global
       Monmouth University                           Technical Services                       Initiatives
     Paul Longo (1999)                             M.A., University of Bucharest,           B.A., Monmouth College; Ph.D., Rutgers
     Director of Field and Professional              Romania; M.L.S., Columbia                University
       Development, School of Social Work            University
     B.A., M.S.W., Rutgers University                                                           Aaron Ansell (2007)
                                                   Mary Beth Meszaros (2008)                    Co-Director of the Jewish Culture
Graduate School and                                Assistant Librarian – Bibliographic            Program
                                                     Instruction                                B.A., University of California, San
Continuing Education
                                                   B.A., M.A., Villanova University;              Diego; M.A., Ph.D., University of
     Datta V. Naik (1977)                            M.L.I.S., Drexel University, Ph.D.,          Chicago
     Vice Provost and Dean of the                    University of Pennsylvania
       Graduate School and Continuing                                                           Robyn Asaro (1998)
       Education
                                                   Linda Silverstein (2005)                     Assistant Director of Study Abroad
                                                   Specialist Librarian; Systems                B.A., State University of New York at
     B.Sc., St. Xavier’s College, University
                                                     Librarian/ILL Coordinator                    Buffalo
       of Bombay, Goa, India; Ph.D.,
                                                   B.A., Monmouth University; M.L.I.S.,
       University of Notre Dame                                                                 Rekha Datta (1995)
                                                     Drexel University
     Anthony Lazroe (2007)                                                                      Founding Director, Institute for Global
     Director of the Office of Grants and
                                               Academic Administration                            Understanding
       Contracts                               Susan J. O’Keefe (1981)                          B.A., M.A., Presidency College,
     B.A., Long Island University; M.A.,       Associate Vice President for Academic              University of Calcutta, India; Ph.D.,
       Northern Illinois University              Administration and Registrar                     University of Connecticut
                                               A.B., Douglass College; M.S., Rutgers            Joseph Patten (2002)
Monmouth University Library
                                                 University                                     Director of the Global Leadership
     Ravindra N. Sharma (2006)                                                                    Institute and of the Washington
     Dean of the University Library
                                                   Laura Papa Babbin, Esq. (1991)
                                                   Director of Registration and Records           Semester
     B.A. (honors), M.A., Delhi University,                                                     B.A., Kean University; M.A., West
                                                   B.A., Drew University; M.B.A.,
       India; M.L.S., University of North                                                         Virginia University; Ph.D., West
                                                     Monmouth University; J.D.,
       Texas; Ph.D., State University of                                                          Virginia University
                                                     Concord Law School
       New York at Buffalo
                                                   Debbie Mellish (1979)                        Maryanne Rhett (2008)
     Susan Bucks (2010)                                                                         Co-Director of the Jewish Culture
                                                   Assistant Director of Registration and
     Instructor Librarian                                                                         Program
                                                     Records for Scheduling
     Instructional Services/Reference/                                                          B.A. University of South Carolina,
                                                   A.A.S., Brookdale Community College
       Government Documents                                                                       M.A., University of Arizona; Ph.D.,
     B.A., M.A., Rutgers University                Lynn Reynolds (2002)                           Washington State University
                                                   Associate Director of Registration
     Lisa Coats (2006)                                                                          Richard Veit (2000)
                                                     and Records for Operations
     Assistant Librarian – Reference                                                            Director of the Center for Excellence
                                                   B.A., Monmouth University
     B.A., Temple University; M.A. Virginia                                                       in Teaching and Learning
       Commonwealth University;                    LacyJane Ryman (2008)                        B.A., Drew University; M.A., College
       M.L.I.S., Rutgers University                Assistant Director for Graduation              of William and Mary; Ph.D.,
                                                   B.A., The College of New Jersey                University of Pennsylvania
     Eleanora Dubicki (2003)
     Associate Librarian                           Karen Wyant (2001)                           To Be Appointed
     B.A., Douglass College; M.L.S.,               Assistant Director for WEB and               Faculty Director of Experiential
       M.B.A., Rutgers University                    Curriculum Management                        Education




                                                                                              Monmouth University 109
Directories



Academic Foundations –                             Erin Kenney (2004)                           Maureen Dries (2003)
General Education                                  Disability Specialist, Disability            Assistant Accountant
                                                     Services for Students                      B.S., Trenton State College; M.B.A.;
Judith L. Nye (1987)                               B.S., Marist College; M.S.W.,                  Pace University
Associate Vice President for Academic                Fordham University
  Foundations – General Education                                                               Catherine Duriske (1994)
B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Virginia Commonwealth           Lori Lichter (1983)                          Director of Investment Accounting
  University                                       Student Development Counselor                B.S., Montclair State College; CPA, NJ
                                                   B.A., M.A., Montclair State University
     Beatrice M. Rogers (1993)                                                                  Josephine Estelle (2001)
     Assistant Vice President for                  Nicole Martinez (2006)                       Accountant
       Academic Foundations – General              Counselor and Freshman Coordinator,          B.S., Georgian Court College
       Education                                     Educational Opportunity Fund
                                                   B.A., M.A., Monmouth University              Jonas Javier (2007)
     B.S., Allegheny College; M.B.A.,                                                           Associate Bursar
       Monmouth College                            Barbara Rubert (2002)                        B.S., New Jersey Institute of
Center for Student Success                         Director, Tutoring Center                      Technology
                                                   B.S., Seton Hall University
Mercy O. Azeke (2009)                                                                           Norma Johnson (1997)
Dean of the Center for Student Success             Danielle Schrama (1999)                      Manager of Payroll Services
B.S., University of Nigeria; M.Ed., Ed.D.,         Coordinator First Year Advising              B.A., Lynchburg College
  Temple University                                B.S., M.S., Monmouth University
                                                                                                Betsy Lunney (1981)
     Skip Carey (2005)                             Tyrone M. Smith (2009)                       Assistant Controller
     Director of Disability Services for           Counselor, Educational Opportunity           B.B.A., Suffolk University; M.B.A.,
       Students                                      Fund                                         Monmouth University
     B.A., Marist College; M.A., New               B.A., M.Ed., Monmouth University
                                                                                                Camille Peterson (1993)
       Jersey City University                      Marilyn Ward (1996)                          Assistant Bursar
     Jean-Marie Caruso (2007)                      Coordinator of Service Learning and
                                                     Community Programs                         Linda Pulcrano (1972)
     Student Development Counselor                                                              Bursar
     B.A., Loyola College; M.S.,                   B.A., Seton Hill College
       Monmouth University                         Lupita Yonker (2002)                         Laurie Stanton (1987)
                                                   Assistant Director, Educational              Accounts Payable Manager
     Carolyne Chirichello (2000)                                                                A.A., Brookdale Community College
     Assistant Director, Disability Services         Opportunity Fund
       for Students                                B.A., M.A., Bowling Green State              Melissa Sweeney (2007)
     B.A., University of California, Santa           University                                 Accountant
       Cruz; M.S., San Jose State              FINANCE                                          B.S., Rutgers School of Business;
       University                                                                                 M.B.A., Monmouth University
                                               William G. Craig (1981)
     William F. Hill (1977)                    Vice President for Finance                   John Gavin (1991)
     Assistant Dean for Career Services        B.S. in Business Administration, Seton       Associate Vice President for Budgets and
     B.A., St. Peter’s College; M.A.,            Hall University; CPA, NJ                     Finance
       Manhattan College                                                                    B.S., M.B.A., Seton Hall University
                                                   Ruth Saporito (1982)
     Colleen Johnson (1981)                        Assistant to the Vice President for          Gary Phoebus (1994)
     Director, Educational Opportunity               Student Financial Appeals                  Copy Center Manager
       Fund Program                                A.A., Hershey Jr. College; M.T.
     B.A., M.S.Ed., Monmouth College                                                            William T. Rainey (1982)
                                                     Harrisburg School of Medical               Bookstore Manager
     Jean Judge (1984)                               Technology, ASCP                           B.A., Rutgers University
     Associate Dean for Support Services       Philip Bodner (1997)
       and Articulation                                                                         Kathy Booth (1985)
                                               Associate Vice President & Controller            Assistant Bookstore Manager
     B.S., Georgian Court College; M.A.,       B.B.A., Bernard M. Baruch (C.U.N.Y.);
       Trenton State College                     M.B.A., Wagner College                         Megan McCluskey (2004)
     Deborah Kavourias (2003)                                                                   Textbook Manager
                                                   Shelley Carlock (2010)
     Director First Year Advising                  Accountant                                   Mark Miranda (2005)
     B.S., Syracuse University; M.A., Iona         B.B.A., Pace University                      Director of Purchasing
       College                                                                                  B.S., St. John’s University
                                                   Marilyn Cusick (1990)
     Kathleen Kennedy (1989)                       Manager of Cashiering                        Patricia Curtis (2006)
     Director of Cooperative Education             B.S., Monmouth University                    Box Office Manager
     B.S., University of Dayton; M.S.,                                                          B.A., Montclair University
       Wright State University                     Ellen Dombroski (1997)
                                                   Assistant Controller
                                                   B.S., Seton Hall University; CPA, NJ




110 Monmouth University
                                                                                                                   Directories



Edward Christensen (1996)                        Tease Gould (1995)                         Paula Cannella (2000)
Vice President for Information Management        Senior Technology Support                  System Administrator
A.S., George Washington University; B.S.,          Manager/IT Project Manager               Cittone Institute
  Southern Illinois University; M.B.A.,          B.S., College of Saint Elizabeth;
  Ph.D., Rutgers University                        M.S.Ed., Monmouth University             Robert Carsey (1998)
                                                                                            Director of Server Operations
     Patricia Dodd (1999)                        Joseph Huybens (2001)                      B.S., M.S., Monmouth University
     Assistant to the Vice President for         Computer Systems Analyst
       Information Management                                                               Alan Chiu (2000)
     A.A.S., Monmouth University                 Ruth Jamnik (2007)                         Programmer/Analyst
                                                 Assistant Computer Trainer                 B.A., Guangzhou Institute of Foreign
     John Cavallo (1997)                         B.A. Kean College                            Languages
     Director, Information Logistics and
       Security                                  Kristen Kormann (1998)                     Kathleen Crawley (2002)
     B.A., Monmouth University                   Senior Technology Support                  Senior Programmer/Analyst
                                                  Manager/IT Project Manager
     Theodore Tsoutsas (2001)                                                               Eric Joyce (1999)
     Software Licensing Administrator            Ronald Lawson (2006)                       Director of Infrastructure Operations
     Assistant LMS Administrator                 Computer Systems Analyst                   Brick Computer Institute
                                                 A.S., Devry University
Information Support                                                                         Mary Latteri (2002)
                                                 Aileen (Teri) Monahan (2008)               Programmer/Analyst
Wendy Savoth (2004)                              Technology Support Manager/IT              B.S., Monmouth University
Associate Vice President for Information           Project Manager
  Support                                        A.S., Staten Island Community              Michael McGuire (2007)
B.S., University of Connecticut; M.S.,             College; B.S. C.U.N.Y.                   Network Systems Administrator
  Monmouth University                                                                       B.A., Moravian College
                                                 Marijean Nagy (1999)
     Lydonna (Sue) Baklarz (2007)                Senior Technology Support                  Steven Mervine (2004)
     Computer Systems Analyst                      Manager/IT Project Manager               Director of Media Operations
                                                 B.A., Felician College; M.S.,              B.S., Monmouth University
     Joseph Bembry (2000)                          Villanova University
     Director of Computer Support                                                           Don Reynolds (2005)
     B.A., Monmouth University                   Billy Pachamango (2001)                    Programmer/Analyst
                                                 Computer Systems Analyst                   Carlton Richardson (2008)
     Karen M. Blaney (2007)                      A.S., Devry University
     Technology Support Manager/IT                                                          System Administrator
       Project Manager                           Linda Puches (2006)                        Gary Rosenberg (2001)
                                                 Instructional Designer                     Manager, Telecommunications
     Mary Caroli (2003)                          B.A., Fordham University; M.A., Kean
     Technology Support Manager/IT                 University                               Thomas Shenko (1999)
       Project Manager                                                                      Senior Programmer/Analyst
     A.A.S., Brookdale Community College         Glenn Schacht (2000)                       A.A., DeVry Technical Institute
                                                 Computer Systems Assistant
     Edward Carson (2004)                                                                   Charles (Joe) Strickland (1993)
     Computer Systems Analyst                    Michael Seeley (2005)                      Network Administrator
                                                 Computer Systems Analyst
     Robert Coles (2007)                         A.A.S., Bergen Community College           Bonnie Ullmeyer (1997)
     Computer Trainer                                                                       Director of Enterprise Programming
     B.A., Monmouth University                   Lynn Stipick (1997)                          and Integration
                                                 Director of Help Desk and Training         B.S., Monmouth University
     Deborah Cotler (2005)                       B.S., West Chester State University
     Director of Instructional Support                                                      Zhenhhong (John) Xu (2000)
     B.A., State University of New York,         Michael Walsh (2002)                       System Administrator
       Albany; Ed.M., Boston University          Technology Support Manager/IT              M.S., Louisiana Tech University
                                                   Project Manager
     Aditi (Rupa) Dasgupta (2008)                B.A., Purdue University; M.A., The     STUDENT SERVICES
     Graphic Web Designer/Videographer             Richard Stockton College of New
     B.A., University of Virginia; M.F.A.,                                              Mary Anne Nagy (1986)
                                                   Jersey
       Parsons Institute                                                                Vice President for Student Services
                                             Information Operations                     B.S., Springfield College; M.S.Ed.,
     Albert DaSilva (1998)                                                                Monmouth College; M.B.A., Monmouth
     Computer Systems Analyst                John Sonn (1988)                             University
                                                 Associate Vice President for
     Wayne Elliott (2002)                          Information Operations                   James Pillar (1995)
     Instructional Technologist and LMS          B.A., Rutgers University                   Assistant Vice President for Student
       Administrator                                                                          Services
     B.A., Monmouth University                   James Allan (2004)                         B.S., Millersville University; M.B.A.,
                                                 System Administrator                         West Chester University
                                                 A.A., Brookdale Community College




                                                                                          Monmouth University 111
Directories



   Mark Holfelder (2000)                      Barbara Nitzberg (1996)                    Lynne Lehrkinder (2008)
   Associate Director of Residential Life     Coordinator of International Student       Psychological Counselor
   B.A., Widener University; M.S., West         Services                                 B.A., Marist College; M.A., Kean
     Chester University                       B.A., M.A., Monmouth University              College
   Ray Gonzalez (2004)                        Shannon Killeen (2002)                     Tom McCarthy (2007)
   Associate Director of Housing              Assistant Vice President for Student       Psychological Counselor
     Operations                                 Services                                 B.A., M.A., Monmouth University
   B.A., S.U.NY. University; M.S.,            B.A., Glassboro State College; M.A.,
     Syracuse University                        Rowan College                            Kathryn Memoli (2004)
                                                                                         Psychological Counselor
   Megan Jones (2000)                         Susan Damaschke (2009)                     B.A., Glassboro State College;
   Assistant Director of Residential Life     Coordinator of First Year Student            M.S.W., State University of New
     and Judicial Affairs                       Retention                                  York Stony Brook
   B.S., Rutgers University; M.S.,            B.A., Bucknell University; M.S.,
     Monmouth University                        Miami University                     UNIVERSITY ADVANCEMENT
   Elizabeth Anton (2006)                     Kathy Maloney (2001)                   Jeffery N. Mills (2005)
   Residential Life Administrator             Director of Health Services            Vice President for University Advancement
   B.S., S.U.N.Y. Oneonta                     B.S.N., Georgetown University;         B.S., University of Maine; M.Ed, Ph.D.,
                                                M.B.A., The George Washington          Arizona State University
   Christopher McKittrick (2006)                University; M.S.N., Monmouth
   Residential Life Administrator                                                        Nadja Andreev (1994)
                                                University                               Director of Prospect Research
   B.S., M.A., The College of New
     Jersey                                   Louise Bosman (1997)                       Jacqueline Bartley-Oxley (2007)
                                              University Nurse Practitioner              Associate Vice President of
   Bradley Bennett (2006)                     B.S.N., M.S.N., Monmouth University
   Residential Life Administrator                                                          Development
   B.A., Salisbury University; M.A.,          Mary Lou Dalessandro (2000)                B.A., Boston College; J.D., Seton
     University of Mississippi                University Nurse Practitioner                Hall University School of Law
                                              B.A., Rutgers University; B.S.N.,          Jan Connolly (2002)
   Corey Inzana (2006)                          M.S.N., Monmouth University
   Residential Life Administrator                                                        Director of Special Events and
   B.S., Quinnipiac University                Donna Maclachian (2008)                      Programs
                                              University Nurse Practitioner              B.S., University of Evansville
   Eric Mochnacz (2005)                       B.S.N., University of Wisconsin,
   Residential Life Administrator                                                        Marian Dalton (2003)
                                                Madison; M.S.N., Monmouth                Senior Special Events Coordinator
   B.A., Seton Hall University; M.A.,           University
     Monmouth University                                                                 Shari DeAnni (2005)
                                              Suanne Schaad (2005)                       Assistant to the Vice President of
   Kerby Vincent (2010)                       Substance Awareness Coordinator
   Residential Life Administrator                                                          University Advancement
                                              B.A., Loyola College (MD); M.A.,
   B.A., M.A., The College of New               Monmouth University                      G. Anthony DelFranco (2000)
     Jersey                                                                              Director of Annual Fund Gifts
                                              Marsha McCarthy (2002)                     B.S., Northern Michigan University
   Amy Bellina (1994)                         Director of Conference and Program
   Director of Student Activities and           Services                                 Lucille Flynn (2002)
     Student Center Operations                B.A., Richard Stockton College of          Associate Vice President of
   B.A., University of Pittsburgh; M.A.,        New Jersey; M.B.A., Monmouth               University Advancement
     Indiana University of Pennsylvania         University                               B.S., Seton Hall University
   Tyler Havens (2005)                        Nicole Frame (2010)                        Jennifer Harris ’03, ‘05 (2007)
   Assistant Director of Student Activities   Assistant Director of Conference and       Associate Director of Alumni Affairs
     for Fraternity and Sorority Life           Program Services                         B.S., M.A., Monmouth University
   B.S.Ed., SUNY Fredonia; M.S.,              B.S., The College of New Jersey;
     Western Illinois University                                                         Freda Karpf ’75, ‘08 (1999)
                                                M.A., Monmouth University
                                                                                         Assistant Director of Prospect
   Heather Kelly (2004)                       Vaughn Clay (1994)                           Research and Advancement
   Assistant Director of Student              Director of Off Campus and                   Proposal Writer and Grants
     Activities for Multicultural and           Commuter Services                          Coordinator
     Diversity Initiatives                    B.S., M.A., Indiana University of          B.A., M.S.W., Monmouth University
   B.A., S.U.N.Y. University; M.S.,             Pennsylvania
     Syracuse University                                                                 Thomas E. Klimchak (2002)
                                              Franca Mancini, Ph.D. (1985)               Director of Advancement Services
   Megan McGowan (2010)                       Director of Counseling and                 B.A., Millersville University
   Assistant Director of Student                Psychological Services
     Activities and Student Center                                                       Michele B. Lassen ’85, ’87 (1996)
                                              B.A., Monmouth University; Ph.D.,
     Operations                                                                          Associate Director of Alumni Affairs
                                                University of Rome, Italy
   B.S., M.S., Springfield College                                                       B.S., M.B.A., Monmouth University




112 Monmouth University
                                                                                                               Directories



     Jennifer Loysen ’96 (2006)                 Danielle Colbert (2007)                  Andrea Thompson (2007)
     Annual Fund and Class Giving               Counselor for Special Initiatives        Graduate Admission Counselor
       Program Manager                          B.A., Lafayette College                  B.A., Marymount Manhattan College;
     B.S., Monmouth University                                                             M.A.T., Monmouth University
                                                Patrick Dorsey (2005)
     Michael S. Maiden, Jr. ’07 (2005)          Associate Director of Undergraduate      Claire Alasio (1997)
     Director of Advancement Publications         Admission                              Associate Vice President of
     B.A., Boston University; M.A.,             B.S., Fairleigh Dickinson University;      Enrollment Management/Director of
       Monmouth University                        M.S.Ed., Monmouth University             Financial Aid
                                                                                         B.A., Roanoke College; M.A.Ed.,
     Sharon Miggins ’06 (2002)                  Amanda Klaus (2009)                        Virginia Polytechnic Institute and
     Assistant Director of Special Events       Admission Counselor                        State University
       and Programs                             B.A., Monmouth University
     A.A.S., Fashion Institute of Technology;                                            Kristen Isaksen (1997)
       B.S., College of Staten Island;          Kamal Kornegay (2004)                    Associate Director of Financial Aid
       M.A.L., Monmouth University              Assistant Director of Undergraduate      B.A., Dickinson College; M.S.Ed.,
                                                  Admission                                Monmouth University
     Heather Mistretta (2006)                   B.A., Rowan University
     Assistant Editor                                                                    Tabitha Conlan (2001)
     B.A., American University                  Lesbia Marrero (2004)                    Senior Financial Aid Counselor
                                                Assistant Director of Undergraduate      B.S., Georgian Court College
     Marilynn W. Perry (1996)                     Admission
     Director of Alumni Affairs                 B.A., Inter America University           Sandra Crawford (2008)
     B.A., St. Lawrence University                                                       Financial Aid Counselor
                                                Christine Benol (1991)                   B.A., Muhlenberg College
     Kevin Scally ’07 (2009)                    Vice President of Enrollment
     Annual Fund Marketing Manager                Management                             Marilyn Dorsey (1985)
     B.A., Monmouth University                  Director of Enrollment Research and      Direct Lending Coordinator
                                                  Technical Support
     Georgina West ’02 (1997)                   B.A., Monmouth University; M.S.Ed.,      Nancy Hanson (1997)
     Director of Gift Planning and                Monmouth University                    Assistant Director of Financial Aid
       Resource Development                                                              B.S., M.B.A., Monmouth University
     B.S., Northern Illinois University;        Patricia Barr (1980)
       M.A., Monmouth University                Associate Director for Enrollment        Robert C. Hennessey (2001)
                                                  Credit Evaluation                      Assistant Director of Financial Aid
ENROLLMENT MANAGEMENT                           B.A., Monmouth University; M.S.Ed.,      B.S., West Chester University
Robert D. Mc Caig (2005)                          Monmouth University                    Sarah Savarese (2001)
Vice President for Enrollment                   Kathleen Dennis (1993)                   Director of Enrollment Publications
  Management                                    Enrollment Research Coordinator            and Communications
B.A., Penn State University; M.A., Arcadia      B.A., College of Saint Elizabeth         B.A., The College of New Jersey;
  University; Ed.D., Temple University                                                     M.B.A., Monmouth University
                                                Barbara Growney (1994)
     Andrea S. Bornstein (1977)                 Director of Admission Processing         Russ Crespolini (2010)
     Assistant to the Vice President for        B.S., Monmouth University; M.S.Ed.,      Web Writer
       Enrollment Management                      Monmouth University                    Enrollment Publications and
                                                                                           Communications
     Lauren Vento Cifelli (2000)                Jaclyn A. Rizzo (2001)                   B.A., Rowan University, M.A.,
     Assistant Vice President of                Assistant Director of Admission            Montclair State University
       Enrollment Management                      Processing
     B.A., B.S., M.A., Monmouth University      B.A., Kean University                    Lauren Harms (2008)
                                                                                         Communications Design Specialist
     Victoria Bobik (2005)                      Kevin L. Roane (1993)                    B.A., Monmouth University
     Director of Undergraduate Admission        Director of Graduate Admission
     B.A., Colgate University; M.A.,            B.S., Fairleigh Dickinson University     Eileen Reinhard (2004)
       University of South Carolina                                                      Communications Coordinator for
                                                Laurie Kuhn (1999)                         Publications Initiatives
     Andrew Amendola (2008)                     Associate Director of Graduate           B.A., Seton Hall University
     Admission Counselor                          Admission
     B.A., Monmouth University                  B.A., State University of New York at    Robert E. Smith (2004)
                                                  Oneonta; M.B.A., Barush College-       Communications Coordinator for
     Rene Anderko                                                                          Web Initiatives
     Admission Counselor                          Mount Sinai School of Medicine
                                                                                         B.S., Boston University
     B.A., Moravian College                     Terry DeTuro (2006)
                                                Graduate Admission Counselor             Vera Towle (2008)
     Brittany Barton (2009)                                                              Communications Design Specialist
     Admission Counselor                        B.A., Rider University; M.Ed.,
                                                  University of Virginia                 B.A., Georgian Court University
     B.A., Muhlenberg College




                                                                                        Monmouth University 113
Directories



ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES                              William McElrath (2003)                  Jon Cascone (1997)
                                                     Chief, MUPD                              Director of Recreation and Intramurals
Patricia Swannack (1975)                             B.A., Kings College; M.A., Seton Hall    B.S., M.A., East Stroudsburg University
Vice President for Administrative Services             University
B.S., Monmouth University                                                                     Vanessa Christensen
                                                     Kenneth Walker (2002)                    Assistant Athletics Trainer
     Kara Sullivan (1998)                            Deputy Chief, MUPD                       B.S., West Chester University
     Assistant to the Vice President for             B.A., Seton Hall University; MPA,
       Administrative Services                         Fairleigh Dickenson University         Joe Compagni (1996)
                                                                                              Director, Track & Field and Cross
     Robert Cornero (1996)                      ATHLETICS                                       Country
     Associate Vice President for Campus                                                      B.A., University of Delaware; M.P.S.,
       Planning and Construction                Marilyn McNeil (1994)                           University of Delaware, Cornell
     B.E., Stevens Institute of Technology      Vice President and Director of Athletics        University
                                                B.P.E., The University of Calgary; M.A.,
     Lester Hauck (1988)                          McGill University, Ed.D.; Washington        Mickey Cook (2006)
     Director of Facilities Management for        State University                            Head Coach Men’s Tennis
       Operations                                                                             B.S., Rutgers University
     B.S., Monmouth University                       Samantha Allison
                                                     Second Assistant Women’s                 Chris Damian
     Richard Su (1990)                                 Basketball Coach                       Assistant Coach Football/Video
     Director of Compliance, Special                 B.A., St. Francis University; M.B.A.,      Coordinator
       Events and Services                             Long Island University                 B.A., Monmouth University, M.S. Ed.,
     B.A., Monmouth University                                                                  Wagner College
                                                     Terence Archer
     Kevin G. Franken, Sr. (2007)                    Assistant Football Coach                 Gregory Decos (1999)
     Business Manager                                B.A., Monmouth University                Assistant Athletics Director
     B.A., Towson University, B.S.,                                                             Equipment, Laundry Services
       College of St. Elizabeth; M.S., New           Courtney Ball (2010)                     Vincent DeStasio (1992)
       Jersey Institute of Technology                Cheerleading Coach
                                                     B.S., Monmouth University                Team Physician
     Stephen Ruggiero (2008)                                                                  B.S., Monmouth University
     Director of Turf and Landscape                  Devin Barry                              University of Iowa
       Management                                    Assistant Coach Track
                                                     B.S., Mount St. Mary’s University        Jill DiSanti
     James Ferris, P.E. (2008)                                                                Assistant Field Hockey Coach
     Director of Facilities Management for           Tom Battaglia (1998)                     B.S., Qunnipiac University
       Special Projects                              Coordinator Strength/Conditioning
     B.S., Massachusetts Institute of                B.S., M.S., Purdue University            Kevin Drew
       Technology                                                                             Assistant Athletics Trainer
                                                     James Belanger                           B.A., S.U.N.Y. College
     Timothy Orr (1996)                              Assistant Coach Baseball
     Construction Manager                            B.S., University of Louisville           Karen Edson (1969)
     B.S., Geneva College                                                                     Associate Athletics Director for
                                                     Louie Berndt                               Business
     Monica Bottone (1994)                           Head Coach Softball
     Assistant to the Directors of Facilities        B.S. Western Michigan, Nicholls          Jeramy Edwards
       Management and Grant Manager                    State University                       Assistant Football Coach
     B.A., Montclair State University; M.A.,                                                  B.A. Duke University
       New York University                           Tom Bieber
                                                     Coordinator for Student Development      Dean Ehehalt (1994)
     Maureen Coffey (1999)                           B.S., Slippery Rock University           Head Coach, Baseball
     Director of HRIS, Employment and                                                         B.S.Ed., M.S.Ed, East Carolina
       Communications                                Andy Bobik                                 University
     B.S., M.B.A., Monmouth University               Associate Head Coach Football
                                                     B.A., Colgate                            Carli Figlio
     Robyn Salvo (2006)                                                                       Head Coach Field Hockey
     Director of Benefits and Training               Kevin Callahan (1992)                    B.A.,Kent State University
     B.A., College of New Jersey                     Head Coach, Football
                                                     B.A., University at Rochester            Abe Flores
     Maureen Slendorn (2007)                                                                  Assistant Coach Men’s and Women’s
     Manager of Recruiting and Staffing              David Calloway (1991)                      In/Outdoor Track
     B.S., Georgian Court University                 Head Coach, Men’s Basketball             B.A. Fine Arts; M.A. Ed., University of
                                                     B.S., M.B.A., Monmouth University          Southern California
     Aimee M. Parks (2000)
     Assistant Director of Human                     Rich Carragher (2001)                    Brian Gabriel
       Resources for Student Employment              Assistant Athletics Director for Event   Assistant Coach/Recruiting Football
     B.A., M.A., Monmouth University                   Management                             B.A. Sienna College
                                                     B.S., St. Joseph’s University
     Sharon Smith (1996)                                                                      Stephanie Gaitley
     Employee Benefits Administrator                                                          Head Coach Women’s Basketball
                                                                                              B.S., M.S., Villanova University




114 Monmouth University
                                                                                                             Directories



Jeff Gallo                              Patrice Murray (1988)                          Kristine Turner (1998)
Assistant Coach Football                Head Coach, Women’s Tennis                     Head Coach, Women’s Soccer
B.S., Monmouth University               B.A., M.A., Monmouth University                B.S., College of New Jersey; M.Ed.,
                                                                                         Lafayette College
Brian Hirshblond                        Karl Nonemaker
Assistant Coach Men’s and Women’s       Assistant Coach Baseball                       Scott Van Zile
  Track and Field                       B.S., Vanderbuilt University                   Assistant Coach/Offensive
B.A., Monmouth University                                                                Coordinator Football
                                        Ed Occhipinti (2006)                           B.A., Towson University
Tahj Holden                             Athletics Communication Assistant
Director of Men’s Basketball            B.A., M.A., Monmouth University                Greg Viscomi (2006)
  Operations                                                                           Assistant Director for Athletics
B.A., University of Maryland, College   Keith Olenik (2004)                              Communications
  Park                                  Assistant Business Manager/                    B.A., Towson University; M.S.,
                                          Assistant Recreation Supervisor                Canisius College
Mike Iuliucci                           B.S., Monmouth University
Assistant Equipment Manager &                                                          Robert Voorhees (2003)
  Recreation                            Doug Padron (2002)                             Assistant Coordinator of Aquatics
B.A., Robert Morris University          Associate Athletics Director for Sports
                                          Medicine and Health Education                Ashley Waldman
John Jackman (1993)                     B.S., Towson                                   Assistant Coach Lacrosse
Assistant Director of the Fitness                                                      B.A., Monmouth University
  Center                                John Quinn
                                        Head Coach, Sailing                            Jarred Weiss (2009)
Juwan Jackson                           B.S., M.S., Northup Institute of               Athletics Communication Assistant
Assistant Coach Football                  Technology, Texas A&M University             B.A., Monmouth University
B.A., Marist College; M.B.A., Wagner
  College                               Tim Rehm                                       Denise Wescott
                                        Assistant Strength and Conditioning            Head Coach, Lacrosse
Chris Kenny (2007)                      B.S., Springfield College                      B.S., M.S., University of Maryland
Assistant Coach Men’s Basketball
B.A., Monmouth University               Simon Rosenblum (2002)                         Clint Wulfekotte (2005)
                                        Associate Director of Sports Medicine          Associate Athletics Director for
Ron Krayl                               B.S., Waynesburg College; M.S.Ed.,               External Affairs
Assistant Men’s Basketball Coach          Old Dominion                                 B.S., University of Delaware; M.S.,
B.A., University of Sioux Falls,                                                         Georgia State University
  M.A.Ed., Trenton State                Clifford Rowley (2006)
                                        Associate Athletics Director for Major         Larry Zdilla
Taryn Landers                             Gifts                                        Assistant Coach Football
Track and Field Operations              B.S., University of Massachusetts              B.S., M.S. Ed., California University
  Coordinator                                                                            of Pennsylvania
B.A., Lafayette University              Tina Sevastakis (2000)
                                        Assistant Athletic Director for Student   FACULTY
Jami Lobpries                             Development
Assistant Softball Coach                B.A., St. Lawrence University             EMERITUS FACULTY
B.S., Texas A&M University                                                        Derek A. Barnes
                                        Dennis Shea (1993)
Maggie Long                             Director of Golf                          Professor Emeritus of Physics
Assistant Coach Field Hockey            B.S., Ithaca College                      B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Christ Church, Oxford
B.A., College of William and Mary                                                   University, England
                                        Jeff Stapleton (1990)
Hugh MacDonald                          Senior Associate Athletics Director for   Willard Bastian
Assistant Coach Men’s Soccer              Internal Affairs                        Associate Professor Emeritus of Computer
B.A., Monmouth University               B.A., Hobart College                        Science
                                                                                  B.Ch.E., John Hopkins University; M.S.,
Robert McCourt (2004)                   Alex Stein                                  Princeton University
Head Coach, Men’s Soccer                Assistant Athletics Trainer
B.A., Adelphia University               B.S., William Patterson; M.Ed.,           Richard Benjamin
                                          University of Virginia                  Professor Emeritus of Software and
Sherri McDonald (2002)                                                              Electrical Engineering
Head Coach, Women’s Golf                Angelika Szumilo                          B.S., Monmouth College; M.S., Newark
B.A., Pennsylvania State University     Associate Head Coach Women’s                College of Engineering
                                          Basketball
Michelle Melia                          B.A., Long Island University              Donald Bretzger
Assistant Athletics Director for                                                  Professor Emeritus of Chemistry
  Student Development                   Chris Tobin (2000)                        B.S., Ursinus College; M.S., Ph.D.,
B.A., Rutgers University                Associate Athletics Director for            University of Delaware
                                          Athletics Communication
David Motisi                            B.S., College of New Jersey
Assistant Athletics Trainer
B.S. Quinnipiac University




                                                                                    Monmouth University 115
Directories



Richard E. Brewer                             Carol A. Giroud                                 Richard A. Kuntz
Associate Professor Emeritus of English       Professor Emerita of Physical Education         Professor Emeritus of Mathematics
B.A., Drew University; B.D., Th.M.,           B.S., University of North Carolina at           B.S., Monmouth College; M.A., Ph.D.,
  Princeton Theological Seminary; M.A.,         Greensboro; M.Ed., University of North          University of Maryland
  Rutgers University                            Carolina; Ph.D., Union Graduate School
                                                                                              Susan Kuykendall
Robert Brooks                                 Richard Guilfoyle                               Associate Librarian Emeritus
Associate Librarian Emeritus                  Professor Emeritus of Mathematics               B.S., Trinity University; M.L.S., Rutgers
B.A., B.S.L.S., University of North           B.S., C.W. Post College; M.S., Ph.D.,             University
  Carolina; M.S.Ed., Monmouth College           Stevens Institute of Technology
                                                                                              Marilyn M. Lauria
Godfrey Buzzelli                              C. Dale Haase                                   Associate Professor Emerita of Nursing
Associate Professor Emeritus of Physical      Associate Professor Emeritus of Music           B.S.N., Hunter College; M.Ed., Ed.D.,
  Education                                   B.S., Mannes College of Music; B.S.,              Teachers College, Columbia University
Ed.B., Ed.M., University of Buffalo             M.A., Teachers College, Columbia
                                                University                                    John J. Lavelle
John E. Carson                                                                                Associate Professor Emeritus of English
Associate Professor Emeritus of               James A. Heely                                  A.B., Cornell University; M.A., Ph.D., New
  Mathematics                                 Associate Professor Emeritus of Accounting        York University
B.A., Drew University; M.S., New York         B.B.A., Saint Francis College; M.B.A.,
  University                                    Fairleigh Dickinson University; CPA,          R. Kaiser-Lenoir
                                                New York                                      Professor Emeritus of Foreign Languages
Floyd R. Deardorff                                                                            Licence es Lettres, Sorbonne; Diplome
Assistant Professor Emeritus of               Waltraud Hieslmair                                 d’Etudes Litteraires Superieures,
  Mathematics                                 Associate Professor Emerita of Physics             C.A.P.E.T., Strasbourg
B.A., Temple University; M.A., Catholic       B.S., M.S., University of Vienna, Austria
  University                                                                                  Murray Levine
                                              Robert L. Huber                                 Associate Professor Emeritus of English
Philip C. Donahue                             Associate Professor Emeritus of                 B.A., New York University; M.A., Harvard
Associate Professor Emeritus of History         Communication                                   University
B.S., Temple University; M.A., University     B.A., Montclair State College; M.A.,
  of Pennsylvania                               Adelphi University                            Helen T. MacAllister
                                                                                              Associate Professor Emerita of Biology
Francis Patrick Dooley                        Edward Jankowski                                B.S., Douglass College; M.S., Rutgers
Professor Emeritus of History                 Professor Emeritus of Art and Design              University
A.B., Villanova University; M.A., Ph.D.,      BFA, Layton School of Art; MFA,
  University of Maryland                        University of Wisconsin                       David Martin
                                                                                              Professor Emeritus of English
Donald Dorfman                                Barbara Harris Jaye                             B.A., Providence College; M.A., University
Professor Emeritus of Biology                 Professor Emerita of English                      of Rhode Island; Ph.D., New York
B.S., Monmouth College; M.S., University      B.A., City College of New York; M.A.,             University
  of Connecticut; Ph.D., Rutgers                Ph.D., Rutgers University
  University                                                                                  Charles R. Mayes
                                              Margaret G. Juckett                             Professor Emeritus of History
Harris Drucker                                Associate Professor Emerita of                  B.S., Central Missouri State University;
Professor Emeritus of Software Engineering      Management                                      M.A., University of Maryland; Ph.D.,
B.S.E.E., Pennsylvania State University;      B.S., West Virginia Wesleyan College;             University of Minnesota
  M.S.E., Ph.D., University of                  M.A., University of Kentucky; M.B.A.,
  Pennsylvania                                  Monmouth College                              Donald B. McKenzie
                                                                                              Professor Emeritus of English
Stanley Dubroff                               Quentin Keith                                   Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania
Associate Professor Emeritus of Business      Associate Professor Emeritus of English
  Law                                         B.A., Lehigh University; B.A., (Hons.),         Rose Mary Miller
B.S., Drexel University; J.D., Temple           M.A., Kings College, Cambridge                Associate Professor Emerita of
  University                                    University, England                             Mathematics
                                                                                              B.S., Middlebury College; Ed.M.,
William R. Feist                              Glenn King                                        University of Vermont; Post-Master’s
Associate Professor Emeritus of Finance       Professor Emeritus of History and                 Certificate, University of Maine
B.A., Princeton University; M.S.Ed.,            Anthropology
  University of Pennsylvania; M.A.,           B.A., Cornell University, M.A., University of   Thomas F. Murtha
  Lehigh University; Ph.D., Temple              California at Los Angeles; Ph.D.,             Associate Professor Emeritus of Physical
  University                                    University of California at Berkeley            Education
                                                                                              B.S., Long Island University; M.S., Newark
Gilbert Fell                                  Carl M. Koreen                                    State College
Associate Professor Emeritus of Philosophy    Associate Professor Emeritus of
B.A., Drew University; S.T.B., M.A., Ph.D.,     Mathematics                                   Howard Nitzberg
  Temple University                           B.S., M.S., Louisiana State University          Professor Emeritus of Foreign Languages
                                                                                              A.B., M.A., Brooklyn College; Ph.D., New
Albert Friedman                                                                                 York University
Professor Emeritus of Sociology
A.B., A.M., Ph.D., University of Michigan




116 Monmouth University
                                                                                                                   Directories



Marilyn A. Parker                           Morris R. Short                             Richard Wilson
Professor Emerita of Chemistry              Professor Emeritus of Philosophy            Associate Professor Emeritus of Business
B.S., University of Wisconsin; Ph.D.,       B.A., M.A., George Washington University;     Administration
  University of Washington                    Ph.D., Columbia University                A.B., Columbia College; J.D., St.John’s
                                                                                          University; L.L.M., New York University;
Richard Pirchner                            Caryl Sills                                   Member of New York Bar
Associate Professor Emeritus of Computer    Associate Professor Emerita of English
  Science                                   B.A., Northwestern University; M.A.T.,      William A. Wollman
B.S., University of Dayton; M.S., St.         Monmouth College; Ed.D., Rutgers          Associate Professor Emeritus of Music
  John’s University                           University                                B.Mus., Manhattan School of Music; M.A.,
                                                                                          Teachers College, Columbia University;
Alicia E. Portuondo                         Robert J. Sipos                               Ed.D., New York University
Professor Emerita of Foreign Languages      Professor Emeritus of English
Licenciado en Filosofia y Lettras;          B.S., Fordham College; M.A., Teachers       William A. Yaremchuk
   Licenciado en Derecho, Oriente             College; M.A., New York University        Professor Emeritus of Communication
   University, Cuba; M.A., Rutgers                                                      A.B., Fairmont (W. Va.) State College;
   University; Ph.D., New York University   Thomas Smith                                  M.A., West Virginia University; Ph.D.,
                                            Associate Professor Emeritus of               New York University
Alfred J. Provencher                          Mathematics
Associate Professor Emeritus of Art         B.S., Nicholls State College; M.S.,         Theresa Julia Zielinski
A.B., Syracuse University; M.A., New York     Louisiana State University; Ph.D.,        Professor Emerita of Chemistry
  University                                  Louisiana State University                B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Fordham University
Robert Rechnitz                             Viola T. Snow                               FACULTY
Professor Emeritus of English               Associate Professor Emerita of Education
B.S., Northwestern University; M.A.,        B.S., M.S.Ed., Monmouth College; Ed.D.,     Julius O. Adekunle (1996)
  Columbia University; Ph.D., University      Rutgers University                        Professor of History
  of Colorado                                                                           B.A., University of Ife, Nigeria; M.A.,
                                            Leonard E. Spiegel                            University of Ibadan, Nigeria; Ph.D.,
Walter Reichert                             Professor Emeritus of Biology                 Dalhousie University, Canada
Associate Professor Emeritus of Computer    A.B., Drew University; M.S., Northwestern
  Science                                     University; Ph.D., Cornell University     Gilda M. Agacer (1998)
B.S.M.E., Drexel Institute of Technology;                                               Associate Professor of Accounting and
  Ph.D., University of Pittsburg            Tadeusz Swietochowski                         Interim Associate Dean of the Leon
                                            Professor Emeritus of History                 Hess Business School
Thomas Reiter                               Magister, University of Warsaw; M.A.,       B.A., University of the East Philippines;
Professor Emeritus of English                 American University of Beirut; Ph.D.,       M.I.B.S., Ph.D., University of South
B.A. Loras College (IA); M.A., University     New York University                         Carolina
  of Virginia; Ph.D., University of
  Massachusetts                             D. Robert Teeters                           G. Oty Agbajoh-Laoye (1997)
                                            Professor Emeritus of Physics               Associate Professor of English
Everett Rich                                B.A., Oregon State College; M.A., Ph.D.,    B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Ibadan,
Associate Professor Emeritus of               University of California at Berkeley        Nigeria
  Communication
B.S., M.S., Emerson College                 Arie van Everdingen                         Gwendolyn Alexis (2005)
                                            Associate Professor Emeritus of Art         Assistant Professor of Management
Benjamin Rigberg                            B.F.A., M.F.A., Alfred University           B.S., University of Southern California;
Professor Emeritus of History                                                             M.A.R.,Yale University Divinity School;
B.S., Temple University; M.A., University   Hildegard Webb                                M.A., Graduate Faculty New School;
  of Illinois; Ph.D., University of         Associate Librarian Emerita                   Ph.D., New School for Social Research
  Pennsylvania                              B.A., Wake Forest University; M.L.S.,
                                              Rutgers University                        Harvey Allen (2006)
Charles W. Rutledge                                                                     Assistant Professor of Educational
Professor Emeritus of Education             Richard E. Weber                              Leadership, School Counseling and
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Michigan State           Professor Emeritus of Economics               Special Education
  University                                B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Rutgers University       B.A., M.A., Montclair State College; Ed.D.,
                                            Ruth C. West                                  Rutgers University
Martin J. Ryan
Associate Professor Emeritus of Art         Associate Professor Emerita of Education    Sheri Anderson (2005)
B.S., M.A., Columbia University             B.A., Barnard College; M.A., Ed.D.,         Specialist Professor of Theatre
                                              Teachers College, Columbia University     B.A., William Jewell College; M.F.A.,
Pierre J. Salmon                                                                          University of California, San Diego;
Associate Professor Emeritus of             William F. Wetzel
                                            Assistant Professor Emeritus of Music         M.A., Monmouth University
  Accounting
B.S.B.A., Boston College; M.B.A., New       B.A., M.A., Montclair State College         Aaron Ansell (2007)
  York University; CMA, CPA, New Jersey                                                 Assistant Professor of History and
                                                                                          Anthropology and Co-Director of the
Aaron H. Schectman                                                                        Jewish Culture Program
Professor Emeritus of Education                                                         B.A., University of California, San Diego;
B.S., M.Ed., Ed.D., Rutgers University                                                    M.A., Ph.D., University of Chicago




                                                                                          Monmouth University 117
Directories



Nahid Aslanbeigui (1988)                     Bojana Beric (2006)                             Kenneth Campbell (1986)
Professor of Economics                       Assistant Professor of Nursing and Health       Associate Professor of History
B.A., University of Tehran; M.A.; Ph.D.,       Studies                                       B.A., Virginia Commonwealth University;
  University of Michigan                     M.A., Montclair State University; Ph.D.,          M.A., Ph.D., University of Delaware
                                               University of Novi Sad, Yugoslavia;
Mary Kate Azcuy (2004)                         Ph.D., New York University                    Alan A. Cavaiola (1996)
Assistant Professor of English                                                               Professor of Psychological Counseling
B.S., Monmouth University; M.A., New         Stanley S. Blair (1996)                         B.A., Monmouth College; M.A., Fairleigh
  York University; Ph.D., Drew University    Associate Professor of English                    Dickinson University; Ph.D., Hofstra
                                             B.A., Gardner-Webb College; M.A.,                 University
Barrie Bailey (2001)                           Marquette University; Ph.D., Duke
Associate Professor of Finance                 University                                    Suneal Chaudhary (2007)
B.S., M.B.A.; Ph.D., University of Central                                                   Assistant Professor Mathematics
  Florida                                    Kristin Bluemel (1994)                          B.S., California Tech; M.S., Ph.D., UCLA
                                             Professor of English
Thomas Baker (2004)                          B.A., Wesleyan University; M.A., Ph.D.,         Laurel Chehayl (2006)
Associate Professor of Art                     Rutgers University                            Assistant Professor of Curriculum and
B.F.A., East Carolina University; M.F.A.,                                                      Instruction
  University of Wisconsin                    Barbara Lynn Bodner (1988)                      B.S., M.Ed., Ph.D., Kent State University
                                             Professor of Mathematics
Shelia Baldwin (1998)                        B.S., Fairleigh Dickinson University; M.S.,     Micah Chrisman (2007)
Associate Professor of Education               Pennsylvania State University; Ed.D.,         Assistant Professor of Mathematics
B.A., University of Mississippi; M.Ed.,        Rutgers University                            B.S., M.S., Virginia Tech; Ph.D., University
  Ph.D., Texas A&M University                                                                  of Hawai’i at Manoa
                                             Carolyn Bradley (2005)
Daniel Ball (2007)                           Assistant Professor of Social Work              Edward W. Christensen (1996)
Assistant Professor of Management and        B.A., College of St. Elizabeth; M.S.W.,         Associate Professor of Management; Vice
  Marketing                                    Ph.D., Fordham University                       President for Information Management
B.S., Western New England College;                                                           A.S., George Washington University; B.S.,
  M.S., Lehigh University; M.S.,             Mary Brennan (2005)                               Southern Illinois University; M.B.A..
  Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute; Ph.D.,   Specialist Professor of Education                 Ph.D., Rutgers University
  University of Massachusetts                B.A., Dominican College; M.S., Lehman
                                               College                                       Andreas C. Christofi (1997)
Rosemary Barbera (2005)                                                                      Associate Professor of Finance
Assistant Professor of Social Work           Karen T. Bright (1996)                          B.A., Graduate Industrial School of
B.A., M.A., La Salle University; M.S.W.,     Associate Professor of Art                        Thessaloniki, Greece; M.B.A., University
  Ph.D., Bryn Mawr College                   B.F.A., University of the Arts; M.F.A.,           of New Orleans; Ph.D., Pennsylvania
                                               Cranbrook Academy of Art                        State University
Jason Barr (2005)
Assistant Professor of Education, Chair of   Liora Brosh (2006)                              Natalie Ciarocco (2007)
  the Department of Educational              Lecturer of English                             Assistant Professor of Psychology
  Leadership, School Counseling and          B.A., M.A., The Hebrew University,              B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Case Western Reserve
  Special Education                            Jerusalem; Ph.D., New York University           University
B.A., University of Hartford; M.A., New
  York University; Ph.D., Fordham            Heather Brown (2010)                            Lisa Coats (2006)
  University                                 Assistant Professor of English                  Lecturer, Librarian, University Library
                                             B.A., Hollins University; M.A., University of   B.A., Temple University; M.A.; Virginia
Mary Lee Bass (2004)                           North Carolina; Ph.D., University of            Commonwealth University; M.L.I.S.,
Lecturer of Education                          Maryland                                        Rutgers University
B.S., Millersville University; M.S.Ed.,
  Monmouth University; Ed.D., Rutgers        John J. Burke (1996)                            Andrew L. Cohen (2007)
  University                                 Associate Professor of Theatre                  Professor of Art; Chair of the Department
                                             B.A., Seton Hall University; M.A.T., Jersey       of Art and Design
Richard Bastian (2006)                         City State College; M.A.L.S., New             B.A., Indiana University, M.A., Ph.D.,
Lecturer of Mathematics                        School - Graduate Faculty; Ph.D.,               University of Chicago
B.S., City College of New York; M.S.,          Michigan State University
  Columbia University; Ph.D., Johns                                                          Gregory J. Coram (1987)
  Hopkins University                         David U. Burkholder (2009)                      Associate Professor of Criminal Justice,
                                             Assistant Professor of Psychological              Associate Chair of Criminal Justice
Judith Bazler (1997)                           Counseling                                    B.A., Wheeling College; M.S., Psy.D.,
Professor of Education                       B.S., Geneva College, M.Ed., Ohio                 Indiana State University
B.S., Northern Illinois University; M.Ed.,     University, Ph.D., Kent State University
  Ed.D., University of Montana                                                               Joseph Corriero (2007)
                                             John Buzza (2005)                               Assistant Professor of Educational
Noel Belinski (2008)                         Specialist Professor of Management and            Leadership and Special Education
Lecturer of English                            Marketing                                     B.A., Hofstra University; M.A., Brooklyn
B.A., Barnard College of Columbia            B.S., Monmouth University; M.S.,                  College; Ed.D., Fordham University
  University; M.A.T., Monmouth University      University of Phoenix




118 Monmouth University
                                                                                                                          Directories



Joseph Coyle (2002)                            Lisa Dinella (2006)                            Ronald G. Frangipane (1997)
Associate Professor of Mathematics             Assistant Professor of Psychology              Associate Professor of Music
B.S., Miami University; M.S., Ph.D.,           B.A., The College of New Jersey; M.S.,         B.A., Eastman School of Music; M.F.A.,
  University of Dayton                           Ph.D., Arizona State University                Goddard College
Pat Hill Cresson (1995)                        Donna Montanaro Dolphin (1987)                 Cira Fraser (1998)
Professor of Art                               Associate Professor of Communication           Associate Professor of Nursing and
B.S., University of Wisconsin; M.F.A., Pratt   B.A., Clark University; M.A., Montclair          Coordinator of the B.S.N. Program
  Institute                                      State College; M.F.A., Mason Gross           B.S., The College of Staten Island; M.S.,
                                                 School of the Arts, Rutgers University         Rutgers University, Newark; Ph.D.,
Michael Cronin (2010)                                                                           Adelphi University
Assistant Professor of Social work             Kevin Dooley (2005)
B.A., Northeastern University; MSW,            Assistant Professor of Political Science       Sophia Fuka (2010)
  Columbia University; Ph.D.,Yeshiva           B.A., Monmouth University; M.A., Rutgers       Specialist Professor of Communication
  University                                     University; Ph.D., Rutgers University        B.A., University of North Dakota; M.A.,
                                                                                                Arizona State University
Stuart Dalton (2005)                           Maureen Dorment (2006)
Lecturer of Philosophy                         Lecturer of History and Anthropology           Aaron Furgason (2004)
M.A., Villanova University; Ph.D., Emory       B.S., Georgetown University; M.S.,             Associate Professor of Communication
  University                                     Monmouth University                          B.A., Monmouth University; M.A.,
                                                                                                Emerson College; Ph.D., Rutgers State
Rekha Datta (1995)                             Ellen Doss-Pepe (2006)                           University of New Jersey
Professor of Political Science and             Lecturer of Biology
  Founding Director, Institute for Global      B.S., University of Scranton; Ph.D.,           Frank Fury (2007)
  Understanding                                  Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute             Lecturer of English
B.A., M.A., Presidency College, University                                                    B.A., Boston College; Ph.D., Drew
  of Calcutta, India; Ph.D., University of     Susan Douglass (2002)                            University
  Connecticut                                  Specialist Professor of History and
                                                 Anthropology                                 Priscilla Gac-Artigas (1995)
Margaret Del Guercio (1988)                    B.A., M.A., Brooklyn College, City             Associate Professor of Foreign Language
Associate Professor of English                   University of New York                         Studies
B.A., M.A., Montclair State College; Ph.D.,                                                   B.A., University of Puerto Rico; Ph.D.,
  New York University                          Eleanora Dubicki (2003)                          University of Franche-Comte, France
                                               Associate Librarian
Chad Dell (1996)                               B.A., Douglass College; M.L.S., M.B.A.,        Rachel Gardner (1989)
Associate Professor of Communication;            Rutgers University                           Associate Librarian, Head of Instructional
  Chair of the Department of                                                                    Services and Collection Development
  Communication                                Tresa Dusaj (2009)                             B.A., Vassar College; M.A., Middlebury
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-    Assistant Professor of Nursing and Health        College; M.L.S., Rutgers University
  Madison                                        Studies
                                               B.S., Johns Hopkins University; M.S., New      Brian T. Garvey (1987)
John W. Demarest (1976)                          York University; Ph.D., Rutgers University   Associate Professor of English
Professor of Psychology                                                                       B.A., Sacred Heart University; Ph.D.,
B.A., State University of New York             Azzam Elayan (2006)                              University of Bradford, England
  (Brockport); M.A., Connecticut College;      Lecturer of Chemistry, Medical Technology
  Ph.D., State University of New York at         and Physics                                  Ivan A. Gepner (1973)
  Stony Brook                                  B.S., Bethlehem University, Israel; Ph.D.,     Associate Professor of Biology and Chair
                                                 Wesleyan University                            of the Department of Biology
Andrew Demirjian (2007)                                                                       B.A., Rutgers University; M.A., Ph.D.,
Specialist Professor of Communication          Josh Emmons (2010)                               Princeton University
B.A., Clark University; M.F.A., Hunter         Assistant Professor of English
  College                                      B.A., Oberlin College; M.F.A., The             George Germek (2006)
                                                 University of Iowa                           Assistant Librarian
Pedram Patrick Daneshgar (2010)                                                               B.A., B.S., Kean University; M.A., M.L.S.,
Assistant Professor of Biology                 Heide Estes (1998)                               Rutgers University
B.A., University of Delaware; M.S., Saint      Associate Professor of English
  Joseph’s University; Ph.D., University of    B.A., University of Pennsylvania; M.A.,        Michael Gillette
  Florida                                        M.Phil., Ph.D., New York University          Specialist Professor of Music and Theatre
                                                                                                Arts
Christopher DeRosa (2004)                      Prescott Evarts, Jr. (1966)                    B.A., Hamilton College; M.A., Yale University
Associate Professor of History                 Professor of English
B.A., Columbia University; Ph.D., Temple       B.A., Harvard College; M.A., Ph.D.,            Elizabeth Gilmartin (2004)
  University                                     Columbia University                          Lecturer of English
                                                                                              B.A., Georgian Court College; M.A., Seton
Vincent M. DiMattio (1968)                     Linda Flaming (2003)                             Hall University; Ph.D., New York
Professor of Art                               Associate Professor of Accounting, Chair         University
B.F.A., Massachusetts College of Art;            of the Department of Accounting
  M.F.A., Southern Illinois University         B.S., University of Science and Arts of
                                                 Oklahoma; B.A., M.S., Queens College,
                                                 City University of New York; Ph.D.,
                                                 University of Oklahoma




                                                                                                Monmouth University 119
Directories



Bonnie Gold (1998)                             Amy Handlin (1991)                           Bradley Ingebrethsen (2004)
Professor of Mathematics                       Associate Professor of Marketing             Lecturer of Chemistry, Medical Technology
A.B., University of Rochester; M.A.,           B.A., Harvard University; M.B.A.,              and Physics
  Princeton University; Ph.D., Cornell           Columbia University; Ph.D., New York       B.S., Brooklyn College City University of
  University                                     University                                   New York; M.S., Ph.D., Clarkson
                                                                                              University
Albert Gorman (2007)                           Wendy A. Harriott (2000)
Specialist Professor of Criminal Justice       Associate Professor of Education             Aurora Ioanid (1996)
B.A. Iona College; M.A., City University of    B.S., Bloomsburg University; M.S.,           Associate Librarian, Head of Technical
  New York                                       Marywood College; Ph.D., Pennsylvania        Services
                                                 State University                           M.A., University of Bucharest, Romania;
Susan M. Goulding (1996)                                                                      M.L.S., Columbia University
Associate Professor of English                 Christine Hatchard (2010)
B.A., M.A., Adelphi University; Ph.D., New     Specialist Professor of Psychology           Laura T. Jannone (2003)
  York University                              B.A., Monmouth University; M.S., Psy.D.,     Associate Professor of Nursing and
                                                 Chestnut Hill College                        Director of the M.S.N. Program
Neil Graves (2008)                                                                          B.S.N., M.S., New Jersey City State
Lecturer of English                            Yihong He (2002)                               College; Ph.D., Columbia University
B.A., University of Manchester; M.A.,          Associate Professor of Accounting
  University of Newcastle; Ph.D., Oxford       B.S., M.S., NanKai Unviersity, Tianjin,      Scott Jeffrey (2009)
  University                                     China; Ph.D., Cleveland State              Assistant Professor of Management
                                                 University                                 BSC, MBA Santa Clara University; Ph.D.,
Letitia Graybill (2004)                                                                       University of Chicago
Lecturer of Education                          Christy Hetzel (2008)
A.B., City University of New York, Hunter      Lecturer of Communication                    Joanne Jodry (2003)
  College; Ed.M., Harvard University;          B.S. Emerson College; J.D., Rutgers          Specialist Professor of Psychological
  Ed.D., Rutgers University                      University                                   Counseling
                                                                                            M.A., Monmouth University, DMH, Drew
Stanton W. Green (2004)                        Doris K. Hiatt (1979)                          University
Professor of Anthropology; Dean of the         Associate Professor of Psychology
  Wayne D. McMurray School of                  A.B., Cornell University; Ph.D., City        Barbara Johnston (2008)
  Humanities and Social Sciences                 University of New York                     Professor and Hess Chair in Nursing
B.A., New York University; M.A., Ph.D.,                                                       Education
  University of Massachusetts, Amherst         Christopher A. Hirschler (2009)              B.S., M.S., Hunter College; Ph.D., Hofstra
                                               Assistant Professor of Nursing                 University
Brian Greenberg (1990)                         B.S., Excelsior College; M.A., State
Professor of History; Jules L. Plangere, Jr.     University of New York; Ph.D.,             Edward Johnston (2010)
  Endowed Chair in American Social               Cleveland State University                 Specialist Professor of Art and Design
  History                                                                                   B.A., M.Ed., University of Notre Dame;
B.A., Hofstra University; M.A., State          Shannon Hokanson (2005)                        MFA, University of Michigan
  University of New York at Albany; Ph.D.,     Lecturer of Communication
  Princeton University                         B.A., M.A., Monmouth University              Robin Kampf (2009)
                                                                                            Specialist Professor of Communication
Michelle Grillo (2010)                         Robyn Holmes (1993)                          B.A., Seton Hall University
Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice        Professor of Psychology
B.S., M.A., University of Massachusetts;       B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Rutgers University        George Kapalka (2001)
  M.A., Ph.D., Rutgers University                                                           Associate Professor of Psychological
                                               Andrea Hope (2007)                             Counseling
Carolyn Groff (2007)                           Assistant Professor of Nursing and Health    Chair of the Department of Psychological
Assistant Professor of Education                 Studies                                      Counseling
B.A., Mount Holyoke College; Ph.D.,            B.S. Montclair State University; M.S., The   B.A., M.A., Manhattan School of Music;
  Rutgers University                             American University; Ed.D., Teachers         M.A., Kean University; Ph.D., Fairleigh
                                                 College, Columbia University                 Dickinson University
Susan Gupta (2006)
Assistant Professor of Management and          Ursula Howson (2006)                         Laura Kelly (2003)
  Marketing                                    Assistant Professor of Biology               Associate Professor of Nursing
B.S., M.S., University of Missouri-Columbia;   B.S., Lebanon Valley College; M.S.,          B.S.N., Monmouth University; M.S.,
  Ph.D., University of Tennessee                 University of Arizona; Ph.D., University     Rutgers University; Ph.D., Rutgers
                                                 of Delaware                                  University
Stephanie Hall (2009)
Assistant Professor of Psychological           Jingzi Huang (1997)                          Louis J. Kijewski (1968)
  Counseling                                   Associate Professor of Education; Chair of   Professor of Physics
B.A. University of Kentucky; M.A.                the Department of Curriculum and           B.A., La Salle College; M.A., Columbia
  Louisiana Tech University; Ph.D.,              Instruction                                  University; Ph.D., New York University
  University of New Orleans                    B.A., M.Ed., Beijing Normal University,
                                                 China; Ph.D., University of British        Jiwon Kim (2010)
Kimberly Hanbury (2008)                          Columbia                                   Lecturer of Curriculum and Instruction
Specialist Professor of Social Work                                                         B.A., M.A., Korea University, Seoul, South
B.A., Loyola College; M.S.W., Monmouth                                                        Korea; Ph.D., Purdue University
  University




120 Monmouth University
                                                                                                                            Directories



Kathryn Kloby (2007)                           Weizheng Liu (1994)                               Robin Mama (1992)
Assistant Professor of Political Science       Professor of Criminal Justice; Chair of the       Professor of Social Work; Dean of the
B.A., Marywood College; M.S., Montclair          Department of Criminal Justice                    School of Social Work
  State University; Ph.D., Rutgers             B.A., M.A., Jilin University, China; Ph.D.,       B.S.W., College of Misericordia; M.S.S.,
  University                                     Indiana University of Pennsylvania                Ph.D., Bryn Mawr College
Rose Knapp (2010)                              Dorothy Lobo (2002)                               Mirta Barrea Marlys (2003)
Assistant Professor of Nursing                 Associate Professor of Biology                    Associate Professor of Foreign Language
DNP, University of Miami                       B.A., Immaculate College; Ph.D., Catholic           Studies
                                                 University of America                           B.A., Rutgers University; M.A., Villanova;
James Konopack (2006)                                                                              Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania
Assistant Professor of Nursing and Health      Brian Lockwood (2010)
  Studies                                      Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice           David Marshall (2004)
Coordinator of Health Studies                  B.A., College of New Jersey; M.A., ABD,           Associate Professor of Mathematics; Chair
B.A., Cornell University; M.E., Boston           Temple University                                 of the Department of Mathematics
  University; Ph.D. University of Illinois                                                       B.A., California State University at
                                               Min-Hua Lu (1991)                                   Fullerton; Ph.D., University of Arizona
Michiko Kosaka (1986)                          Associate Professor of Marketing
Associate Professor of Computer Science        B.A., M.A., Beijing Institute of Foreign Trade;   Susan Hammond Marshall (2004)
B.A., Manhattanville College; M.A., Ph.D.,       D.B.A., George Washington University            Assistant Professor of Mathematics
  New York University                                                                            B.S., Wake Forest University; Ph.D.,
                                               Francis C. Lutz (1996)                              University of Arizona
Steven Kosiba (2008)                           Professor of Electrical Engineering
Assistant Professor History and                B.S., New Jersey Institute of Technology;         Anne Massoni (2008)
  Anthropology                                   M.S., Ph.D., New York University                Specialist Professor of Art and Design
B.A., M.A., University of South Florida;                                                         B.A., Connecticut College; M.F.A., Ohio
  Ph.D., University of Chicago                 James P. Mack (1974)                                University
                                               Professor of Biology
Jamie Kretsch (2007)                           B.S., Monmouth College; M.S., William             Golam Mathbor (1999)
Specialist Professor of Software Engineering     Paterson College; Ed.D., Teachers               Professor of Social Work; Associate Dean
B.S., Monmouth University; M.S.,                 College, Columbia University                      of the Wayne D. McMurray School of
  University of Wisconsin-Madison                                                                  Humanities and Social Sciences
                                               Alison Maginn (1997)                              B.S.S., M.S.S., Bachelor of Law; (L.L.B.),
Robin Kurcharczyk (2005)                       Associate Professor of Foreign Language             University of Dhaka, Bangladesh;
Lecturer of Chemistry, Medical                   Studies                                           M.S.W., McGill University; Ph.D., The
  Technology, and Physics                      Chair of the Department of Foreign                  University of Calgary
B.A., Douglass College, Rutgers                  Language Studies; B.A., University of
  University; Ph.D., Yale University             Ulster, Northern Ireland; M.A., Ph.D.,          Elena Mazza (2005)
                                                 University of Wisconsin                         Assistant Professor of Social Work
Massimiliano Lamberto (2006)                                                                     B.S.W., Monmouth University; M.S.W.,
Assistant Professor of Chemistry, Medical      Y. Lal Mahajan (1979)                               Fordham University
  Technology and Physics                       Associate Professor of Economics and
B.S., M.S., University of Messina, Italy;        Finance                                         Sheila McAllister-Spooner (2007)
  Ph.D., University of Southampton,            B.A., University of Panjab, India; M.A.,          Assistant Professor of Communication
  United Kingdom                                 University of Chicago; Ph.D., Northern          B.A., M.A., William Paterson University;
                                                 Illinois University; Ph.D., Rutgers               Ph.D., Rutgers University
Gary Lewandowski (2002)                          University
Associate Professor of Psychology                                                                Rebecca McCloskey (2010)
B.A., Millersville University; M.A.,Ph.D.,     Janet Mahoney (1995)                              Specialist Professor of Social Work
  State University of New York at Stony        Professor of Nursing; Dean of the Marjorie        B.A., Seton Hall University; M.S.W., Ohio
  Brook                                          K. Unterberg School of Nursing and                State University
                                                 Health Studies
Kathryn A. Lionetti (1990)                     R.N., St. Mary’s Hospital; B.S.N.,                James McDonald (1999)
Associate Professor of Biology                   Monmouth College; M.S.N., Seton Hall            Associate Professor of Software
B.S., Ph.D., State University of New York        University; Ph.D., New York University            Engineering
  at Stony Brook                                                                                 B.S.E.E., New Jersey Institute of
                                               Jose M. Maldonado (2005)                            Technology; M.S.E.E., Massachusetts
Linda Littman (2005)                           Assistant Professor of Education                    Institute of Technology; Ph.D., New York
Lecturer of English                            B.A., East Stroudsburg University; M.Ed.,           University School of Engineering
B.A., State University of New York; M.S.,        Lehigh University; M.S., Wilkes
  Canisius College; M.A., Columbia               University; Ph.D., University of Arkansas       Frederick L. McKitrick (1994)
  University; Ph.D., Teachers College,                                                           Associate Professor of History; Chair of
  Columbia University                          Srikantaiah Mallikarjun (1967)                      Department of History and Anthropology
                                               Professor of Physics                              B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Columbia University
Biyue (Betty) Liu (2000)                       B.Sc., M.Sc., University of Musore, India;
Professor of Mathematics                         A.M., Ph.D., University of London,              Marilyn McNeil (1994)
B.S., M.S., Nanjing University, China;           England                                         Vice President and Director of Athletics;
  Ph.D., University of Maryland                                                                    Associate Professor of Physical Education
                                                                                                 B.P.E., The University of Calgary; M.A.,
                                                                                                   McGill University; Ed.D., Washington
                                                                                                   State University




                                                                                                   Monmouth University 121
Directories



Vincenzo Mele (2008)                          Enoch L. Nappen (1960)                        Tina Paone (2006)
Lecturer of Political Science                 Associate Professor of Political Science      Assistant Professor of Educational
M.A., Pisa University, Ph.D., Bielefeld       B.A., M.A., Rutgers University; Ph.D., New      Leadership, School Counseling and
  University/University of Pisa                 York University                               Special Education
                                                                                            B.A., University of Tampa; M.A.,Ph.D.,
Mary Beth Meszaros (2008)                     Roy L. Nersesian (1985)                         University of Nevada
Assistant Librarian                           Associate Professor of Management
B.A., Villanova University; M.S., Drexel      B.S., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute;       Richard Paris (1987)
  University; Ph.D., University of              M.B.A., Harvard Business School             Associate Professor of English
  Pennsylvania                                                                              B.A., University of California at Berkeley;
                                              Marta Neumann (2009)                            M.A., San Francisco State University;
Nancy Mezey (2002)                            Lecturer of Nursing and Health Studies          Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley
Associate Professor of Sociology              B.A., M.A. College of Physical Education,
B.A., Vassar College; M.A., Ph.D.,              Wroclaw, Poland; Ph.D., Academy of          Katherine Parkin (2003)
  Michigan State University                     Physical Education, Wroclaw, Poland         Associate Professor of History
                                                                                            B.A., Lake Forest College; Ph.D., Temple
Allen Milewski (2003)                         Bruce Normandia (2000)                          University
Associate Professor of Software               Associate Professor of Education
  Engineering                                 B.S., Seton Hall University; M.A.,            Abha Sood Patel (2005)
B.A., University of Wisconsin; M.A., Ph.D.,     Montclair State College; Ed.D., Rutgers     Lecturer of English
  Brown University                              University                                  B.A., M.A., University of Delhi; Ph.D.,
                                                                                              Indian Institute of Technology
Kenneth Mitchell (2006)                       Eleanor M. Novek (1996)
Assistant Professor of Political Science      Associate Professor of Communication          Joseph N. Patten (2002)
B.A., University of California; M.S.,         B.A., Georgia State University; M.A.,         Associate Professor of Political Science,
  London School of Economics; D.Phil.,          Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania             Chair of the Department of Political
  Oxford University, United Kingdom                                                           Science
                                              Judith L. Nye (1988)                          Director of the Global Leadership Institute
William P. Mitchell (1968)                    Associate Professor of Psychology;              and of the Washington Semester
Professor of Anthropology                       Associate Vice President of Academic        B.A., Kean University; M.A., Ph.D., West
Interim Dean of the Honors School; Freed        Foundations                                   Virginia University
   Foundation Endowed Chair in Social         B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Virginia Commonwealth
   Science                                      University                                  David P. Paul III (1998)
A.B., Brooklyn College; Ph.D.., University                                                  Associate Professor of Marketing; Chair of
   of Pittsburgh                              Guy B. Oakes (1968)                             the Department of Management and
                                              Professor of Philosophy and Corporate           Marketing
Donald M. Moliver (1982)                        Values; Kvernland Endowed Chair in          B.S., Hampden-Sydney College; D.D.S.,
Professor of Economics; Interim Dean of         Philosophy and Corporate Social Policy        Medical College of Virginia; M.B.A.,
  the Leon Hess Business School; Pozycki      A.B., University of Chicago; Ph.D., Cornell     Ph.D., Old Dominion University
Endowed Professor of Real Estate; Director      University
  of the Kislak Real Estate Institute                                                       David E. Payne (1986)
B.A., Fairleigh Dickinson University; M.A.,   Mohammad S. Obaidat (1996)                    Associate Professor of Psychology
  Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute       Professor of Computer Science                 B.A., University of Mississippi; M.A.,
                                              B.S.E.E., Aleppo University; M.S.E.E.,          M.Phil., Ph.D., Columbia University
John Morano (1988)                              Ph.D., Ohio State University
Professor of Communication                                                                  Thomas Pearson (1978)
B.A., Clark University; M.A., Pennsylvania    Helen O’Brien (2008)                          Professor of History; Vice President for
  State University                            Assistant Professor of Social Work              Academic Affairs and Provost
                                              B.A., Pace University; M.S.W., Columbia       B.A., Santa Clara University; M.A., Ph.D.,
Joseph Mosca (1987)                             University; Ph.D., New York University        University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Associate Professor of Management
B.A., M.A., Montclair State College; Ed.D.,   Patrick O’Halloran (2003)                     Karen Pesce (2008)
  New York University                         Associate Professor of Economics              Lecturer of Biology
                                              B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin    B.A., B.S., M.S., Seton Hall University;
Kanchana Mudalige (2008)                                                                      Ph.D., Rutgers University
Lecturer of Chemistry, Medical Technology     Michael Palladino (1999)
  and Physics;                                Associate Professor of Biology; Dean of       Michael Phillips (2007)
B.S. East-West University; B.S., University     the School of Science                       Assistant Professor of Communication
  of Colombo; M.S., Ph.D., University of      B.S., The College of New Jersey (Trenton      B.A., George Mason University; M.A., St.
  Illinois at Chicago                           State College); Ph.D., University of          John’s College; Ph.D., University of
                                                Virginia                                      Maryland
Datta V. Naik (1977)
Professor of Chemistry; Dean of the           Emanuel Palsu-Andriescu (2010)                Sue E. Polito (2004)
  Graduate School and Continuing              Lecturer of Mathematics                       Specialist Professor of Nursing and Health
  Education and Vice Provost                  B.S., M.S., Al.I, Cuza University, Romania;     Studies
B.Sc., St. Xavier’s College, University of      Ph.D., Rutgers University                   B.A., Providence College; M.S.N.,
  Bombay, Goa, India; Ph.D., University       Wai Kong Pang (2008)                            Monmouth University
  of Notre Dame                               Assistant Professor of Mathematics
                                              B.S., Brigham Young University; M.S.,
                                                Ph.D., Texas Tech University




122 Monmouth University
                                                                                                                           Directories



Steven Pressman (1981)                          Stuart Rosenberg (2010)                        Michelle Ann Scott (2008)
Professor of Economics                          Associate Professor of Management and          Assistant Professor of Social Work
B.A., Alfred University; M.S., Syracuse           Marketing                                    B.A., Clark University; M.S.W., Ph.D.,
  University; Ph.D., New School for Social      B.A., Marquette University, M.A.,                University of California, Berkeley
  Research                                        University of Wisconsin-Madison; MBA,
                                                  Ph.D., Fordham University                    Robert E. Scott (2005)
Bruce Ralli (2007)                                                                             Specialist Professor of Communication
Lecturer of Mathematics                         Gloria Rotella (2006)                          B.A., Monmouth University; M.F.A.,
B.A., West Virginia University; M.A.,           Specialist Professor of Music and Theatre        University of Miami
  Georgian Court University                       Arts
                                                B.A., M.A., New Jersey City University;        Robert Scott, III (2005)
Ronald L. Reisner (1995)                          M.S., Monmouth University; Ed.D.,            Associate Professor of Economics
Associate Professor of Criminal Justice           Rutgers University                           B.A., Western State College of Colorado;
B.A., Brooklyn College; Ph.D., Columbia                                                          M.A., Ph.D., University of Missouri
  University; J.D., Rutgers University          Terri Rothman (2001)
  School of Law                                 Associate Professor of Education; Associate    Brion Sever (1998)
                                                  Dean of the School of Education              Associate Professor of Criminal Justice
Benedicte Reyes (2002)                          B.A., M.S., Ph.D., State University of New     B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Florida State University
Associate Professor of Economics; Chair           York at Albany
  of the Department of Economics,                                                              Christine Severson (2007)
  Finance and Real Estate                       Rebecca Sanford (2004)                         Lecturer of English
B.A., Ecole Superieure de Commerce de           Associate Professor of Communication           B.A. Buena Vista University; M.A.,
  Reims, France; M.B.A., Temple                 B.A., University of Pittsburgh; M.A.,            University of Rhode Island; Ph.D.,
  University; Ph.D., Columbia University          Monmouth University; Ph.D., Temple             Indiana University of Pennsylvania
                                                  University                                   Jennifer Shamrock (2004)
Maryanne Rhett (2008)
Assistant Professor of History and              Saliba Sarsar (1985)                           Lecturer of Communication
  Anthropology; Co-Director of the Jewish       Professor of Political Science; Associate      B.A., LaSalle University; M.A., University of
  Culture Program                                 Vice President for Global Initiatives          Maine; Ph.D., Arizona State University
B.A., University of South Carolina; M.A.,       B.A., Monmouth College; Ph.D., Rutgers         Deanna Shoemaker (2005)
  University of Arizona; Ph.D.,                   University                                   Assistant Professor of Communication
  Washington State University                                                                  B.F.A., Webster University; M.A., Ph.D.,
                                                Paul G. Savoth (1986)
Dennis Rhoads (1995)                            Associate Professor of Accounting and            University of Texas at Austin
Professor of Biology                              Business Law                                 Linda Silverstein (2006)
B.A., University of Delaware; Ph.D.,            B.A., Middlebury College; J.D., Seton Hall     Specialist Librarian
  University of Cincinnati                        University; CPA, New Jersey                  A.S., Brookdale Community College; B.A.,
Nicole Ricciardi (2007)                         Richard Scherl (2002)                            Monmouth University; M.L.I.S., Drexel
Assistant Professor of Music and Theatre        Associate Professor of Computer Science          University
  Arts                                          B.A., Columbia University; M.A., University    Eugene S. Simko (1978)
B.A., Drew University; M.F.A., Carnegie           of Chicago; Ph.D., University of Illinois    Associate Professor of Management
  Mellon University                                                                            B.B.A., M.B.A., Temple University; Ph.D.,
                                                Karen Schmelzkopf (1998)
Michael Richison                                Associate Professor of Geography                 Baruch College of the City University of
Specialist Professor of Art and Design          B.A., M.A., Florida Atlantic University;         New York
B.F.A., Calvin College; M.F.A., Cranbrook         Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University         Kristine Simoes (2001)
  Academy of Art                                                                               Specialist Professor of Communication
                                                William Schreiber (2006)
Julia Riordan-Goncalves (2007)                  Lecturer of Chemistry, Medical Technology      B.A., Rowan University; M.A., Rowan
Lecturer of Foreign Language Studies              and Physics; Interim Chair of the              University
B.A., Dickinson College; M.A., ABD,               Department of Chemistry, Med Tech            Maria Simonelli (2007)
  University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill     and Physics                                  Lecturer of Foreign Language Studies
                                                B.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology;   M.A., Licio Statale Nola, Italy; Ph.D.,
Joseph Rocereto (2006)                            Ph.D., University of Rochester
Assistant Professor of Management and                                                            Universita di Napoli, Italy
  Marketing                                     Solomon Z. Schuck (1966)                       Pasquale Simonelli (2005)
B.A., Dickinson College; M.B.A., Ph.D.,         Associate Professor of Psychological           Lecturer of Philosophy
  Drexel University                               Counseling                                   Liberal Arts Major, Collegio DeMerode;
                                                B.S., City College of New York; Ph.D.,            Ph.D., Universita di Napoli, Italy
Lynn Andrews Romeo (1994)                         New York University
Associate Professor of Education; Dean of                                                      Michaeline Skiba (2003)
  the School of Education                       Alan Schwerin (1996)                           Associate Professor of Management
B.A., Glassboro State College; M.A., Kean       Associate Professor of Philosophy              B.S., M.S., Loyola University; M.S., Boston
  College; Ed.D., Rutgers University            B.A., M.A., Rhodes University; Ph.D., Rice       College; Ed.D., Columbia University
                                                  University
Daniela Rosca (1998)
Associate Professor of Software                 Patricia Sciscione (2010)
  Engineering                                   Specialist Professor of Nursing
M.S., Polytechnic University of Bucharest;      M.S.N., Kean University
  Ph.D., Old Dominion University




                                                                                                 Monmouth University 123
Directories



Donald R. Smith (2002)                         G. Boyd Swartz (1966)                         Michelle Van Volkom (2007)
Associate Professor of Management              Professor of Mathematics                      Lecturer of Psychology
B.A., Cornell University; M.S.,Columbia        B.S.E.E., M.S.E.E., Lehigh University;        B.A., Seton Hall University, M.A.; Ph.D.,
  University; Ph.D.,University of California     M.S., Ph.D., New York University              State University of New York at Albany
  at Berkeley
                                               Mary E. Swigonski (1997)                      Dorothy Varygiannes (2007)
Nora Smith (2000)                              Associate Professor of Social Work            Lecturer of Education
Associate Professor of Social Work             B.A., Allentown College of St. Francis de     B.A., New Jersey City University; M.A.,
B.S., M.S., Ph.D., State University of New       Sales; M.S.W., Marywood College;              Montclair State University; Ed.D., Seton
  York at Albany                                 Ph.D., Rutgers University                     Hall University
William Stanley (2003)                         Danuta Szwajkajzer (2004)                     Richard Veit (2000)
Professor of Education                         Lecturer of Chemistry                         Associate Professor of Anthropology
B.A., Kean College; M.A., Ed.D., Rutgers       M.S., Technical University of Warsaw;         Director of the Center for Excellence in
  University                                     M.S., University of Rochester; Ph.D.,         Teaching and Learning
                                                 Rutgers University                          B.A., Drew University; M.A., College of
Janice Stapley (1990)                                                                          William and Mary; Ph.D., University of
Associate Professor of Psychology; Chair       Claude Taylor (2005)                            Pennsylvania
  of the Department of Psychology              Lecturer of Communication
B.A., Russell Sage College; M.S.; Ph.D.,       B.A., M.A., West Chester University           Lisa Vetere (2005)
  Rutgers University                                                                         Assistant Professor of English
                                               William M. Tepfenhart (1999)                  B.A., Siena College; M.A., St.
Sharon W. Stark (1996)                         Associate Professor of Software Engineering     Bonaventure University; Ph.D., Lehigh
Associate Professor of Nursing; Associate      B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of Texas at       University
  Dean of the School of Nursing                  Dallas
B.S., Thomas Edison State College;                                                           Marina Vujnovic (2008)
  M.S.N., Rutgers University; Ph.D.,           David J. Tietge (2002)                        Assistant Professor of Communication
  Widener University                           Associate Professor of English                B.A., University of Zagreb, M.A.,
                                               B.A., University of North Iowa; M.A.,           University of Northern Iowa; Ph.D.,
Sue Starke (2000)                                Indiana State University; Ph.D., South        University of Iowa
Associate Professor of English; Chair of         Illinois University at Carbondale
  the Department of English                                                                  Jiacun Wang (2004)
B.A., Wellesley College; Ph.D., Rutgers        Tsanangurayi Tongesayi (2006)                 Associate Professor of Software
  University                                   Assistant Professor of Chemistry, Medical       Engineering; Chair of the Department of
                                                 Technology and Physics                        Computer Science and Software
Lilly Steiner (2010)                           B.S., M.S., University of Zimbabwe; Ph.D.,      Engineering
Assistant Professor of Educational               West Virginia University                    B.S., Jiangsu University of Science and
  Leadership, School Counseling and                                                            Technology; M.S.; Ph.D., Nanjing
  Special Education                            David Tripold (2002)
                                               Associate Professor of Music, Chair of the      University of Science and Technology
B.A., University of Wisconsin; M.A.,
  University of North Dakota; Ed.D.,             Department of Music and Theatre Arts        Kelly Ward (1999)
  Boston University                            B.M., M.M., Westminster Choir College of      Associate Professor of Social Work
                                                 Rider University; Ph.D., Drew University    B.S., Eastern Michigan University; B.S.W.,
Douglas Stives (2006)                                                                          Rutgers University; Ph.D., Fordham
Specialist Professor of Accounting;            Mary Ann Troiano (2001)
                                               Assistant Professor of Nursing and Health       University
  Director of the M.B.A. Program
B.S., M.B.A., Lehigh University                  Studies                                     Michael Waters (2008)
                                               B.S.N., Long Island University; M.S.N.,       Associate Professor of English
David Strohmetz (1996)                           Wagner College                              B.A., M.A., State University of New York;
Professor of Psychology; Associate Vice                                                        M.F.A., University of Iowa; Ph.D., Ohio
  President for Academic and                   Frances K. Trotman (1995)
                                               Professor of Psychological Counseling           University
  Instructional Assessment
B.A., Dickinson College; M.A., Ph.D.,          B.A., City College; M.S.Ed., City             Sherry Wien (2001)
  Temple University                              University; M.Phil., Ph.D., Columbia        Associate Professor of Communication
                                                 University                                  B.A., Lynchburg College; M.A., Penn State
Kenneth R. Stunkel (1965)                                                                      University; Ph.D., Rutgers University
Professor of History                           Nancy Uddin (1999)
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Maryland      Associate Professor of Accounting             Hettie Williams (2007)
                                               B.A., William Paterson University; Ph.D.,     Lecturer of History
Carolyn Supplee (2005)                           Rutgers University                          B.A., Rowan University; M.A., Monmouth
Assistant Professor of Chemistry                                                               University
B.A., Goucher College; M.S., Ph.D., The        Laura Valenzuela (2007)
  Ohio State University                        Lecturer of Foreign Language Studies          Charles Willow (2004)
                                               B.A., Kean University, M.A., University de    Associate Professor of Management
Don R. Swanson (1995)                            Salamanca, Spain                            B.S., Hanyang University; M.S., Hanyang
Professor of Communication and Chair of                                                        University; M.S., Texas A&M University;
  the Department of Philosophy, Religion,      Jack M. Van Arsdale (1965)
                                               Associate Professor of Software Engineering     Ph.D., University of Houston
  and Interdisciplinary Studies
B.A., Augustana College; M.A., University      B.S., Monmouth College; M.S.E.E.,
  of Montana; Ed.D., University of               Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn
  Northern Colorado




124 Monmouth University
                                                                                                                    Directories



Sheila Witherspoon (2007)                   Cui Yu (2002)                                Ronald Zhao (2002)
Assistant Professor of Educational          Associate Professor of Computer Science      Associate Professor of Accounting
  Leadership and Special Education          B.S., Nanjing University of Aeronautics &    B.A., Fudan University, China; M.A.,
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., South Carolina State       Astronautics; Ph.D., National University     Shanghai Foreign Language Institute,
  University                                  of Singapore, Singapore                      China; M.B.A., Yale School of
                                                                                           Management; Ph.D., Texas Tech
George Wurzbach (2009)                      Minna Yu (2010)                                University
Specialist Professor of Music and Theatre   Assistant Professor of Accounting
  Arts                                      B.A., M.S., Dongbei University, China;       Jing Zhou (2004)
B.A., Brooklyn College CUNY; M.A.,            Ph.D., Kent State University               Associate Professor of Art
  Hunter College CUNY                                                                    B.A., Sichuan Fine Arts Institute; M.F.A.,
                                            Ying Zhang (2008)                              Georgia Southern University
                                            Assistant Professor of Economics and
                                              Finance
                                            B.S., JiNan University, M.S.; Ph.D.,
                                              University of Texas at Arlington




                                                                                           Monmouth University 125
126 Monmouth University
Monmouth University
Academic Calendar




                                                                                                                                                                Academic Calendars
FALL SEMESTER 2010
  September 2010
     End of Continuing Registration ..............................................................Wednesday, September 1, 2010
     CLASSES BEGIN (8:30 A.M.) .....................................................................Tuesday, September 7, 2010
     Late Registration or Program Changes .................................Tuesday–Tuesday, September 7–14, 2010
     Leave of Absence Deadline.......................................................................Tuesday, September 14, 2010
  October 2010
     Last Day to Withdraw from Pattern “A” Classes ............................................Tuesday, October 12, 2010
     Undergraduate Midterm Grades Due in
        Office of Registration and Records*...........................................................Tuesday, October 26, 2010
     Pattern “A” Classes End ...............................................................................Thursday, October 28, 2010
     Pattern “B” Classes Begin..................................................................................Friday, October 29, 2010
  November 2010
     Deadline to submit graduation applications for
        January 2011 Graduation ..........................................................................Monday, November 1, 2010
     Thursday Classes Meet on Tuesday, Nov. 23 ............................................Tuesday, November 23, 2010
     Friday Classes Meet on Wednesday, Nov. 24 ......................................Wednesday, November 24, 2010
     Thanksgiving Recess ..............................................................Thursday–Friday, November 25–26, 2010
     Last Day to Withdraw from Pattern “B” Classes ........................................Monday, November 29, 2010
  December 2010
     CLASSES END .....................................................................................Wednesday, December 15, 2010
     Reading Day .........................................................................................................................................n/a
     Final Examination Period ...............................................Thursday–Wednesday, December 16–22, 2010
     Final Grades Due 6 A.M. ............................................................................Tuesday, December 28, 2010

* Grades will be posted on WEBstudent approximately 2 days after the Office of Registration and Records has received
  all grades.




                                                                                                                 Monmouth University 127
Academic Calendar



SPRING SEMESTER 2011
  January 2011
     End of Continuing Registration .....................................................................Thursday, January 13, 2011
     COMMENCEMENT ............................................................................................Friday, January 14, 2011
     Martin Luther King Holiday ..............................................................................Monday, January 17, 2011
     CLASSES BEGIN 8:30 A.M............................................................................Tuesday, January 18, 2011
     Late Registration or Program Changes ....................................Tuesday–Tuesday, January 18–25, 2011
     Leave of Absence Deadline............................................................................Tuesday, January 25, 2011
     Graduation Applications Due for May 2011...................................................Thursday, January 31, 2011
  February 2011
     Last Day to Withdraw from Pattern “A” Classes ...............................................Friday, February 11, 2011
  March 2011
     May Graduates Deadline Waivers and Substitutions...........................................Monday, March 1, 2011
     Graduation Applications Due for July and August 2011.......................................Monday, March 1, 2011
     Spring Recess ....................................................................................Monday–Friday, March 7–11, 2011
     Pattern “A” Classes End .........................................................................................Friday, March 4, 2011
     Undergraduate Midterm Grades Due in
         Office of Registration and Records* ..............................................................Tuesday, March 15, 2011
     Pattern “B” Classes Begin..................................................................................Monday, March 14, 2011
     Last Day to Withdraw with “W” Grade................................................................Monday, March 28, 2011
  April 2011
     Academic Advising and Priority/Early Registration
         for Summer, Fall and Spring..............................................Thursday–Friday, March 31–April 15, 2011
     Last Day to Withdraw from Pattern “B” Classes ........................................................Friday, April 8, 2011
  May 2011
     CLASSES END .......................................................................................................Monday, May 2, 2011
     Reading Day ...........................................................................................................Tuesday, May 3, 2011
     Final Examination Period.............................................................Wednesday–Tuesday, May 4–10, 2011
     Grades Due 10 P.M. ............................................................................................Thursday, May 12, 2011
     COMMENCEMENT .........................................................................................Wednesday, May 18, 2011

* Grades will be posted on WEBstudent approximately 2 days after the Office of Registration and Records has received all
  grades.




128 Monmouth University
Directions



1. From the Garden State Parkway: Take Exit 105. The Parkway offramp leads directly onto Route 36
   East. Continue on Route 36 East approximately three miles to Route 71 South. Go approximately one
   mile and Route 71 will fork left and become Cedar Avenue. Enter the campus through the Norwood
   Avenue entrance.




                                                                                                                 Directions
2. From the NJ Turnpike: From the South, take Turnpike North to Exit 7A. After the toll plaza, take I-195
   East to Shore Points. Approaching Belmar, I-195 becomes NJ Route 138. After crossing the Garden
   State Parkway, exit right to NJ Route 18 North, marked Eatontown. Take the Deal Road exit and drive
   east to the intersection at Monmouth Road. Turn left and proceed to the third traffic light, which is Cedar
   Avenue. Turn right onto Cedar (also labeled NJ Route 71 South) and follow to campus. Enter the cam-
   pus through the Norwood Avenue entrance.


3. From the NJ Turnpike: From the North, take Turnpike South to Exit 11 (Garden State Parkway South),
   Take Exit 105 as outlined in #1 above.


4. From Trenton and Points West: Take I-195 East, and follow instructions outlined in #2 above.


5. From Freehold area: Take US Route 9 South to I-195 East. Follow instructions outlined in #2 above.




                                                                                  Monmouth University 129
130 Monmouth University
Appendix A:
Graduate Course Descriptions




                                                                                                                    Course Descriptions
         The course descriptions for undergraduate       Graduate Courses:
or graduate courses offered by Monmouth                           The graduate courses are numbered 500 to
University are listed alphabetically by discipline and   699. The number by which a course is designated
in numerical order within discipline in this section.    usually indicates the relative level of the course.
This introduction may prove helpful in interpreting               Each discipline is identified by a letter code.
this information.                                        This code precedes the course number in course
         Courses with odd numbers usually are            listings and class schedules.
given in the fall semester, while courses bearing                 Prerequisites for all courses must be met
even numbers usually are given in the spring             unless waived by the chair of the department offering
semester.                                                the course, or for graduate students, by the program
                                                         director. Registration for courses for which the pre-
Undergraduate Courses:                                   requisites have been waived must be done by the
         The number by which a course is designated      academic department that waived the prerequisite.
indicates the relative level of the course. Those num-            Please note that this list was created in
bered “050” (undergraduate developmental) are not        June 2010. Monmouth University maintains the
eligible for credit toward graduation requirements.      most current course descriptions on their WEBsite,
Those numbered 100 to 299 are for undergraduate          which can be accessed through the University’s
freshmen and sophomores. Those numbered 300 to           WEBstudent menu (https://webadvisor.mon-
499 are for undergraduate juniors and seniors.           mouth.edu/datatel/openweb/st/stmenu.html).




                                                                                  Monmouth University A1
Appendix A: Course Descriptions



ANTHROPOLOGY                                                   ART AND DESIGN

AN 502                                            Cr. 3.0      AR 505                                             Cr. 3.0
Culture and Society                                            Images of Contemporary Culture
An in-depth introduction to the comparative analysis of        A study of the major forms of artistic expression in con-
human cultures; concepts and principles of cultural            temporary culture; their backgrounds in tradition, the inter-
anthropology; theories of cultural patterning, structure,      relationships and limitations of their styles and themes;
and dynamics; application to various aspects of cultural       and a critical evaluation of their contributions to and
behavior in simple and complex societies, ranging from         impact on modern society.
tribal communities through third-world peasantries to          Course Type(s): None
modern America.
Course Type(s): None                                           AR 522                                             Cr. 3.0
                                                               Art in the Age of Revolution
AN 504                                            Cr. 3.0      Investigation of major art movements from the early nine-
Ancient Civilizations of Native America                        teenth to mid-twentieth century; analysis of visual stylistic
Cultural developments in Mesoamerica and the Central           developments in conjunction with exploration of other
Andes, from the development of agriculture to the              integral issues, subject matter, and the relationship of art
Spanish conquest, focusing on Inca and Aztec civiliza-         to its political, cultural, social, and historical climate.
tions; theoretical exploration of developmental similarities   Course Type(s): None
between the two regions.
Course Type(s): HSNW                                           AR 525                                             Cr. 3.0
                                                               Art in World Perspective
AN 513                                            Cr. 3.0      An examination of major artistic developments from 1300
Origin of Civilization and the State                           AD to 1750 AD. Traditionally, this area of study is referred
Evolution of the ancient civilizations in China, Peru,         to as Renaissance, Mannerism, and the Baroque. The
Mexico, Mesopotamia, the Indus Valley, and Egypt.              major thrust of the course will be concerned with artistic
Emphasis on the causal processes underlying the devel-         innovations surrounding the rebirth of Western Civilization.
opment of these societies.                                     Course Type(s): None
Course Type(s): None
                                                               AR 528                                             Cr. 3.0
AN 575                                            Cr. 3.0      Asian Art and Ideas
Civilizations of the Andes                                     A comparative exploration of the relationship of art and
A survey of Andean history from the beginning of human         thought in Hindu India, Confucian China, and Feudal Japan.
settlement through the Inca Empire and the Spanish con-        Course Type(s): None
quest to contemporary peasant society. The evolution and
nature of precolumbian civilizations, focusing on Chavin,      AR 551                                             Cr. 3.0
Paracas-Nazca, Huari-Tiahuanaco, Chimor, and the Inca;         Methods of Teaching Art
the social and political organization of the Inca empire;      Prepares pre-service teachers to implement a discipline-
the Spanish conquest and its impact on native culture;         based sequential curriculum in the art content area.
contemporary social changes; and rural migration and the       Satisfies the requirements of the NJCCCS (New Jersey
transformation of contemporary Andean society.                 Core Curriculum Content Standards).
Theoretical exploration of the developmental trajectory of     Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor or department
Andean civilization. Also listed as History 575.               chair.
Course Type(s): HSNW, HSWLD                                    Course Type(s): LA

AN 599                                       Cr. 1.0-3.0       AR 580                                             Cr. 3.0
Independent Study in Anthropology                              Themes and Variations in Cultural History
Reading and research leading to significant written work       The exploration of symbol, style, and value in six histori-
under the direction of a member of the anthropology faculty.   cal periods from classical Greece to the end of the nine-
Course Type(s): None                                           teenth century through art, literature, and philosophy.
                                                               Course Type(s): None




A2 Monmouth University
                                                                               Appendix A: Course Descriptions



AR 597                                            Cr. 3.0       well as the social, political, and intellectual consequences
Fine Art/Design Studio                                          of the evolutionary world view. (Cannot be taken to fulfill
Advanced study within a classroom setting in a number of        an MS or an MAT in Biology without permission of the
creative disciplines. Emphasis to further the student’s         appropriate departments.)
knowledge base; unique approach to artistic investigation       Course Type(s): LA
through advanced theory, research, technical experience,
and critical dialog. Students must meet individually with       BY 521                                             Cr. 3.0
the instructor at the beginning of the semester to discuss      Pathophysiology and Histology
and define their creative work plan as a point of departure     Focuses on pathogenesis of selected diseases leading to
for critical discourse and grading.                             alterations of body structure and functions across the lifes-
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor to verify six credits    pan. Emphasizes the laboratory identification of vertebrate
of previous study in selected Art/Design discipline.            tissue. Students must earn a minimum of a B- in the
Course Type(s): None                                            course. Students who receive less than a B- will be
                                                                required to repeat the course. Students will be allowed to
AR 598                                            Cr. 3.0       repeat the course no more than once. A second grade
Special Topics: Art and Design                                  below a B- will make students ineligible to continue in pro-
The subject matter varies with the curricula needs of the       grams requiring this course. Also listed as Nursing 521.
student and the professor. The exact nature of the topic        Course Type(s): None
covered in any given semester is indicated in the student’s
transcript. Permission of the program director is required.     BY 599                                        Cr. 2.0-4.0
Prerequisite: As announced in the course schedule.              Biological Research
Course Type(s): None                                            Principles and applications of research in life sciences; par-
                                                                ticipation and presentation of seminars; and preparation of
AR 599                                       Cr. 1.0-3.0        research paper in publishable format. Hours arranged.
Independent Study in Art                                        Prerequisite: Prior permission of the directing professor,
Independent study in a topic not substantially treated in a     department chair, and graduate program director.
regular graduate course; weekly consultation. Prior per-        Course Type(s): LA
mission of the directing professor and the chair of the
department is required. For the course to count for credit      BUSINESS
toward a particular graduate program outside of the
department of art and design, prior permission from the         BU 588                                             Cr. 1.0
student’s department chair must be obtained. The prereq-        Business Practice and Experience
uisite varies with the topic.                                   Provides the opportunity for MBA graduate students to
Course Type(s): None                                            obtain related experience in employment at a local com-
                                                                pany or institution with Monmouth University sponsorship.
BIOLOGY                                                         Available to MBA students who have completed at least
                                                                nine credit hours of graduate courses at the 500 level
BY 502                                            Cr. 3.0       with a minimum GPA of 3.00. Does not satisfy elective
Technology and Human Biology                                    requirements; students may take this course a maximum
An examination of the potential effects of recent advances in   of two times.
biology on the natural processes, of human reproduction and     Course Type(s): None
evolution. (Cannot be taken to fulfill an MS or an MAT in
Biology without permission of the appropriate departments.)     BUSINESS - ACCOUNTING
Course Type(s): None
                                                                BA 503                                             Cr. 3.0
BY 503                                            Cr. 3.0       Financial Accounting
Evolution                                                       Principles and application of current accounting theory; the
An interdisciplinary approach to the topic of evolution that    development and use of financial statements; and the influ-
combines historical and biological perspectives. Explore        ence of the various financial and accounting institutions.
the current understanding of the evolutionary process as        Course Type(s): None




                                                                                         Monmouth University A3
Appendix A: Course Descriptions



BA 510                                             Cr. 3.0     with one-hour computer lab (extra fee).
Business Income Tax                                            Prerequisite: Accounting 503 or equivalent.
Advanced topics in corporate taxation, including corporate     Course Type(s): None
organizations, distributions, liquidations, reorganizations,
and international and multistates operations; advanced         BA 545                                             Cr. 3.0
topics in partnership taxation, including formation, basis,    Fraud Examination
distribution, loss limitations, sale of an interest; and       Students will learn how and why occupational fraud is com-
exempt organizations.                                          mitted, how fraudulent conduct can be deterred, and how
Prerequisite: Accounting 503.                                  allegations of fraud should be investigated and resolved.
Course Type(s): None                                           Prerequisite: Accounting 541.
                                                               Course Type(s): None
BA 512                                             Cr. 3.0
Selected Topics in Financial Accounting                        BA 552                                             Cr. 3.0
This is an intensive capstone course covering major,           Management Control Systems
intermediate accounting topics. It provides an in-depth        Focus on management control systems, which are
examination of accounting principles and concepts per-         processes intended to help implement strategies.
taining to the preparation of financial statements. It also    Includes discussion and critical examination of concepts,
deals with a series of particular issues, including dilutive   text, and cases designed to allow students to gain knowl-
securities, investments, revenue recognition, income           edge, insights, and analytical skills related to how a firm’s
taxes, pension, and leases.                                    manager would go about designing and using planning
Prerequisite: Accounting 503.                                  and control systems to implement a firm’s strategies.
Course Type(s): None                                           Prerequisite: Accounting 541.
                                                               Course Type(s): None
BA 515                                             Cr. 3.0
Advanced Accounting Practice                                   BA 555                                             Cr. 3.0
Covers an analytical approach to accounting and financial      Contemporary Accounting Theory
reporting when (1) two or more companies are involved,         This course identifies the elements of accounting theory
and (2) recording and reporting of transactions involving      and then relates those elements to specific problem areas
exchange of US dollars and foreign currencies. Provides        in accounting. The focus will be on controversial topics
an introduction to accounting for government and non-          and the need for accurate data in this ever-changing
profit organizations.                                          information age.
Prerequisite: Accounting 512.                                  Prerequisite: Accounting 541.
Course Type(s): None                                           Course Type(s): None

BA 525                                             Cr. 3.0     BA 560                                             Cr. 3.0
Controlling Global Enterprises                                 Auditing Practices and Cases
Deals with the challenge of managing and controlling a         Acquaints students with auditing standards and proce-
company in the global economy with emphasis on man-            dures associated with examination of financial state-
agement structure and style, financial reports as a control    ments. Students who successfully complete this course
mechanism, currency exchange exposure, transaction and         will be able to understand the role and methods of inde-
translation issues, transfer pricing, and risk management.     pendent auditors and the legal and ethical environment in
Prerequisite: Accounting 541.                                  which an auditor functions.
Course Type(s): None                                           Prerequisite: Accounting 512.
                                                               Course Type(s): None
BA 541                                             Cr. 3.0
Managerial Accounting                                          BA 598                                             Cr. 3.0
Concepts and methods of cost determination, reporting          Special Topics in Accounting
and control for internal management, and varying types of      The subject matter of this course varies according to the
information systems, with emphasis on the development          interest of the students and the professor teaching the
and use of data for managerial decisions. May be offered       course. The exact nature of the topic covered is indicated




A4 Monmouth University
                                                                               Appendix A: Course Descriptions



in the student’s permanent record.                              goods and services, employment, income and wealth—will
Prerequisite: Accounting 541.                                   be contrasted with its costs-volatility, contagion, environ-
Course Type(s): None                                            mental degradation, inequality, and poverty. A discussion of
                                                                the management of globalization through global-coordina-
BA 599                                             Cr. 3.0      tion governance is at the end of the course.
Business Research                                               Prerequisite: Economics 501 and Finance 511.
Independent research in business administration in an           Course Type(s): MBA.E, MBA.I
area not substantially treated in a regular course offering,
under the supervision of a Business Administration faculty      BE 575                                             Cr. 3.0
member; written evaluation of the research required.            Analysis and Forecasting
Student must be within nine credits of graduation.              Identification, analysis, and appraisal of forces influencing
Prerequisite: Prior permission of the directing professor       the course of economic activity; evaluation of theories
and department chair.                                           and models of cycles and growth; and various forecasting
Course Type(s): None                                            and projecting techniques.
                                                                Prerequisites: Economics 501 and Management 506 or
BUSINESS - ECONOMICS                                            equivalent.
                                                                Course Type(s): MBA.E
BE 501                                             Cr. 3.0
Economics for Management                                        BE 598                                             Cr. 3.0
Microeconomic and macroeconomic concepts and prob-              Special Topics: Economics
lems of the economic society and their relationship to the      Subject matter varies according to the interest of the stu-
business sector; the forces that determine the composi-         dents and the professor. The exact nature of the topic
tion and allocation of resources in the domestic as well as     covered is indicated in the student’s permanent record.
global economics.                                               Course Type(s): None
Course Type(s): None
                                                                BE 599                                             Cr. 3.0
BE 561                                             Cr. 3.0      Business Research
Managerial Economics                                            Independent research in business administration in an
The application of the theory of production and the theory      area not substantially treated in a regular course offering,
of the firm to problems of managerial decision making.          under the supervision of a Business Administration faculty
Prerequisites: Economics 501 and Management 506 or              member; written evaluation of the research required.
equivalent.                                                     Student must be within 9 credits of graduation.
Course Type(s): MBA.E                                           Prerequisite: Prior permission of the directing professor
                                                                and department chair.
                                                                Course Type(s): None
BE 571                                             Cr. 3.0
Economic Policy in Society
The factors that determine the level of national income,        BUSINESS - FINANCE
employment, and business activity; the relationship of
government in the productive system in establishing eco-        BF 511                                             Cr. 3.0
nomic goals and objectives and its role in making policy.       Business Finance
Prerequisite: Economics 501 or equivalent.                      Principles and techniques of financial analysis: financial
Course Type(s): MBA.E                                           planning and control, profit planning and management,
                                                                capital budgeting, working capital management, financial
BE 574                                             Cr. 3.0      structure, and the cost of capital; valuation theory and div-
Globalization                                                   idend policy.
Students will be introduced to debates on the meaning,          Prerequisites: Accounting 503, Management 506, and
causes, and consequences of globalization. The role of          Economics 501.
trade, finance, labor, multinational corporations, nation—      Course Type(s): None
states, international institutions, and civil society will be
examined. Benefits of globalization—the potential to create




                                                                                        Monmouth University A5
Appendix A: Course Descriptions



BF 517                                            Cr. 3.0      BF 535                                            Cr. 3.0
Financial Institutions and Markets                             International Finance
Study of the theory, nature, and environment of financial      Explores corporate financing and investment decisions in
institutions and markets of the United States, especially      an international context. A variety of frameworks and tools
as it relates to activities of the federal government and      are studied, such as the balance of payments accounts,
Federal Reserve System. It includes: financial intermedi-      as well as the theories of interest rate and purchasing
aries, the central and commercial banking systems, the         power parity. Emphasis is given to the identification and
determination of the money supply and interest rates, and      management of foreign-exchange risk associated with the
an introduction to international financial activities.         operations of multinational firms, as compared to single-
Prerequisites: Economics 501 and Finance 511.                  nation firms.
Course Type(s): MBA.E                                          Prerequisite: Finance 511 or equivalent.
                                                               Course Type(s): MBA.E, MBA.I
BF 522                                            Cr. 3.0
Corporate Finance                                              BF 598                                            Cr. 3.0
Review and reinforce concepts and techniques of finan-         Special Topics in Finance
cial management learned in earlier coursework and, in          Subject matter varies according to the interest of the stu-
addition, demonstrate the application of these tools to real   dents and the professor. The exact nature of the topic
world situations through the utilization of case studies.      covered is indicated in the student’s permanent record.
The emphasis will be on valuation analysis. Students will      Course Type(s): None
learn to develop analytical and case presentation skills
that are essential attributes for a successful corporate       BF 599                                            Cr. 3.0
career. Consequently, considerable weight will be placed       Business Research
on verbal and written communication skills as evidenced        Independent research in business administration in an
in the case presentations and analyses. Readings are           area not substantially treated in a regular course offering,
supplemented from academic and professional journals.          under the supervision of a Business Administration faculty
Prerequisite: Finance 511.                                     member; written evaluation of the research required.
Course Type(s): MBA.E                                          Student must be within nine credits of graduation.
                                                               Prerequisite: Prior permission of the directing professor
BF 523                                            Cr. 3.0      and department chair.
Investments                                                    Course Type(s): None
Security analysis and portfolio selection and evaluation
techniques and models dealing with risk-reward relation-       BUSINESS – HEALTH CARE MANAGEMENT
ships. Individual, as well as corporate investment and
financing decisions under uncertainty, are dealt with.
Prerequisite: Finance 511.
                                                               BH 571                                            Cr. 3.0
Course Type(s): None
                                                               Introduction to the United States Health Care System
                                                               An overview of the U.S. health care delivery system,
                                                               including the history, development, and description of the
BF 525                                            Cr. 3.0      component parts involved in providing health care servic-
Real Estate Analysis                                           es. Taught from a sociological perspective, course
Real estate financing and appraising. Examination of per-      emphasis is placed upon factors such as need, demand,
sonal and corporate real estate portfolio strategies. The      quality, cost of care, distribution, and supply of manpower
analysis of specific types of real properties are reviewed.    and physical resources. Also explored are the relation-
This includes: single family homes, apartment houses,          ships of health care delivery to consumers, providers, fin-
condominiums, shopping centers, and office and industrial      anciers, regulators, and other health care stakeholders.
buildings. Also listed as Real Estate 525.                     Prerequisite: Completion or waiver of at least three of the
Prerequisite: Real Estate 511 or equivalent.                   six M.B.A. core courses.
Course Type(s): None                                           Course Type(s): None




A6 Monmouth University
                                                                              Appendix A: Course Descriptions



BH 572                                            Cr. 3.0      pendent study for the residency.
Health Care Economics                                          Prerequisites: Health Care Management 571, 572, and 573.
Application of the tools of economics to issues of the         Course Type(s): None
organization, delivery, and financing of health care. Topics
include: economic concepts relevant to health care, the        BH 599                                            Cr. 3.0
system of health care financing and delivery arrangements      Independent Study in Health Care Management
in the U.S., the role of economic factors in the develop-      Independent research in health care management in an
ment of health and health care public policy, and a base       area not substantially treated in a regular course offering,
for analyzing the implications of changes in health policy.    under the supervision of a Business Administration faculty
Prerequisite: Economics 501.                                   member with the permission of the Program Director.
Course Type(s): None                                           Prerequisites: Health Care Management 571, 572, and 573.
                                                               Course Type(s): None
BH 573                                            Cr. 3.0
Management of Health Care Organizations                        BUSINESS - LAW
Investigates the evolving management structures of
health and health care-related organizations. In addition,     BL 501                                            Cr. 3.0
the structure of managed care is investigated. The course      Legal Environment of Business
integrates the changing provider organizations, regulatory,    Government regulation affects every facet of how a busi-
and quality assurance agencies and how they are affect-        ness operates. Therefore, it is important for business stu-
ed by evolving, managed care reimbursement.                    dents to understand the fundamental legal principles of
Prerequisites: Health Care Management 571 and                  contracts, crimes, torts, business organizations, property,
Management 502.                                                negotiable instruments, and the employment relationship.
Course Type(s): None                                           Course Type(s): None

BH 574                                            Cr. 3.0      BL 551                                            Cr. 3.0
Seminar in Health Care Management                              Law, Government, and Business
The capstone in health care concentration, materials con-      The legal environment in which business organizations
tained in previous courses, as well as skills taught in gen-   function; the nature of law, its sources, and the factors
eral business courses, are incorporated into a unified         that shape it; recent trends of public regulation of com-
examination of critical issues facing the health care serv-    merce, competition, freedom of contract, and labor-man-
ices environment. Concentrates on the major events driv-       agement relations.
ing health management: the consolidation of individual         Course Type(s): None
stakeholders into integrated health delivery systems.
Current efforts by these stakeholders are included as
well, as a tool to reinforce class material.
                                                               BL 598                                      Cr. 1.0-3.0
Prerequisites: Health Care Management 571, 572, 573,           Special Topics in Business Law
and Finance 511.                                               Subject matter varies according to the interest of the stu-
Course Type(s): None                                           dents and the professor. The exact nature of the topic
                                                               covered is indicated in the student’s permanent record.
                                                               Course Type(s): None
BH 575                                            Cr. 3.0
Health Care Management Residency
Applies the health care and business course material into
                                                               BL 599                                      Cr. 1.0-3.0
the health care practitioner work setting. The goal is to      Independent Study in Business Law
unify the academic and conceptual with the pragmatism          Independent research in business administration in an
of the work experience. A residency is completed within a      area not substantially treated in a regular course offering,
health care or health-related setting, such as a hospital,     under the supervision of a Business Administration faculty
long-term care facility, or other health care setting, such    member; written evaluation of the research required.
as managed care organizations. The residency is com-           Student must be within nine credits of graduation.
posed of 400 hours of on-the-job responsibility under the      Course Type(s): None
directorship of a practicing health care manager. Students
with extensive health experience may substitute an inde-




                                                                                       Monmouth University A7
Appendix A: Course Descriptions



BUSINESS - MANAGEMENT                                           oriented introduction to the fundamentals of information
                                                                systems and their integration into business organizations.
                                                                Prerequisite: Management 502.
BM 502                                             Cr. 3.0
                                                                Course Type(s): MBA.T
Management and Organizational Behavior
Managerial functions, styles, techniques, and practices
contingent on the internal and external global organiza-        BM 521                                             Cr. 3.0
tional environment; overview of diagnostic, behavioral,         Seminar in Electronic Commerce
technical, and conceptual management skills and                 Provides an overview of the managerial side of e-com-
processes; comparative and applied study of organiza-           merce for the purpose of discussing the strategic and man-
tional effectiveness, with emphasis on group dynamics           agerial implications of this new and emerging phenome-
and team building.                                              non. The technological and business possibilities for com-
Course Type(s): None                                            merce using information technologies and networks will be
                                                                explored in terms of their value-adding potential to current
                                                                business practices, as well as the development of new
BM 506                                             Cr. 3.0
                                                                products and/or services. Also listed as Marketing 521.
Graduate Business Statistics
                                                                Prerequisites: Management 502 and Marketing 509.
Surveys some of the primary statistical tools and applica-
                                                                Course Type(s): None
tions. The topics chosen reflect those that are most com-
monly encountered in business and not-for-profit organi-
zations. Topics include: graphical representation of data,      BM 525                                             Cr. 3.0
descriptive statistics, probability, discrete and continuous    Management for Human Resources
random variables, inferential statistics, hypothesis testing,   Examination of the practices and problems associated
analysis of variance, and regression analysis.                  with the staffing, managing, evaluation, and compensation
Course Type(s): None                                            of employees, including employment discrimination,
                                                                employee rights, and affirmative action.
                                                                Prerequisite: Management 502 or equivalent.
BM 507                                             Cr. 3.0
                                                                Course Type(s): MBA.B
Production and Operations Management
and Laboratory
Application and adaptation of current managerial methods        BM 549                                             Cr. 3.0
for the production of goods and services, employing quali-      Management Science
tative and quantitative analyses of allocating such produc-     Advanced application of quantitative methods in business,
tion factors as human resources, materials, and technolo-       including in-depth linear programming and an introduction
gy in context of optimizing performance. Prerequisite:          to computer simulation and decision support systems.
Management 506 or equivalent.                                   Prerequisites: Management 506 and 507.
Course Type(s): None                                            Course Type(s): MBA.Q


BM 515                                             Cr. 3.0      BM 556                                             Cr. 3.0
Ethics, Law, and Social Responsibility                          Principles of Logistics Management
The American state, its legislature, judicial, and regulatory   Conceptual underpinnings of business logistics; designing an
apparatus are analyzed as factors that underpin and limit       integrated logistics system; managing for effective logistics.
strategic decisions in business organizations. Markets,         Prerequisite: Management 507.
organizational structures, and organizational cultures are      Course Type(s): MBA.Q
analyzed as factors that determine the role of organiza-
tional ethics in managerial decision making.                    BM 563                                             Cr. 3.0
Prerequisite: Management 502 or equivalent.                     International Business
Course Type(s): None                                            The nature of international business and the demographic,
                                                                geographic, financial, economic, political, legal, and cultur-
BM 520                                             Cr. 3.0      al factors affecting international business relationships.
Management Information Systems                                  Prerequisite: Management 502.
A survey of the concepts of management information sys-         Course Type(s): MBA.B, MBA.I
tems and the information needs of management. A user-




A8 Monmouth University
                                                                              Appendix A: Course Descriptions



BM 565                                            Cr. 3.0      agerial implications of this new and emerging phenome-
Management of Technology                                       non. The technological and business possibilities for com-
Study of the management of the technological innovation        merce using information technologies and networks will be
process and internal entrepreneurship; major topic areas       explored in terms of their value-adding potential to current
include: technology strategy, technological evolution,         business practices, as well as the development of new
strategic alliances, and new product development.              products and/or services. Also listed as Management 521.
Prerequisite: Management 502.                                  Prerequisites: Management 502 and Marketing 509.
Course Type(s): MBA.T                                          Course Type(s): None


BM 590                                            Cr. 3.0      BK 533                                             Cr. 3.0
Strategic Management                                           Marketing Research
A conceptual and capstone approach to business organiz-        Tools and techniques for conducting, evaluating, and uti-
ing and planning through seminars, case studies, and           lizing marketing research; decisions concerning pricing,
simulation of global enterprise; the formulation and imple-    promotion, personal selling, consumer behavior, and dis-
mentation of competitive strategy.                             tribution policies evolving from the research data.
Prerequisites: Accounting 541, Finance 511, Marketing          Prerequisites: Marketing 509 and Management 506.
509, Management 507 and 515, and either Management             Course Type(s): MBA.K
520, 521, or 565.
Course Type(s): None                                           BK 535                                             Cr. 3.0
                                                               International Marketing Management
BM 598                                            Cr. 3.0      Strategic planning and management of resources, includ-
Special Topics in Management                                   ing finished goods between nations, environmental fac-
Subject matter varies according to the interest of the stu-    tors, government controls, cultural influences, and social
dents and the professor teaching the course. The exact         and demographic factors.
nature of the topic covered is indicated in the student’s      Prerequisite: Marketing 509.
permanent record. Prerequisite: Management 502.                Course Type(s): MBA.I, MBA.K
Course Type(s): None
                                                               BK 539                                             Cr. 3.0
BM 599                                            Cr. 3.0      Promotional Strategy
Business Research: Management                                  Emphasis on promotional mix, including advertising, sales
Independent research in business administration in an          promotion, reseller stimulation, personal selling, and relat-
area not substantially treated in a regular course offering,   ed communication tools; covers fundamental marketing
under the supervision of a Business Administration faculty     issues and problems. Focus is on understanding and
member; written evaluation of the research required.           developing promotional decisions and marketing strategies.
Student must be within nine credits of graduation.             Prerequisite: Marketing 509.
Course Type(s): None                                           Course Type(s): MBA.K

BUSINESS - MARKETING                                           BK 540                                             Cr. 3.0
                                                               Consumer Behavior
BK 509                                            Cr. 3.0      An in-depth study of the various perspectives, theories,
                                                               and contributors to behavior displayed by consumers in
Marketing Management
                                                               the search, purchase, use, evaluation, and disposal of
An integrated approach to managing the business func-
                                                               economic goods and services including the decision
tion of marketing: planning, organizing, controlling, and
                                                               processes that precede and determine these acts.
measuring the total marketing effort; managerial principles
                                                               Prerequisite: Marketing 509.
and practices applied to the marketing process.
                                                               Course Type(s): MBA.K
Course Type(s): None

BK 521                                            Cr. 3.0      BK 541                                             Cr. 3.0
Seminar in Electronic Commerce                                 Advertising and Media Management
                                                               Current practices in advertising and media planning;
Provides an overview of the managerial side of E-com-
                                                               importance of the advertising campaign and the media
merce for the purpose of discussing the strategic and man-




                                                                                       Monmouth University A9
Appendix A: Course Descriptions



plan; emphasis on print media, broadcast media, out of          BR 530                                             Cr. 3.0
home advertising, and nonmedia advertising; examination         Real Estate Lease and Negotiations
of advertising campaigns and media plans. Emphasis will         Students will look at the commercial leasing of real estate,
be on planning, directing, creating, and controlling strate-    including statutory law, public policy, and landlord-tenant
gic advertising and media efforts to meet domestic and          relations, along with the role of the real estate broker.
global promotional and marketing goals.                         Course Type(s): None
Prerequisite: Marketing 509.
Course Type(s): MBA.K
                                                                BR 580                                             Cr. 3.0
                                                                Regulation and Real Estate Development Process
BK 598                                            Cr. 3.0       Real Estate Development analyzes the distinctive roles and
Special Topics in Marketing                                     perspectives of government and business in the land devel-
Subject matter varies according to the interest of the stu-     opment process. A step-by-step examination of the phases
dents and the professor. The exact nature of the topic          of a real estate development project from conceptualization
covered is indicated in the student’s permanent record.         to either disposition or lease-up that emphasizes both the
Course Type(s): None                                            management and approval aspects of those phases.
                                                                Course Type(s): None
BK 599                                            Cr. 3.0
Business Research                                               BR 598                                        Cr. 1.0-3.0
Independent research in Business Administration in an           Special Topics in Real Estate
area not substantially treated in a regular course offering,    Subject matter varies according to the interest of the stu-
under the supervision of a business administration faculty      dents and the professor. The exact nature of the topic
member; written evaluation of the research required.            covered is indicated in the student’s permanent record.
Student must be within nine credits of graduation.              Course Type(s): None
Course Type(s): None
                                                                BR 599                                             Cr. 3.0
BUSINESS – REAL ESTATE                                          Independent Study in Real Estate
                                                                Independent research in real estate in an area not sub-
BR 510                                            Cr. 3.0       stantially treated in a regular course offering, under the
Real Estate Law                                                 supervision of a Business Administration faculty member
Students will be introduced to the legal issues in the own-     and with the permission of the program director.
ership, transfer, and development of real property.             Course Type(s): None
Course Type(s): None
                                                                CHEMISTRY
BR 525                                            Cr. 3.0
Real Estate Analysis                                            CE 560                                             Cr. 3.0
Students gain insight into basic real-estate finance and        Chemistry and Physics in Elementary Education
valuation theory. Traditional approaches to value are           Discovery of the laws of chemistry and physics using
reviewed. Examination of personal and corporate real            commonly available materials and equipment. The accent
estate portfolio strategies. The analysis of specific types     is on cooperative learning and personal understanding.
of real properties are reviewed. This includes: single-fami-    Application of learned material will result in the creation of
ly homes, condominiums, shopping centers, and office            individual topic modules.
and industrial buildings. Also listed as Finance 525.           Prerequisite: Bachelor’s degree in a non-science field, or
Prerequisite: Finance 511.                                      permission of the instructor.
Course Type(s): None                                            Course Type(s): None

BR 527                                            Cr. 3.0       CE 598                                        Cr. 1.0-3.0
Real Estate Finance, Investment and Tax                         Special Topics in Chemistry
Designed to introduce students to the world of real-estate      The subject matter varies with the interest of the students
finance, including debt and equity issues and securitization.   and the professor teaching the course. The exact nature
Course Type(s): None                                            of the topic covered in any given semester is indicated in




A10 Monmouth University
                                                                                  Appendix A: Course Descriptions



the student’s transcript. For the course to count for credit       of study to guide future course and project selections.
toward a particular graduate program outside chemistry,            Course Type(s): None
prior permission of the chair of graduate studies in that
program must also be obtained.                                     CO 504                                             Cr. 3.0
Prerequisite: The equivalent of a Monmouth University bac-         Principles of Public Relations
calaureate minor in Chemistry or permission of the chair.          Explores the theoretical foundations and principles that
Course Type(s): None                                               encompass the field and practice of public relations. In
                                                                   addition to surveying relevant public relations communica-
COMMUNICATION                                                      tion theories, students will develop core competency skills
                                                                   in the creation and execution of strategies and tactics that
CO 500                                               Cr. 1.0       encompass comprehensive public relations campaigns.
Graduate Colloquium in Communication                               Course Type(s): LA
Required during the first year of graduate study, a basic
introduction to graduate study in communication is provid-         CO 505                                             Cr. 3.0
ed and enables the students to get to know their profes-           Interpersonal Communication
sors and the other students in the program. Basic                  An examination of the theories, models, elements, and
resources and research in process will be discussed.               processes of dyadic communication with emphasis on
Students finishing their program will do a presentation of         relationship development. The concepts, principles, and
their research projects.                                           practices of interpersonal communication will be applied
Course Type(s): None                                               to selected interpersonal contexts, such as first encoun-
                                                                   ters, marriage, family, friendship, professional, and busi-
CO 501                                               Cr. 3.0       ness settings.
Communication Theory                                               Course Type(s): LA
Introduces foundational ideas in the fields of human and
mass communication and the ways scholars have devel-               CO 506                                             Cr. 3.0
oped these through research. Highlights theories that              The Mass Media and Contemporary Values
apply to public service communication (social responsibili-        An analysis of the products of television, cinema, and the
ty, relationship building, etc.). Students learn to write liter-   print media as they relate to lifestyle, morality, and social
ature review exploring recognized branch of theory.                behavior in America. Such problems as individuality in a
Course Type(s): EN.RW, LA                                          mass society, the power of deity and religions, the decline
                                                                   of family, sexual behavior, and anti-intellectualism will be
CO 502                                               Cr. 3.0       explored within the framework of intensive media study.
Research Methods in Communication and                              Course Type(s): LA
Mass Media
Introduces commonly employed quantitative and qualita-             CO 507                                             Cr. 3.0
tive research techniques in communication as well as               Organizational Communication
research ethics. Students learn to design a research proj-         The study of the role and impact of communication in con-
ect, conduct pilot study, and write formal proposal.               temporary organizations and a survey of contemporary
Research for the public good will be emphasized.                   organizational research. Examination of how an organiza-
Course Type(s): LA                                                 tion’s structure, management philosophy, and internal cul-
                                                                   ture impact the flow of information, productivity, and goal
CO 503                                               Cr. 3.0       achievement of the organization and its members and
Graduate Foundations in Communication                              clients. Study of the communication processes in busi-
Introduces new students to the field of communication, its         ness, medical, educational, and nonprofit organizations.
history, branches and disciplines, emphasizing communi-            Course Type(s): None
cation for the public good. Assists students in meeting
demands of graduate study, using research resources,               CO 508                                             Cr. 3.0
and understanding departmental policies. Establishes               Executive Communication
public service objectives of the program. Introduces               A survey of the rhetorical principles that provide a basis
options for final thesis or project. Students create a plan        for the production and analysis of effective oral presenta-




                                                                                          Monmouth University A11
Appendix A: Course Descriptions



tion and impression management. Experience with the            lic relations plays in furthering the mission and goals of
preparation of messages that represent communication           nonprofit and non-government organizations (NGOs).
specialists. Speech writing, testimony preparation, and        Instruction focuses on using effective public relations
preparation for a variety of public communication chal-        techniques to gain support from different constituencies.
lenges are studied, and student presentation skills are        Course Type(s): TPS
honed in practice sessions.
Prerequisite: Communication 503.                               CO 523                                            Cr. 3.0
Course Type(s): LA, TPS                                        Persuasion, Social Influence
                                                               A study of the historical and contemporary theoretical
CO 509                                            Cr. 3.0      approaches and empirical research in the persuasive
Communication, Culture, and Community                          process. An examination of how information diffuses
Fosters an understanding of community as a communica-          throughout and affects a socio-cultural system. Attention
tion concept and explores the performance of community         focused on the emergence, maintenance, and change of
roles through civic engagement and democratic participa-       attitudes and values. Case study analysis and practicum
tion. Students will explore the nature of community, the       in social marketing.
impact of institutions in everyday life, the consequences      Prerequisite: Communication 503.
of individual, social, and global privilege, and the role of   Course Type(s): LA
personal responsibility in communities. Students test the
possibilities and problems of contemporary forms of com-       CO 524                                            Cr. 3.0
munity through a community-based service project.              Public Opinion and Media
Course Type(s): TPS                                            An examination of the shifting nature of public opinion,
                                                               the agenda-setting role of mass media, and the survey
CO 512                                            Cr. 3.0      methods that are employed to determine public opinion.
Intercultural Communication and                                The practices, values, and traditions of journalism that
Diversity Management                                           impact public opinion. Experience with the conduct of a
An examination of the cultural nature of communication         survey and analysis of case studies.
and the dynamics of face-to-face interaction between per-      Prerequisite: Communication 503.
sons from diverse cultures and co-cultures. Examining the      Course Type(s): None
challenge of managing a diverse organizational workforce
in a multicultural society and methods to increase organi-     CO 525                                            Cr. 3.0
zation members intercultural communication competence.         Political Communication
Prerequisite: Communication 503.                               The study of traditional and contemporary theories of
Course Type(s): LA, TPS                                        rhetoric as applied in research and analysis of political
                                                               campaigns. The rhetorical creation, maintenance, applica-
CO 514                                            Cr. 3.0      tion, and legitimization of symbolic power. A survey of
Conflict Management and Negotiation                            analytic models of political communication and application
Theory and research on the nature, causes, and resolu-         of the models to case studies. The role of the political
tion of interpersonal, group, and organizational conflict. A   communication specialist. Practicum in political communi-
comprehensive examination of conflict styles, techniques,      cation strategies and techniques. Also listed as Political
and methods of resolution of conflicts. Emphasis is            Science 525.
placed on information sharing, effective listening, problem    Prerequisite: Communication 503.
solving, mediation, and negotiation as tools for conflict      Course Type(s): None
management.
Prerequisite: Communication 503.                               CO 526                                            Cr. 3.0
Course Type(s): LA, TPS                                        Advanced Public Relations Planning
                                                               Explores advanced theoretical foundations and principles
CO 516                                            Cr. 3.0      demanded of public relations professionals working with
Public Relations and Fundraising for Nonprofits                corporations, for-profit entities and non-profit organiza-
Through case study analysis, practical assignments, and        tions. In addition to surveying relevant public relations
examination of key public relations theories, this course      communication theories, students will develop advanced
provides an understanding of the important role that pub-      competency skills required to plan and execute compre-




A12 Monmouth University
                                                                              Appendix A: Course Descriptions



hensive public relations campaigns. Also examines the         CO 540                                                 Cr. 3.0
dynamics of the evolving approach to integrated market-       Organizational Training and Consulting
ing communication that currently dominates the field and      A survey of adult-learning theory, needs assessment,
practice of public relations.                                 training techniques, and evaluation as applied to commu-
Prerequisite: Communication 503.                              nication training. Planning and implementing training pro-
Course Type(s): None                                          grams that serve real organizational needs. The role and
                                                              ethical standards of the communication professional serv-
CO 527                                           Cr. 3.0      ing as a communication specialist or counsel to an organ-
Crisis and Issues Management                                  ization. The completion of a practicum project in training
Advanced public relations theory and practices dealing        or development.
with management of organizational crisis and issues. The      Prerequisite: Communication 503.
process of research, analysis, planning, and implementa-      Course Type(s): None
tion of crisis management will be explored. The role of the
public relations professional in the development of crisis    CO 590                                           Cr. 1.0-3.0
communication strategies and tactics will be examined.        Special Problems
Control of crisis, rumor, public perception, corporate        For students capable of developing and pursuing a prob-
image, and reputation will be emphasized. Case studies,       lem independently through research, conferences, and
simulations, group exercises, and projects will be used to    activities. Problem chosen by the student with the con-
develop skills in crisis and issues management.               sent of the graduate program director and supervision of
Prerequisite: Communication 503.                              a graduate professor. To be approved, this independent
Course Type(s): None                                          study must target a problem that relates to the nature of
                                                              the student’s graduate program focus. May be taken for
CO 530                                           Cr. 3.0      one, two, or three credits and repeated in subsequent
Mass Media, Public Interest, Corporation Profit               semesters until three credits are earned. Does not substi-
Undertakes a critical examination of the relationship         tute for Communication 599.
between the citizens of the United States, the increasingly   Prerequisite: Communication 503.
corporate, electronic mass media, and American laws and       Course Type(s): None
policies that attempt to regulate it. Students will gain an
understanding of the historical context behind the contem-    CO 598                                           Cr. 1.0-3.0
porary media policy environment and will examine the          Special Topics in Communication
challenge faced by citizens, regulators, and broadcasters     Subject matter varies with the interests of the students
in determining how the media should operate in the public     and the professor. Intensive study of such topics in com-
interest. Prerequisite: Communication 503.                    munication processes as gender relations, small group
Course Type(s): None                                          communication and decision making, leadership commu-
                                                              nication, film and video criticism, telecommunication tech-
CO 532                                           Cr. 3.0      nology, and legal communication.
Global Media and New Technologies                             Prerequisite: Communication 503.
An examination of the interlinked world of international      Course Type(s): LA
mass media systems and media technologies; how soci-
eties and nations are both connected and divided by com-      CO 599                                                 Cr. 3.0
munication methods, technologies, national and interna-       Independent Study in Communication
tional policies, and cultural expression. Students will       Guided research in selected topics in Communication.
examine the variety of models of electronic media around      Prior permission of the directing professor and depart-
the globe and investigate the influence of national and       ment chair is required.
international policy decisions on sovereign nations and       Course Type(s): None
indigenous culture, particularly in light of the constant
advances of emerging media technologies. Prerequisite:
Communication 503.
                                                              CO 691                                                 Cr. 3.0
Course Type(s): LA                                            Communication Thesis Proposal
                                                              A two-semester sequence of an independent research
                                                              study in consultation with a faculty thesis advisor. In this first




                                                                                       Monmouth University A13
Appendix A: Course Descriptions



semester, the student will select an area of communication       Upon completion of the project, the student is required to
research and develop a thesis proposal. The completed 10-        defend the project before a faculty committee and to
15 page proposal will include a research question or             make a presentation in Communication 500 Graduate
hypothesis, rationale for study, literature review, methodolo-   Colloquium. Prerequisites: Communication 693 and per-
gy, and (if applicable) approval from the Institutional Review   mission of the faculty project advisor.
Board for research involving human participants.                 Course Type(s): None
Prerequisites: Communication 501, 502, 503 and comple-
tion of 9 graduate level communication credits (or approved      CO COL                                           Cr. 1.0
equivalent), and permission of the faculty thesis advisor.       Colloquium in Communication
Course Type(s): None                                             Required in first semester of graduate study. Department
                                                                 faculty will present their areas of research and graduate
CO 692                                             Cr. 3.0       courses they teach. Students network with other students,
Communication Thesis II                                          professors, and speakers from various branches of the
A two-semester sequence of an independent research               field of communication. Graduating students present their
study in consultation with a faculty thesis advisor. In the      research in this forum. (One section required)
second semester, the student will complete work to exe-          Course Type(s): None
cute the thesis proposal from Communication 691. The
completed 25-30 page thesis will include a research              CO CPE                                           Cr. 0.0
question or hypothesis, rationale for study, literature          Communication Comprehensive Exam
review, methodology, results, discussion, conclusion,            Communication Comprehensive Exam
complete bibliography, and appropriate appendices. Upon          Course Type(s): None
completion of the study, the student is required to defend
the thesis before a faculty committee and to make a pres-
entation in Communication 500, Graduate Colloquium.
                                                                 COMPUTER SCIENCE
Prerequisite: Communication 691.
Course Type(s): None                                             CS 501A                                          Cr. 3.0
                                                                 Computer Programming Essentials
CO 693                                             Cr. 3.0       An introduction in computer programming for newly admit-
                                                                 ted graduate students. Students will learn basic concepts
Communication Project Proposal
                                                                 in modern computer programming. Students will complete
A two-semester sequence of an independent professional
                                                                 all the programming exercises and assignments in the
project in consultation with a faculty project advisor. In the
                                                                 modern objected-oriented language. Limited to graduate
first semester, the student will review relevant trade and
                                                                 students in Computer Science or Software Engineering.
scholarly literature and conduct research leading to the
                                                                 Prerequisite: Permission of the department chair.
development of a project proposal. The student must
                                                                 Course Type(s): TPS
receive approval of the project advisor based on a
demonstration of his or her pre-existing competence with
media message construction.                                      CS 501B                                          Cr. 3.0
Prerequisites: Communication 501, 502, 503 and comple-           Program Development
tion of nine graduate level communication credits.               Continuation at the coverage of the same modern object-
Course Type(s): None                                             oriented language introduced in CS 501A. More
                                                                 advanced object-oriented design, including inheritance
CO 694                                             Cr. 3.0       and polymorphism. Limited to Computer Science or
                                                                 Software Engineering majors.
Communication Project
                                                                 Prerequisite: Computer Science 501A, passed with a
A two-semester sequence of an independent professional
                                                                 grade of B- or higher.
project in consultation with a faculty project advisor. In the
                                                                 Course Type(s): None
second semester the student will complete work to exe-
cute the project proposal from Communication 693. The
project requires the production and execution of a profes-       CS 502                                           Cr. 3.0
sional-quality media message of significant length and           Theoretical Foundations of Computer Science
value for a public service organization as well as a well-       Concepts, methods, models, and associated computer
researched paper documenting and justifying the process.         exercises for important topics in discrete mathematics




A14 Monmouth University
                                                                              Appendix A: Course Descriptions



and probability. Includes: logic and mathematical reason-       M.S. program in Computer Science.
ing, functions, sets, summations, asymptotic notation,          Course Type(s): None
algorithms and complexity, number theory, cryptography,
matrix algebra, induction and recursion, counting tech-         CS 512                                           Cr. 3.0
niques, combinatorial objects, discrete structures, discrete    Algorithm Design
probability theory, relations, graph theory, moments, ran-      Design and analysis of algorithms; dependence of algo-
dom variables, and graph algorithms. Limited to                 rithm efficiency on data structure choice; correctness of
Computer Science majors.                                        algorithm implementation and basic design techniques
Course Type(s): None                                            and their applications to programming with fundamental
                                                                data structures.
CS 503                                             Cr. 3.0      Prerequisites: Computer Science 502 and 503, both
Data Structures and Algorithms                                  passed with a grade of B- or higher.
Design and implementation of fundamental data struc-            Course Type(s): None
tures and algorithms, including: linked lists, hashing, sort-
ing, trees, stacks, queues, sets and bags, and recursion.       CS 514                                           Cr. 3.0
Application to problem solving and object-oriented design       Networks
of moderate sized programs.                                     This is an introductory-level course on the hierarchy of
Prerequisite: Computer Science 501B, passed with a              networking software and hardware. Particular emphasis on
grade of B- or higher.                                          medium Access Control, Network layer, Transport layer,
Course Type(s): None                                            and Session layer. Several MAC-layer protocols, TCP/IP.
                                                                Corequisite: Computer Science 502.
CS 505                                             Cr. 3.0      Course Type(s): None
Operating Systems Concepts
The basic concepts of operating systems from the point of       CS 515                                           Cr. 3.0
view of an advanced user: the interaction of the kernel,        Formal Methods
the command interpreter, and user processes. Focus is           The use of formal specifications to describe the behavior
on process and resource management, concurrency con-            of computer systems and the use of formal proof methods
trol, and inter-process communication. Examples and             to verify design.
projects are based mainly on Unix. The course also              Prerequisite: Computer Science 509, passed with a grade
includes an introduction to computer architecture from an       of B- or higher.
operating-systems perspective (processors, devices,             Course Type(s): None
interrupts, clocks, etc.).
Prerequisites: Computer Science 503 and 509, both
passed with a grade of B- or higher.                            CS 517                                           Cr. 3.0
Course Type(s): None                                            Database Design and Management
                                                                Introduction to database systems, data modeling, design
                                                                theory and methodologies, query languages and query pro-
CS 509                                             Cr. 3.0      cessing. Coverage of relational database model and design,
Advanced Object-Oriented Programming and Design                 normalization process, SQL, hands-on database design and
Object-oriented programming and design, using a lan-            application development. Prerequisite: Computer Science
guage different from that used in CS 501B. Used in class-       503, passed with a grade of B- or higher.
es, inheritance, polymorphism, and libraries.                   Course Type(s): None
Prerequisite: Computer Science 501B, passed with a
grade of B- or higher.
Course Type(s): None                                            CS 518                                           Cr. 3.0
                                                                Fundamentals of Computer Security
CS 511                                             Cr. 3.0      and Cryptography
                                                                An introduction to computer security and its related
Technical Communication                                         issues, including cryptography. It covers threats assess-
Preparation, analysis, synthesis, and presentation of sys-
                                                                ment, security policies, basic cryptography, security
tem documentation, technical papers, and data flow dia-
                                                                mechanisms, and assurance. Also includes several case
grams; literature search.
                                                                studies on enhancing the security level of specific sys-
Prerequisite: Open only to those students accepted in the




                                                                                      Monmouth University A15
Appendix A: Course Descriptions



tems by integrating different security mechanisms and          Prerequisites: Computer Science 517 and 520, both
techniques. Both theoretical and practical issues are          passed with a grade of B- or higher.
addressed in the course. Students who complete this            Course Type(s): None
course successfully will be capable of assessing the
threats, enhancing the security, and evaluating the assur-     CS 523                                             Cr. 3.0
ance level of specific computer systems.                       Networked Information Systems
Prerequisites: Computer Science 503 and 514, both              Basic principles, techniques, and tools for building networked
passed with a grade of B- or higher.                           information systems with a significant database component.
Course Type(s): None                                           Current protocols, languages, and data formats.
                                                               Prerequisites: Computer Science 505 and 517, both
CS 519                                            Cr. 3.0      passed with a grade of B- or higher.
Advanced Operating Systems                                     Course Type(s): None
Advanced operating systems with a number of case stud-
ies. Emphasis is placed on issues in both centralized and      CS 525                                             Cr. 3.0
distributed operating systems (concurrency control,            Simulation
resource management, file systems, network interface).         Formal models of discrete event systems, computer simu-
Flavored with UNIX; some prior knowledge of C will be an       lation of models, and analysis of simulation results.
asset, but is not necessary.                                   Discrete event simulation is applied to studying the per-
Prerequisites: Computer Science 505 and 509, both              formance of computer and communication systems.
passed with a grade of B- or higher.                           Object-oriented design and programming in C++.
Course Type(s): None                                           Prerequisites: Computer Science 502, 503, and 514, both
                                                               passed with a grade of B- or higher.
CS 520                                            Cr. 3.0      Course Type(s): None
Introduction to Intelligent Systems
Introduction to methods and algorithms used to incorpo-        CS 526                                             Cr. 3.0
rate intelligence into computer programs. Topics include       Performance Evaluation
search techniques, representation and reasoning, and           The role of performance evaluation in the product lifecy-
machine learning. Applications of these methods are            cle. Introduction to Markov chains and elementary queu-
stressed. Also covers implementation of some of the fun-       ing theory; complementary roles of analytic and simula-
damental algorithms.                                           tion methods and applications to performance evaluation
Prerequisites: Computer Science 502 and 503, both              of computer and communication systems.
passed with a grade of B- or higher.                           Prerequisites: Computer Science 501B, 502, and 514, all
Course Type(s): None                                           passed with a grade of B- or higher.
                                                               Course Type(s): None
CS 521                                            Cr. 3.0
Artificial Intelligence                                        CS 528                                             Cr. 3.0
Basic and advanced methods in symbolic and quantitative        Database and Transactions Security
artificial intelligence through Lisp programming tech-         An overview of the methodologies to protect data. It cov-
niques. Current issues concerning rule-based vs. statisti-     ers both traditional and emerging security mechanisms
cal methods via applications.                                  and services, as well as the common threats and vulnera-
Prerequisites: Computer Science 503 and 520, both              bilities of database and transaction processing systems.
passed with a grade of B- or higher.                           The topics include: discretionary and mandatory access
Course Type(s): None                                           controls in database systems, secure database design,
                                                               data integrity, secure transaction processing, inference
CS 522                                            Cr. 3.0      controls, and auditing. Also covers security models for
Knowledge Fusion                                               relational and object-oriented databases, and security of
Fundamental techniques for integrating information from het-   databases in a distributed environment. Both theoretical
erogeneous sources to obtain actionable knowledge. The         and practical issues will be addressed in the course.
sources of information include databases, files, and web       Prerequisites: Computer Science 517 and 518, both
pages. Covered techniques include both those based upon        passed with a grade of B- or higher.
logic and also approaches based on probabilistic reasoning.    Course Type(s): None




A16 Monmouth University
                                                                          Appendix A: Course Descriptions



CS 529                                          Cr. 3.0     CS 535                                           Cr. 3.0
Web Services and .NET                                       Telecommunications
Introduction to web services. Theoretical and practical     In-depth coverage of the lower layers of the network hier-
coverage of client-server architecture, communication       archy: Physical layer, Data Link layer, Network layer, and
protocols, messaging, including XML and SOAP transac-       Transport layer.
tions. .NET Framework architecture is used for the appli-   Prerequisites: Computer Science 502, 505, and 514, all
cations. We contrast with other platforms, e.g. Java-       passed with a grade of B- or higher.
based web services. Students implement web services         Course Type(s): None
and simple clients on PC’s or mobile devices.
Prerequisite: Computer Science 503 passed with a grade      CS 537                                           Cr. 3.0
of B- or higher.                                            Client-Server Interfaces
Course Type(s): None                                        Design of client-server systems. This is a project-dominat-
                                                            ed course. Students from the AI stream will design and
CS 530                                          Cr. 3.0     implement a distributed client-server system for some AI
Knowledge-Based Systems                                     application, while students from the COMPUTER NET-
Fundamental techniques in building knowledge-based sys-     WORKS stream will be more involved in Transport layer
tems using logic programming technology; applications of    issues. Coverage of the higher layers of the network hier-
knowledge-based systems; prolog programming tech-           archy: Transport layer, Session layer, and Application
niques; using advanced Prolog programming environments.     layer. Programming with TCP and UDP.
Prerequisites: Computer Science 502 and 509, both           Prerequisites: Computer Science 505, 509, and 514, all
passed with a grade of B- or higher.                        passed with a grade of B- or higher.
Course Type(s): None                                        Course Type(s): None

CS 531                                          Cr. 3.0     CS 540                                           Cr. 3.0
Intelligent Interfaces                                      Model Building and Algorithms
Computer-human interfaces that use speech understand-       Solving real-world problems requires skills in model-build-
ing and image processing (such as handwriting).             ing, model-selection and the application of appropriate
Prerequisites: Computer Science 503 and 520, both           algorithms. The applicable field of knowledge is basically
passed with a grade of B- or higher.                        Operations Research (OR). We discuss optimization (lin-
Course Type(s): None                                        ear/integer programming, branch and bound, game theo-
                                                            ry), network and queuing models, and algorithms that
CS 532                                          Cr. 3.0     may be applied in the solution of many practical problems
Compiler Design                                             arising, for example, in business, government, and private
The major techniques used in compiler writing, lexical      settings. Prerequisites: Computer Science 502, 503, and
analysis, syntax analysis, storage management, error        514, all passed with a grade of B- or higher.
detection and recovery, and code generation. Tools for      Course Type(s): None
compiler writing (LEX, YACC, etc.).
Prerequisite: Computer Science 512, passed with a grade     CS 545                                           Cr. 3.0
of B- or higher.                                            Graphics
Course Type(s): None                                        Drawing with a graphics kernel, 2D and 3D transforma-
                                                            tions, view transformation, area filling, line and polygon
CS 533                                          Cr. 3.0     clipping, hidden surface algorithms, curves and surfaces,
Database System Implementation                              Gouraud and Phong shading, pattern and texture map-
DBMS architecture, data storage and indexing, query pro-    ping, fractals, and rendering using a ray-tracer.
cessing and optimization, transaction management and        Prerequisite: Computer Science 509, passed with a grade
recovery, and some issues related to advanced database      of B- or higher.
applications. Prerequisites: Computer Science 502 and       Course Type(s): None
503, both passed with a grade of B- or higher.
Course Type(s): None




                                                                                  Monmouth University A17
Appendix A: Course Descriptions



CS 550                                            Cr. 3.0      the topic covered in any given semester is indicated in
Computer System Architecture                                   the student’s transcript.
Computer system interconnection structures, central pro-       Prerequisites: Computer Science 502 and 503, both
cessing unit, control unit, microprogrammed control, memo-     passed with a grade of B- or higher.
ry organization, cache and virtual memory, computer arith-     Course Type(s): None
metic, RISC processors, introduction to parallel processing,
and case studies. Prerequisites: Computer Science 502          CS 618                                            Cr. 3.0
and 503, both passed with a grade of B- or higher.             Data Mining
Course Type(s): None                                           An introduction to the fundamental concepts, algorithms,
                                                               and techniques of data mining. Topics include: data pre-
CS 551                                            Cr. 3.0      processing, classification algorithms and techniques,
Parallel Processing                                            anomaly detection, and the design of data warehousing
Parallel computer paradigms, parallel processing applica-      and OLAP systems.
tion, conditions of parallelism, scalable computer plat-       Prerequisites: Computer Science 517, 520, and 533, all
forms, parallelism issues, performance metrics and             passed with a grade of B- or higher.
benchmarking, speedup performance laws for parallel            Course Type(s): None
systems, parallel memory organization, interconnection
networks, multiprocessing and multiprocessors, multicom-       CS 625                                            Cr. 3.0
puters, massively parallel systems, mapping applications       Internet Crawler
to parallel systems, and case studies.                         In-depth coverage of the crawler component of modern
Prerequisite: Computer Science 550, passed with a grade        search engine. Examination of the architecture of
of B- or higher.                                               crawlers; algorithms for visitation, retrieval and processing
Course Type(s): None                                           of Web pages; link analysis, (e.g. PageRank computa-
                                                               tion). Coverage of ethical and legal issues of customized
CS 560                                            Cr. 3.0      Web robots. Students build automatic internet crawlers.
Master’s Seminar                                               Prerequisite: Computer Science 529 passed with a grade
Emphasis on preparation, analysis, synthesis, and pres-        of B- or higher.
entation of software system documentation, project             Course Type(s): None
progress reports, and technical papers based on literature
research. Prerequisite: Completion of 21 credits toward        CS 627                                            Cr. 3.0
the M.S. degree, including four core courses, or permis-       Quantitative Systems Engineering
sion of the instructor.                                        Development of methods and techniques for analyzing
Course Type(s): None                                           the performance of complex systems. Application to the
                                                               performance engineering of computer/communications
CS 588                                            Cr. 1.0      systems, including distributed computing/information sys-
Computer Science Practice and Experiences                      tems and integrated telecommunications.
Provides opportunity for Computer Science graduate stu-        Prerequisite: Computer Science 526, passed with a grade
dents to obtain related experience in employment at a          of B- or higher.
local company or institution with Monmouth University          Course Type(s): None
sponsorship. Available to Computer Science graduate stu-
dents who have completed at least 18 credit hours of           CS 628                                            Cr. 3.0
graduate courses (500 level), with a minimum GPA of            Security of E-Systems and Networks
3.00. Does not satisfy elective requirements. Students         The fundamental techniques in security of e-based
may take the course a maximum of two times.                    Systems and Computer Networks. E-based systems are
Course Type(s): None                                           ubiquitous in the modern world with applications spanning
                                                               e-commerce, e-government, e-services, Virtual Private
CS 598                                            Cr. 3.0      Networks (VPNs), health care, and government organiza-
Special Topics in Computer Science                             tions. Deals with the fundamental concepts and tools of
Subject matter varies with the interest of the students and    security of e-based systems and computer networks and
of the professor teaching the course. The exact nature of      its range of applications. Among the topics to be covered
                                                               include: authentication of users, system integrity, confi-




A18 Monmouth University
                                                                              Appendix A: Course Descriptions



dentiality of communication, availability of business serv-    research in collaboration with, or under the supervision of,
ice, non-repudiation of transactions, public key cryptosys-    a faculty member. Sequential registration of one or more
tems, authentication and digital signature, e-security tools   credits is required until successful completion. (Minimum
such as Public Key Infrastructure (PKI) systems, biomet-       of six credits must be accumulated.)
ric-based security systems, trust management systems in        Prerequisites: Completion of all foundation and core
communication networks, intrusion detection systems,           courses and departmental approval.
protecting against malware, and computer network securi-       Course Type(s): None
ty risk management. Intended for graduate students in
computer science, software engineering, and electrical         CS 692                                            Cr. 3.0
engineering who have some background in computer net-          Computer Science Thesis II
works and fundamentals of computer security.                   Independent investigation of special topics reflecting the
Prerequisite: Computer Science 518, passed with a grade        research interests of the sponsoring professor. Provides
of B- or higher.                                               students with an opportunity to do extended relevant
Course Type(s): None                                           research in collaboration with, or under the supervision of,
                                                               a faculty member. Sequential registration of one or more
CS 635                                            Cr. 3.0      credits is required until successful completion. (Minimum
Wireless Network Systems and Security                          of six credits must be accumulated.)
Fundamental techniques in the design, operation, per-          Prerequisite: Computer Science 691.
formance evaluation, and security of wireless network          Course Type(s): None
systems. Among the topics covered are first, second,
third, and fourth generation wireless systems, cellular        CS 698                                            Cr. 3.0
wireless networks, medium access techniques, physical          Advanced Special Topics
layer, protocols (AMPS, IS-95, IS-136, GSM, GPRS,              The advanced subject matter varies with the interest of
EDGE, WCDMA, cdma2000, etc), fixed wireless systems,           the students and of the professor. The full syllabus for a
personal area networks (PANs) including Bluetooth and          specific offering will be filed with the STE and Graduate
Home RF systems, wireless local area networks (WLANs)          School Deans when it is scheduled. The exact nature of
technologies, architectures, protocols, and standards, and     the topic covered in any given semester is indicated in
advanced topics. Security of WLANs, wireless sensor net-       the student’s transcript.
works (WSNs), cellular systems, and Bluetooth and Home         Prerequisites: Computer Science 502, 503, one core and
RF networks will be dealt with as well. intended for gradu-    one 521+ level course, as per course syllabus, all passed
ate students in computer science, software engineering,        with a grade of B- or higher.
and electrical engineering who have some background in         Course Type(s): None
computer networks.
Prerequisite: Computer Science 514, passed with a grade
of B- or higher.                                               CS 699                                            Cr. 3.0
Course Type(s): None                                           Independent Study in Computer Science
                                                               Independent study of a subject not substantially treated in
                                                               a regular graduate course. Designed for students with
CS 661                                            Cr. 3.0      superior abilities who, with guidance and direction from
Computer Science Advanced Project                              the supervising faculty member, can master a new sub-
A challenging project, such as the development of a large,     ject. (Limited to students who have not yet taken
complex program, done under the supervision of a faculty       Computer Science 699.)
member.                                                        Prerequisites: A minimum GPA of 3.50; completion of all
Prerequisites: Completion of all foundation and core           foundation and core courses and departmental approval.
courses and departmental approval.                             Course Type(s): None
Course Type(s): None

CS 691                                            Cr. 3.0
Computer Science Thesis I
Independent investigation of special topics reflecting the
research interests of the sponsoring professor. Provides
students with an opportunity to do extended relevant




                                                                                     Monmouth University A19
Appendix A: Course Descriptions



CRIMINAL JUSTICE                                               CJ 515                                             Cr. 3.0
                                                               Institutional Treatment of the Offender
CJ 500                                            Cr. 3.0      Provides the theoretical framework for the understanding of
Theories and Methods of Geographic Information                 criminal behavior and the strategies employed in providing
Systems                                                        treatment and support services to the inmate. Focuses on
This course provides students with a solid foundation in       techniques designed to facilitate the development of alter-
the theories and methods of Geographic Information             native behaviors. Attention will be given to problems that
Systems. Students gain knowledge of important applica-         are especially relevant to penal institutions, e.g. violence,
tions, as well as acquisition, accuracy, formatting man-       racial discord, sexual assault, and theories of punishment.
agement, analysis, and manipulation of data. When stu-         Course Type(s): None
dents complete this course, they are expected to know
what GIS is, what GIS can and cannot do, how data is           CJ 525                                             Cr. 3.0
stored, and how data in GIS is manipulated and analyzed        Applied Data Analysis in Criminal Justice
to satisfy a project’s goals.                                  The examination, interpretation, and application of social
Course Type(s): None                                           statistical concepts in criminal justice; computerized data
                                                               analysis techniques.
CJ 502                                            Cr. 3.0      Course Type(s): None
Advanced Criminology
Professionals interested in the criminal justice system        CJ 530                                             Cr. 3.0
require a foundation in the criminological theories that       Criminal Justice Policy
underlie criminal behavior and rehabilitation. Provides the    The examination of opposing viewpoints on complex and
student with an opportunity to study and critically evaluate   sensitive issues in criminal justice. Emphasis on providing
prominent criminological theories presented in the read-       students with the ability to develop basic thinking skills and
ings and research. Lectures emphasize the role of psy-         assisting students in evaluating sources of information.
chological principles, theories of learning, techniques of     Course Type(s): None
counseling, and psychopathology in the context of crimi-
nological theory on rehabilitation programs and on policy      CJ 535                                             Cr. 3.0
development. Also serves as a context for other graduate       Evaluation Strategies for Criminal Justice
courses that pertain to the prison system and institutional    Formulation of research problems and hypotheses; quan-
treatment of offenders.                                        titative research designs; data collection strategies; data
Course Type(s): None                                           analysis methods.
                                                               Course Type(s): LA
CJ 510                                            Cr. 3.0
The American Penal System                                      CJ 540                                             Cr. 3.0
Examines the history, philosophy, and organizational           Spatial Analysis and Modeling in Geographic
structure of correctional systems in the United States,
                                                               Information Systems
analyzing the various models of incarceration as they
                                                               Focuses on methods of spatial analysis and various kinds
relate to punishment and rehabilitation.
                                                               of modeling within GIS. Included are such topics as: 3-D
Course Type(s): None
                                                               terrain visualization and analysis, location and network
                                                               modeling, map algebra, and spatial statistics.
CJ 512                                            Cr. 3.0      Course Type(s): None
Psychopathology
Advanced abnormal psychology; intensive investigation of       CJ 542                                             Cr. 3.0
current thinking regarding the etiology and development
                                                               Computer Application in Criminal Justice
of aberrant behavior; theory in the light of experimental
                                                               Introduces computer basics, information system, and the
findings and clinical applications.
                                                               Internet. Students will use several management-related
Course Type(s): None
                                                               applications, including spreadsheets, database, employee
                                                               performance evaluations, and statistical analysis programs
                                                               to develop an integrated database management system.
                                                               Course Type(s): None




A20 Monmouth University
                                                                             Appendix A: Course Descriptions



CJ 545                                            Cr. 3.0     tunities will be an integral component of this course.
Seminar: Ethics, Law, and Society                             Course Type(s): None
Probes ethical issues that arise throughout the criminal
justice system. Students will examine the fundamental         CJ 565                                            Cr. 3.0
meaning of justice, explore approaches to moral reason-       Comparative Criminal Justice Systems
ing, and investigate issues such as the use of discretion,    Compares and contrasts the main similarities and differ-
capital punishment, prisoners’ rights, and other ethics of    ences among the major criminal justice systems in the
criminal justice research.                                    world, including the civil law, common law, socialist law,
Course Type(s): None                                          and Islamic law families.
                                                              Course Type(s): None
CJ 550                                            Cr. 3.0
Seminar: Police Administration                                CJ 572                                            Cr. 3.0
Examines the tasks and roles of police administrators for     Civil Rights and Liberties
effective and efficient police operations. Police organiza-   An examination of the Bill of Rights in contemporary
tion, policies, and rules will be analyzed for their impact   America. The seminar analyzes the conflicting group
on the delivery of police services.                           interests, which advise around issues such as freedom of
Course Type(s): None                                          speech and assembly, church-state relations, and equal
                                                              treatment before the law for members of minority groups.
CJ 552                                            Cr. 3.0     Course Type(s): None
Computer Crime
Understanding the nature of computer crime and the            CJ 575                                            Cr. 3.0
basic principles of technology in order to provide a foun-    Professionalism in Criminal Justice
dation for criminal investigation.                            An examination of major changes in politics, professional-
Course Type(s): None                                          ism, and public order in society. Emphasis is on policing,
                                                              criminal justice education, corrections, and jail manage-
CJ 555                                            Cr. 3.0     ment issues and examining the progress of, and obstacles
Criminal Procedure and Constitution                           to, improving training and split-second decision making.
A multidisciplinary examination of the major stages of the    Course Type(s): None
criminal process from arrest to trial. The course explores
the effectiveness of criminal procedure, the Constitution,    CJ 585                                            Cr. 3.0
and the law in relationship to crime.                         Forensic Pathology
Course Type(s): None                                          Designed to introduce students to concepts of forensic
                                                              pathology with an emphasis on the recognition and inter-
CJ 560                                            Cr. 3.0     pretation of diseases and injuries in the human body that
Seminar: Leadership and Management                            are the basis for medicolegal investigations. It presents
Examines the role of leader or visionary in analyzing and     an overview of the medicolegal investigative systems and
improving organizational operations in the criminal justice   the substance and mechanics of forensic pathology. The
system. Emphasis is on the ability to assess and solve        medical examiner, usually the pathologist, is primarily
the complex problems facing criminal justice in the twen-     concerned with the investigation of violent, sudden, unex-
ty-first century.                                             pected, and suspicious deaths. The medical examiner
Course Type(s): None                                          determines the cause and manner of death, identifies the
                                                              deceased if unknown, determines the approximate time of
                                                              injury and death, collects evidence from the body, issues
CJ 562                                            Cr. 3.0     a death certificate, and documents these events through
Graduate Criminal Justice Internship                          an official autopsy report.
Provides the student an opportunity to integrate academic     Course Type(s): None
theory with experiential learning. Each student will have
an opportunity to focus on areas specific to his/her career
objectives. Intern students will evaluate principles of the
criminal justice system through on-site participation at an
approved criminal justice agency. Executive writing oppor-




                                                                                    Monmouth University A21
Appendix A: Course Descriptions



CJ 590                                             Cr. 3.0      CJ 610                                              Cr. 3.0
Internship in Crime Mapping                                     Introduction to Homeland Security:
Internship and seminar providing capstone experience for        Principles and Policies
the Crime Mapping Certificate and M.A. in Criminal              Overview of homeland security basic management con-
Justice/Crime Mapping Concentration.                            cepts, issues contributing to terroristic acts and critical
Course Type(s): None                                            analysis of terrorist activities.
                                                                Course Type(s): None
CJ 595                                             Cr. 3.0
Geographic Information Systems, Crime Mapping,                  CJ 615                                              Cr. 3.0
and Analysis                                                    Terrorism: Crisis and Trauma
Incorporates GIS into criminal justice by including the use     Explore the psychological impact of terrorism, including
of crime mapping and analysis in problem solving. Takes         psychiatric disorders, physiological changes, and
a hands-on approach to many of the issues a criminal            social/family disruption. Strategies and techniques for iden-
justice manager, officer, or crime analyst will face in pur-    tifying trauma and skill for intervention will be discussed.
suit of his/her work. Facilitates students’ understanding of    Course Type(s): None
GIS and crime mapping theories, principles, concepts,
and the software. Upon completion of the course, stu-           CJ 620                                              Cr. 3.0
dents will have developed two projects as part of their         Terrorism: Causes and Consequences-
portfolio: one in crime mapping implementation and one
                                                                The Unconventional Threat
in project design and analysis within their particular topic
                                                                Provides students with an in-depth examination of the
of study.
                                                                unconventional threat of terrorism and its impact on the
Prerequisite: Criminal Justice 500.
                                                                Homeland Security enterprise by exploring the overall phe-
Course Type(s): LA
                                                                nomena of terrorism as well as the complex motivations,
                                                                ideologies, goals and tactics of various domestic and inter-
CJ 598                                       Cr. 1.0-3.0        national groups. Cultural, religious and economic influ-
Special Topics in Criminal Justice                              ences on terrorism, and media impact, will be considered.
Subject matter varies with the interest of the students and     Students will analyze these groups in light of historical,
the professor. The exact nature of the topic covered in         contemporary and potential future acts of terrorism in order
any given semester is indicated in the student’s transcript.    to understand the causes, consequences, and impact ter-
Permission of the program director is required.                 rorism has on our society. Balances out topical issues relat-
Course Type(s): None                                            ed to state terrorism, political terrorism, religious and apoc-
                                                                alyptic violence, the media and terrorism, weapons of mass
CJ 599                                             Cr. 3.0      destruction, terrorist tactics and targeting, and the opera-
Independent Study in Criminal Justice                           tional and organizational dynamics of terrorism.
Development and execution of a relevant reading and             Course Type(s): None
research project leading to significant written work
designed by the student in consultation with the profes-        CJ 625                                              Cr. 3.0
sor. The subject chosen for study should be related with        Terroristic Crime Scene Investigation
any area of Criminal Justice of special interest for the stu-   Utilizing modern investigative technology in terroristic
dent. Students applying for this course must demonstrate        crime scenes; specialized evidence collection; role of
their knowledge of research techniques and their abilities      crime scene manager.
to apply them to the specific area of studies chosen. It is     Course Type(s): None
also required that the student should be able to present
the results of his/her research in appropriate written and      CJ 630                                              Cr. 3.0
oral form.
                                                                Intelligence for the Homeland Security Practitioner
Course Type(s): None
                                                                Acquaints students with the concepts and practices
                                                                involved in the process of collecting, analyzing and evalu-
                                                                ating intelligence and in managing the intelligence func-
                                                                tion, as well as the influence of intelligence in shaping
                                                                homeland security decision making at the federal, state




A22 Monmouth University
                                                                               Appendix A: Course Descriptions



and local levels. It examines the structures, roles, and        CJ 691                                            Cr. 3.0
interactions of the foreign and domestic intelligence com-      Criminal Justice Thesis I
munities, the intelligence gathering and analysis of capa-      Independent investigation of special topics reflecting the
bilities of criminal justice and private sector entities, and   research interests of the sponsoring professor.
the use of intelligence processes to support homeland           Prerequisites: Criminal Justice 502, 525, 530, and 542.
security investigations, planning, and intelligence applica-    Corequisite: Criminal Justice 535.
tions to support strategic decision making.                     Course Type(s): None
Course Type(s): None
                                                                CJ 692                                            Cr. 3.0
CJ 635                                             Cr. 3.0      Criminal Justice Thesis II
Weapons of Mass Destruction                                     Independent investigation of special topics reflecting the
Focus on the practical and theoretical aspects of prepar-       research interests of the sponsoring professor.
ing for, and dealing with, incidents involving weapons of       Prerequisite: Criminal Justice 691.
mass destruction. Discussion on the various devices and         Course Type(s): None
the means of delivering damage. Analysis of the intelli-
gence approaches to reduce such an event.
Course Type(s): None
                                                                CJ CPE                                            Cr. 0.0
                                                                Comprehensive Exam
                                                                Criminal Justice Comprehensive Exam
CJ 640                                             Cr. 3.0      Course Type(s): None
Multidisciplinary Approach to Homeland Security
Acquaints students with the concepts and practices
                                                                EDUCATION – CURRICULUM
among the various disciplines within the homeland securi-
ty domain that provide the architecture for the nation’s
                                                                AND INSTRUCTION
preparedness strategy. Provides an understanding of how
the law, constitution and interaction between the various       ED 507                                            Cr. 3.0
disciplines of homeland security and defense, in theory         Issues and Problems in Education
and practice affect the development and execution of            Major issues and problems affecting education are pre-
homeland security operations, strategies, and policies in       sented with historical perspectives for understanding the
general. Explores the collaborative efforts of multiple dis-    context in which these concerns arose.
ciplines drawn from all levels of the public and private        Course Type(s): None
sectors, how they integrate with one another, and how
they collectively factor into the prevention of, response to,   ED 510                                            Cr. 3.0
and recovery from major events. Conversely, it will             Foundations of Education
enhance the students understanding of the various disci-        An introduction to education in the United States.
plines associated with homeland security including law          Theories of curriculum and instruction are introduced and
enforcement, fire services, emergency management,               principles and practices for instructional delivery are pre-
infrastructure custodians, the military, public health, and     sented. The history and philosophy of education, psycho-
government administrators.                                      logical principles including behavioral, social and cultural
Course Type(s): None                                            perspectives related to educational practice are explored.
                                                                Contemporary issues and controversies in American edu-
CJ 650                                             Cr. 3.0      cation are highlighted Fieldwork hours required for
Cyber Terrorism                                                 Education majors.
Explores how new technology throughout the world has            Course Type(s): None
contributed to terroristic crimes and how information and
communication technology (ICT) has become a tool, a tar-        ED 524                                            Cr. 3.0
get, and a place of criminal activity threatening national      Research in Teaching Practice
security. Topics of study include: the information environ-     Research in education related to contemporary teaching
ment as crime scene, computer use in crimes, political ter-     practice will be emphasized. Introduction to qualitative
rorism, hacking, unauthorized access, and identity theft.       and quantitative approaches from different theoretical per-
Course Type(s): None                                            spectives is presented. Content will include: literature
                                                                reviews, analysis and implication of existing research,




                                                                                      Monmouth University A23
Appendix A: Course Descriptions



classroom observation skills, and the role of the teacher     school level and/or those who wish to learn more about
as reflective practitioner. For Education majors only.        the history and sociology of science.
Course Type(s): MAT                                           Course Type(s): None

ED 528                                           Cr. 3.0      ED 550                                             Cr. 3.0
Middle Level Learning and Teaching                            Teaching Diverse Populations
The candidate will examine aspects of middle-level            Addresses two issues in today’s field of education: ESL
schooling that are responsive to the nature and needs of      students in mainstream classrooms and students with spe-
adolescents. The candidate will apply knowledge of ado-       cial needs in inclusion classrooms. The relevant topics will
lescents’ cognitive and affective development to design       be explored from a multicultural perspective to provide
learning environments and to structure and implement          teacher candidates with a theoretical foundation, an under-
learning experiences that effectively promote academic        standing of their legal responsibility, and an opportunity to
achievement and personal growth for all middle-grade          design instruction addressing various needs of diverse stu-
students. Four days of fieldwork is required over the         dents in an inclusive setting. Fieldwork is required.
course of the term.                                           Prerequisite: Education 510.
Prerequisites: Education 510 and 550.                         Course Type(s): MAT
Course Type(s): None
                                                              ED 552                                             Cr. 3.0
ED 529                                           Cr. 3.0      Child and Adolescent Development
Content Literacy                                              Psychological, sociological and physiological develop-
Focuses on theory, methods, strategies, and materials for     ment related to academic functioning of children and ado-
teaching literacy in all content areas, with an emphasis at   lescents. Learning theories studied are related to current
the secondary level of education. The use of literature in    educational concerns in this age group. For Education
all content areas will be explored, leading to a better       majors only.
understanding of the interdisciplinary approach to learning   Course Type(s): None
at the secondary level. Fieldwork hours are required.
Course Type(s): None                                          ED 554                                             Cr. 3.0
                                                              Supplemental Instruction in Reading
ED 533                                           Cr. 3.0      and Mathematics
Contemporary Issues in Science Education                      Focus on supplemental instruction for reading and mathe-
Examines current topics of special interest in science        matics in educational settings from grades 6-8 but draws
content and curriculum to a variety of students. Can be       heavily on assessment and analysis of student errors
designed individually, based on strengths of students and     from Pre-K to 5 as well. Extensive opportunities for diag-
their interest in personal professional development in an     nosis and planning for remedial intervention in reading
area of concentration in science curriculum. Valuable for     and mathematics will be provided.
practicing teachers at the elementary, middle, or high        Prerequisites: Education 556 and Educational Leadership
school level and/or those who wish to learn more about        575.
science teaching and content.                                 Course Type(s): MAT
Course Type(s): None
                                                              ED 556                                             Cr. 3.0
ED 537                                           Cr. 3.0      Teaching Elementary Mathematics
Science and Society in the Twenty-First Century               Provides elementary teacher candidates with a modern
Examines the developments in science knowledge and            vision of elementary mathematics and beyond.
their impact on society over the last century and predicts    Candidates will learn to create a math classroom where
changes that might occur in the twenty-first century. We      students of diverse backgrounds and abilities can con-
are the only species on earth that has the power to           struct a conceptual as well as a procedural understanding
change our environment and the ability to comprehend          of mathematics. Four days of fieldwork are required over
the universe. Students will explore major scientific          the course of the term.
advances over the past 100 years and the resulting prob-      Prerequisites: Education 510, 550 and 552.
lems that these advances have wrought. Valuable for           Course Type(s): None
practicing teachers at the elementary, middle, or high




A24 Monmouth University
                                                                             Appendix A: Course Descriptions



ED 560                                           Cr. 3.0      ED 565                                            Cr. 3.0
Methods of Teaching in Secondary Education                    Methods of Teaching Mathematics for Secondary
A general methods course designed for candidates who          School Part II
are preparing to teach in subject-specific classrooms in      Extends the study of secondary methodology begun in
high school environments. Provides an integrated per-         ED 564. The intent is to deepen the understanding of
spective of general teaching methods from grade 9             future secondary-school teachers in the complexities of
through grade 12. Four days of fieldwork are required         the secondary-mathematics curriculum and build their
over the course of the term.                                  competencies at the level of instructional implementation.
Prerequisites: Education 510, 550, and 552; and permis-       Instructional methodologies studied will be more broadly
sion of the MAT program director.                             applied to more advanced mathematical concepts. Four
Course Type(s): None                                          days of fieldwork is required over the course of the term.
                                                              Prerequisite: Education 560 or 564.
ED 562                                           Cr. 3.0      Course Type(s): None
Methods of Teaching Science at the Elementary Level
Provides an integrated perspective of teaching science at     ED 566                                            Cr. 3.0
the elementary level. This perspective will allow future      Methods of Teaching Science at the Secondary
elementary teachers to understand how foundational sci-       Level I
ence concepts should be taught. It will allow future ele-     Provides the candidates with an understanding of the
mentary teachers to appreciate the developmental needs        concepts and relationships of science to support student
of early learners and the corresponding pedagogy uti-         learning. The teaching strategies and techniques are
lized. Predominantly hands-on, interrelated to the national   based on research and emphasize the need to provide
and New Jersey Science Core Curriculum Content                equal opportunities for all learners. Focuses on teaching
Standards, providing useable materials adapted to each        science through inquiry as defined by state and national
student’s needs. Four days of fieldwork is required over      standards for science education. Four days of fieldwork
the course of the term.                                       required over the course of the term.
Prerequisites: Education 510, 550, and 552.                   Prerequisites: Education 510, 550, and 552.
Course Type(s): None                                          Course Type(s): None

ED 563                                           Cr. 3.0      ED 567                                            Cr. 3.0
Assessment and Treatment of Literacy Problems                 Methods of Teaching Science at the Secondary
Focus is on authentic assessment and corrective teaching      Level II
strategies to address literacy problems from a developmen-    Science methods for initial M.A.T. students at the second-
tal perspective. Techniques and methods for at-risk learn-    ary level. Provides active learning of science concepts
ers will be emphasized. Strategies that guide students to     through various inquiry activities. Following the learning
self-monitor their literacy acquisition will be addressed.    theories that have produced both the National Science
Prerequisite: Educational Leadership 503.                     Education Standards and the New Jersey Core Curriculum
Course Type(s): None                                          Content Standards for science, this course will utilize proj-
                                                              ects, cases, and problems in real-world settings using a
ED 564                                           Cr. 3.0      diversity of instructional methods and strategies to provide
Preparing for School Mathematics: Secondary                   each student with the opportunity to learn how to teach
Provides secondary-mathematics teacher candidates with        inquiry and problem-solving across the sciences. Designed
knowledge for teaching secondary mathematics.                 for those with a strong background in science. Four days of
Candidates will learn to create a math classroom where        fieldwork is required over the course of the term.
students of diverse backgrounds and abilities can con-        Prerequisite: Education 560 or 566.
struct a conceptual, as well as a procedural, understand-     Course Type(s): None
ing of mathematics. Four days of fieldwork required over
the course of the term.                                       ED 576                                            Cr. 3.0
Prerequisites: Education 510, 550, and 552.                   Teaching Social Studies at the Elementary Level
Course Type(s): None                                          Introduces the P-8 teacher certification candidates to the
                                                              social studies curriculum and methods. Emphasizes
                                                              national and state standards for social studies education




                                                                                     Monmouth University A25
Appendix A: Course Descriptions



cross-curriculum integration, particularly world languages    ED 582                                            Cr. 3.0
and culture, personal and social problem solving, and sit-    World Language Education
uated cognition in social studies education learning. Four    Issues and practices in world language education. Four
days of fieldwork is required over the course of the term.    days of fieldwork is required over the course of the term.
Prerequisites: Education 510, 550, and 552.                   Prerequisites: Education 529, 550, and Foreign Language
Course Type(s): None                                          599.
                                                              Course Type(s): None
ED 578                                           Cr. 3.0
Methods of Teaching English at the Secondary Level            ED 583                                            Cr. 3.0
Prepares candidates to teach English/language arts at the     Theories and Practice of ESL Instruction Part I
secondary level (grades 7-12) by providing the essential      With an emphasis on teaching English through content,
knowledge, skills, and strategies grounded in research        Part I of this two-semester course introduces the history
and related to effective classroom instruction.               of ESL teaching and critically explores exemplary curricu-
Emphasizes the use of literature and the integration of the   lum designs and methods of teaching ESL. A wide range
components of literacy, namely reading, listening, speak-     of ESL instructional strategies will be introduced and
ing, and viewing. The New Jersey Core Curriculum              practiced. Both instructional design and implementation
Standards will be an integral part of the course. Four        will be the focus for practice with the embedded language
days of fieldwork is required over the course of the term.    acquisition/learning theories and research studies careful-
Prerequisites: Education 510, 550, and 552.                   ly examined. Fieldwork is required.
Course Type(s): None                                          Prerequisites: Education 529, 550, and either Liberal Arts
                                                              580 or English 563.
ED 579                                           Cr. 3.0      Course Type(s): MAT
Teaching Social Studies and Cultural Education at
the Secondary Level                                           ED 584                                            Cr. 3.0
Introduces the middle- and secondary-level teacher certi-     Theories and Practice of ESL Instruction Part II
fication candidate to social studies curriculum and meth-     A continuation of Part I, examines public issues pertinent
ods. Emphasizes national and state standards for social       to ESL education with an emphasis on making connec-
education curriculum across the social science disci-         tions between theories or research findings and class-
plines. Four days of fieldwork is required over the course    room practice. While more approaches to ESL instruction
of the term.                                                  will be introduced, a wide range of ESL instructional
Prerequisites: Education 510, 550, and 552.                   materials, services, and assessment measures will be
Course Type(s): None                                          introduced and explored. Fieldwork is required.
                                                              Prerequisite: Education 583.
ED 580                                           Cr. 3.0      Course Type(s): None
Secondary Social Studies Education Part II
Expands and further develops competencies covered in          ED 585                                            Cr. 3.0
Part I. Instructional methodologies focusing on a con-        Methods of Teaching English at the Secondary
structivist, student-centered approach will be explored.      Level Part II
Targets strategies for future secondary teachers to meet      A continuation of Part I. Expands teacher candidates’ under-
the New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards for          standing of the intricacies of curriculum design and planning
Social Studies to include: infusing Economics and             and builds their teaching competencies in English/Language
Geography into the curriculum, developing greater tech-       Arts at the secondary level (grades 7-12). Teacher candi-
nology coalescence, extending cross-curriculum lesson         dates will have increased opportunities to apply theory and
plans, embracing a pluralistic approach, and expanding        refine practice in the use of print and nonprint texts and in
multicultural themes. Curse design will foster the develop-   the integration of the English Language Arts. The NCTE/IRA
ment of effective inquiry-based curriculum activities mak-    English Language Arts Standards and the New Jersey Core
ing effective use of community-based resources. Four          Curriculum Standards for Language Arts/Literacy will be
days of fieldwork is required over the course of the term.    applied throughout the course. Four days of fieldwork is
Prerequisite: Education 560 or 579.                           required over the course of the term.
Course Type(s): None                                          Prerequisite: Education 560 or 578.
                                                              Course Type(s): None




A26 Monmouth University
                                                                                  Appendix A: Course Descriptions



ED 587                                              Cr. 3.0       teacher, student teacher candidates assume full responsi-
Integrated Methods in K-12 Education                              bility for lesson planning and teaching.
In-depth understanding and application of curriculum and          Prerequisites: Passing score on the appropriate Praxis
instruction in K-12 education. 30 hours of field work is          test(s) prior to registration and completion of all coursework.
required for candidates.                                          Permission of the MAT Director is required to register.
Prerequisites: Education 510, 550, and 552 and a mini-            Course Type(s): None
mum GPA of 3.00.
Course Type(s): None                                              ED 596                                               Cr. 3.0
                                                                  Methods of Teaching Health K-12
ED 590                                              Cr. 8.0       Focuses on the planning, development, and teaching of
Student Teaching                                                  health education in K-12 school settings. Emphasis will
Full-time public school assignment includes observation, ori-     be placed on using recent data and contextual informa-
entation, and classroom teaching under the daily supervi-         tion to design instruction that focuses on the importance
sion of a cooperating teacher. In addition, the college super-    of exercise, family and community, school and work envi-
visor observes, evaluates and confers with the student            ronments, and diet to promoting and maintaining good
teacher a minimum of six times. Campus seminar required.          health throughout life for students with diverse needs and
Prerequisites: All other course work completed and suc-           from diverse backgrounds.
cessful completion of the Education Praxis requirement.           Prerequisites: Education 510, 550, and 552.
Course Type(s): None                                              Course Type(s): None


ED 591                                              Cr. 8.0       ED 597                                               Cr. 3.0
Supervised Student Teaching                                       Methods of Teaching Physical Education K-12
Designed for full-time teachers; on-the-job experiences           Designed to present current methods and techniques of
are used to plan and evaluate teaching strategies and             teaching physical education to students in grades K-12.
materials, develop teaching skills based on a knowledge           Particular attention will be on new techniques for adjusting
of sound learning theory, and develop a teaching model            tasks for a wide variety of children’s interests, abilities, and
or personal philosophy of teaching. The college supervi-          learning styles, and ensuring safe use of equipment in
sor observes, evaluates, and confers with the in-service          physical education. As well, lifetime sports and activities
teacher a minimum of six times each semester.                     for students with diverse needs and from diverse back-
Prerequisite: Successful completion of the Education              grounds will be highlighted. Field experience is required.
Praxis requirement.                                               Prerequisites: Education 510, 550, and 552.
Course Type(s): None                                              Course Type(s): None


ED 593                                              Cr. 9.0       ED 598                                               Cr. 3.0
Student Teaching                                                  Special Topics in Education
Student teaching for teacher candidates provides experi-          The subject matter varies with the interest of the students
ences with regular and special education students. Under          and the professor teaching the course. The exact nature
college supervision and working with a cooperative                of the topic covered in any given semester is indicated in
teacher, student teacher candidates assume full responsi-         the student’s transcript. Permission of the program direc-
bility for lesson planning and teaching.                          tor is required.
Prerequisites: Passing score on the appropriate Praxis            Course Type(s): None
test(s) prior to registration and completion of all coursework.
Permission of the MAT Director is required to register.           ED 599                                       Cr. 1.0 - 3.0
Course Type(s): None                                              Independent Study in Education
                                                                  Independent research in education in an area not sub-
ED 594                                              Cr. 9.0       stantially treated in a regular course offering, under the
Supervised Student Teaching                                       supervision of an Education faculty member; written eval-
Student teaching for teacher candidates provides experi-          uation of the research is required. For students with supe-
ences with regular and special education students. Under          rior ability.
college supervision and working with a cooperative                Course Type(s): MAT




                                                                                          Monmouth University A27
Appendix A: Course Descriptions



ED 606                                              Cr. 3.0      studies and conceptualize connections between those
Diversity in Education                                           works and our daily practice in the field.
Dealing with cultural differences in multi-ethnic and plural-    Course Type(s): None
istic school settings. The nature of the school as a social
system.                                                          ED 624                                             Cr. 3.0
Course Type(s): MAT                                              Research in Teaching Practice
                                                                 Research in education related to contemporary teaching
ED 608                                              Cr. 3.0      practice will be emphasized. Introduction to qualitative
Curriculum in the Classroom                                      and quantitative approaches from different theoretical per-
Today’s practitioners must strike a balance between state        spectives is presented. Content will include literature
and national curriculum standards and the needs and              reviews, analysis and implication of existing research,
expectations of their own classroom. Candidates will             classroom observation skills and the role of the teacher
examine various facets of curriculum specific to their pro-      as reflective practitioner.
fessional environment.                                           Course Type(s): None
Course Type(s): None
                                                                 ED 626                                             Cr. 3.0
ED 610                                              Cr. 3.0      Assessment Practice Now and When
Education in a Democratic Society                                Theory and practice of educational testing, development of
Critical examination of ideas, purposes, and aims of             and use of tests and alternative forms of assessment, analy-
schooling in historical and cultural contexts; explores ethi-    sis and interpretation of assessment results to monitor stu-
cal and research issues related to teaching and learning         dent progress, inform instruction, evaluate student achieve-
in ways that enhance democratic practices.                       ment, and evaluate programs. Emphasis is placed on alter-
Course Type(s): None                                             native and authentic forms of assessment that complement
                                                                 and support the standardized testing system. Through exam-
                                                                 ination of techniques and strategies that characterize quality
ED 616                                              Cr. 3.0      assessment, students will develop a philosophy of assess-
Fundamental of Curriculum Studies                                ment supportive of classroom evaluation and understanding
The emergence of the field from the early twentieth centu-       that fosters student growth and learning.
ry. Surveys the foundations of the field of curriculum stud-     Course Type(s): None
ies at large, examines the standardization movement of
the institutional curriculum and culminates in a critical
examination of NCLB. Candidates will consider the impor-         ED 630                                             Cr. 3.0
tance of study tied to socially responsive curricular design.    Research in Curriculum Studies
Course Type(s): None                                             The possession of effective research skills is an integral
                                                                 and necessary proficiency for success in the field of
                                                                 Curriculum Studies. Candidates will engage in the explo-
ED 618                                              Cr. 3.0      ration of both qualitative and quantitative research method-
Survey of Curricular Paradigms                                   ologies. They will then design an investigation, apply for
Provides an examination of the field of Curriculum Studies       Institutional Research Board approval, and conduct a study
through the lens of key paradigms and perspectives.              relevant to their professional milieu and the field.
Course Type(s): None                                             Prerequisite: Education 624.
                                                                 Course Type(s): None
ED 620                                              Cr. 3.0
Philosophy and Curriculum                                        ED 632                                             Cr. 3.0
Serves to extend the examination of the evolution and            Classroom Technologies and Educational Media
current conditions of the field of curriculum studies initiat-   Emphasis on commercially available computer software;
ed in fundamentals of curriculum studies. Introduces the         analysis and evaluation of software design and documenta-
work of core philosophies that inform contemporary cur-          tion. Continuation of children’s programming languages
riculum work and encourage participants’ analysis of vari-       and word processing. Access to a microcomputer provided.
ous influential voices in the field. Primary goals are to        Course Type(s): None
engage in critical discussions about the work of various
philosophers who have influenced the field of curriculum




A28 Monmouth University
                                                                             Appendix A: Course Descriptions



ED 645                                           Cr. 6.0      ED 699                                            Cr. 3.0
Theories and Practice of ESL Instruction                      Independent Study in Education
With an emphasis on teaching English through content,         Independent research in education in an area not sub-
this two-semester course will introduce the history of ESL    stantially treated in a regular course offering, under the
teaching and critically explore exemplary curriculum          supervision of an Education faculty member; written eval-
designs and methods of teaching ESL. A wide range of          uation of the research is required. For students with supe-
ESL instructional strategies and assessment measures          rior ability.
will be introduced and practiced. Both instructional design   Prerequisites: Prior permission of the directing professor
and implementation will be the focus for practice with the    and department chair. Application
embedded language acquisition/learning theories and           must be filed before registration.
research studies carefully examined.                          Course Type(s): None
Course Type(s): None
                                                              ED PRAXIS                                         Cr. 0.0
ED 658                                           Cr. 3.0      Successfully Complete Praxis
Advanced Curriculum Studies                                   This graduate education Praxis requires a passing
A comprehensive study of the theory and practice of           score(s) on the appropriate Praxis II test(s) and is a grad-
designing, evaluating, and implementing valid and effec-      uation requirement.
tive P-12 curricula.                                          Course Type(s): None
Course Type(s): None
                                                              EDUCATION – EDUCATIONAL COUNSELING
ED 670                                           Cr. 3.0
Qualitative Research: Principles and Practices                EDC 500                                           Cr. 3.0
An introduction to the methods of qualitative research. A     Introduction to Professional School Counseling
reading-based discussion/seminar focusing on method-          Designed as an introduction to the counseling profession
ological issues and an exploration of the variety of meth-    with an emphasis on school counseling. Traces the histo-
ods used in executing qualitative studies. Offers students    ry of the school counseling profession, exposes the stu-
a theoretical foundation for this form of inquiry and an      dent to theoretical positions and approaches of coun-
opportunity to engage in research. Applicable to a variety    selors, orients the student to an initial understanding of
of social inquiry disciplines.                                legal and ethical obligations, prepares the student for
Course Type(s): None                                          school counseling and the culture of schools, differenti-
                                                              ates school counseling from other counseling specialties
ED 680                                           Cr. 3.0      and other school professionals, and provides the basis for
Advanced Professional Development Seminar                     continued studies in the counseling program.
for Teachers                                                  Course Type(s): None
This capstone seminar will support candidates for the
degree in producing electronic portfolios, teacher research   EDC 501                                           Cr. 3.0
plans for teaching improvement, presentation of research,     Introduction to Student Affairs and College
and self-reflection for future professional growth.           Counseling
Course Type(s): None                                          A comprehensive study of the theory and practice of stu-
                                                              dent affairs and college counseling with an emphasis on
ED 698                                           Cr. 3.0      preparing students to work in professional positions in
Special Topics in Curriculum and Instruction                  higher education for the purpose of demonstrating the
The subject matter varies with the interest of the candi-     knowledge, skills and practices necessary to promote the
dates and the professor teaching the course. The exact        development of postsecondary students.
nature of the topic covered in any given semester is indi-    Course Type(s): None
cated on the candidate’s transcript. The course curriculum
will include a variety of readings, as well as a research-    EDC 505                                           Cr. 3.0
based summative course assessment.                            Counseling and Ethical Practice
Prerequisite: Permission of the program director.             An intensive introduction to counseling skills and ethical
Course Type(s): None                                          principles within the school environment. Skills in counsel-




                                                                                    Monmouth University A29
Appendix A: Course Descriptions



ing responses, feedback, goal setting, termination and fol-      EDC 525                                             Cr. 3.0
low-up are practiced in a clinical setting. Integration of       Assessment for Counseling
ethical and legal procedures into school counseling prac-        Covers the theories and practice of selection, administra-
tice with children and families is emphasized. A combina-        tion, and interpretation of various instruments used in
tion of theory and practice through role-play, videotape         school settings to measure achievement, intelligence,
practice, and supervisory feedback.                              aptitude, and ability with an overview of the ethical and
Course Type(s): None                                             legal use of these instruments. Statistics necessary to
                                                                 understand test data will be examined as well as strate-
EDC 510                                             Cr. 3.0      gies necessary to communicate test results to clients,
Human Growth and Development                                     parents, and school personnel. Part theory and part skill
A study of principles and concepts of cognitive, personali-      laboratory where students will practice the administration
ty, and social development from conception through               of various educational instruments.
death. An overview of empirical research and theoretical         Course Type(s): None
frameworks used in the study of life-span human develop-
ment with a special emphasis on school-age populations.          EDC 530                                             Cr. 3.0
Uses both lecture and seminar formats. Students should           Counseling Theory and Practice for the School
be able to discuss the major theoretical questions               Environment
involved in the study of life span development, as well as       Explores the major counseling theories and related tech-
be able to discuss current findings in the areas of social,      niques with emphasis on translating counseling theory
cognitive, personality, and moral development and the            into effective practice with children, adolescents, and fam-
implications for student success in school and throughout        ilies in schools. Special attention is given to experiential
the life span.                                                   analysis and the demonstration of effective school coun-
Course Type(s): None                                             seling skills using the various theoretical modalities. Part
                                                                 theory and part counseling skills laboratory with intensive
EDC 515                                             Cr. 3.0      role play, discussion and feedback.
Risk and Resiliency in Children and Adolescents                  Prerequisite: Educational Counseling 500.
Examines the developmental trajectory for at-risk children       Course Type(s): None
and adolescents and factors that promote resilience.
Thoroughly examines the etiology of alcohol and drug             EDC 535                                             Cr. 3.0
abuse. Factors that contribute to school failure and suc-        Multicultural Counseling for Social Justice
cess will also be addressed. Candidates will be able to          Experiential and clinical opportunities to become multicul-
identify risk (e.g. poverty, disabilities, child maltreatment,   turally competent school counselors as well as to under-
etc.) and protective factors and identify interventions that     stand students and their families within their unique cul-
promote positive developmental outcomes.                         tural, historical, and ethnic contexts. Emphasis is placed
Course Type(s): None                                             on individual, group and systemic counseling models and
                                                                 interventions to promote multicultural sensitivity, diversity,
EDC 520                                             Cr. 3.0      equity, and access for all students. Extensive personal
The Group Experience                                             development experiences, role play, and Triad Model
Designed to encompass the experience of participating in         practice are provided. Prerequisites: Educational
a counseling group. It will simulate the group experience        Counseling 500, 505, and 530.
over the course of one academic semester. Topics that            Course Type(s): None
will be addressed during the course of the semester will
include ethnic identity development, self-awareness, as          EDC 540                                             Cr. 3.0
well as other counselor issues. Designed to understand           Group Counseling
what it is like to be a member of a counseling group. A          Designed to provide an overview of the basic process,
pass/fail course, solely based on attendance, participa-         dynamics, theoretical components, and developmental
tion, and disposition. Prerequisite: Educational                 aspects of group counseling. It encompasses an increase
Counseling 535.                                                  in counselor skills, group leadership and facilitation.
Course Type(s): None                                             Emphasis is placed on understanding the diversity of stu-
                                                                 dents and their families. Combines the use of lectures,
                                                                 discussion, experiential exercises, readings, and journal-




A30 Monmouth University
                                                                               Appendix A: Course Descriptions



ing to advance students’ knowledge and skills in group           sultation with a school counseling program. Consultation
counseling. Emphasis on working with diverse groups is           procedures are emphasized as a central part of the school
also integrated into the course. Students will explore           counselor competencies in a multicultural environment.
group leader and member roles through participation in           Includes consultation case conceptualization, role play,
various group situations.                                        clinical demonstrations, reflections, and course projects.
Prerequisites: Educational Counseling 500, 505, and 530.         Prerequisites: Educational Counseling 500, 505, and 530.
Course Type(s): None                                             Course Type(s): None

EDC 545                                             Cr. 3.0      EDC 565                                          Cr. 3.0
Career Development and Counseling for the School                 Supervision of Counselors
Environment                                                      Explore current foundational concepts, theories, and mod-
Designed to explore career counseling, development the-          els fundamental to the administration of supervision of
ory, and practices with consideration for life roles, diversi-   school counselors, and student service professionals
ty issues, and nontraditional careers within the context of      within an educational environment. Multidimensional
a comprehensive school counseling program. Theories,             approaches to clinical supervision will be addressed using
models, techniques, and resources relevant to decision           supervision models, including practical experience for
making, assessment, career planning, and placement are           counseling professionals who have responsibility directing
addressed with attention to computer-based applications          the personal and professional development of school
and Internet resources.                                          counselors. Critical analysis of theories of counselor
Prerequisites: Educational Counseling 500, 505, and 530.         supervision, techniques associated with theories, and
Course Type(s): None                                             assessment of supervision models will be examined. Also
                                                                 explores the benefits and shortcomings of individual ver-
EDC 550                                             Cr. 3.0      sus group supervision, with particular focus on character-
                                                                 istics that make for a competent supervisor and effective
Counseling At-Risk Children and Families
                                                                 supervisory relationships. Further explores the role of
Counseling, intervention, and referral techniques for at-risk
                                                                 both supervisor and supervisee, ethical and legal consid-
children, adolescents and their families with intensive
                                                                 erations, evaluative criteria, cultural and gender issues,
practice in family counseling and crisis intervention skills.
                                                                 research and social justice.
Family theory and applications for practical skills in the
                                                                 Course Type(s): None
school environment are emphasized through various expe-
riential learning activities. The school counselor’s role as
an advocate and direct service provider for students and         EDC 570                                          Cr. 3.0
their families with multiple risk factors is emphasized.         Alcohol and Drug Abuse Programs and Services
Prerequisites: Educational Counseling 500, 505, and 530.         A comprehensive study of alcohol and drug programs and
Course Type(s): None                                             services in the school and community including research-
                                                                 based prevention and intervention programs, chemical
EDC 555                                             Cr. 3.0      health curricula, policy, and staff development. Emphasis
                                                                 on the role of the substance awareness coordinator in
School Counseling Program Planning and Practice
                                                                 organizing and coordinating intervention and referral serv-
A comprehensive data-driven overview of the theory and
                                                                 ices and multidisciplinary intervention teams.
practice for designing, implementing, and evaluating a
                                                                 Course Type(s): None
comprehensive school counseling program P-12.
Empirical research will be utilized in conjunction with
school counseling programs based on national standards.          EDC 575                                          Cr. 3.0
Prerequisites: Educational Counseling 500, 505, and 530.         Alcohol and Drug Assessment and Counseling
Course Type(s): None                                             A comprehensive approach to assessment and treatment
                                                                 planning with alcohol and drug-affected students, includ-
EDC 560                                             Cr. 3.0      ing the intake interview, clinical assessment, and adminis-
                                                                 tration and interpretation of formal and informal instru-
Consultation Procedures for Counseling
                                                                 ments. Attention is given to the roles of the substance
Explores foundational concepts, theories, and models fun-
                                                                 awareness coordinator and the counselor in assessment,
damental to school-based practices. Multidimensional
                                                                 referral, and intervention.
approaches will be studied, including school-based consul-
                                                                 Course Type(s): None
tation, case consultation, systems consultation, and con-




                                                                                       Monmouth University A31
Appendix A: Course Descriptions



EDC 598                                             Cr. 3.0       practicum to participate in a range of professional experi-
Special Topics in Educational Counseling                          ences expected of a school counselor. Includes a require-
The subject matter varies with the interest of the students       ment of documented supervised work as a student school
and the professor. The exact nature of the topic covered in       counselor under the supervision of a practicing school
any given semester is indicated on the student’s transcript.      counselor and intensive individual and group supervision
Course Type(s): None                                              in the university seminar through videotaped and/or audio
                                                                  taped sessions. Prerequisite: Educational Counseling
                                                                  601. Corequisite: Comprehensive Exam(CPE).
EDC 599                                             Cr. 3.0       Course Type(s): None
Independent Study in Educational Counseling
Independent research in education in an area not substan-
tially treated in a regular course offering; under the supervi-   EDC 604                                           Cr. 3.0
sion of a counseling faculty member; written evaluation of        Clinical Practice in Addiction
the research is required. For students with superior ability.     Evaluates the clinical implications of substance use and
Prerequisites: Prior permission of the directing professor        abuse at three levels of social work practice. On the micro
and department chair. Application must be filed before            level, clinical implications including symptomatology, etiol-
registration.                                                     ogy, and physiology of substance use will be addressed.
Course Type(s): None                                              Assessment and treatment theory and techniques will be
                                                                  explored, implemented and evaluated. On a mezzo level,
                                                                  the effects of the extended family and systemic community
EDC 600                                             Cr. 3.0       of those who use substances are addressed. Strategies
Practicum in Counseling                                           for meeting those needs will be researched and evaluated.
An intensive supervised 100-hour, field-based experience          Lastly, on the Macro level, existing resources available
in the school, which provides an orientation to the school        and active policy regarding substance abuse will be criti-
counselor’s role within a school counseling program.              cally studied, and potential proposed changes will be dis-
Provides supervised opportunities to practice individual          cussed. Also listed as Social Work 604.
and group counseling skills along with day-to-day tasks of        Course Type(s): None
the school counselor. Additionally, intensive individual and
group supervision is provided through videotaped and/or
audio taped sessions.                                             EDC 605                                           Cr. 3.0
Prerequisites: Educational Counseling 500, 505, 530, and          Clinical Practice with Families and Children
completion of 18 credits.                                         Understanding of family practice theory and intervention
Course Type(s): None                                              with a focus on core subsystems and operations of the fam-
                                                                  ily. Different family types, ethnic backgrounds and cultures
                                                                  as well as gender differences and issues of power and con-
EDC 601                                             Cr. 3.0       trol are topics included. Also listed as Social Work 605.
Internship in Counseling I                                        Course Type(s): None
An intensive internship, supervised 300-hour field based
experience, which allows students who have completed the
practicum to participate in a range of professional experi-       EDC 610                                           Cr. 3.0
ences expected of a school counselor. Includes a require-         SAC Internship
ment of documented supervised work as a student school            A supervised three-credit, 300 hour, field based, super-
counselor under the supervision of a practicing school            vised experience in the school, which allows students to
counselor and intensive individual and group supervision in       intern as a substance awareness coordinator. This is the
the university seminar through videotaped and/or audio            culminating activity of the substance awareness coordina-
taped sessions. Prerequisites: Educational Counseling 500,        tor program in which students will apply what they have
505, 525, 530, 540, and 600, and completion of 24 credits.        learned in a school setting.
Course Type(s): None                                              Prerequisites: 15 credits and permission of the instructor.
                                                                  Course Type(s): None
EDC 602                                             Cr. 3.0
Internship in Counseling II                                       EDC CPE                                           Cr. 0.0
An intensive, supervised 300-hour-field-based experi-             School Counseling Comprehensive Examination
ence, which allows students who have completed the                A comprehensive examination to demonstrate the knowl-
                                                                  edge of counseling in terms of CACREP professional




A32 Monmouth University
                                                                             Appendix A: Course Descriptions



standards of 1) Human Growth and Development, 2)              to a diverse population of learners in a literate environ-
Social and Cultural Foundations, 3) Helping Relationship,     ment and assisting and supporting colleagues and para-
4) Group Work, 5) Career and Lifestyle Development, 6)        professionals. Word identification, vocabulary, compre-
Appraisal, 7) Research and Program Evaluation, and 8)         hension, and content strategies will be presented.
Professional Orientation and Ethics. Must be taken during     Course Type(s): MAT
the final semester of program.
Corequisite: Educational Counseling 602.                      EDL 516                                           Cr. 3.0
Course Type(s): None                                          Literacy Strategies for All Learners I
                                                              Explores word identification and vocabulary research and
EDUCATION – EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP                            instructional strategies for all learners including those
                                                              from culturally diverse backgrounds. Individual and group
EDL 502                                          Cr. 3.0      instructional techniques in the area of phonemic aware-
Development and Learning in Early Childhood                   ness, phonics, word recognition, vocabulary, and fluency
Studies designed to foster understanding of the dynamic       are explored in environments that promote collaboration
continuum of development and learning in children from        and self-regulation. Instructional teaching strategies and
birth through age eight. Typical and atypical development     techniques for coaching colleagues and paraprofessionals
of young children is addressed through a multicultural        are practiced in real settings.
perspective. Developmental factors that impact learning in    Course Type(s): None
preschool and the primary grades are emphasized.
Approaches to learning grounded in developmental theory       EDL 517                                           Cr. 3.0
are presented with an emphasis on developmentally             Literacy Strategies for All Learners II
appropriate practice.                                         Addresses comprehension research and instructional
Course Type(s): None                                          strategies for all learners including those from culturally
                                                              diverse backgrounds. Individual and group comprehen-
EDL 503                                          Cr. 3.0      sion strategies, metacognition, and student self-evaluation
Literacy Instruction                                          are explored and practiced in collaborative education set-
Content focuses on principles, methods, and materials         tings. Instructional teaching strategies and techniques for
applicable to teaching, reading, and writing to the begin-    coaching colleagues and paraprofessionals are practiced
ning and skilled reader. Topics will include current          in real settings.
approaches for developing literacy within a diverse popu-     Course Type(s): None
lation of learners. Comprehension, content, and vocabu-
lary strategies are presented. The writing process and        EDL 521                                           Cr. 3.0
writer’s workshop are explored. Prepares students for         Early Childhood Family, School and Community
participation in school-based experience.                     Collaboration in a Diverse Society
Course Type(s): None                                          Focuses on the process of family assessment and inter-
                                                              vention, issues of family and professional collaboration
EDL 504                                          Cr. 3.0      and diversity, and methods of promoting adult communica-
Introduction to Educational Leadership P-12                   tion and management strategies. It applies the knowledge
Introduces the conceptual, theoretical, and practical foun-   of cultural and linguistic diversity and the significance of
dations of educational administration. Focus on the           socio-cultural and political contexts as they relate to the
school as a social system with emphasis on the role of        family, culture and society. It identifies the members of
the educational leader in creating and sustaining an effec-   teams designed to support and optimize children’s health,
tive learning community.                                      growth, and development and the network of community
Course Type(s): None                                          services to individuals, families and groups handicapped
                                                              by social, environmental, health and related problems.
EDL 515                                          Cr. 3.0      Course Type(s): None
Advanced Literacy Instruction
Focuses on pedagogy and theories that are applicable to       EDL 522                                           Cr. 3.0
teaching literacy to beginning, struggling, and skilled       Early Literacy and Language Development
readers. Topics include approaches for teaching literacy      Focuses on the early literacy and language development of
                                                              regular and special education children, ages three through




                                                                                    Monmouth University A33
Appendix A: Course Descriptions



eight. The content includes the study of the theories and      support of education in local school districts.
acquisition of language, the interrelated nature of reading    Course Type(s): None
and writing, the appropriate development and assessment
of early literacy, methods for engaging and motivating         EDL 533                                            Cr. 3.0
young learners, and the importance of family involvement.      Community Relations
Course Type(s): None                                           Examines the theoretical and practical approaches for
                                                               establishing effective school/community relations and the
EDL 525                                           Cr. 3.0      role of the educational leader in promoting the success of
Multicultural Literature and Literacy                          all students by collaborating with families and other com-
Focuses on multicultural literature and how it is integrated   munity members.
into a classroom and/or school-wide literacy program. A        Course Type(s): None
wide array of multicultural literature and other genre for
children and young adults will be presented, studies and       EDL 535                                            Cr. 3.0
integrated into a Teacher Work Sample. Coaching col-           School Plant Planning
leagues and paraprofessionals is emphasized.                   Problems of housing the educational program, school
Prerequisite: Educational Leadership 515.                      plant management, building needs, construction, unit cost
Course Type(s): None                                           and financing, facilities, community growth, and planning.
                                                               Course Type(s): None
EDL 526                                           Cr. 3.0
Strategies for Teaching Writing, K-12                          EDL 536                                            Cr. 3.0
Provides an in-depth study of strategies for teaching vari-    Curriculum Development and Design
ous types of writing to elementary and secondary students.     Examining models of curriculum development, candidates
It involves assessing and instructing students who require     evaluate, design and develop effective curricula to sup-
assistance with the development of written expressive lan-     port the instructional process and enhance student learn-
guage under the direction of a university supervisor.          ing experiences.
Course Type(s): None                                           Course Type(s): None

EDL 527                                           Cr. 3.0      EDL 537                                            Cr. 3.0
Literacy Trends and Issues                                     Technology for School Leaders
Focuses on issues, problems, and trends in the field of lit-   Focuses on the practical applications and the authentic
eracy. The content includes the study of divergent view-       use of technology to provide instructional and administra-
points and research regarding theories, instructional          tive support of the learning community.
strategies, assessment, classroom environment and pro-         Course Type(s): None
fessional development.
Prerequisite: Educational Leadership 515.
Course Type(s): None                                           EDL 539                                            Cr. 3.0
                                                               Instructional Theory and Leadership for
EDL 530                                           Cr. 3.0      Student Learning
                                                               Examines the knowledge and research base of learning
School Law and Policy                                          theory and the role of the instructional leader in transfer-
A study of court decisions addressing the legal principles
                                                               ring theory into best practices to enhance student learn-
affecting education, schools, and school professionals.
                                                               ing and sustain professional learning communities.
Constitutional, statute, and administrative laws related to
                                                               Course Type(s): None
education are examined and analyzed through case stud-
ies and Socratic methods.
Course Type(s): None                                           EDL 541                                            Cr. 3.0
                                                               Administration in Higher Education
                                                               Provides theoretical and practical foundation of manage-
EDL 532                                           Cr. 3.0
                                                               ment and administration as applied to institutions of high-
Human Resource Management and School Finance                   er education. Designed to give students the analytical and
Provides combined theory and practice of human
                                                               behavioral skills necessary to manage on this level.
resource management and public school finance in rela-
                                                               Course Type(s): None
tion to expenditures and resources, and state and federal




A34 Monmouth University
                                                                              Appendix A: Course Descriptions



EDL 551                                           Cr. 3.0      EDL 554                                            Cr. 3.0
The In’s and Out’s and Do’s and Don’ts of                      A Proactive Approach to Technology
Embracing Technology Tools in the Classroom                    Implementation Across the Curriculum
Focuses on the use of educational technology in class-         Focus is on helping students infuse teaching with mean-
room settings and the strategies, resources, planning,         ingful technology across the curriculum. Students will have
and assessment of an effective program. Addresses col-         the opportunity to create, share, demonstrate and show-
laboration with colleagues regarding the ethical bound-        case a portfolio of resources, strategies, methods and var-
aries of excursions, ways to fit in technology that saves      ied options for technology integration through the creation
time and provides meaningful experiences to learners at        of an authentic classroom technology plan. Through col-
all levels and curricular areas. Students will become          laboration, guidance practice then independent work, stu-
familiar with relevant text materials and participate in an    dents will embrace all aspects of technology integration
exploration of resource options for utilizing technology for   and work step-by-step to create a ready-to-use plan.
various purposes during instructional planning and execu-      Prerequisites: Educational Leadership 551 and 552.
tion of plans. Materials, methods and strategies will be       Course Type(s): None
prepared and ready-to-utilize for authentic purposes,
upon completion of this course.                                EDL 560                                            Cr. 4.0
Course Type(s): None                                           Early Childhood Curriculum Assessment for
                                                               Inclusive Environments
EDL 552                                           Cr. 3.0      Curriculum and assessment for early childhood programs
Creative Technology: Utilizing Technology to Ignite            serving children in preschool through age eight.
a Passion for Learning                                         Multidimensional, ongoing, and performance-based
Through graphic design and the integration of digital pho-     assessment strategies are addressed. Characteristics of
tography, Flip Video, software such as PowerPoint, the         developmentally appropriate curricula are explored.
Print Shop, and multi-media projection devices, the            Development of learning environments that respect diver-
opportunity to use technology for stimulating, engaging        sity and create opportunities for active participation of all
and motivating students will be explored. Enables stu-         children are emphasized.
dents to explore and develop exciting learning experi-         Course Type(s): None
ences. Includes ways to utilize resources in routine les-
son planning and to make technology an exciting aspect         EDL 564                                            Cr. 3.0
of all lesson plans.                                           Assessment and Instruction in Literacy I
Course Type(s): None                                           Focuses on the principles of on-going assessment and
                                                               instruction of K-12 students’ reading and writing develop-
EDL 553                                           Cr. 3.0      ment. Strategies to select, use, and interpret appropriate
Technology Integration: Methods for Successfully               standardized, criterion- referenced and informal assess-
Meeting Diverse Learning Needs Within a Classroom              ment measures will be provided. Techniques for analysis
Expands further upon the various forms of technology           of students’ literacy strengths and weaknesses and tech-
available for classroom use. Students will develop engag-      niques for coaching colleagues and paraprofessionals will
ing learning activities designed to meet the diverse learn-    be addressed. Individual and group literacy strategies are
ing needs within a classroom. Opportunities will be pro-       explored and practiced in public school classrooms and a
vided to explore the various possibilities for modifications   clinical setting.
and adaptations made possible via specific technology          Course Type(s): None
tools. Helps students maximize learning opportunities
through the use of Podcasts, instant messaging, text-to-       EDL 565                                            Cr. 3.0
speech capabilities, WebQuests, and more.                      Assessment and Instruction in Literacy II
Prerequisites: Educational Leadership 551 and 552.             Focuses on assessment and instructional literacy strate-
Course Type(s): None                                           gies for assisting all learners, including those with diverse
                                                               backgrounds. The content includes the theory and practice
                                                               of portfolio assessment and varied instructional strategies
                                                               as well as the integration of technology. Individual and
                                                               group literacy and coaching strategies are explored and
                                                               practiced in public school classrooms and a clinical setting.




                                                                                      Monmouth University A35
Appendix A: Course Descriptions



Prerequisite: Educational Leadership 564.                       EDL 582                                           Cr. 3.0
Course Type(s): None                                            Practicum in Supervision and Curriculum P-12
                                                                Application of duties and responsibilities of the supervisor
EDL 566                                            Cr. 3.0      and/or curriculum specialist to an in-school supervised
Diagnosis and Remediation of Literacy Problems I,               practicum project.
Secondary                                                       Prerequisite: Educational Leadership 569 or 565.
Involves a field-based component, which focuses on              Course Type(s): None
assessing and evaluating secondary students’ reading
and writing. Strategies to select appropriate standardized,     EDL 585                                           Cr. 3.0
criterion-referenced and informal assessment measures           Practicum in Literacy
will be provided. Techniques for the analysis of literacy       Concentrates on the clinical assessment and instruction of
difficulties and the formulation of remediation plans will be   students who have difficulty with reading and writing. The
addressed.                                                      practicum involves instructional sessions, observing col-
Course Type(s): None                                            leagues tutoring, and being observed during a seamless
                                                                assessment and instruction cycle. In addition, self-assess-
EDL 569                                            Cr. 3.0      ment is encouraged via the use of videotaped teaching
Public School Supervision and Communication                     sessions and in-depth, collaborative case discussions.
Aspiring supervisors and principals will develop a greater      Prerequisites: Educational Leadership 515, 564, and 565.
understanding of the knowledge, interpersonal skills, and       Course Type(s): None
technical processes necessary to provide developmental
supervision and professional growth experiences for staff       EDL 588                                           Cr. 3.0
members.                                                        Practicum in School Leadership, P-12
Prerequisite: Educational Leadership 536 or 565.                Principles, problems, and techniques relative to the duties
Course Type(s): None                                            and responsibilities of the elementary and secondary
                                                                school administrator will be discussed in conjunction with
EDL 572                                            Cr. 3.0      the ELCC Standards. Practical application of these con-
Current Topics in Educational Psychology                        cepts through internship will be the primary focus of the
Several important contemporary theoretical, applied, and        course and the course assessments.
methodological issues in various areas of educational           Prerequisite: Educational Leadership 569.
psychology are selected by the instructor for inclusion in      Course Type(s): None
the course. Seminar discussions focus on the critical
evaluation of the recent literature in the areas selected.      EDL 589                                           Cr. 3.0
Course Type(s): None                                            Practicum in School Leadership P-12 II
                                                                Principles, problems, and techniques relative to the duties
EDL 575                                            Cr. 3.0      and responsibilities of the elementary and secondary
Methods of Teaching Language Arts and Content                   school administrator will be discussed in conjunction with
Literacy at the Elementary Level                                the ELCC Standards. Practical application of these con-
Provides candidates with the knowledge of language as a         cepts through internship will be the primary focus of the
medium for teaching and learning. Candidates will be            course and the course assessments. The mentor is
introduced to strategies that facilitate an integrated          expected to extend and involve the intern in more admin-
approach to language arts and content literacy instruction.     istrative experiences now that he or she has had one
The use of literature in all content areas will be explored,    semester of practicum.
leading to a better understanding of the interdisciplinary      Prerequisite: Educational Leadership 588.
approach to learning at the elementary level. Four days of      Course Type(s): None
fieldwork is required over the course of the term.
Prerequisites: Education 510, 550, 552 and Educational          EDL 593                                           Cr. 3.0
Leadership 503.                                                 Administration and Supervision of Literacy Practices
Course Type(s): None                                            and Professional Development for School Leaders
                                                                Focuses on the principles, methods, and materials applica-
                                                                ble to the administration, organization, and supervision of




A36 Monmouth University
                                                                                 Appendix A: Course Descriptions



literacy programs as well as the coaching of staff and col-       ed research proposal, to gather, analyze, and present their
leagues. Students are involved in observation, supervision,       data and findings in the form of a research thesis.
and a long-term staff development program in schools.             Prerequisite: Educational Leadership 601.
Prerequisite: Educational Leadership 569.                         Course Type(s): None
Course Type(s): None
                                                                  EDL 603                                            Cr. 3.0
EDL 598                                             Cr. 3.0       Individual Research Study
Special Topics in Educational Leadership                          Techniques of educational research including: types of
The subject matter varies with the interest of the students       research, problem definition, variables and controls, data
and the professor teaching the course. The exact nature           collection, data analysis and communication of results.
of the topic covered in any given semester is indicated in        Course Type(s): None
the student’s transcript.
Prerequisite: Permission of the program director is required.     EDL 606                                            Cr. 3.0
Course Type(s): None                                              Research Based Program Evaluation and
                                                                  Decision Making
EDL 599                                             Cr. 3.0       Examines key concepts, methods, and approaches in the
Independent Study in Education                                    field of evaluation research. Students will be exposed to
Independent research in education in an area not substan-         the basic principles and practices in educational program
tially treated in a regular course offering, under the supervi-   evaluation as well as the process of using evaluations to
sion of an Education faculty member; written evaluation of        make decisions on the implementation of new programs
the research is required. For students with superior ability.     or on the continuation of existing programs. Research of
Prerequisites: Prior permission of the directing professor        best practices, data-driven assessment that is unique to
and department chair. Application must be filed before            each student’s particular school, statistical analysis, com-
registration.                                                     bined with a comprehensive range of activities involved in
Course Type(s): None                                              designing and implementing educational programs will be
                                                                  the primary focus of the course. Presents students with
EDL 601                                             Cr. 3.0       the larger political, administrative, and financial issues
Research Methodology and Applications I                           that occur in program evaluation.
Designed to provide the students with a basic understand-         Prerequisite: Educational Leadership 569.
ing of the practical and theoretical applications of educa-       Course Type(s): None
tional research methodology. Beginning with an examina-
tion of the role of research in education, students will be       EDL 620                                            Cr. 3.0
guided through the process of reviewing and analyzing             Practicum in Executive Leadership
information and data from a variety of sources, comparing         Issues, principles, and responsibilities of the executive
and contrasting the different types of research designs,          leader at the district level are focused on. Using the
understanding the role of descriptive and inferential statis-     ELCC Standards as a guide, the practical applications of
tics, and the development of a research project.                  contemporary principles of educational leadership through
Course Type(s): None                                              a 150 hour internship experience are explored.
                                                                  Prerequisite: Educational Leadership 589.
EDL 602                                             Cr. 3.0       Course Type(s): None
Research Methodology and Applications II
This course is designed to extend students’ understanding         EDL 671                                            Cr. 3.0
of research methodological knowledge and techniques pre-          Advanced Practice with Children
sented in Educational Leadership 601 Research                     Designed for play therapy students; builds upon the foun-
Methodology and Applications I. Beginning with an in-depth        dation courses on individual, family and group counseling,
examination of the various types of quantitative and quali-       with advanced clinical applications for work with children.
tative research designs in education, the course will pres-       Assessment and intervention skills are used with children
ent students with inferential statistical procedures, experi-     and adolescents with special emphasis on expressive
mental vs. non-experimental studies, and an analysis of           therapies such as art, play, sand tray, and music. Also list-
results and their implications. Students will use the informa-    ed as Psychological Counseling 671 and Social Work 671.
tion garnered through this course, along with their complet-      Course Type(s): None




                                                                                         Monmouth University A37
Appendix A: Course Descriptions



EDL 672                                           Cr. 3.0    supervision of an Education faculty member; written eval-
Advanced Theory in Play Therapy                              uation of the research is required. For students with supe-
History and theory of play therapy are of central focus;     rior ability.
designed for play therapy students. A deep understanding     Prerequisite: Prior permission of the directing professor
of engagement and assessment techniques will be devel-       and department chair. Application must be filed before
oped and related to clinical practice. Also listed as        registration.
Psychological Counseling 672 and Social Work 672.            Course Type(s): None
Course Type(s): None
                                                             EDUCATION – SPECIAL EDUCATION
EDL 673                                           Cr. 3.0
Advanced Techniques in Play Therapy                          EDS 500                                               Cr. 3.0
Designed for play therapy students; advanced techniques      Integrated Approach to Foundations of
of play therapy are covered. Areas of play with children     Special Education
and adolescents, both individual and group, will be cov-     Focuses on topics related to Special Education as a pro-
ered. Also listed as Psychological Counseling 673 and        fession; the study of legal, social, and educational issues
Social Work 673.                                             related to diverse students across the life-span, research-
Course Type(s): None                                         based approaches for assessment, intervention, and
                                                             remediation for students with disabilities, and technology
EDL 674                                           Cr. 3.0    applications in the classroom guided by the Council for
Play Therapy for Children at Risk                            Exceptional Children Code of Ethics and the Professional
Designed for play therapy students; content on play ther-    Practice Standards for Teachers of Exceptional Learners,
apy with vulnerable and high-risk children is covered. The   and the New Jersey Professional Teaching Standards.
areas of play therapy with this population will include      Course Type(s): MAT
assistance with the legal system. Also listed as
Psychological Counseling 674 and Social Work 674.            EDS 502                                               Cr. 3.0
Course Type(s): None                                         Autism: Characteristics, Etiology, and
                                                             Current Issues
EDL 675                                           Cr. 3.0    Content includes an overview of various characteristics
Play Therapy Practicum Seminar I                             and learning traits of students who are served within the
First part of a six-credit practicum in play therapy.        category of autism spectrum disorders. Candidates will
Designed to allow students to process the clinical experi-   examine definitions, eligibility criteria, incidence rates, eti-
ence of play with children and adolescents, with applica-    ology and historical perspectives on autism. Perspectives
tions of advanced skills, assessment and treatment plan-     on the roles and responsibilities of students, families, edu-
ning. Also listed as Psychological Counseling 675 and        cational professionals, community personnel, and employ-
Social Work 675.                                             ers in relation to individuals with autism are also explored.
Course Type(s): None                                         Course Type(s): None


EDL 676                                           Cr. 3.0    EDS 522                                               Cr. 3.0
Play Therapy Practicum Seminar II                            Accommodating Learners with Special Needs in
Second part of a six-credit practicum in play therapy.       Inclusive Settings
Designed to allow students to process the clinical experi-   Designed to explore the concept of inclusion, discuss it
ence of play with children and adolescents, with a review    from a theoretical and practical perspective, and present
of practice evaluation. Also listed as Psychological         strategies necessary for inclusion to be successful.
Counseling 676 and Social Work 676.                          Included will be an emphasis on instructional strategies,
Course Type(s): None                                         differentiated instruction, accommodations and modifica-
                                                             tions, and communication and consultation techniques for
                                                             co-teaching and professional collaboration.
EDL 699                                      Cr. 1.0-3.0
                                                             Course Type(s): None
Independent Study in Educational Leadership
Independent research in education in an area not sub-
stantially treated in a regular course offering under the




A38 Monmouth University
                                                                                Appendix A: Course Descriptions



EDS 530                                           Cr. 3.0       in the classroom; the impact of disability on the family
Research Issues and Trends in Special Education                 system, communication skills needed for collaborating
An appraisal of current practices and issues in the field of    with diverse families; identifying and researching commu-
special education is conducted through discussion and           nity resources for persons with disabilities and their fami-
review of the research literature. Candidates explore the       lies; strategies for involving the families in the referral and
code of ethics and standards of practice in the field and       evaluation and development process of transition and
are encouraged to become critical consumers of research         career planning as well as the selection of transition
as a foundation for practice. The ability to critically ana-    resources and services.
lyze, synthesize, and evaluate the research base in spe-        Course Type(s): None
cial education is emphasized.
Course Type(s): None                                            EDS 542                                             Cr. 3.0
                                                                Communication and Social Competence Skills
EDS 532                                           Cr. 3.0       Focuses on the development and improvement of speech,
Physiological Aspects of Learning                               language and social competence skills for individuals with
Extends candidates’ knowledge of various applications of        autism. Also included are research-based approaches to
the physiological model of learning and learning disorders      assessment, intervention and remediation of communica-
to various aspects of assessment and training of students       tion disorders for individuals with autism. The functional
with various learning, medical, and behavioral problems.        relationship between communication skills and behavior is
Emphasis is placed on Learning Disorders (both right and        also examined. (Field experience is required.)
left brain), ADHD (both inattentive and hyperactive), Social    Course Type(s): None
and Emotional Disorders, Autism Spectrum Disorder and
other disorders under the category of Other Health              EDS 550                                             Cr. 3.0
Impaired (Tourette Syndrome and other chronic disorders).       Learning Theories and Applications in
Course Type(s): None                                            Educational Settings
                                                                Covers various classical and contemporary philosophies,
EDS 534                                           Cr. 3.0       aspects and models of learning. Emphasis will be placed
Classroom Management in Inclusive Settings                      upon such topics as multiple intelligences, learning styles,
Includes the study of the principles of behavior and a          teaching styles, information processing critical thinking
focus on the practical application strategies for teachers      skills, brain-based learning and other learning theories.
in inclusive settings. Factors that influence the behavior of   Students will review and critique general learning theo-
students with disabilities and research-based techniques        ries, as well as investigate how people organize, encode,
to facilitate positive teacher-student and peer relation-       process, transform, utilize and articulate information pre-
ships in a classroom environment are discussed.                 sented in an instructional environment.
Prerequisite: Special Education 500.                            Course Type(s): None
Course Type(s): MAT
                                                                EDS 552                                             Cr. 3.0
EDS 535                                           Cr. 3.0       Methods of Teaching Students with Disabilities
Technology and Students with Disabilities                       Methods in the field of special education are emphasized.
Focus is on instructor-centered and learner-centered inte-      Focus on identifying and creating accommodations and
gration of technology to provide a technological support-       modification to meet the needs of all students in special edu-
ive environment to meet the special needs of students.          cation and inclusive settings. (Field experience is required.)
Course Type(s): MAT                                             Prerequisites: Educational Leadership 515, and Special
                                                                Education 500, 534, 535, 537 and 569.
                                                                Course Type(s): None
EDS 537                                           Cr. 3.0
Collaborating with Families, Students, and
Professionals in Community and Educational Settings             EDS 566                                             Cr. 3.0
A study of social, legal, and educational issues related to     Assessment and Interventions for Individuals
diverse students across the lifespan, research-based            with Autism I
approaches for assessment, intervention, and remediation        Assessment processes such as screening, diagnosis, and
for students with disabilities, and technology applications     identification of developmental skills for individuals with
                                                                autism are included. Focus is on assessment of specific




                                                                                       Monmouth University A39
Appendix A: Course Descriptions



skills in developmental domains, such as sensory, oral,          bility and validity; formal and informal assessment tech-
motor, play, and communication and practical strategies          niques; administration of norm-referenced and informal
detailing what to teach based on assessment data.                tests; analysis of data; and the interpretation of assess-
Research-based interventions that promote progress in            ment for educational intervention and instructional plan-
the areas of communication, social, academic, behavior,          ning. The knowledge and skills of the educational diag-
and sensory motor skills for students with autism are            nostician are also emphasized.
examined. An overview of numerous curricula approaches           Prerequisite: Special Education 500.
and materials for individuals with autism are also includ-       Course Type(s): None
ed. Methods for monitoring the impact of interventions are
explored in a variety of service delivery models. (Field         EDS 571                                            Cr. 3.0
experience is required.)                                         Management of Challenging Behaviors
Course Type(s): None                                             An overview of the use of applied behavior analysis
                                                                 (ABA) for individuals with autism is the main focus of the
EDS 567                                            Cr. 3.0       course. Included are methods to increase behaviors,
Assessment and Interventions for Individuals with                decrease behaviors, maintain behaviors, and generalize
Autism II                                                        behaviors. Observation skills, data collection, and moni-
Various assessment processes such as screening, diag-            toring effectiveness of interventions are practiced. (Field
nosis, and identification of specific skills for individuals     experience is required.)
with autism are included. Focus is on using assessment           Course Type(s): None
data from various developmental domains to plan,
choose, and implement appropriate intervention strategies        EDS 572                                            Cr. 3.0
based on specific needs of an individual with autism. An         Assessment Strategies and Applications in the
overview of numerous curricula approaches and materials          Classroom
for individuals with autism is included in this course. (Field   Focuses on the educational assessment of students P-12
experience is required.)                                         who may be at risk or who have been identified as having
Prerequisite: Special Education 566.                             learning problems. Course content includes a discussion
Course Type(s): None                                             of assessment processes and concerns, importance of
                                                                 early intervention and procedural considerations. The
EDS 568                                            Cr. 3.0       course also includes an emphasis on educational interven-
Advanced Instructional Methods in Special Education              tions and strategies necessary to create an environment
A focus on the physical and instructional dimensions of          that leads to success for all learners with special needs.
teaching to include research-based strategies and tech-          Further topics that are presented include accommodations
niques for learners with special needs; effective instruc-       and adaptations; technology across the curriculum; learn-
tion for students with disabilities across the content area;     ing implications of classroom assessments, classroom
accommodations and adaptations; technology across the            organization and planning. Candidates must demonstrate
curriculum; as well as the learning implications of class-       that they are able to create informal assessments, analyze
room organization and planning. This course requires             data and structure and collaborate about instructional
demonstration that enrollees are able to evaluate, design,       techniques and curriculum adaptations for students with
structure and implement instructional techniques and cur-        learning problems. (Field experience is required.)
riculum adaptations for students with learning problems.         Course Type(s): None
Field experience required.
Prerequisite: Special Education 500.                             EDS 580                                            Cr. 3.0
Course Type(s): None                                             Research Seminar in Autism
                                                                 Research in the field of autism is emphasized. An
EDS 570                                            Cr. 3.0       overview of various types of research and methodologies
Assessment and Curricula Interventions                           is included in the course. Candidates will locate, interpret,
and Strategies                                                   analyze and synthesize the research base on autism.
A supervised clinical course where candidates develop            Candidates will prepare and implement a comprehensive
assessment plans and conduct assessments of students             research project and share the results. (Field Experience
(P-12) who are at risk or who have learning problems.            is required.)
Content includes: evaluation of sound assessment; relia-         Course Type(s): None




A40 Monmouth University
                                                                               Appendix A: Course Descriptions



EDS 590                                            Cr. 3.0      ries will be considered.
Diagnosis and Correction of Learning Disabilities               Course Type(s): EN.4
Focuses on the legal and ethical foundations for assess-
ment of school-age students. Strategies for the selection,      EN 502                                            Cr. 3.0
administration, and scoring of formal and classroom-based       Seminar in Literary Research
educational and social assessments are addressed.               Methods and materials for composing and presenting
Assessing students’ levels of performance, interpreting         graduate research centered upon selected texts chosen
results to enhance learner functioning and identifying serv-    by the instructor; bibliography, reference resources, criti-
ice and programming options are explored. Collaboration         cal analysis, and evaluation of sources; techniques, forms
with families and other professionals to assist in writing      and formats for research projects and papers.
Individual Education Plans (IEP) is addressed.                  Course Type(s): LA
Prerequisites: Special Education 570 and completion of
18 graduate credits.                                            EN 509                                            Cr. 3.0
Course Type(s): None
                                                                Middle English Literature
                                                                Study of selected works from the twelfth through the fif-
EDS 598                                            Cr. 3.0      teenth centuries in the context of contemporary cultural
Special Topics in Special Education                             and literary developments.
The subject matter varies with the interest of the students     Course Type(s): EN.1
and the professor teaching the course. The exact nature
of the topic covered in any given semester is indicated in      EN 511                                            Cr. 3.0
the student’s transcript.
                                                                The English Renaissance
Prerequisite: Permission of the program director is
                                                                Intensive study of the major genres and authors of
required.
                                                                English literature from 1550-1660, the age of Spenser,
Course Type(s): None
                                                                Johnson and Milton. Lyric and epic poetry, drama, prose
                                                                fiction, and the essay are represented.
EDS 599                                            Cr. 3.0      Course Type(s): EN.LT, LA
Independent Study in Special Education
Independent research in education in an area not sub-           EN 513                                            Cr. 3.0
stantially treated in a regular course offering, under the
                                                                Shakespeare, His Contemporaries and
supervision of an Education faculty member; written eval-
uation of the research is required. For students with supe-
                                                                Renaissance Society
                                                                Study of selected Shakespeare plays along with works by
rior ability.
                                                                Marlowe, Webster and others in order to place
Course Type(s): None
                                                                Shakespeare’s achievement within aesthetic, critical and
                                                                historical contexts.
EDS 610                                            Cr. 3.0      Course Type(s): EN.LT, LA
Internship in Learning Disabilities Teacher-Consultant
Teacher consultation in a public or private agency as part
of a Child Study Team under the supervision of a certified
                                                                EN 523                                            Cr. 3.0
L.D.T.C. and a faculty member.
                                                                Novel in English
                                                                The development of long prose fiction from the
Prerequisites: Admission into the L.D.T.C. program and
                                                                Eighteenth century to the present with consideration of
approval of the instructor.
                                                                criticism that defines the novel as a genre.
Course Type(s): None
                                                                Course Type(s): LA
ENGLISH
                                                                EN 525                                            Cr. 3.0
                                                                Eighteenth Century British Literature
EN 500                                             Cr. 3.0      Intensive study of selected works of prose, poetry, and
Critical Theory                                                 drama, which represent the Ages of Dryden, Pope,
Introduction to a variety of critical approaches to litera-     Johnson, and Hume.
ture. Theories will be applied to texts: poetry, fiction, and   Course Type(s): EN.LT, LA
drama, and the interpretation developed from these theo-




                                                                                       Monmouth University A41
Appendix A: Course Descriptions



EN 528                                              Cr. 3.0     EN 541                                               Cr. 3.0
Foundations of World Literature                                 Utopias
The oral and written traditions of the foundation of the        The significance of utopian proposals and attempts to cre-
non-Western world: Africa, the African Diaspora, Asia and       ate utopian communities in the history of ideas. From the
the Middle East.                                                utopias of Plato and More to dystopian visions of the Brave
Course Type(s): EN.3, LA                                        New World to 1984 and science fiction as a utopian genre.
                                                                Course Type(s): LA
EN 530                                              Cr. 3.0
Contemporary World Literature                                   EN 542                                               Cr. 3.0
Major literary texts from three broad areas of the non-         Contemporary American/British Literature
Western world (African Diaspora, Asia, the Middle East)         This course will explore American and/or British literature
will be critically examined, including literary trends, theo-   written in English from the contemporary period. These
ries, and criticism. Selections will be drawn from poetry,      works will be critically examined via close readings and
fiction, non-fiction, and drama.                                discussions within literary, historical, cultural, and/or theo-
Course Type(s): EN.LT                                           retical framework.
                                                                Course Type(s): EN.5, EN.LT
EN 532                                              Cr. 3.0
South Asian Literature                                          EN 544                                               Cr. 3.0
Traces the development of twentieth-century South Asian         Irish Literary Studies
fiction, poetry, and essays in English alongside the theo-      Ireland’s literary tradition in English from the eighteenth-
ries and discourses of nationalism, subaltern history, reli-    century to today. Different semesters may focus on a par-
gion, and politics that are a product of and response to        ticular period, genre or theme within Irish literature, such
experiences that literary pieces represent. We will             as Irish drama, the eighteenth century tradition, W.B.
address the content and aesthetics of literature for India,     Yeats and his circle or James Joyce and Irish Modernism.
Pakistan, Bangladesh, and Sri Lanka and develop tech-           Course Type(s): EN.LT
niques for interpreting and applying the inter-disciplinary
theory written by South Asian critics.                          EN 546                                               Cr. 3.0
Course Type(s): EN.LT                                           Historical Persuasion and Argumentation
                                                                Examines important texts in the history of persuasion and
EN 537                                              Cr. 3.0     argumentation. Covers the era when Rhetoric - the study
British Romanticism                                             and practice of persuasion and argumentation - was one
Investigation of British Romanticism as a self-consciously      of the fundamental disciplines (The Trivium) that every
defined movement in literature. Will also consider how          educated person had to learn.
Romanticisms have been read and defined historically.           Course Type(s): EN.4, EN.RW, LA
Course Type(s): LA, EN.2
                                                                EN 547                                               Cr. 3.0
EN 538                                              Cr. 3.0     Definitions of Contemporary Rhetoric
Victorian Novel                                                 Examines the use of language in a number of key spheres
Through a close thematic and formal analysis, this course       of human communication with the ultimate objective of con-
will study how British Victorian novels responded to the        structing a usable definition of modern rhetoric. Work in the
momentous social, political and intellectual changes of         course is especially concerned with defining more precisely
their time.                                                     the boundaries of contemporary rhetoric and language the-
Course Type(s): EN.LT, LA                                       ories to gain a deeper understanding of the richness and
                                                                dangers of language in our own written expression.
EN 540                                              Cr. 3.0     Course Type(s): EN.4, EN.RW, LA
Modernism in Britain
Study of British modernism in the context of twentieth-         EN 548                                               Cr. 3.0
century culture and history.                                    Rhetoric of Science and Society
Course Type(s): EN.LT, LA                                       Examination of how language-using agents (corporate,
                                                                governmental, educational, journalistic, and scientific) out-




A42 Monmouth University
                                                                               Appendix A: Course Descriptions



side the activities of a professional scientific community      EN 571                                           Cr. 3.0
(and sometime within it) rely on the dominance and force        Modern American Literature
of scientific language and its symbol systems to influence      Major works of American literature written between 1910
the society we live in.                                         and 1945 will be critically examined and placed within a
Course Type(s): EN.4, EN.RW                                     literary context in order to discuss techniques used by
                                                                their authors.
EN 558                                             Cr. 3.0      Course Type(s): EN.LT
Teaching Composition
The scholarship and methods of teaching composition             EN 581                                           Cr. 3.0
with a focus on the collaboration experience of the writing     Women in Literature
process, one-on-one conferencing, and integration of lan-       Investigates the role of women in literature as writers,
guage skills.                                                   readers and subjects. Includes theoretical consideration
Course Type(s): EN.RW, LA                                       of gender. Topics vary by semester.
                                                                Course Type(s): LA
EN 560                                             Cr. 3.0
Early American Literature                                       EN 598                                           Cr. 3.0
The development of American literature in various genres        Special Topics in English
through the Colonial, Revolutionary War, and Early              The subject matter varies with the interest of the students
Republic periods.                                               and of the professor teaching the course. The exact
Course Type(s): EN.LT, LA                                       nature of the topic covered in any given semester is indi-
                                                                cated in the student’s transcript.
EN 561                                             Cr. 3.0      Course Type(s): None
Nineteenth Century American Literature
Major works of American literature from 1830 to World War       EN 599                                           Cr. 3.0
I will be critically examined to place them in their literary   Independent Study in English
context and discover the techniques used by their authors.      Reading and research under the direction of a member of
Course Type(s): EN.LT, LA                                       the English faculty.
                                                                Prerequisite: Prior permission of the directing professor
EN 563                                             Cr. 3.0      and department chair.
Linguistics and the English Language                            Course Type(s): None
Includes a grounding in the structural aspects of general
linguistics: morphology, syntax, semantics, phonology,          EN 607                                           Cr. 3.0
and pragmatics. Examines the structure of the English           Seminar: Creative Nonfiction
language, including nouns and noun classes, ways of             Students will analyze, in a workshop setting, readings in
talking about actions and states, how ideas are combined        creative non-fiction to understand and become aware of
into complex sentences, and how context and purpose             the variant forms, techniques, and approaches used. As
affect how we use language. Also considers differences          workshop participants, students will write and analyze
between learning a first and second language.                   their own creative nonfiction pieces.
Course Type(s): EN.4, EN.RW                                     Course Type(s): EN.CW, EN.RW

EN 565                                             Cr. 3.0      EN 609                                           Cr. 3.0
New Jersey’s Literary Heritage                                  Seminar: Poetry
The development of New Jersey’s literary heritage in vari-      Students analyze in a workshop setting readings in con-
ous genres from the Colonial period to the present,             temporary poetry to observe techniques in craft, and
through analyses of representative works from different         present their own poetry for intensive examination by
regions of the state, with emphasis on their local signifi-     workshop participants.
cance and their relationship to national literary trends.       Course Type(s): EN.CW
Course Type(s): EN.LT




                                                                                      Monmouth University A43
Appendix A: Course Descriptions



EN 611                                            Cr. 3.0       EN 691                                              Cr. 3.0
Seminar: Fiction Writing                                        English Thesis Development
Students will analyze in a workshop setting readings in         An intensive and rigorous study of an author, topic, or
both American and World fiction to observe techniques in        theme developed under the direction of and evaluated by a
craft and present their own short stories for intensive         thesis advisor in consultation with two other full-time faculty
examination by workshop participants.                           members, at least one of whom must be in the Monmouth
Course Type(s): EN.CW                                           University Department of English. The thesis may be based
                                                                upon a paper completed in a course taken in a previous
EN 613                                            Cr. 3.0       semester and further developed with the advice of the pro-
Seminar for Playwrights                                         fessor in that course. By the end of the semester, students
In a workshop format, students will write, critique and per-    will have submitted a full, annotated bibliography and a
form stage readings of their classmates’ plays.                 preliminary draft of at least twenty pages.
Course Type(s): EN.CW                                           Prerequisites: Completion of 18 credits and a minimum
                                                                GPA of 3.00.
                                                                Course Type(s): LA
EN 615                                            Cr. 3.0
Writer’s Craft
An in-depth study of the creative writing process.
                                                                EN 692                                              Cr. 3.0
Students may develop a craft workbook that focuses on           English Thesis Writing
both traditional and contemporary literary forms and            Completion of the writing of the thesis under the continu-
strategies. Students write by assignment and develop            ing direction of a thesis advisor. The thesis must comprise
techniques of reviewing in order to compare and contrast        of at least fifty pages and will be evaluated by the thesis
major authors’ aesthetics with their own creative gestures.     advisor in consultation with two other full-time faculty
Course Type(s): EN.CW                                           members, at least one of whom must be in the Monmouth
                                                                University Department of English.
                                                                Prerequisites: Completion of 21 credits and a minimum
EN 617                                            Cr. 3.0       GPA of 3.00.
Advanced Academic Writing                                       Course Type(s): LA
Designed for the graduate student interested in sharpen-
ing his or her writing skills for the purpose of developing
                                                                FOREIGN LANGUAGE STUDIES
publication-quality articles. Content and assignments are
structured in such a way as to provide practice in acceler-
ated academic prose and, ideally, to produce a publica-         FF 511                                              Cr. 3.0
tion-quality article by the end of the course. Taught in a      Intensive Study: French
lecture/discussion and workshop format.                         Readings and research on an area or topic in the field of
Course Type(s): None                                            French, chosen under the guidance of the instructor;
                                                                weekly conferences and written reports.
                                                                Prerequisites: Undergraduate major in French and the
EN 644                                            Cr. 3.0       permission of the department.
Manuscript Seminar                                              Course Type(s): None
Completion of the writing of the manuscript under the
continuing direction of the mentor in consultation with two
other full-time faculty members, at least one of whom           FO 598                                              Cr. 3.0
must be in the Monmouth University Department of                Special Topics in Foreign Languages
English. The manuscript will consist of at least forty pages    Students study text in the original language at an advanced
of poetry, or fiction, or creative non-fiction, or drama, and   level. Course content will vary from semester to semester.
may contain work, substantially revised, completed in pre-      Course Type(s): None
vious graduate creative writing courses. The emphasis
will be on the manuscript as an integral unit, thematically     FO 599                                              Cr. 3.0
and stylistically, rather than on individual works. Mixed       Independent Studies in the Teaching of
genre manuscripts are discouraged.                              World Languages
Prerequisite: Completion of 21 credits.                         Curriculum development in foreign languages at the ele-
Course Type(s): None                                            mentary and secondary level; the study and application of




A44 Monmouth University
                                                                                 Appendix A: Course Descriptions



teaching methods and materials.                                   gain knowledge of important applications as well as the
Course Type(s): None                                              acquisition, accuracy, formatting, management, analysis
                                                                  and manipulation of data. When students complete this
FO LTIOPI                                           Cr. 0.0       course, they are expected to know: what GIS is, what GIS
Oral Proficiency Interview                                        can and cannot do, how data is stored, how data in GIS is
Language Testing International Examination for graduate           manipulated and analyzed to satisfy a project’s goals.
students; requires one-hour preparation a week.                   Course Type(s): LA
Course Type(s): None
                                                                  GO 501                                            Cr. 3.0
FS 511                                              Cr. 3.0       Advanced GIS Applications and Project
Intensive Study: Spanish                                          Implementation
Readings and research on an area or topic in the field of         Enables students to deepen their understanding of the
Spanish, chosen under the guidance of the instructor;             software, theory, and applications of GIS. Upon comple-
weekly conferences and written reports.                           tion of the course, students will have developed two proj-
Prerequisites: Undergraduate major in Spanish and the             ects as part of their portfolio: one in GIS implementation
permission of the department.                                     and one in project design and analysis within their partic-
Course Type(s): TPS                                               ular area of study.
                                                                  Prerequisite: Geography 500.
                                                                  Course Type(s): LA
FS 512                                              Cr. 3.0
Intensive Study: Spanish
Readings and research on an area or topic in the field of         GO 510                                            Cr. 3.0
Spanish, chosen under the guidance of the instructor;             Cartography in GIS
weekly conferences and written reports.                           Introduction to the study of cartography within Geographic
Prerequisite: Spanish 511.                                        Information Systems. Topics will include map types, the
Course Type(s): TPS                                               content and structure of maps, map interpretation, the
                                                                  history of mapping, map propaganda, the use of maps in
                                                                  society, and sources of data. Students will learn to make
FS 599                                              Cr. 3.0       maps using GIS software.
Independent Study in Spanish                                      Course Type(s): None
Development and execution of a relevant reading and
research project leading to significant written work designed
by the student in consultation with the research director.        GO 515                                            Cr. 3.0
Subject chosen for study should be related with any area of       Visual Basic for GIS
Spanish or Spanish American literature of special interest to     Visual Basic is becoming the primary programming tool
the student. Students applying, must demonstrate their            for developing Windows applications in most GIS environ-
knowledge of research techniques and their ability to apply       ments. Students will learn fundamental programming
them to the specific area of studies chosen. It is also           technique and advanced methodologies, including com-
required that the students should be able to present the          ponent programming and object-oriented data structures.
results of their research in appropriate written and oral form.   They will have hands-on experience and at the end of the
Prerequisites: Permission of the program director, chair,         semester will be able to customize and expand GIS func-
and research director. Student must be within last 12             tions for different GIS applications.
credits of graduation and have a GPA of at least 3.00.            Prerequisite: Geography 500.
Course Type(s): TPS                                               Course Type(s): None


GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS                                    GO 520                                            Cr. 3.0
                                                                  Spatial Database Design and Management in GIS
GO 500                                              Cr. 3.0       Spatial databases make up the foundation for Geographic
                                                                  Information Systems. This course focuses on proper
Theories and Methods of Geographic Information
                                                                  design, implementation, and management of spatial data-
Systems                                                           bases. Students will consider both logical and physical
Provides students with a solid foundation in the theories
                                                                  design. Students will get the theoretical training as well as
and methods of Geographic Information Systems. Students
                                                                  hands-on experience.




                                                                                         Monmouth University A45
Appendix A: Course Descriptions



Prerequisite: Geography 500.                                    and project(s) prepared during the internship. The seminar
Course Type(s): LA                                              component will provide students with academic support and
                                                                a framework to critically examine theoretical as well as prac-
GO 530                                             Cr. 3.0      tical aspects of their research and internship experience.
Advanced Techniques and Technology in GIS                       Prerequisite: Nine credits in Geography.
Covers current topics within the field of Geographic            Course Type(s): None
Information Systems. The topics will change each semes-
ter depending on the changes within the discipline and          GO 599                                        Cr. 1.0-3.0
the needs of students. Such areas of study will include         Independent Study in Geography
ArcInfo, Geomedia, Avenue Programming, Visual Basic             Reading and research under the direction of a member of
for GIS, and Arcview extensions.                                the Geography faculty.
Prerequisite: Geography 500.                                    Prerequisite: Prior permission of the directing professor
Course Type(s): LA                                              and department chair.
                                                                Course Type(s): None
GO 540                                             Cr. 3.0
Spatial Analysis                                                HEALTH STUDIES
Focuses on methods of spatial analysis and various kinds
of modeling within GIS. Included are such topics as 3-D         HE 584                                             Cr. 3.0
terrain visualization and analysis, locational and network      Curriculum and Instruction in Health Education
modeling, map algebra, and spatial statistics.                  Examination of theoretical bases for health education
Prerequisite: Geography 500.                                    including program development and implementation, edu-
Course Type(s): LA                                              cational strategies, behavioral objectives, learner character-
                                                                istics, instructional assessment, and classroom manage-
GO 559                                             Cr. 3.0      ment. Not open to students who have taken Health 512.
Remote Sensing and GPS                                          Course Type(s): None
Students will learn the principles of remote sensing, digi-
tal image processing, and image analysis. Students will         HISTORY
also learn the basic principles of GPS, how to integrate
GPS data with other GIS data sets, and how quality can          HS 501                                             Cr. 3.0
affect problem solving and decision-making.                     Historical Criticism
Course Type(s): None                                            History as a scholarly discipline, with emphasis on histori-
                                                                cal interpretation and philosophy since Classical Antiquity,
GO 580                                             Cr. 3.0      the evaluation of sources, and the rules of critical analy-
GIS and Society                                                 sis. A research paper will be required.
Examines the political, economic, legal, ethical, and social    Course Type(s): None
implications of GIS. Students will learn how GIS influ-
ences policy decisions. Topics include societal effects of      HS 502                                             Cr. 3.0
GIS including issues of privacy, representation, and            The Great Writings of History
access to technology.                                           Analysis and appraisal of representative writings and
Course Type(s): None                                            philosophies of great historians from Classical Antiquity to
                                                                modern times, reflecting the development of history as
GO 595                                             Cr. 3.0      scholarly discipline.
Geographic Information Systems Internship Seminar               Course Type(s): None
Provides the capstone experience for the GIS Certificate, in
which students undertake an internship and participate in a     HS 503                                             Cr. 3.0
seminar. Through the internship, students will get hands-on     Introduction to the Study of World History
experience in a field related to their academic and career      Introduces students to the growing field of World History,
interests, working 10-15 hours per week in public, private,     surveying the developments in the field since the nine-
or non-profit agencies. Students will maintain a journal of     teenth century. Examines key concepts and methods, and
their intern experience and provide a portfolio of their work   explores major themes and categories of analysis, includ-




A46 Monmouth University
                                                                               Appendix A: Course Descriptions



ing empire, nationalism, gender, and law. Required of all       lution within the states and under the Articles of
students in the World History specialization.                   Confederation; postwar struggles resulting in the adoption
Course Type(s): HSNW, HSWLD                                     of the Constitution.
                                                                Course Type(s): HSUS
HS 504                                             Cr. 3.0
Ancient Civilizations of Native America                         HS 514                                            Cr. 3.0
Cultural developments in Mesoamerica and the Central            Readings on Jacksonian Era
Andes from the development of agriculture to the Spanish        The meaning of Jacksonian democracy; political, eco-
conquest, focusing on Inca and Aztec civilizations; theo-       nomic, and social reforms; labor in transition from mer-
retical exploration of developmental similarities between       cantile to industrial capitalism; humanitarian, communitari-
the two regions. Also listed as Anthropology 504.               an, and anti-slavery movements; Manifest Destiny; the
Course Type(s): HSNW                                            Mexican War and its aftermath.
                                                                Course Type(s): HSUS
HS 505                                             Cr. 3.0
US Women’s History                                              HS 515                                            Cr. 3.0
Explores US Women’s History and focus on how women              Readings on the Civil War and Reconstruction
of different socioeconomic backgrounds, races, and eth-         The economic, social, and political forces in the United
nic groups have experienced cultural transformations and        States during the years 1850-1877 relating to the onset,
political change. Emphasis will be on the significance of       nature, and impact of the Civil War and Reconstruction,
citizenship, political agency, the cultural construction of     and the Black Revolution.
race and gender, and reproductive rights.                       Course Type(s): HSUS
Course Type(s): HSUS
                                                                HS 516                                            Cr. 3.0
HS 506                                             Cr. 3.0      Readings on Populism and Progressivism in America
Historical Archeology                                           A critical analysis of the reform impulses of the late nine-
An intensive introduction to historical and industrial arche-   teenth and early twentieth centuries with an emphasis on
ology (c. 1492+). Topics covered include exploration,           the various schools of interpretation.
imperialism, colonization, industrialization and urbanism.      Course Type(s): HSUS
Archeological field methods and the interpretation of
material culture are also introduced.                           HS 517                                            Cr. 3.0
Course Type(s): HSUS                                            Readings on Modern America, 1933-Present
                                                                Readings of pertinent historical literature (monographs
HS 510                                             Cr. 3.0      and journal articles) dealing with United States history
Seminar in American History                                     since the administration of F.D. Roosevelt.
Selected topics in American history, with emphasis on           Course Type(s): HSUS
techniques of independent historical research and writing.
Course Type(s): HSUS                                            HS 518                                            Cr. 3.0
                                                                United States Family History
HS 511                                             Cr. 3.0      This seminar explores United States Family History and
Readings on American Colonial History                           the social construction of the family, its many diverse
Readings in recent writings in monographs and periodi-          forms, and the relationship between society and the fami-
cals devoted to social, economic, and political aspects of      ly. Analyzing issues of race, class, ethnicity, gender, and
American colonial history.                                      sexuality will further enable us to consider the history of
Course Type(s): HSUS                                            the family form. We will cover such diverse topics as the
                                                                history of adoption, courtship, and divorce.
HS 512                                             Cr. 3.0      Course Type(s): HSUS
American Revolution and Constitutional Issues,
1763-1789
Problems of Empire; the causes, course, and conse-
quences of the American Revolution; the continuing revo-




                                                                                       Monmouth University A47
Appendix A: Course Descriptions



HS 521                                            Cr. 3.0      HS 526                                                Cr. 3.0
All the Livelong Day: The Meaning of Work in                   The Cold War
Modern America                                                 Examines the rivalry between the United States and the
Examination of content changes in the meaning of work in       Soviet Union that organized global politics for forty-five
America through the twentieth century.                         years; the roles of ideology, economy, and security that
Course Type(s): HSUS                                           fueled it; the diplomacy, propaganda, and armed might
                                                               used to wage it; and the impact it had on participants’ pol-
HS 522                                            Cr. 3.0      itics and culture.
                                                               Course Type(s): HSEU, HSUS
History Urbanization in America
Provides an interdisciplinary study of the history of urban-
ization and industrialization in the United States from the    HS 527                                                Cr. 3.0
mid-nineteenth century to the early twentieth century.         United States Military History
Using the themes of community, technology, public policy,      Surveys the American experience of war, from the first
and immigration, students will examine the development         Native American-European contact through the military
and changes in the social, physical, political, and econom-    interventions at the dawn of the twenty first century;
ic urban landscape. Also listed as Political Science 522.      examines not only the major conflicts in this period, but
Course Type(s): HSUS                                           also the evolution of strategy, military institutions, civil-mil-
                                                               itary relations, and the American way of war.
HS 523                                            Cr. 3.0      Course Type(s): HSUS
Studies in Mexican History and Culture
The development of Mexican nationalism in the fusion of        HS 528                                                Cr. 3.0
Indian and Spanish Catholic cultures; the chaos of inde-       History of Consumerism in America
pendence; Mexico and the United States; the Reform; the        A seminar that explores the origins of the consumer cul-
Diaz dictatorship; Positivism, the search for order and        ture and the multitude of ways in which it has shaped
progress; the Revolution of 1910; and Reconstruction.          American society. We consider both the reverence of and
Course Type(s): HSNW                                           the critiques of consumerism, analyzing race, class, gen-
                                                               der, ethnicity, and geography in our consideration of con-
HS 524                                            Cr. 3.0      sumer ideology and practices. Advertising, marketing,
                                                               sales, and the consumer will all be considered in our
Twentieth Century United States Political History
                                                               analysis of the history of consumerism.
Examines the twentieth century evolution of liberalism
                                                               Course Type(s): HSUS
and conservatism, campaigns and elections, and con-
gress and the presidency; considers critical elections,
consensus and dissent, and the status of political rights      HS 529                                                Cr. 3.0
through the progressive period, the Republican ascen-          History of Sexuality in America
dancy, the New Deal, the Second World War, the Cold            A seminar that explores the cultural history of sexuality in
War, and Post-Cold War period.                                 the United States. We will consider how race, class, and
Course Type(s): HSUS                                           gender have influenced ideas about sexuality, morality,
                                                               and power. Major topics include prostitution, reproduction,
HS 525                                            Cr. 3.0      gay, lesbian, and transgender sexualities, sexually trans-
                                                               mitted diseases, and sexual representation and censor-
World War II
                                                               ship. Working with monographs, scholarly articles, and
Considers the military, economic, and political characteris-
                                                               primary sources that come from throughout American his-
tics of the Allied and Axis powers and the strategies they
                                                               tory, we will explore the ways in which sexuality has both
produced; examines the military campaigns, the wartime
                                                               shaped and been affected by this nations’ history.
economics, life on the home fronts, the experience of
                                                               Course Type(s): HSUS
combat, the dynamics of occupation, and the roles of
morality and immorality in the conduct of the war.
Course Type(s): HSEU, HSUS                                     HS 530                                                Cr. 3.0
                                                               New Jersey History
                                                               A study of New Jersey history especially as a venue for
                                                               exploring general trends in American history. Topics cov-




A48 Monmouth University
                                                                             Appendix A: Course Descriptions



ered include New Jersey’s Native Americans, colonial set-     HS 537                                            Cr. 3.0
tlement, the proprietary government, agricultural unrest,     Power and Enlightenment: Europe 1648-1789
the American Revolution, Federalism, slavery, industrial-     A study of European history from the Treaty of Westphalia
ization, urbanization and suburbanization.                    to the French Revolution, emphasizing the contrast
Course Type(s): HSUS                                          between political and military developments and cultural
                                                              and intellectual trends. Special emphasis on the develop-
HS 531                                           Cr. 3.0      ment of absolutism in France, Prussia, Austria, Spain,
Studies in Ancient History                                    and Russia, the struggle against absolutism in Britain,
Readings and discussion of principal aspects of Graeco-       Sweden, and the Netherlands; the ideals and goals of the
Roman culture, with emphasis on contribution of Classical     European enlightenment, developing social and political
Antiquity to Western Civilization and recent research in      tensions, and enlightened despotism.
the field.                                                    Course Type(s): HSEU, HSPRE
Course Type(s): HSEU
                                                              HS 541                                            Cr. 3.0
HS 532                                           Cr. 3.0      Graduate Seminar in European History
Native American History and Prehistory                        Selected topics in European history, with emphasis on
Examines North America’s native people in the area north      techniques of independent historical research and writing.
of the Rio Grande. It combines North American prehistory      Course Type(s): HSEU
with a historical overview of Native American experiences
since contact. Evidence from archaeology, oral histories,     HS 542                                            Cr. 3.0
and written sources are all presented. Challenges facing      French Revolution
modern Native Americans are also examined.                    The causes of the Revolution; its relationship to the
Course Type(s): HSNW, HSWLD                                   Enlightenment; the political, economic, social, and cultural
                                                              consequences of the moderate phase and of the Terror.
HS 533                                           Cr. 3.0      Course Type(s): HSEU
The History of Public Policy in the United States
The objective is to survey major issues in domestic public    HS 544                                            Cr. 3.0
policy. The emphasis is on changes in the process of poli-    The German Empire, 1871-1914
cy formation in both the public and private sectors. Also     The unification of the Empire; the political and social set-
listed as Political Science 533.                              tlement imposed by Bismarck; the domestic crisis preced-
Course Type(s): HSUS                                          ing World War I.
                                                              Course Type(s): HSEU
HS 535                                           Cr. 3.0
The Renaissance                                               HS 545                                            Cr. 3.0
Europe in transition from the fourteenth to the sixteenth     World War I
century; the crisis of the church, humanism and art, poli-    The international and domestic causes of the Great War;
tics and diplomacy, exploration and discovery, science        its political, economic, social, cultural, and psychological
and the occult.                                               consequences in Britain, France, and Germany; its role in
Course Type(s): HSEU                                          the birth of the modern age.
                                                              Course Type(s): HSEU
HS 536                                           Cr. 3.0
The Reformation                                               HS 546                                            Cr. 3.0
A study of sixteenth and early seventeenth century reli-      The Weimar Republic, 1918-1933
gious and political developments in Europe; causes of the     The foundation of the first German republic as an out-
Reformation, its political and social institutionalization,   come of revolution and defeat in war; its political and cul-
ideas of reformers, wars of religion, and the counter-        tural innovations; the causes of its collapse.
Reformation.                                                  Course Type(s): HSEU
Course Type(s): HSEU




                                                                                     Monmouth University A49
Appendix A: Course Descriptions



HS 547                                             Cr. 3.0    HS 571                                                Cr. 3.0
The Third Reich                                               Studies in the History of Revolution
The ideological origins of Nazism; the consolidation and      An interdisciplinary study of the nature and causes of
character of Nazi rule; the relation of Hitler with the       modern revolutions, the makeup of the revolutionary per-
German people; Nazism as revolution.                          sonality, and the role of ideology, strategy, and tactics in
Course Type(s): HSEU                                          the making of revolution. Emphasis is on twentieth-centu-
                                                              ry communist revolutions.
HS 551                                             Cr. 3.0    Course Type(s): HSEU
Graduate Seminar in British History
Selected topics in modern English and British history, with   HS 572                                                Cr. 3.0
emphasis on techniques of historical research.                History of Tourism
Course Type(s): HSEU                                          Students will study the history of tourism in different parts
                                                              of the world from political, social, cultural, geographic, and
HS 553                                             Cr. 3.0    economic perspectives. This will include an examination of
Tudor-Stuart England                                          historical differences in tourist attractions, tourist behav-
The political, religious, social, and cultural history of     iors, and impacts on tourist destinations and their people.
England in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries:           Students will also study how historical memory and inter-
Tudor absolutism, the English Reformation, the rise of        pretation shapes the contemporary tourist experience, as
Puritanism, social and economic change, the conflict          well as questions concerning authenticity and tourism.
between crown and Parliament, the English Civil War, and      Course Type(s): HSEU, HSWLD
the Revolution of 1688.
Course Type(s): HSEU                                          HS 575                                                Cr. 3.0
                                                              Civilization of the Andes
HS 561                                             Cr. 3.0    Survey of Andean history from the beginning of human
Twentieth Century Russia and the Soviet Union                 settlement through the Inca Empire and the Spanish con-
Studies in the transformation of Russian society, with        quest to contemporary peasant society. The evolution and
emphasis on the revolutionary movements and the eco-          nature of precolumbian civilizations, focusing on Chavin,
nomic, social, and political institutions of Soviet Russia.   Paracas-Nazca, Huari-Tiahuanaco, Chimor, and the Inca.
Course Type(s): HSEU                                          The social and political organization of the Inca empire.
                                                              The Spanish conquest and its impact on native culture.
                                                              Contemporary social changes; rural migration and the
HS 562                                             Cr. 3.0    transformation of contemporary Andean society.
History of Maps and Mapping                                   Theoretical exploration of the developmental trajectory of
Students will study the historical developments in carto-     Andean civilization. Also listed as Anthropology 575.
graphic technique, the development of mapping in different    Course Type(s): HSNW, HSWLD
parts of the world, and the future of mapping in the com-
puter age. Students will focus on the ways the events and
ideology of a time period influence maps and mapping,
                                                              HS 577                                                Cr. 3.0
and how in turn mapping influences history and ideology.      European Intellectual Revolution, 1500-1800
Course Type(s): HSEU, HSNW, HSWLD                             An examination of the roots of the modern mind, the sec-
                                                              ularization of thought, and individualism vs. traditional
                                                              ideals of stability and order. Scientific, religious, and politi-
HS 563                                             Cr. 3.0    cal thought will be traced through readings, painting,
Twentieth Century East Central Europe                         architecture and sculpture.
The political, economic, and social development of the        Course Type(s): HSEU
lands between Germany and Russia, emphasizing the
breakdown of the Ottoman and Hapsburg empires, the
rise of the independent successor states between the
                                                              HS 580                                                Cr. 3.0
wars, the Soviet takeover in the post-war era, and the        Themes and Variations in Cultural History
development of national communism and polycentrism.           The exploration of symbol, style, and value in six histori-
Course Type(s): HSEU                                          cal periods from classical Greece to the end of the nine-
                                                              teenth century through art, literature, and philosophy.
                                                              Course Type(s): HSEU




A50 Monmouth University
                                                                              Appendix A: Course Descriptions



HS 581                                            Cr. 3.0      teenth century. Transformations resulting from transat-
Seminar in East Asian History                                  lantic trade and the colonial order; conceptual changes
A study of selected topics in Chinese or Japanese history,     about life, the biological order, and religion; exchanges of
with emphasis on techniques of historical research.            crops, animals, and disease; depopulation and migration;
Course Type(s): HSNW                                           African slavery and the plantation system; the forging of
                                                               labor as capital; the transfer of American gold, silver, and
                                                               other wealth to Europe and its impact on class formation
HS 583                                            Cr. 3.0      and capitalism; interactions with Asia. Roots of the con-
China, Japan, and the Modern World                             temporary world.
Experiences of China and Japan with Europe, America,           Course Type(s): HSNW, HSWLD
and pressures to modernize in the nineteenth and early
twentieth centuries. Emphasis is on contacts, exchanges,
conflicts, and images of one another across space and          HS 591                                              Cr. 3.0
time. Areas explored include traditional cultural patterns     Graduate Seminar in the Modern History of
and ways of thinking, systems of foreign relations, the        Islamic Peoples
role of technology, and comparative successes and fail-        Selected topics in Islamic history in the Middle East,
ures with modernization.                                       North Africa, and some areas of the Balkan Peninsula;
Course Type(s): HSNW, HSWLD                                    political, social, and intellectual change, the rise of nation
                                                               states, and cultural interaction with the West.
                                                               Course Type(s): HSNW
HS 585                                            Cr. 3.0
Seminar in African History
Analysis and appraisal of colonialism in Africa, reflecting    HS 595                                              Cr. 3.0
on the political, economic, and sociocultural transforma-      History Internship/Practicum
tions, which occurred in Africa between 1880 and 1960.         Provides graduate students with the opportunity to gain
Course Type(s): HSNW                                           substantive career experience and build specific applied
                                                               skills by working in outside programs, institutions, agen-
                                                               cies and firms engaged in the fields of public history, his-
HS 587                                            Cr. 3.0
                                                               torical archeology and anthropology and regional geogra-
Nationalism in Africa
                                                               phy. Prerequisite: Completion of 12 graduate credits.
Examines a major episode that transformed the political
                                                               Course Type(s): None
history of Africa in the twentieth century. It discusses how
nationalism became an instrument of political change that
led to the independence of African states. Begins by           HS 598                                              Cr. 3.0
examining the concept of nationalism in Europe, how it         Special Topics in History
was applied in Africa, and how it contributed to the strug-    Allows students to study a specific aspect of history. The
gle for independence.                                          subject matter varies from semester to semester, and
Course Type(s): HSNW, HSWLD                                    depends on the professor who teaches the course.
                                                               Course Type(s): None
HS 588                                            Cr. 3.0
Decolonization in Africa 1940-1960                             HS 599                                              Cr. 3.0
Examines the process of transfer of power from colonial        Independent Study in History
powers to Africans; the emergence of education elites;         Reading and research leading to significant written work
the rise of nationalism; implications of decolonizations;      under the direction of a member of the History faculty.
and African expectations of independence.                      Prerequisite: Prior permission of the directing professor
Course Type(s): HSNW, HSWLD                                    and department chair.
                                                               Course Type(s): None
HS 589                                            Cr. 3.0
Formation of the Global System: Fifteenth to                   HS 691                                              Cr. 3.0
Sixteenth Centuries                                            History Master’s Thesis I
Formation of the early global system that changed the          Reading and research leading to significant written work
world in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries. Brief survey   under the direction of a member of the history faculty.
of the Euro-African and American worlds prior to the fif-      Course Type(s): None




                                                                                      Monmouth University A51
Appendix A: Course Descriptions



HS 692                                           Cr. 3.0      INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES
History Master’s Thesis II
Reading and research leading to significant written work      IS 502                                             Cr. 3.0
under the direction of a member of the history faculty.       Web Writing and Development in the Liberal Arts
Course Type(s): None                                          Aids students who are interested in developing an expert-
                                                              ise in Web techniques and writing as applied to profes-
HS CPE                                           Cr. 0.0      sional projects and skills associated with careers in the
History Comprehensive Exam                                    Liberal Arts.
History Comprehensive Exam                                    Course Type(s): None
Course Type(s): None
                                                              IS 513                                             Cr. 3.0
HS THD                                           Cr. 0.0      War and Humanity
Thesis Defense                                                An examination of the issues relating to war and peace.
Course Type(s): None                                          Through a selection of specific crises and wars, an
                                                              emphasis is placed on the meaning, significance, and
INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY                                        morality of war. Wars such as the two World Wars, and
                                                              crises such as the Cuban Missile Affair will be diagnosed
                                                              and evaluated.
IT 500                                           Cr. 3.0      Course Type(s): None
Information Technology
Introduction to computer-based information management
concepts that provide an integrated approach to personal      IS 516                                             Cr. 3.0
computer software in a Windows environment. These             Adult Development
include: word processing, spreadsheet, database, presen-      Contemporary views of intellectual, ego, moral, and faith
tation graphics, and electronic communication applica-        development in the context of the adult life cycle, relating
tions; information retrieval from the Internet and online     these to participation in families, friendships, professional,
library resources; fundamental computer literacy; and the     and public life.
ethical and societal implications of computer technology.     Course Type(s): None
Hands-on experience with a microcomputer in a net-
worked environment is provided for completion of individ-     IS 523                                             Cr. 3.0
ual and group projects. This course is appropriate only for   Commitment in Adulthood
students from non-technology areas of study.                  An exploration of commitments formed in relationships
Course Type(s): None                                          and family life, careers and the workplace, and concerns
                                                              as related to social and global issues and religious/spiritu-
IT 510                                           Cr. 3.0      al development; familiarization with the literature on these
Internet Technology                                           issues from the field of adult development psychology,
Introduction to integrated application software used for      social psychology, social theory, and biography, and intro-
authoring and publishing Web sites. Applications include,     duction to interview-based research methodology.
preprogrammed software, markup programming and                Course Type(s): None
Internet scripting languages used to create Web pages.
Network technologies and the fundamental concepts             IS 531                                             Cr. 3.0
involved in creating a network and in facilitating network    Social Implications of Human Nature
operation will also be introduced. Hands-on experience        Scientific interpretation of human nature as biologically
with a microcomputer on a networked system is provided        evolved influences on modern human behavior; relevant
for completion of individual and group projects. This         theories and methods; integration of bio-evolutionary per-
course is appropriate only for students from non-technolo-    spective with cultural and historical explanations of
gy areas of study.                                            human behavior. Comparison of the scientific views with
Prerequisite: Information Technology 500.                     other ideas about human nature. Applications of the evo-
Course Type(s): None                                          lutionary perspective to selected issues and problems in
                                                              modern society.
                                                              Course Type(s): None




A52 Monmouth University
                                                                               Appendix A: Course Descriptions



LIBERAL ARTS                                                    LA 532                                             Cr. 3.0
                                                                Professional and Organizational Ethics
LA 501                                             Cr. 1.0      Applies ethical concepts and theories to moral issues in
Introduction to Liberal Arts                                    professional and organizational life. Special attention is
What does it mean to learn freely (liberal-ly)? This on-line    given to professional and corporate social responsibility.
course serves as an orientation to the field of inquiry         Course Type(s): LA
known as the liberal arts. It acquaints students with the
concept of a liberal education, grounds this concept in a       LA 580                                             Cr. 3.0
history of classical education, and inquires into the utility   American Cultural Diversity
of the liberal arts in the contemporary work world.             Explores the historical, social, and cultural backgrounds
Introduces students to broad intellectual traditions that       of immigrant groups found within the United States.
help people gain critical distance from the problems they       Through lectures, readings, case studies, and observa-
confront as citizens, workers and private persons. (Open        tions in an English-as-a-second-language classroom, stu-
to MALA students only.)                                         dents will be introduced into the complexity and diversity
Course Type(s): LA                                              of American society.
                                                                Course Type(s): LA
LA 502                                             Cr. 1.0
Origins and Implications of a Knowledge Society                 LA 595                                             Cr. 3.0
As our society ushers in the information revolution, sub-       Professional Internship
stantial changes in the social, political, educational, and     The Professional Internship provides Liberal Studies
economic contexts force us to reexamine the nature of           graduate students with the opportunity to gain substantive
productive labor. Provides an overview of the historical        career experience and build specific applied skills by
origins and implications of the currently unfolding informa-    working in outside programs, institutions, agencies and
tion revolution. Focuses on where these changes come            firms. The primary emphasis of the internship will be on
from, and the impact they have on the way we learn,             student development of professional methods, techniques
understand, and work. Students will explore opportunities       and skills in career fields related to one or more of the six
that a liberal arts education provides for adapting to these    core areas of the Liberal Studies program: History,
changes.(Open to MALA students only.)                           Natural Sciences, Social Sciences, Literature, Philosophy,
Course Type(s): LA                                              Religion and Ethics, and Art, Music, and Theatre.
                                                                Course Type(s): LA
LA 503                                             Cr. 1.0
Politics, Culture and Economy in New Jersey                     LA 598                                             Cr. 3.0
Orients students to the recent history, culture, and econo-     Special Topics in Liberal Arts
my of central New Jersey. Examines the various popula-          The subject matter varies with the interest of the students
tions, modes of employment, residential patterns, social        and the professor teaching the course. The exact nature
movements, and political division within New Jersey, and        of the topic covered in any given semester is indicated in
specifically those in and around Monmouth County. (Open         the student’s transcript. Permission of the program direc-
only to MALA students.)                                         tor is required.
Course Type(s): LA                                              Course Type(s): LA

LA 530                                             Cr. 3.0      LA 599                                             Cr. 3.0
Seminar in Liberal Arts                                         Independent Study in Liberal Arts
Designed to introduce students to graduate-level, interdis-     Reading and research leading to significant written work
ciplinary research and writing and provide a graduate-level     under the direction of a program chair. Prior permission of
seminar experience with detailed reports, informed discus-      an approved faculty member required.
sions, and critical evaluations. As the introductory seminar    Course Type(s): LA
for the program, students will be required to complete this
course before the end of their third semester of study.
Course Type(s): LA




                                                                                       Monmouth University A53
Appendix A: Course Descriptions



LA 691                                             Cr. 3.0      MA 520                                             Cr. 3.0
Liberal Arts Advanced Paper/Project                             Introduction to Financial Mathematics
Independent project investigating an area of special inter-     An introduction that combines the topics of finance to math-
est to the student, based on previous coursework in the         ematics. Topics include: introduction to pricing of derivative
Liberal Arts program.                                           securities markets; futures, swaps; options and bonds.
Course Type(s): LA                                              Prerequisite: Permission of the director of the MSFM or
                                                                department chair.
LA COL1                                            Cr. 0.0      Course Type(s): None
Colloquia
Colloquia                                                       MA 530                                             Cr. 3.0
Course Type(s): LA                                              Stochastic Calculus
                                                                Exposes students to some of the techniques from sto-
LA COL2                                            Cr. 0.0      chastic analysis that are employed in mathematical
Colloquia                                                       finance. This includes the importance in the revolution
Colloquia                                                       that has taken place in the financial markets over the last
Course Type(s): LA                                              twenty-five years. Topics include developing the relation-
                                                                ship between Brownian motion and stochastic calculus.
                                                                Prerequisite: Permission of the director of the MSFM or
MARINE SCIENCES                                                 department chair.
                                                                Course Type(s): None
MS 589A                                       Cr. 1.0-3.0
Special Topics in Marine Sciences                               MA 540                                             Cr. 3.0
Marine science education in the K-12 classroom. A brief
                                                                Statistical Theory in Finance and Economics
history of marine science and education is followed by a
                                                                Covers topics related to multiple regression techniques,
review of current marine education projects.
                                                                including testing the assumptions required for each to be
Course Type(s): None
                                                                valid. This includes applications to yield curve smoothing,
                                                                pricing, and investment models. Also covered are tech-
MATHEMATICS                                                     niques for the analysis and modeling of time series data,
                                                                forecasting and market risk measures. In addition, factor
MA 501                                             Cr. 3.0      analysis, structural equation modeling, and other multi-
C++ for Numerical Applications                                  variate techniques will be covered.
Teaches C++ in the UNIX/Cygwin development environ-             Prerequisites: Mathematics 520 and 530, both passed
ment. It specializes on practicalities of coding large appli-   with a grade of C- or higher.
cations utilizing software libraries containing numerical       Course Type(s): None
methods such as LAPACK/TNT/GSL and data structures
such as STL.                                                    MA 550                                             Cr. 3.0
Prerequisite: Permission of the director of the MSFM or         Computation and Simulation in Finance
department chair.                                               Teaches the most fundamental aspect of financial mathe-
Course Type(s): None                                            matics and numerical implementation from a practical
                                                                business. Topics include Black Scoles equations; Tree
MA 510                                             Cr. 3.0      based and Monte Carlo methods. Products.
Numerical Methods for Financial Mathematics                     Prerequisites: Mathematics 520 and 530, both passed
Teaches numerical methods aimed at implementing the             with a grade of C- or higher.
mathematics developed in financial engineering. This            Course Type(s): None
includes practical implementation in C++ of numerical
methods used in finance such as tree-based methods,             MA 595                                             Cr. 3.0
finite differences, and Monte Carlo simulation.                 Financial Mathematics Practicum
Prerequisite: Mathematics 501, passed with a grade of C-        Team work on substantial projects submitted by corporate
or higher.                                                      sponsors. Students address practical quantitative prob-
Course Type(s): None                                            lems from first formulation to final presentation, making




A54 Monmouth University
                                                                              Appendix A: Course Descriptions



full use of their modeling and computing skills. Projects      NU 509                                             Cr. 3.0
will result in a final written report, formal defense, and     Health Informatics
presentation to corporate sponsor, faculty and other stu-      Introduction to the concept of informatics and its impact
dents in the course.                                           on decision making in Nursing and Allied Health sciences.
Prerequisites: Finance 511 and Mathematics 540, passed         Review of the methodology of analyzing, formalizing and
with a grade of C- or higher, and permission of the direc-     processing information applicable to all components of
tor of the MSFM or department chair.                           health and nursing practice: clinical practice, manage-
Course Type(s): None                                           ment, education and research; investigating determinants,
                                                               conditions, elements, models and processes in order to
MA 598                                            Cr. 3.0      design, implement and test the effectiveness and efficien-
Special Topics in Mathematics                                  cy of computerized information as it relates to nursing and
The subject matter varies with the interest of the students    health practice. The course will include: (1) an overview
and the professor teaching the course. The exact nature        of the basic computer skills required to process electronic
of the topic covered in any given semester is indicated in     information, (2) identification of the nature and types of
the student’s transcript. For the course to count for credit   health, nursing and medical information available on the
toward a particular graduate program outside mathemat-         World Wide Web, (3) development of search skills associ-
ics, prior permission of the chair of graduate studies in      ated with finding health, nursing and medical information
that program must also be obtained.                            on the World Wide Web and (4) linking electronic informa-
Course Type(s): None                                           tion to decision making processes in nursing, medical and
                                                               allied health services.
MA 599                                            Cr. 3.0      Course Type(s): NU.EL
Independent Study in Mathematics
Independent study in a topic not substantially treated in a    NU 510                                             Cr. 3.0
regular graduate course; weekly consultation. Prior per-       Knowledge Development in Nursing
mission of directing professor and the chair of the depart-    History and philosophy of science and nursing science;
ment is required. For the course to count for credit toward    techniques for concept analysis and knowledge develop-
a particular graduate program outside mathematics, prior       ment; examination of nursing conceptual models used to
permission of the chair of graduate studies in that pro-       develop nursing knowledge, research, and practice;
gram must also be obtained.                                    review and analysis of concepts and relational statements
Course Type(s): None                                           for the development of nursing knowledge.
                                                               Course Type(s): NU.EL
MUSIC
                                                               NU 512                                             Cr. 3.0
MU 599                                       Cr. 1.0-3.0       Nursing Research Advanced Nursing Practice I
Independent Study in Music                                     Critical appraisal of the role of nursing research and
Reading and research on a selected topic under the             research methods of inquiry in the development of nursing
direction of a Music department faculty member.                theory and practice. Qualitative and quantitative research
Course Type(s): None                                           methods; research designs; measurement theory and
                                                               strategies; methods of data analysis; read, critique and write
                                                               research reports; ethics, application of research techniques
NURSING                                                        for outcomes evaluation and evidence-based practice.
                                                               Prerequisite: Nursing 510.
NU 508                                            Cr. 3.0      Course Type(s): None
Factors Affecting Healthcare I
Examine models and contexts for health promotion and
                                                               NU 514                                             Cr. 3.0
disease prevention; examine the influence of culture on
                                                               Nursing Research Advanced Nursing Practice II
health beliefs and practices; ethical dilemmas. Investigate
                                                               Planning for and collection of outcome data; preparation of
factors, such as access to care, health and social policy,
                                                               data for hypothesis testing; use of the SPSS statistical
healthcare finance and economics, and legislative influ-
                                                               computer package for data management and analysis;
ences on health.
                                                               selection and interpretation of appropriate parametric and
Course Type(s): NU.EL, TPS
                                                               nonparametric descriptive and inferential statistics for out-




                                                                                      Monmouth University A55
Appendix A: Course Descriptions



come evaluation. Quantitative and qualitative data analysis.      variations. Application of techniques is practiced in the
Prerequisite: Nursing 512.                                        college laboratory and with clients in outside agencies.
Course Type(s): None                                              Students translate assessment data into differential diag-
                                                                  nosis and interpret laboratory and diagnostic data.
NU 518                                              Cr. 3.0       Relationship of health assessment to the role and respon-
Education and Motivation of Nursing Clients                       sibilities of the nurse is examined. Not open to students
Role of the nurse in fostering health promotion via educa-        who have taken Nursing 555.
tion of clients, families, and professional colleagues.           Prerequisite: Biology or Nursing 521.
Essential factors for successful teaching and learning.           Course Type(s): None
Motivating the client to make behavioral changes to pro-
mote health and development. Development, presenta-               NU 540                                            Cr. 3.0
tion, and evaluation of a formal teaching plan. Not open          Pharmacology for Advanced Practice Nursing
to students who have taken Nursing 550.                           Historical perspective, legal regulations and standards,
Course Type(s): NU.EL                                             the Controlled Substances Act; pharmacokinetics; phar-
                                                                  macodynamics; choice and use of pharmacotherapeutics;
NU 521                                              Cr. 3.0       nursing responsibilities in drug prescription; client educa-
Pathophysiology and Histology                                     tion with respect to drug-desired effects, side effects,
Focuses on pathogenesis of selected diseases leading to           interactions, toxicity, dependence, and addiction. Students
alterations of body structure and functions across the life       must earn a minimum grade of B- in the course. Students
span. Emphasizes the laboratory identification of verte-          who receive less than a B- will be required to repeat the
brate tissue. Students must earn a minimum of a B- in the         course no more than once. A second grade below a B-
course. Students who receive less than a B- will be               will make students ineligible to continue in programs
required to repeat the course. Students will be allowed to        requiring this course.
repeat the course no more than once. A second grade               Course Type(s): None
below a B- will make students ineligible to continue in pro-
grams requiring this course. Also listed as Biology 521.          NU 541                                            Cr. 3.0
Course Type(s): None                                              Primary Care
                                                                  Aspects of advanced health assessment, clinical reason-
NU 524                                              Cr. 3.0       ing, and diagnostic skills necessary to manage common
Pharmacology for Advanced Practice Nursing                        stable, chronic, and episodic alterations in health. Various
Historical perspective, legal regulations and standards,          advanced nursing practice roles in health care, ethical
the Controlled Substances Act; pharmacokinetics; phar-            and legal issues in clinical practice, application of
macodynamics; choice and use of pharmacotherapeutics;             research-based clinical outcomes, promotion and mainte-
nursing responsibilities in drug prescription; client educa-      nance of health, disease prevention and treatment modal-
tion with respect to drug-desired effects, side effects,          ities for individuals are explored. Content is presented in
interactions, toxicity, dependence, and addiction. Students       weekly clinical case studies related to common alterations
must earn a minimum grade of B- in the course. Students           in health. Factors influencing health care systems, pat-
who receive less than a B- will be required to repeat the         terns of human responses, cultural and epidemiological
course no more than once. A second grade below a B-               influences will be discussed in weekly clinical case stud-
will make students ineligible to continue in programs             ies. Performing assessments and screenings related to
requiring this course.                                            common alterations in health are also included in a week-
Course Type(s): None                                              ly, faculty-supervised clinical practice. Not open to stu-
                                                                  dents who have taken Nursing 556.
                                                                  Prerequisites: Nursing 521, 524, and 535. Corequisite:
NU 535                                              Cr. 3.0       Nursing 542.
Advanced Health Assessment                                        Course Type(s): None
Theory and practice of health assessment skills, identifi-
cation of deviations from the normal and documentation
of findings are refined. Advanced-level assessment
                                                                  NU 542                                            Cr. 1.0
includes the comprehensive history, physical, and psycho-         Primary Care Laboratory
logical variations of the client. The client is viewed holisti-   This clinical course is designed to be taken with the lecture
cally, incorporating cultural, nutritional, and developmental     component of NU 541. Aspects of advanced health assess-




A56 Monmouth University
                                                                                   Appendix A: Course Descriptions



ment, clinical reasoning, and diagnostic skills necessary to       NU 546                                                Cr. 2.0
manage common stable, chronic, and episodic alterations            Advanced Clinical Nursing Laboratory
in health. Various advanced nursing practice roles in health       Students will enroll for the clinical experience if, in the opin-
care, ethical and legal issues in clinical practice, application   ion of their advisor, current clinical experience is necessary.
of research-based clinical outcomes, promotion and main-           Prerequisite: Nursing 535. Corequisite: Nursing 545.
tenance of health, disease prevention and treatment                Course Type(s): None
modalities for individuals are explored. Content is present-
ed in weekly clinical case studies related to common alter-
ations in health. Factors influencing health care systems,
                                                                   NU 562                                                Cr. 3.0
patterns of human responses, cultural and epidemiological          Tests and Measures
influences will be discussed in weekly clinical case studies.      Considers evaluation methods related to norm-referenced
Performing assessments and screenings related to com-              and criterion-referenced evaluation methods in education.
mon alterations in health are also included in a weekly, fac-      Students will investigate criteria used to develop reliable
ulty-supervised clinical practice.                                 and valid evaluation measures. Current issues and
Prerequisites: Nursing 521, 524, and 535. Corequisite:             research related to educational testing instruments, alter-
Nursing 541.                                                       natives to standardized evaluation methods, and outcome
Course Type(s): None                                               measurement in education will be discussed. Students
                                                                   will explore measurement theory and evaluate measures
                                                                   that are used to identify cognitive, affective, and psy-
NU 543                                               Cr. 3.0       chomotor domains as they relate to education.
Diagnosis and Treatment of Psychopathology                         Course Type(s): None
Provides the basic foundations of clinical management of
common psychiatric/mental health problems in adults. For
students in Adult Psychiatric Mental Health APN track.
                                                                   NU 564                                                Cr. 3.0
Corequisite: Nursing 544.                                          Curriculum Development and Instruction in
Course Type(s): None                                               Nursing Education
                                                                   The primary focus of this course is the process of curriculum
                                                                   development in nursing. Factors influencing curriculum
NU 544                                               Cr. 1.0       development, the process of curriculum development and
Diagnosis and Treatment of Psychopathology                         evaluation methods are emphasized. Instruction and evalua-
Clinical Laboratory                                                tion in didactic nursing courses and clinical experiences are
Provides the basic foundations of clinical management of           addressed. Individuals completing this course will be pre-
common psychiatric/mental health problems in adults.               pared for the role of nurse educator in academic settings.
The student will deliver mental health care to adults with         Prerequisite: Nursing 518.
mental health problems including collection of subjective          Course Type(s): None
and objective data using the techniques of interview;
establishing a psychiatric diagnosis utilizing the DSMIV-
TR classification system, completing an initial psychiatric
                                                                   NU 566P                                               Cr. 2.0
assessment and identifying psychopharmacologic inter-              Nurse Educator Practicum And Seminar
ventions as appropriate. Establishment of collaborative            Focuses on the application of teaching and learning prin-
role with other health care providers.                             ciples in academic and clinical settings. Instruction and
Corequisite: Nursing 543.                                          evaluation in didactic nursing courses and clinical experi-
Course Type(s): None                                               ences are applied in nursing programs providing generic
                                                                   nursing education, in cooperation with a preceptor.
                                                                   Corequisite: Nursing 566S.
NU 545                                               Cr. 2.0       Course Type(s): None
Advanced Clinical Nursing Seminar
Designed to provide students with an opportunity for cur-
rent experience in clinical environments in which they
                                                                   NU 566S                                               Cr. 2.0
plan to have their student teaching experiences. Weekly            Nurse Educator Seminar
seminar will provide an opportunity for students to share          Provides a forum for reflection on student teaching expe-
varied clinical experiences with their peers. All students         riences in the classroom and clinical settings. Through
must enroll for the 2-credit seminar.                              discussion and sharing, students refine the application of
Prerequisite: Nursing 535.                                         theory and research to practice as an educator. Topics
Course Type(s): None                                               relevant to the academic faculty role and current issues in




                                                                                           Monmouth University A57
Appendix A: Course Descriptions



nursing education are explored.                                 appropriate techniques for the identification, prevention,
Corequisite: Nursing 566P.                                      and management of victims of crime and trauma. Students
Course Type(s): None                                            will develop expertise in the collection, preservation and
                                                                documentation of evidence as identified in scopes and
NU 575                                             Cr. 3.0      standards of forensic nursing practice. Individual experi-
Issues in Forensic Nursing                                      ences are arranged in conjunction with students’ goals for
The principles of forensic science and forensic nursing         practice. Students will attend a one-hour weekly seminar
will be introduced. The advanced practice role of the           and a weekly eight-hour clinical practicum.
forensic nurse and the use of nursing process in forensic       Prerequisites: Nursing 521, 535, 543, 575, 576, and
decision making for the management of victims of crimes         Criminal Justice 585.
and their perpetrators are illustrated. The relationship        Corequisite: Nursing 578S.
between various sociocultural factors and psychosocial          Course Type(s): None
issues related to violent crimes are analyzed. Additionally,
philosophies of clinical forensics are identified. Roles of     NU 578S                                           Cr. 1.0
the nurse in forensic science and scopes and standards          Forensic Nursing Seminar
of forensic nursing practice are discussed. Techniques in       Explores forensic theory and research and their applica-
collection of forensic evidence and preservation are            tion to forensic nursing practice. Forensic nurses practice
demonstrated. Ethical responsibilities of the forensic nurs-    as sexual assault examiners, educators, nurse coroners,
es’ responsibilities in the identification, prevention, and     death investigators, correctional nurses, and clinical spe-
treatment of victims of violent crime are recognized.           cialists in pediatrics, gerontology, and domestic violence.
Course Type(s): None                                            Issues addressing systematic analysis of pertinent data,
                                                                and the physical/psychological issues related to forensic
NU 576                                             Cr. 3.0      nursing and pathology will be discussed in seminar and
Interpersonal Violence                                          reinforced in clinical practicum. Identification of outcomes
Examines the various types and patterns of violence             and plans of action that provide effective coordination and
related to cultural values, beliefs, biases and societal        communication in managing clients will be addressed. A
issues, as well as the historical perspective of violence.      scientific and conceptual knowledge of nursing, forensic
Content includes: family, community, youth, and work-           and criminal justice will assist students to recognize
place violence, child, domestic, elder and sexual abuse.        appropriate techniques for the identification, prevention,
Theories concerning gender violence, gangs, bias and            and management of victims of violent crime, as well as
hate crimes, and terrorism are challenged. Public health        collection, preservation and documentation of evidence
and health care issues related to violence, and primary,        as identified in scopes and standards of forensic nursing
secondary, and tertiary level interventions for victims and     practice. Students will attend a one hour weekly seminar
offenders of violence are discussed. Individual responsi-       and a weekly eight hour clinical practicum.
bilities associated with identification and reporting vio-      Prerequisites: Nursing 521, 535, 543, 575, 576, and
lence are identified. Health care measures to identify and      Criminal Justice 585.
prevent violence are analyzed. Methods of treatment for         Corequisite: Nursing 578P.
victims and perpetrators of violence are evaluated.             Course Type(s): None
Course Type(s): NU.EL
                                                                NU 585                                            Cr. 3.0
NU 578P                                            Cr. 2.0      School Nursing I
Forensic Nursing Practicum                                      Examines and analyzes the role of the school nurse as
Students will work in an interdisciplinary team or with indi-   health care provider, health educator, health counselor,
viduals in forensic arenas as they apply forensic theory        child advocate in the school community, and interdiscipli-
and research in forensic nursing practice. Appropriate          nary team member. Explores financial, legal, and adminis-
techniques for identifying, collecting and documenting per-     trative issues as they relate to school nursing. Reviews
tinent data will be reinforced through clinical practice in a   normal growth and developmental patterns. Describes
forensic arena. Under the supervision and guidance of a         common health problems, special needs, and interven-
clinical preceptor, students will identify outcomes and         tions appropriate for school nurses.
plans of action for effective coordination and communica-       Course Type(s): None
tion among professionals and clients as a means to learn




A58 Monmouth University
                                                                           Appendix A: Course Descriptions



NU 586                                           Cr. 3.0     Corequisite: Nursing 588P.
School Nursing II                                            Course Type(s): None
A continuation of the examination and analysis of the role
of the school nurse as healthcare provider, health educa-    NU 598                                           Cr. 3.0
tor, health counselor, and interdisciplinary team member.    Special Topics in Nursing
An expansion of the role of the nurse as child advocate in   Allows students to study a specific aspect of nursing. The
the community and as public health nurse. Explores           subject matter varies from semester to semester and
external and internal environmental influences that impact   depends on the professor who teaches the course.
on the health of children.                                   Course Type(s): None
Course Type(s): None
                                                             NU 599                                      Cr. 1.0-4.0
NU 587P                                          Cr. 2.0     Independent Study in Nursing
Practicum: School Nurse I                                    Independent study (theory and/or practica) in a special-
Introduction to the clinical experience for the School       ized area of interest to the student. Weekly consultations
Nurse. The student has his/her clinical experience in the    with supervising faculty member.
school nurse’s office where he/she takes an active part in   Course Type(s): None
school health services, physical assessments, organiza-
tion and administration of the school health program as      NU 621                                           Cr. 3.0
outlined in NJAC 6A:9 Professional Licensure and
                                                             Advanced Practice Nursing I: Adult
Standards of the NJ Board of Education Standards.
                                                             Detailed study analysis of health problems of the adult,
Prerequisite: Nursing 585. Corequisite: Nursing 587S.
                                                             including pathophysiology, strengths and weaknesses of
Course Type(s): None
                                                             assessment data collection, diagnostic process, planning,
                                                             intervention, and evaluation. Interview and physical exam-
NU 587S                                          Cr. 2.0     ination techniques for collecting subjective and objective
Seminar: School Nurse I                                      data from the adult client in the primary care setting;
Discusses the school nurse’s role as a health care           deriving nursing diagnoses; planning care for acute and
provider, health counselor, administrator and member of      chronic illness using community resources; use of com-
the interdisciplinary school team. Students that are         munication for health teaching, counseling and motivating
employed as a school nurse should take this two- credit      clients for positive health maintenance. Expansion of tra-
seminar to fulfill the New Jersey Board of Education’s       ditional nursing role to the advanced practice nurse (APN)
requirement of a minimum six semester-hour credits in        role through the incorporation of the fundamental patterns
school nursing, including school health services, physical   of knowing; empirics, aesthetics, personal knowledge,
assessments, organization and administration of the          and ethics. A process driven course which will require
school health program. Prerequisite: Nursing 585.            extensive reading in the student’s specialty area.
Corequisite: Nursing 587P.                                   Prerequisites: Nursing 521, 524, 535, 541, and 542.
Course Type(s): None                                         Corequisites: Nursing 622P and 622S.
                                                             Course Type(s): None
NU 588P                                          Cr. 2.0
Practicum: School Nurse II                                   NU 622P                                          Cr. 3.0
A continuation of the clinical experience for the School     Advanced Practice Nursing Practicum I Adult
Nurse. The student functions in the role of the School       Delivery of primary health care to adults with common
Nurse as a Health Educator.                                  health problems, including collection of subjective and
Prerequisites: Nursing 586, 587S, and Health 584.            objective data using the techniques of interview and phys-
Corequisite: Nursing 588S.                                   ical examination; deriving nursing diagnoses, planning
Course Type(s): None                                         care for acute and chronic illness using community
                                                             resources; use of communication for health teaching,
NU 588S                                          Cr. 2.0     counseling and motivating clients for positive health main-
Seminar: School Nurse II                                     tenance. Establishment of collaborative role with other
Discusses the school nurse’s role as a health educator.      health care providers.
Prerequisites: Nursing 586, 587S, and Health 584.            Corequisites: Nursing 621 and 622S.
                                                             Course Type(s): None




                                                                                   Monmouth University A59
Appendix A: Course Descriptions



NU 622S                                          Cr. 1.0      nursing diagnoses; planning care for acute and chronic ill-
Advanced Practice Nursing Seminar I: Adult                    ness using community resources; use of communication
Discuss the delivery of primary health care to adults with    for health teaching, counseling and motivating clients for
common health problems, including collection of subjec-       positive health maintenance. Establishment of collabora-
tive and objective data using the techniques of interview     tive role with other health care providers.
and physical examination; deriving nursing diagnoses;         Prerequisites: Nursing 621, 622S and 622P. Corequisites:
planning care for acute and chronic illness using commu-      Nursing 623 and 624P.
nity resources; use of communication for health teaching,     Course Type(s): None
counseling and motivating clients for positive health main-
tenance. Establishment of collaborative role with other       NU 631                                            Cr. 3.0
health care providers.                                        Advanced Practice Nursing I: Family
Corequisites: Nursing 621 and 622P.                           Detailed case study analysis of health problems, including
Course Type(s): None                                          pathophysiology, strengths and weaknesses of assessment
                                                              of data collection, diagnostic process, planning, interven-
NU 623                                           Cr. 3.0      tion, and evaluation. Interview and physical examination
Advanced Practice Nursing II: Adult                           techniques for collecting subjective and objective data in
Detailed case study analysis of health problems of the        the primary care setting; deriving nursing diagnoses; plan-
adult, including pathophysiology, strengths and weak-         ning care for acute and chronic illness in culturally diverse
nesses of assessment data collection, diagnostic process,     populations utilizing community resources; use of commu-
planning, intervention, and evaluation. Expansion of tradi-   nication for health teaching and counseling and to motivate
tional nursing role to the advanced practice nurse (APN)      clients for positive health maintenance with be explored.
role through the incorporation of the fundamental patterns    Expansion of traditional nursing role to the advanced prac-
of knowing: empirics, aesthetics, personal knowledge,         tice nurse (APN) role through the incorporation of evi-
and ethics. A process-driven course which will require        dence-based practice, personal knowledge, and ethics will
extensive reading in the student’s specialty area. An         be discussed. A process-driven course which will require
extension of Advanced Practice Nursing I: Adult.              extensive reading in the student’s specialty area.
Prerequisite: Nursing 621. Corequisites: Nursing 624P         Prerequisite: Nursing 521, 524, 535, 541, and 542.
and 624S.                                                     Corequisites: Nursing 632P and 632S.
Course Type(s): None                                          Course Type(s): None


NU 624P                                          Cr. 3.0      NU 632P                                           Cr. 3.0
Advanced Practice Nursing Practicum II Adult                  Advanced Practice Nursing Practicum I: Family
Delivery of primary health care to adults and adolescents     Delivery of primary health care to adults with common
with common health problems, including collection of sub-     health problems, including collection of subjective and
jective and objective data using the techniques of inter-     objective data using the techniques of interview and phys-
view and physical examination; deriving nursing diag-         ical examination; deriving nursing diagnoses; planning
noses; planning care for acute and chronic illness using      care for acute and chronic illness using community
community resources; use of communication for health          resources; use of communication for health teaching,
teaching, counseling and motivating clients for positive      counseling and motivating clients for positive health main-
health maintenance. Establishment of collaborative role       tenance. Establishment of collaborative role with other
with other health care providers.                             health care providers.
Prerequisites: Nursing 621, 622S, and 622P.                   Corequisites: Nursing 631 and 632S.
Corequisites: Nursing 623 and 624S.                           Course Type(s): None
Course Type(s): None
                                                              NU 632S                                           Cr. 1.0
NU 624S                                          Cr. 1.0      Advanced Practice Nursing Seminar I: Family
Advanced Practice Nursing Seminar II: Adult                   Discuss the delivery of primary health care to adults with
Discuss the delivery of primary health care to adults and     common health problems, including collection of subjec-
adolescents with common health problems, including col-       tive and objective data using the techniques of interview
lection of subjective and objective data using the tech-      and physical examination; deriving nursing diagnosis;
niques of interview and physical examination; deriving        planning care for acute and chronic illness using commu-




A60 Monmouth University
                                                                                Appendix A: Course Descriptions



nity resources; use of communication for health teaching,         using community resources; use of communication for
counseling and motivating clients for positive health main-       health teaching, counseling and motivating clients for pos-
tenance. Establishment of collaborative role with other           itive health-maintenance. Establishment of collaborative
health care providers.                                            role with other health care providers.
Corequisites: Nursing 631 and 632P.                               Prerequisites: Nursing 631, 632S and 632P. Corequisites:
Course Type(s): None                                              Nursing 633 and 634P.
                                                                  Course Type(s): None
NU 633                                              Cr. 3.0
Advanced Practice Nursing II: Family                              NU 642P                                          Cr. 3.0
Detailed case study analysis of health problems, including        Advanced Practice Nursing Practicum I: Gerontology
pathophysiology, epidemiology, strengths and weaknesses           Delivery of primary health care to older adults with geron-
of assessment of data collection, diagnostic process, plan-       tological common health problems, including collection of
ning, intervention, and evaluation. Interview and physical        subjective and objective data using the techniques of
examination techniques for collecting subjective and              interview and physical examination; deriving nursing diag-
objective data in primary, acute and long term care set-          noses; planning care for acute and chronic illness using
tings; deriving nursing diagnoses; planning care for acute        community resources; use of communication for health
and chronic illness in culturally diverse populations utilizing   teaching and counseling and to motivate clients for posi-
community resources; using communication for health               tive health-maintenance. Establishment of collaborative
teaching and counseling and to motivate clients for posi-         role with other health care providers.
tive health maintenance. Expansion of traditional nursing         Corequisites: Nursing 641 and 642S.
role to the advanced practice nurse (APN) role through the        Course Type(s): None
incorporation of evidence-based practice, personal knowl-
edge, and ethics. A process-driven course which will              NU 642S                                          Cr. 1.0
require extensive reading in the student’s specialty area.        Advanced Practice Nursing Seminar I: Gerontology
Prerequisite: Nursing 631. Corequisites: Nursing 634P             Discuss primary health care to older adults with geronto-
and 634S.                                                         logical common health problems, including collection of
Course Type(s): None                                              subjective and objective data using the techniques of
                                                                  interview and physical examination; deriving nursing diag-
NU 634P                                             Cr. 3.0       nosis; planning care for acute and chronic illness using
Advanced Practice Nursing Practicum II: Family                    community resources; use of communication for health
A continuation of NU 632. Delivery of health care to the          teaching and counseling and to motivate clients for posi-
child, pregnant couple, and adults with complex health            tive health maintenance. Establishment of collaborative
problems, including collection of subjective and objective        role with other health care providers.
data using the techniques of interview and physical exami-        Corequisites: Nursing 641 and 642P.
nation; deriving nursing diagnoses; planning care for acute       Course Type(s): None
and chronic illness using community resources; use of
communication for health teaching, counseling and motivat-        NU 644P                                          Cr. 3.0
ing clients for positive health maintenance. Establishment        Advanced Practice Nursing Practicum II:
of collaborative role with other health care providers.
                                                                  Gerontology
Prerequisites: Nursing 631, 632S and 632P. Corequisites:
                                                                  Delivery of primary health care to older adults with com-
Nursing 633 and 634S.
                                                                  mon health problems, including collection of subjective
Course Type(s): None
                                                                  and objective data using the techniques of interview and
                                                                  physical examination; deriving nursing diagnoses; plan-
NU 634S                                             Cr. 1.0       ning care for acute and chronic illness using community
Advanced Practice Nursing Seminar II: Family                      resources; use of communication for health teaching,
This course is a continuation of NU 632. Discussion of            counseling and motivating clients for positive health main-
delivery of health care to the child, pregnant couple, and        tenance. Establishment of collaborative role with other
adults with complex health problems that include, collec-         health care providers.
tion of subjective and objective data using the techniques        Prerequisites: Nursing 641, 642S, and 642P.
of interview and physical examination; deriving nursing           Corequisites: Nursing 643 and 644S.
diagnoses; planning care for acute and chronic illness            Course Type(s): None




                                                                                        Monmouth University A61
Appendix A: Course Descriptions



NU 644S                                          Cr. 1.0      ing, counseling and motivating clients and families for
Advanced Practice Nursing Seminar II: Gerontology             positive health maintenance. Establishment of collabora-
Discuss primary health care to older adults with common       tive role with other health care providers.
health problems, including collection of subjective and       Prerequisites: Nursing 651, 652S and 652P. Corequisites:
objective data using the techniques of interview and phys-    Nursing 653 and 654S.
ical examination; deriving nursing diagnoses; planning        Course Type(s): None
care for acute and chronic illness using community
resources; use of communication for health teaching,          NU 654S                                           Cr. 1.0
counseling and motivating clients for positive health main-   Advanced Practice Nursing Seminar II: Acute Care
tenance. Establishment of collaborative role with other       Discuss primary health care to clients with common
health care providers.                                        health problems, including collection of subjective and
Prerequisites: Nursing 641, 642S and 642P. Corequisites:      objective data using the techniques of interview and phys-
Nursing 643 and 644P.                                         ical examination; deriving nursing diagnoses; prioritizing
Course Type(s): None                                          and planning care for acute and chronic illness using
                                                              agency resources; use of communication for health teach-
NU 652P                                          Cr. 3.0      ing, counseling and motivating clients and families for
Advanced Practice Nursing Practicum I: Acute Care             positive health maintenance. Establishment of collabora-
Delivery of primary health care to clients with common        tive role with other health care providers.
health problems, including collection of subjective and       Prerequisites: Nursing 651, 652S and 652P. Corequisites:
objective data using the techniques of interview and phys-    Nursing 653 and 654P.
ical examination; deriving nursing diagnoses; prioritizing    Course Type(s): None
and planning care for acute and chronic illness using
agency resources; use of communication for health teach-      NU 661                                            Cr. 3.0
ing, counseling and motivating clients and families for       Nursing Administration I
positive health maintenance. Establishment of collabora-      Students are socialized into the middle-level management
tive role with other health care providers.                   and administration roles by examination of the administra-
Corequisites: Nursing 651 and 652S.                           tive process in a variety of health care organizations.
Course Type(s): None                                          Students are expected to assess, plan, develop, evaluate,
                                                              and refine their effectiveness as managers and leaders of
NU 652S                                          Cr. 1.0      nursing and patient care services. By synthesizing infor-
Advanced Practice Nursing Seminar I: Acute Care               mation from previous coursework, management theories,
Discuss primary health care to clients with common            and relevant research, students will be able to apply
health problems, including collection of subjective and       themselves to the management/administration roles.
objective data using the techniques of interview and phys-    Corequisite: Nursing 662.
ical examination; deriving nursing diagnoses; prioritizing    Course Type(s): None
and planning care for acute and chronic illness using
agency resources; use of communication for health teach-      NU 662P                                           Cr. 2.0
ing, counseling and motivating clients and families for       Nursing Administration I Practicum
positive health maintenance. Establishment of collabora-      Students observe and participate in the middle- level man-
tive role with other health care providers.                   agement/administrative process in a variety of health care
Corequisites: Nursing 651 and 652P.                           organizations. For the required practicum, the student
Course Type(s): None                                          selects a nursing service compatible with the student’s
                                                              individual goals. Socialization into the middle management
NU 654P                                          Cr. 3.0      and administrative roles permit students to assess, plan,
Advanced Practice Nursing Practicum II: Acute Care            implement, and refine their skills as beginning practitioners
Delivery of primary health care to clients with common        as managers and leaders of nursing and patient care serv-
health problems, including collection of subjective and       ices. Corequisites: Nursing 661 and 662S.
objective data using the techniques of interview and phys-    Course Type(s): None
ical examination; deriving nursing diagnoses; prioritizing
and planning care for acute and chronic illness using
agency resources; use of communication for health teach-




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                                                                              Appendix A: Course Descriptions



NU 662S                                           Cr. 1.0      administration. Prerequisites: Nursing 661, 662S, and
Nursing Administration I Seminar                               622P. Corequisites: Nursing 663 and 664P.
Students analyze the middle level-management/adminis-          Course Type(s): None
trative process in a variety of health care organizations.
Socialization into the middle management and administra-       NU 671                                             Cr. 3.0
tive roles permit students to assess, plan, implement, and     Advanced Practice Psychiatric/Mental Health
refine their skills as beginning practitioners as managers     Nursing I
and leaders of nursing and patient care services.              Focuses on advanced knowledge of psychiatric/mental
Corequisites: Nursing 661 and 662P.                            health nursing. Assessment, treatment planning and thera-
Course Type(s): None                                           peutic interventions with individuals, families and groups
                                                               will be introduced. Offers various treatment models includ-
NU 663                                            Cr. 3.0      ing the classic schools and current developments in individ-
Nursing Administration II                                      uals, families and groups. Each therapeutic modality will be
Students are prepared to practice in the role of middle-       presented using key concepts, an explanation of the thera-
level administration and nursing case manager. Students        peutic process and application of techniques. In view of the
will build on the information obtained in Nursing              reliance on direct practice experiences with individuals,
Administration I. In addition, nurses will learn the role of   families and groups, students will be placed in clinical sites
the nursing case manager. Students learn how to provide        concurrently with the courses Nursing 672P and 672S.
quality health care along a continuum, decrease fragmen-       Prerequisites: Nursing 521, 535, 543 and 544.
tation of care across multiple settings, enhance the           Corequisites: Nursing 672P and 672S.
client’s quality of life, and address issues concerning cost   Course Type(s): None
containment. Communication and collaboration tech-
niques are utilized to assess, plan, implement, coordinate,    NU 672P                                            Cr. 3.0
monitor and evaluate the options and services available        Advanced Practice Psychiatric/Mental Health
to meet individual health needs.                               Practicum I
Prerequisites: Nursing 661 and 662. Corequisite: Nursing       Delivery of mental health care to adults with mental health
664.                                                           problems, including collection of subjective and objective
Course Type(s): None                                           data using the techniques of interview; deriving psychi-
                                                               atric diagnoses; deriving nursing diagnoses; planning
NU 664P                                           Cr. 2.0      care for acute and chronic mental health issues using
Nursing Administration II Practicum                            community resources; use of interventions including short
Students observe and participate in the human resources        term problem focused psychotherapy, group therapy and
and the nursing case management roles. Students build          psychopharmacologic modalities. Establishment of collab-
on the information obtained in Nursing Administration I.       orative role with other health care providers.
Students investigate the integration of the nursing admin-     Corequisites: Nursing 671 and 672S.
istrator role and human resource elements and observe          Course Type(s): None
the relationship through direct observation of the HR staff
and the Executive Team. Prerequisites: Nursing 661,            NU 672S                                            Cr. 1.0
662S and 662P. Corequisites: Nursing 663 and 664S.             Advanced Practice Psychiatric/Mental Health
Course Type(s): None                                           Nursing Seminar I
                                                               Delivery of mental health care to adults with mental health
NU 664S                                           Cr. 1.0      problems, including collection of subjective and objective
Nursing Administration II Seminar                              data using the techniques of interview; deriving psychi-
Students analyze the Human Resource role and the nurs-         atric diagnoses; deriving nursing diagnoses; planning
ing case management role and their relationship to nurs-       care for acute and chronic mental health issues using
ing administration. Students build on the information          community resources; use of interventions including short
obtained in Nursing Administration Seminar I. Students         term problem focused psychotherapy, group therapy and
assess, plan, and implement their effectiveness as admin-      psychopharmacologic modalities. Establishment of collab-
istrative-level nursing personnel and delve into the knowl-    orative role with other health care providers.
edge required to comprehend the role of case manage-           Corequisites: Nursing 671 and 672P.
ment and human resources and their relation to nursing         Course Type(s): None




                                                                                      Monmouth University A63
Appendix A: Course Descriptions



NU 673                                             Cr. 3.0       NU SANE                                             Cr. 0.0
Advance Practice Psychiatric/Mental Health                       Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner
Nursing 2                                                        Provides basic theoretical and forensic principles to treat
Builds upon the foundation course NU 671. As clinicians          victims of sexual crimes by introducing standards of prac-
there is an ever-pressing need to interpret theory and           tice for the sexual assault nurse examiner (SANE) as out-
engage in practice inclusively. Examines how clients’ lives      lined for SANE certification. Standards and principles of
are affected by larger societal structures. This course will     nursing practice will be applied to the practice of various
examine modalities and ways to intervene with clients with a     areas of expertise held by SANE nurses. Forensic evalua-
true sensitivity and understanding of issues of race, culture,   tion may include victims of all ages and ethnic and socioe-
gender, religion and sexual orientation. Each therapeutic        conomic backgrounds within a framework of community
modality will be presented using key concepts, an explana-       and agency policies, procedures and protocols. Using the
tion of the therapeutic process and application of techniques.   nursing process in the investigation of sexual assault and
In view of the reliance on direct practice experiences with      in the promotion and restoration of psychological, biologi-
individuals, families and groups, students will be placed in     cal, and social health of survivors of sexual assault or
clinical sites concurrently with this course (NU 674).           abuse will be introduced. History and physical examina-
Prerequisites: Nursing 671 and 672. Corequisite: Nursing         tion, crisis intervention, identifying and collecting evidence,
674.                                                             treating and counseling victims will be discussed.
Course Type(s): None                                             Course Type(s): None

NU 674P                                            Cr. 3.0       PHILOSOPHY
Advanced Practice Psychiatric Mental Health
Nursing Practicum II                                             PL 518                                              Cr. 3.0
A continuation of NU 672P. Delivery of mental health care to     Religious Foundations of Contemporary Values
adults with mental health problems, including collection of      Systematic study of major contemporary value themes
subjective and objective data using the techniques of inter-     and their derivation from religious, mythic, and quasi-
view; deriving psychiatric diagnoses; deriving nursing diag-     philosophic roots.
noses; planning care for acute and chronic mental health         Course Type(s): None
issues using community resources; use of interventions
including short term, problem-focused psychotherapy, group       PL 529                                              Cr. 3.0
therapy and psychopharmacologic modalities. Establishment        Personal Identity, Ethics, and Social Order
of collaborative role with other health care providers.          An exploration of how the social formation of personal life
Prerequisites: Nursing 671, 672P and 672S. Corequisites:         and moral character is represented in social science, fic-
Nursing 673 and 674S.                                            tion, and philosophy.
Course Type(s): None                                             Course Type(s): None

NU 674S                                            Cr. 1.0       PL 532                                              Cr. 3.0
Advanced Practice Psychiatric Mental Health                      Professional and Organizational Ethics
Nursing Lab and Seminar II                                       Applies ethical concepts and theories to moral issues in
A continuation of NU 672S. Delivery of mental health care        professional and organizational life. Special attention is
to adults with mental health problems, including collection      given to professional and corporate social responsibility.
of subjective and objective data using the techniques of         Course Type(s): LA
interview; deriving psychiatric diagnoses; deriving nursing
diagnoses; planning care for acute and chronic mental
health issues using community resources, use of inter-
                                                                 POLITICAL SCIENCE
ventions including short-term, problem focused psy-
chotherapy, group therapy and psychopharmacologic                PS 510                                              Cr. 3.0
modalities. Establishment of collaborative role with other       Policy Analysis
health care providers.                                           An overview of the field of public policy studies with par-
Prerequisites: Nursing 671, 672S and 672P. Corequisites:         ticular attention paid to the role of the policy analyst in the
Nursing 673 and 674P.                                            field of public policy. This course provides a solid founda-
Course Type(s): None                                             tion for the study of public policy analysis by concentrat-




A64 Monmouth University
                                                                                  Appendix A: Course Descriptions



ing on the five stages of the policy process, including            and changes in the social, physical, political, and eco-
agenda setting, policy formulation, budgeting, policy              nomic urban landscape. Also listed as History 522.
implementation, and policy evaluation.                             Course Type(s): None
Course Type(s): TPS
                                                                   PS 524                                            Cr. 3.0
PS 514                                               Cr. 3.0       Public Opinion and the Media
Public Opinion and Polling                                         An examination of the shifting nature of public opinion,
Students are taught how to use social science research             the agenda setting role of mass media, and the survey
methods to critique and create polling surveys. Particular         methods that are employed to determine public opinion.
attention is paid to the data collection and sample design,        The practices, values, and traditions of journalism that
survey research methods, questionnaire development,                impact public opinion. Experience with the conduct of a
and data collection and analysis. Students are taught how          survey and analysis of case studies.
to evaluate the quality of survey research methods.                Course Type(s): None
Students will also be expected to design, implement, and
analyze an original polling survey.                                PS 525                                            Cr. 3.0
Course Type(s): None                                               Political Communication
                                                                   The study of traditional and contemporary theories of
PS 516                                               Cr. 3.0       rhetoric as applied in research and analysis of political
Research Methods                                                   campaigns. The rhetorical creation, maintenance, applica-
An introduction to the different ways in which social scien-       tion, and legitimization of symbolic power. A survey of
tists study the social world. Designed to develop students’        analytic models of political communication and application
understanding of the major purposes of social research             of the models to case studies. The role of the political
as well as the major types of quantitative and qualitative         communication specialist. Practicum in political communi-
research designs. They will also learn the research                cation strategies and techniques. Also listed as
process itself, from conceptualization and measurement             Communication 525.
to operationalization, sampling, ethics, and the analysis          Course Type(s): None
and presentation of their study. An opportunity is provided
to apply what students learn in class to actual research           PS 530                                            Cr. 3.0
projects, including the ones they will design themselves.          Environmental Policy
Prerequisite: Political Science 691.                               A survey of the process by which environmental politics,
Course Type(s): None                                               planning, and public policy is conducted in the United
                                                                   States and around the world. We will examine the nature
PS 518                                               Cr. 3.0       and scope of environmental, energy, and natural resource
Theory, Policy, Ethics                                             problems; contrasting perspectives on their severity and
Seeks to enable students to develop a critical understand-         policy implications; the goals and strategies of the envi-
ing of the moral and political values that come into play in       ronmental movement and public opinion on the environ-
public policy. Topics include the tensions between ethics          ment; scientific, economic, political, and institutional
and politics in the tradition of political theory as well as how   forces that shape policymaking and implementation;
they feature in contemporary public policy debates in              approaches to environmental policy analysis; and select-
American and global politics. Students gain an understand-         ed issues in environmental policy in the global community.
ing of the role of ethics as a matter of social justice as well    In addition to the covering of certain ecological science
as ethical issues and dilemmas in professional ethics.             terms, the interplay between international organizations,
Course Type(s): None                                               non-governmental organizations, and traditional states
                                                                   and the ways in which these actors seek diplomatic solu-
PS 522                                               Cr. 3.0       tions to environmental problems is also covered.
History of Urbanization in America                                 Course Type(s): None
Provides an interdisciplinary study of the history of urban-
ization and industrialization in the United States from the        PS 533                                            Cr. 3.0
mid-nineteenth century to the early twentieth century.             The History of Public Policy in the United States
Using the themes of community, technology, public policy,          The objective is to survey major issues in domestic public
and immigration, students will examine the development             policy. The emphasis is on changes in the process of poli-




                                                                                         Monmouth University A65
Appendix A: Course Descriptions



cy formation in both the public and private sectors. Also      methods developed in political science as well as in sister
listed as History 533.                                         disciplines of the social sciences.
Course Type(s): HSUS                                           Course Type(s): None

PS 553                                            Cr. 3.0      PS 585                                           Cr. 3.0
Gender, Family, and Policy                                     American Foreign Policy
Examines how policies affect a diverse spectrum of fami-       Examines, analyzes, and evaluates the many dimensions
lies based on class, race, gender, sexuality, age, and         and issues of American foreign policy since 1945. It pro-
nationality. It begins with a historical perspective on how    vides an interpretative framework within which the
families have developed because of historical factors          sources of American action abroad may be understood.
such as changing economy and technology. It also exam-         Combines descriptive and explanatory material with
ines how social structures such as race, class, gender,        empirical evidence and makes a serious effort to distin-
and sexuality have shaped families. It then focuses on         guish facts from inferences, hypotheses, and opinions.
current issues facing families and the policies that regu-     The post-Cold War and post-9/11 worlds are assessed,
late those issues, such as the balance between work and        with a focus on American goals, capabilities, and relation-
family, welfare, reproductive issues, violence, healthcare,    ships around the world.
and educational issues. A comparative approach will be         Course Type(s): None
taken to examine policies both in the US and within other
countries. Also discussed will be family activism aimed at     PS 595                                           Cr. 3.0
affecting policy in the US.                                    Political Science Practicum
Course Type(s): None                                           An opportunity to apply classroom theory in practice
                                                               through actual work experience. Students have the oppor-
PS 563                                            Cr. 3.0      tunity to apply the theories and concepts of public policy
Global Policies and Issues                                     to actual work settings.
Adopting an interdisciplinary perspective, this course         Course Type(s): None
looks at the positive and negative effects of globalization.
It also explores the national and international aspects of     PS 597                                           Cr. 0.0
major global policies and issues that shape the interde-       Portfolio
pendent world of the 21st century.                             Enables students to complete their portfolios for the
Course Type(s): None                                           Master of Arts in Public Policy (M.A.P.P.). The portfolio
                                                               displays academic and professional development and
PS 566                                            Cr. 3.0      learning gained from the M.A.P.P. program and related
Comparative Public Policy                                      experiences. The portfolio contains collections of academ-
In the world in which terrorism and chaos threaten to          ic and professional goal statements, term papers, reflec-
upset the policy making capabilities of state governments,     tive essays and artifacts gathered in various classes and
it is vital that we understand the different ways that         colloquiums and connected work.
nations formulate and implement public policy. Through         Course Type(s): None
an extensive investigation of policy analysis across a
broad spectrum of states, the student will be able to bet-     PS 598                                           Cr. 3.0
ter understand the reasons for policy decisions around         Special Topics/Special Projects
the world. Democratic governments will be compared and         Offered occasionally to match the interest of the students’
contrasted to non-democratic governments in an attempt         and the professor teaching the course. The instruction will
to provide greater insight and answer questions of health,     follow classroom lectures and discussions on the topic.
economic, environmental, and foreign policies.                 The exact nature of the topic covered in any given
Course Type(s): None                                           semester is indicated on the student’s transcript.
                                                               Permission of program director required.
PS 583                                            Cr. 3.0      Course Type(s): None
The Causes of War
A critical analysis of the general and recurring problems
of war in human life; the course probes the direct and
indirect causes of war by employing various analytical




A66 Monmouth University
                                                                             Appendix A: Course Descriptions



PS 599                                           Cr. 3.0      PSYCHOLOGICAL COUNSELING
Readings and Research
An independent research study based on relevant               PC 505                                             Cr. 3.0
research and the writing of a substantial paper designed      Mental Health Counseling
and executed by the student in consultation with a super-     An overview of the profession of counseling, its ethical
vising professor.                                             standards, literature, professional organizations, and the
The subject matter should cover public policy and related     knowledge, skills and abilities required for success in the
areas.                                                        field. Assists students in formulating a concept of the pro-
Course Type(s): None                                          fession that will allow them to enhance their growth and
                                                              professional identity as a counselor. In addition, the
PS 618                                           Cr. 3.0      opportunity for students to become aware of counseling
Social Work Administration                                    career opportunities in the region is provided. Limited to
Designed to develop in the student an awareness and           Psychological Counseling majors.
understanding of administrative procedures and tech-          Course Type(s): None
niques employed in the implementation of policies or pro-
grams. Examines various techniques of personal man-           PC 506                                             Cr. 3.0
agement, such as civil service system, management by          Testing and Assessment in Counseling
objectives, staff development, management information         An overview of test administration and validity. Students
systems, as well as techniques of fiscal management,          will be introduced to tests of intelligence, personality and
such as budgeting and cost effectiveness analysis. Also       interests. Limited to Psychological Counseling majors.
listed as Social Work 618.                                    Course Type(s): LA
Course Type(s): TPS
                                                              PC 507                                             Cr. 3.0
PS 691                                           Cr. 3.0      Psychological Testing of Students
Public Policy Research Proposal                               The use of interpretation of objective tests of achieve-
The first of a two-part research writing project (PS 691-     ment, aptitude, interest, and personality, with emphasis
Public Policy Research Proposal and PS 692-Public             on those tests used by educators. Limited to
Policy Research Project). Students in this class will con-    Psychological Counseling majors. Prerequisite:
struct a research proposal in partial fulfillment of the      Psychological Counseling 506.
research project requirement. Students will also form their   Course Type(s): LA
research project committee by selecting a faculty member
from the department (project supervisor) and second
reader (from within or outside the department). The pro-
                                                              PC 508                                             Cr. 3.0
posal will include the research question, research design,    Psychological Counseling of Students
and literature review. Upon completion of the proposal        Provides students with an eclectic view of counseling the-
writing (20 pages) the student will defend the proposal.      ory and techniques. Students will practice skills of inter-
Course Type(s): None                                          vention, counseling, recognition of problems, and referral.
                                                              Limited to Psychological Counseling majors.
                                                              Course Type(s): LA
PS 692                                           Cr. 3.0
Public Policy Research Project
The second of a two-part research writing project (PS
                                                              PC 510                                             Cr. 3.0
691-Public Policy Research Proposal and PS 692-Public         Community Mental Health
Policy Research Project). In this part (PS 692), students     An overview of mental health counseling within communi-
will work with the committee selected for PS 691              ty and health/human services settings. Reviews preven-
(Proposal) and work under their guidance to complete the      tion, intervention, needs assessment, as well as, program
research project and presentation/defense at a depart-        implementation and evaluation, in a comprehensive way.
mental colloquium.                                            Client advocacy, governmental policies, obtaining funding,
Prerequisites: Political Science 516 and 691.                 and other aspects of the delivery of human services are
Course Type(s): None                                          explored, with particular focus on the management and
                                                              ethical standards of all administrative and clinical counsel-
                                                              ing services related to mental health programs. Limited to




                                                                                     Monmouth University A67
Appendix A: Course Descriptions



Psychological Counseling majors.                                  PC 518                                             Cr. 3.0
Course Type(s): None                                              Psychology of the Exceptional Child
                                                                  The cognitive, social and emotional growth, diagnosis and
PC 512                                              Cr. 3.0       potentials of the exceptional child; mental retardation, lan-
Psychopathology                                                   guage disorders, motor coordination disorders, blindness,
Offers an intensive investigation of current thinking             and the gifted child; some field work required. Counseling
regarding the etiology and development of aberrant                interventions for exceptional children will be covered.
behavior; theory in the light of experimental findings and        Limited to Psychological Counseling majors.
clinical applications.                                            Course Type(s): None
Course Type(s): LA
                                                                  PC 519                                             Cr. 3.0
PC 515                                              Cr. 3.0       Theories of Learning
Human Development Through the Life Span                           Associationist theories, classical conditioning, operant
Provides students with an overview of human develop-              conditioning, and major cognitive theories. Major princi-
ment, with comprehensive coverage of all major develop-           ples of learning will be explored as to their application to
mental stages (prenatal period and infancy, childhood,            modern educational techniques and behavior change.
adolescence, early adulthood, middle adulthood, and late          Limited to Psychological Counseling majors.
adulthood) and focuses on both normal and abnormal                Course Type(s): LA
physical, mental health and social development.
Emphasis on the interaction of biological, psychological          PC 520                                             Cr. 3.0
and sociological forces that influence development.               Handling of Emotional Problems in the Classroom
Limited to Psychological Counseling majors.                       Analysis of emotional climate necessary for effective
Course Type(s): None                                              learning; recognition of some major causes of learning
                                                                  disability and disruptive classroom behavior; behavior
PC 516                                              Cr. 3.0       modification techniques. Limited to Psychological
Sex Therapy                                                       Counseling majors.
Introduction to human sexuality and related issues that           Course Type(s): None
counselors may encounter in their work. Students will
learn about normal and abnormal sexual functioning.               PC 521                                             Cr. 3.0
Aims to desensitize students and provoke introspection            Spirituality and Counseling
about diverse expression of sexuality; not designed to            Students are given a basic understanding of philosophical
train students as sex therapists. Limited to Psychological        and practical ways to integrate existential, mystical, or
Counseling majors.                                                other inexplicable issues into the counseling process. The
Course Type(s): None                                              student will look at different spiritual practices with a
                                                                  respectful, multicultural lens. Spiritual practices will be
PC 517                                              Cr. 3.0       viewed as possible psychological techniques, pathology
Counseling and Religion                                           and/or cognitive distortions. The student will be given the
Counseling and Religion will explore the world religions          opportunity to develop a personal spiritual theory of how
with a focus on the religions as they function in the U.S.A.      he or she would like to integrate or not spirituality into his
in a multi-cultural context. This will give the student a basic   or her work as a counselor. Limited to Psychological
understanding and respect for religious differences when          Counseling majors.
counseling clients who have different religious values than       Course Type(s): None
the counselor. A historical perspective on the relationship
between psychology and religion will be traced to contem-         PC 522                                             Cr. 3.0
porary practice. The student will be given the opportunity        Self Exploration: Body, Mind, Spirit
to develop a theory of how he or she would like to inte-          This experiential course will take the student through a
grate his or her knowledge into his or her work as a coun-        self exploration that will allow the student to explore the
selor. Limited to Psychological Counseling majors.                motivation, unconscious drives, anxieties, spiritual and
Course Type(s): None                                              existential meaning that lead he or she to be a counselor.
                                                                  It will explore many aspects of the personality, such as




A68 Monmouth University
                                                                                 Appendix A: Course Descriptions



need for power/control and compassion, which will allow           Prerequisite: Psychological Counseling 525.
the student to become more fully aware. Limited to                Course Type(s): None
Psychological Counseling majors.
Course Type(s): None                                              PC 529                                             Cr. 3.0
                                                                  Multicultural Counseling
PC 524                                              Cr. 3.0       Examines counseling theories and techniques as they
Counseling Children and Adolescents:                              relate to diversity in the client population. Limited to
Theories and Techniques                                           Psychological Counseling majors.
An exploration of psychotherapeutic counseling theories           Course Type(s): None
and techniques used with children and adolescents within
the developmental psychopathological framework. Limited           PC 530                                             Cr. 3.0
to Psychological Counseling majors.                               Crisis Intervention
Course Type(s): LA                                                This graduate seminar reviews crisis intervention theory
                                                                  and techniques. Students learn and practice counseling
PC 525                                              Cr. 3.0       intervention skills for clients in crisis.
Counseling Theory and Techniques                                  Course Type(s): LA
Study of the prominent theories that underlie the tech-
niques of counseling psychology. Emphasis on the specif-          PC 533                                             Cr. 3.0
ic techniques utilized in the context of a therapeutic rela-      Marriage and Couples Counseling
tionship. Limited to Psychological Counseling majors.             Students are provided with an overview of the historical
Course Type(s): LA                                                development, theoretical framework, and conceptual
                                                                  directions in the field of marriage and couples counseling.
PC 526                                              Cr. 3.0       Also provides students with methods of marital/couples
Case Conceptualization                                            assessment and counseling techniques related to various
Allows students to put into practice all aspects of case          clinical issues that are often encountered in counseling
conceptualization. Students will enter this class with the        settings. Limited to Psychological Counseling majors.
basic understanding of counseling theories, assessment,           Prerequisite: Psychological Counseling 525.
and psychopathology. Techniques and approaches for                Course Type(s): None
chosen theories, basic skills, and differential diagnosis will
be reviewed and practiced. Students will develop an               PC 534                                             Cr. 3.0
approach or style, based on known theory and technique.           Health Counseling
They will be able to identify how and why an intervention         Explores different non-conventional models of health.
is chosen according to theory and knowledge in the field.         Non-medical models of counseling will be explored in
Prerequisites: Psychological Counseling 505, 512, and 525.        relation to healing physically, mentally, emotionally and
Course Type(s): None                                              spirituality. The student will explore personal health in all
                                                                  domains, as well as health needed as a counselor.
PC 527                                              Cr. 3.0       Prevention, stressors and techniques will be discussed.
Counseling Single Parent Families                                 Limited to Psychological Counseling majors. Prerequisite:
A look at counseling theories and techniques as they              Psychological Counseling 525.
relate to the single parent household. Limited to                 Course Type(s): LA
Psychological Counseling majors.
Course Type(s): None                                              PC 535                                             Cr. 3.0
                                                                  Rorschach: Comprehensive System
PC 528                                              Cr. 3.0       Introduction to the Comprehensive System of the
Family Counseling: Theory and Technique                           Rorschach with emphasis on administration and scoring.
Enables students to examine the historical development,           Prerequisites: Psychological Counseling 506 and 512.
theoretical foundations, and contemporary conceptual              Course Type(s): None
directions in the field of family counseling. Clinical concerns
are interwoven with theoretical literature and counseling
techniques. Limited to Psychological Counseling majors.




                                                                                         Monmouth University A69
Appendix A: Course Descriptions



PC 540                                             Cr. 3.0     ATOD as seen in the school systems. School law, regula-
Introduction to Alcohol and Drug Abuse                         tions, and policies, as it relates to substance abuse in the
An overview of models of addiction: medical, socio-cultur-     schools, as well as how well/consistent it is followed
al, familial and psychological. Definitions and diagnostic     based on the school culture and the dynamics in a partic-
implications; an overview of basic treatment approaches.       ular district. Prevention and advocacy will be emphasized
Course Type(s): LA                                             as a large part of the SAC position, as well as learning to
                                                               work within the school culture. Curriculum planning and
                                                               staff education and development in chemical health will
PC 542                                             Cr. 3.0     be an essential part of the course. Negotiating the sys-
Treatment of Alcohol and Drug Abuse                            tems to maximize potential of the SAC position will be the
An examination of various treatment models within the          main focus.
alcohol and drug treatment field. The basics of individual,    Prerequisite: Psychological Counseling 540.
group, family, and couples counseling with alcoholic and       Course Type(s): None
addicted patients. Provides specific counseling tech-
niques. This course can be used toward the Substance
Awareness Coordinator Certificate.                             PC 550                                            Cr. 3.0
Prerequisite: Psychological Counseling 540.                    Group Counseling
Course Type(s): LA                                             Didactic and experiential course that introduces students
                                                               to group dynamics and theories/techniques of group
                                                               counseling. Didactic component reviews, group counsel-
PC 544                                             Cr. 3.0     ing theories/techniques, stages in group development,
Advanced Alcohol and Drug Counseling                           and salient characteristics of effective group facilitators.
Covers advanced topics that are introduced in                  Experiential component facilitates understanding of one’s
Psychological Counseling 542 and is therefore dedicated        own personality, biases and impact upon others in profes-
to addiction counselor skill building. Advanced topics         sional interactions. Legal and ethical issues relevant to
include skill building in areas of counselor ethics, motiva-   group counseling are also examined.
tional interviewing and motivational enhancement skills,       Course Type(s): None
group counseling skills, community and professional
skills, counseling skills needed to work effectively with
individuals impacted by HIV/AIDS, and counseling skills        PC 570                                            Cr. 3.0
needed to work with those impacted by gambling addic-          Career Counseling
tions and clinical supervision skills.                         The psychology of careers and career counseling is a
Prerequisites: Psychological Counseling 540 and 542.           cornerstone of the counseling profession and forms the
Course Type(s): None                                           historical basis of the profession’s emphasis on normal
                                                               development, decision-making, and assessment. Career
                                                               theories, life-span development, and assessment instru-
PC 545                                             Cr. 3.0     ments used in career counseling are reviewed.
Psychopharmacology                                             Recognizing the particular career issues of minorities and
An overview of basic psychopharmacology as it pertains         women, attention will be afforded to such trans-cultural
to alcohol and mood-altering drugs (both licit and illicit).   issues. Limited to Psychological Counseling majors.
Information regarding drug action, interactions, adverse       Course Type(s): LA
reactions, tolerance, dependency and withdrawal. Focus
on biopsychosocial assessment and treatment. Limited to
Psychological Counseling majors.                               PC 574                                            Cr. 3.0
Prerequisite: Psychological Counseling 512.                    Assessment and Treatment of Personality
Course Type(s): LA                                             Disorders
                                                               This course is designed to provide students with an
                                                               overview of current assessment tools and treatment tech-
PC 546                                             Cr. 3.0
                                                               niques pertaining to various personality disorders as listed
Substance Awareness in the Schools
                                                               in the DSM-IV.
A comprehensive study of the role of the Substance
                                                               Course Type(s): None
Awareness Coordinator in the Schools K-12. The areas
that will be included for study will be a review of research
based awareness and prevention programs as related to




A70 Monmouth University
                                                                                Appendix A: Course Descriptions



PC 595                                             Cr. 3.0       PC 603                                             Cr. 3.0
Psychological Counseling Practicum                               Research Methods in Counseling
Students integrate theory and practice in the counseling         Reviewing the literature, problem hypothesis research,
profession through an off-campus practicum. In addition to       naturalistic observation, survey and interview procedures,
the requirement of 100 hours of supervised field service in      and experimental methods are discussed.
an approved counseling agency, students also attend              Prerequisite: Psychological Counseling 601 or permission
class each week which consists of group supervision.             of the instructor.
During class the students also review relevant profession-       Course Type(s): LA
al, ethical and legal issues in counseling (for example
assessment procedures, treatment planning, best empiri-          PC 671                                             Cr. 3.0
cally proven interventions, confidentiality, etc. Limited to     Advanced Practice with Children
Psychological Counseling majors who have completed at            Designed for play therapy students, builds upon the foun-
least 21 credits, 12 of which include selected core courses      dation courses on individual, family and group counseling,
(e.g. PC 505 Mental Health Counseling, PC 510                    with advanced clinical applications for work with children.
Community Mental Health, PC 512 Psychopathology, PC              Assessment and intervention skills are used with children
525 Counseling Theory and Technique). Registration is by         and adolescents with special emphasis on expressive
special application, requiring the signature of the advisor      therapies such as art, play, sand tray, and music. Also list-
and the Field Placement Coordinator.                             ed as Educational Leadership 671 and Social Work 671.
Course Type(s): LA                                               Course Type(s): None

PC 598                                             Cr. 3.0       PC 672                                             Cr. 3.0
Special Topics in Psychological Counseling                       Advanced Theory in Play Therapy
The subject matter varies with the interest of the students      History and theory of play therapy are of central focus for
and the professor teaching the course. The exact nature          this course designed for play therapy students. A deep
of the topic covered in any given semester is indicated in       understanding of engagement and assessment techniques
the student’s transcript.                                        will be developed and related to clinical practice. Also list-
Prerequisite: Prior permission of the department chair is        ed as Educational Leadership 672 and Social Work 672.
required.                                                        Course Type(s): None
Course Type(s): None

                                                                 PC 673                                             Cr. 3.0
PC 599                                        Cr. 1.0-3.0        Advanced Techniques in Play Therapy
Independent Study in Psychological Counseling                    Designed for play therapy students; advanced techniques
Reading and research leading to significant written work         of play therapy are covered. Areas of play with children
under the direction of a faculty member.                         and adolescents, both individual and group, will be cov-
Prerequisites: Prior permission of the directing professor       ered. Also listed as Educational Leadership 673 and
and department chair.                                            Social Work 673.
Course Type(s): None                                             Course Type(s): None

PC 601                                             Cr. 3.0       PC 674                                             Cr. 3.0
Understanding Statistics in Counseling Research                  Play Therapy for Children at Risk
An overview of common statistical methods used in coun-          Designed for play therapy students; content on play ther-
seling research. Students will read articles that utilize com-   apy with vulnerable and high-risk children is covered. The
mon statistical procedures (t-tests, ANOVA, correlation,         areas of play therapy with this population will include
etc.). Students will also learn to understand the major dif-     assistance with the legal system. Also listed as
ferences between these techniques and the research               Educational Leadership 674 and Social Work 674.
questions that these statistical techniques address.             Course Type(s): None
Course Type(s): None




                                                                                        Monmouth University A71
Appendix A: Course Descriptions



PC 675                                             Cr. 3.0       PC 691                                               Cr. 3.0
Play Therapy Practicum Seminar I                                 Psychological Counseling Research Study
First part of a six-credit practicum in play therapy. Designed   Empirical research under the supervision of a sponsoring
to allow students to process the clinical experience of play     faculty member to data collection and significant written
with children and adolescents, with applications of              work.
advanced skills, assessment and treatment planning. Also         Prerequisite: Permission of the sponsoring instructor and
listed as Educational Leadership 675 and Social Work 675.        departmental approval.
Course Type(s): None                                             Course Type(s): None

PC 676                                             Cr. 3.0       PC 692                                               Cr. 3.0
Play Therapy Practicum Seminar II                                Psychological Counseling Thesis
Second part of a six-credit practicum in play therapy.           Independent investigation of special topics related to
Designed to allow students to process the clinical experi-       counseling, reflecting the research interests of the spon-
ence of play with children and adolescents, with a review        soring professor. Provides students with an opportunity to
of practice evaluation. Also listed as Educational               do extended quantitative or qualitative research in collab-
Leadership 676 and Social Work 676.                              oration with or under the supervision of a faculty member.
Course Type(s): None                                             Prerequisites: Psychological Counseling 501, completion
                                                                 of 27 total credits within the program, permission of the
PC 680                                             Cr. 3.0       sponsoring instructor, and departmental approval.
Clinical Internship in Professional Counseling I                 Course Type(s): None
Designed to provide students intensive experience where
they can integrate their academic learning during clinical       PC CPE                                               Cr. 0.0
experience. In addition to the requirement of 300 hours of       Psychological Counseling Comprehensive
supervised field service in an approved counseling               Examination
agency, they also attend class each week. The weekly             Comprehensive Examination in Professional Counseling.
class consists of group supervision and a review of rele-        Prerequisite: Successful completion of 39 credits.
vant professional, ethical and legal issues in counseling        Corequisite: PC 680.
(for example assessment procedures, treatment planning,          Course Type(s): None
best empirically proven interventions, confidentiality, etc.
Limited to Psychological Counseling majors who have              SOCIAL WORK
completed at least 30 graduate credits.
Prerequisites: Psychological Counseling 595 and
approval of the department. Registration is by special
                                                                 SW 503                                               Cr. 3.0
application, requiring the signature of the advisor and the      Social Work Practice with Individuals and Families
Field Placement Coordinator.                                     This beginning practice course introduces students to the
Course Type(s): LA                                               basic processes of social work and the roles and skills
                                                                 needed for foundation practice. Relevant theories of
                                                                 social work practice with individuals and families are
PC 681                                             Cr. 3.0       explored. Interviewing skills and assessment strategies
Clinical Internship in