Proposal for the Initiation of a - College of Education - Oregon State

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					                               Proposal for the Initiation of a
                                 New Instructional Program
                     Leading to the Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor of Science
                                        in Education

                                              Oregon State University
                                               School of Education


     Description of Proposed Program

1.   Program Overview

     a. Proposed CIP number: 130101

     b.   Provide a brief overview (approximately 1-2 paragraphs) of the proposed program, including a description
          of the academic area and a rationale for offering this program at the present time. Please include a
          description of any related degrees, certificates, or subspecialties (concentrations, areas of special emphasis,
          etc.) that may be offered now or in the foreseeable future.

Recently, Oregon State University identified teacher education as one of the university’s highest priorities. With a
bold new vision, the School of Education at Oregon State University (OSU) is preparing to launch a new university-
wide B.A./B.S. in Education degree in the fall of 2003. The new Education degree program will enable students to
earn two undergraduate degrees – one in their chosen field and the second in Education. Similar to the International
Degree program (B.A. in International Studies), the B.A./B.S. in Education can only be obtained in conjunction with
a B.A./B.S. in student’s chosen field. The Education degree can be obtained concurrently or subsequently with the
primary degree.

The proposed Education degree program is designed to provide students with increased access to Education
programs by providing a multiple-entry pathway to teacher preparation that is available to all qualified OSU students
and promote opportunities to recruit a more diverse pool of candidates. The proposed pathway is a 40 credit hour
program that includes all the course work and field experiences (e.g., student teaching) necessary to qualify for an
Oregon Initial Teaching License granted by the Teacher Standards and Practices Commission (TSPC).

The proposed program addresses the goal of promoting excellence and innovation in both disciplinary and
interdisciplinary curricula envisioned by OSU 2007 and is modeled after OSU’s successful and acclaimed
International Degree program (B.A. in International Studies). The Education degree program (B.A./B.S. in
Education) is specifically cited in Recommendation 3(A) of the 2007 Curricular Issues Planning Team report as an
innovation to be supported. The major elements of the International Degree and the proposed Education degree are
highlighted in the table below.


                International Degree                                             Education Degree

Overseas internship                                             Internship in schools or community settings (as
                                                                appropriate)

International coursework                                        Teaching and learning coursework (pedagogy)

Thesis on international dimension of the discipline             Capstone including a portfolio, action research, and
                                                                work samples (TSPC requirement)

4th year language proficiency                                   Multicultural coursework and practicum



                                                            1
Dr. Loren Kellogg, Director, International Degree Program at OSU, states in his letter of support, “The innovative
nature of the proposed OSU education degree program will attract interest from other universities and enhance
the national recognition to the university.” Dr. David Imig, President and CEO of the American Association of
Colleges for Teacher Education (AACTE) echoes this sentiment in his letter of support, “Given the enormous need
for secondary science and mathematics teachers, this is an important development that merits the attention of
colleagues across the country. You and your colleagues are to be congratulated for the innovative proposal and I
wish you well in having it recognized within the college, university, and state. Let me know how it progresses so
that AACTE can provide you with visibility for this important program.” (See Appendix A).

     c.   When will the program be operational, if approved?

Implementation of the proposed degree program will begin with piloting the 8 credit hours of the Core Education
Courses in summer 2003 on an experimental basis with a small number of students. The School of Education will
begin accepting students into the program fall 2003 and the first students will graduate from the program at the end
of the 2003-04 academic year. The new program will initially target areas of high need for teachers by the public
schools in Oregon (e.g., mathematics, science, technology, middle level teachers) and areas of high student interest
(e.g., early childhood and elementary education).

Full implementation of the new program will begin fall term 2003. This would include both the OSU main campus
and the OSU Cascade campus in Bend. Dr. Jay Casbon, CEO, OSU-Cascade Campus indicated in his letter of
support, “If approved, this new program will be added to the programmatic offering at the branch campus as
early as September 2003. There is a growing need for baccalaureate level, job ready teacher candidates for
school districts in Central Oregon. In fact, I have been approached by several Central Oregon superintendents in
recent months asking for Oregon State University to offer teacher preparation programs.” (See Appendix A).

2.   Purpose and Relationship of Proposed Program to the Institution's Mission and Strategic Plan

     a.   What are the objectives of the program?

The objectives of the program are:

         Access. Provide a multiple-entry pathway to teacher preparation, available to all qualified OSU students.

         Diversity. Promote opportunities to recruit a more diverse pool of candidates.

         Quality. Ensure strength and integrity of both disciplinary content and professional education content and
          experiences.

         Quantity. Prepare more OSU graduates to teach in Oregon schools

         University-wide engagement. Facilitate university-wide engagement with teaching and learning at all
          levels.

         Efficiency. Provide a more cost efficient and cost effective program for students and for OSU.

     b.   How does the proposed program support the mission and strategic plan of the institution(s)? How does the
          program contribute to attaining long-term goals and directions of the institution and program?

The proposed program supports OSU’s three strategic goals: being a statewide campus, providing a compelling
learning experience, and aspiring to be a top-tier university. Land Grant institutions can and should be playing a
larger role in the preparation of teachers. Part of the mandate of Land Grant institutions is to support community and
youth development. They also include some of the most highly talented students especially in areas where there is
the most critical need for K-12 teachers (e.g., mathematics, sciences, and technology). Land Grant institutions have
an enormous opportunity for ensuring teacher quality in the 21st century, if we recruit promising people into teaching
and give them the highest quality preparation. However, students do not currently see a clear, viable pathway for
themselves into the teaching profession.

                                                           2
OSU, as a comprehensive, research university and as the state’s Land Grant, Sea Grant, and Space Grant institution,
has the programs and the faculty to be the leader in meeting the challenge of providing a talented and dedicated
teacher in every classroom in Oregon. OSU’s School of Education currently has programs and faculty located in
every county in the state and is committed to developing a new, university-wide approach to teacher education that
will serve as a model for other Land Grant institutions. The School of Education views the state of Oregon as its
campus, and works in partnership with Oregon community colleges and other Oregon University System (OUS)
institutions in providing access to educational programs.

In addition, the proposed program contributes to the goal of providing a “compelling learning experience” that
celebrates knowledge; encourages personal growth and awareness; acknowledges the benefits of diverse experiences,
world views, learning styles, and values; and engenders personal and societal values that benefit the individual and
society. Bridget Burns, ASOSU President describes in her letter of support how the School of Education’s proposal
supports this goal. “I have been impressed to find an amazing number of students who want to go out into the
world to truly make a difference. Many of them want to make a difference for children, for our future. They
want to become teachers. And that is why I am so excited about this proposal for an undergraduate Education
degree. The new degree would open up so many doors for OSU students. Many now graduate with a degree that
they don’t know what to do with. The double degree, with just a little more time, would enable them to teach
AND make a difference for the future of our country.”

    c.   How does the proposed program meet the needs of Oregon and enhance the state's capacity to respond
         effectively to social, economic, and environmental challenges and opportunities?

Oregon has approximately 37,000 teachers in the public school system with approximately a ten percent turnover
rate each year. The Oregon colleges/universities do not produce enough graduates to meet the need for new
teachers. Over the past decade, Oregon has been a consistent importer of new teachers (i.e., Oregon has hired more
teachers than are produced by the public and private colleges in Oregon). Each year Oregon school districts hire
approximately 3,600 new teachers. Approximately 2,200 of these are graduates from Oregon colleges/universities
(public and private). The remaining 1,400 new teachers are hired from outside of Oregon. In 2001-02, OSU had
only 129 students graduate with an Initial Teaching License.

Every student in every community deserves to have a talented and dedicated teacher in every classroom. OSU has an
enormous opportunity for ensuring teacher quality in the 21 st century, if we recruit promising people into teaching
and give them the highest quality preparation and training. While working to provide a highly qualified teacher in
every classroom, we also have to address the challenge of not having enough teachers.

Despite the recent gloomy economic conditions, school districts continue to hire new teachers and when they do hire,
they often prefer to hire less expensive teachers (i.e., applicants with a B.A. or B.S. degree rather than a Master’s
degree). Dr. Jim Ford, Superintendent of the Corvallis School District has indicated in his letter of support that
forty (40) percent of the Corvallis School District teachers are eligible to retire in the next two years. “As a school
district, we are already scrambling in our attempt to find qualified candidates in mathematics, science, and
technology positions. The proposed OSU program is specifically designed to address these areas.” (See
Appendix A).

Dr. Terry Kneisler, Superintendent of the Philomath School District echoes these needs in his letter of support. “I
have noted that the pool of candidates is shallow and there are often but a few truly viable candidates. This
condition, despite our close proximity to the university and a highly desirable district within which to work,
does not bode well for the K-12 public education system, particularly when fifty (50) percent of our teaching
staff is on the cusp of retirement.” (See Appendix A)




                                                           3
3.   Course of Study

     a.   Briefly describe the proposed curriculum. (List is fine.)
          i. Slash courses (i.e., 400/500-level) should be listed as such.
          ii. Include course numbers, titles, credit hours.

Licensure Pathway: The pathway is a 40 credit hour program that includes all the course work and field experiences
(e.g., student teaching) necessary to qualify for an Initial Teaching License granted by the Teacher Standards and
Practices Commission (TSPC). Within this pathway, candidates may specialize in one of four areas: Early
Childhood Education, Elementary School, Middle School, or High School. It is anticipated that students seeking
only the Early Childhood Education authorization level (PreK - Grade 3) will be able to complete this as a dual
degree with an HDFS major and an Education major. Those students seeking both Early Childhood Education
authorization and Elementary Education authorization (Grade 3 – Grade 8) will be able to do so through the new
Education degree program (i.e., earn two undergraduate degrees).

Adult Development/Youth Development Pathway (Option for future development): This option would be a 32 credit
hour program designed for those students interested in teaching in a community agency, adult/youth development
setting, or work force development setting. Within this option, candidates may specialize in youth development or
adult education.

New courses are indicated in bold. Slash courses (4XX/5XX) are indicated with an asterisk (*).

Core Education Courses (8)

ED 216 Purpose, Structure, and Function of Education in a Democracy (3)
ED 219 Multicultural Issues in Education (2)
ED 253 Learning Across the Lifespan (3)

Professional Education Courses (17)

ED 320 Fostering Supportive Learning Environments (2), (all levels)
ED 348 Differentiating Instruction and Students with Exceptionalities (2), (all levels)

ED 456 Strategies for Teaching Language Arts & Social Studies (2), (Elementary School only)
ED 457 Teaching Mathematics for Understanding (3), (Elementary School only)
ED 458 Strategies for Teaching Wellness and Fine Arts (2), (Elementary School only)
ED 459 Science, Technology, and the Nature of Inquiry (3), (Elementary School only)
ED 483 Reading, Literacy, and Language Development (3), (Elementary School only)

ED 491 Content Standards and Curriculum Development for Middle School Teaching (3), (Middle
       School only)
ED 492 Strategies and Organizational Structures for Middle School (4), (Middle School only)

ED 412 Learning Styles and Needs of Adolescence (2), (Middle School & High School)
ED 427 Performance Standards and Assessments (2), (Middle School & High School)
ED 493 Reading, Literacy, and Language Development in Content Areas (2), (Middle School & High
       School)

ED 454 Curriculum Implementation and Instructional Strategies (4), (High School only)
ED 494 Content Standards and Curriculum Development for High School (3), (High School only)

Field (Teaching) Experiences and Seminar (15)

ED 407 Seminar: Student Teaching (3), (all levels)
ED 410 Internship: Student Teaching (12), (all levels)

                                                           4
    b.   Describe new courses. Include proposed course numbers, titles, credit hours, and course descriptions.

All the courses are new except ED 412 (Learning Styles and Needs of Adolescence) which will be a revision of the
current ED 412 (Psychology of the Adolescent). See Appendix B for course numbers, titles, credit hours and course
descriptions.

    c.   Provide a discussion of any nontraditional learning modes to be utilized in the new courses, including, but
         not limited to: (1) the role of technology, and (2) the use of career development activities such as practica or
         internships.

The program will utilize distance delivery systems such as V-Tel and web-based instruction including the
Blackboard system for instruction to maximize student access and to support student teaching and internships at sites
outside the immediate Corvallis area. Blackboard experiences will be embedded in every course. In addition,
students interested in obtaining an Initial Teaching License through the Licensure Pathway must complete 15 weeks
of student teaching/internship that includes 9 continuous weeks in schools. They will also complete shorter
experiences in schools in conjunction with the Professional Education Courses listed in 3(a) above. Students
pursuing the Adult Development/Youth Development Pathway will have similar experiences except the internship
will not be as extensive.

    d.   What specific learning outcomes will be achieved by students who complete this course of study?

The specific learning outcomes are:

        Content/Subject Matter. Demonstrate an understanding of concepts/subject matter, sufficient in breadth
         and depth, to support student learning as defined by state (as described by 21 st Century public school
         standards) and national subject specific standards.

        Nature of the Disciplines. Engage students in activities that reflect the values, beliefs, and assumptions
         inherent in the content area as well as in the interdisciplinary applications.

        Inquiry and Problem Solving. Engage students regularly and effectively in content-specific exploration,
         inquiry, and problem solving.

        Students as Learners, Cultural Diversity, and Exceptionalities. Engage students in relating the
         disciplines to their life and interests (providing for differences in gender, ability, socioeconomic
         background, culture, and ethnic membership) as well as the needs, values, issues and interests of the
         community.

        Pedagogy and Androgogy. Create effective learning opportunities using a variety of teaching
         methodologies and assessment strategies and their applications, helping students to derive meaning from
         instruction and creating a disposition for further inquiry and learning.

        Learning Environments. Design and manage safe, secure, and stimulating learning environments that
         meet the needs of all students.

        Assessment. Use a variety of assessment strategies that are aligned with goals and methods of instruction,
         appropriate to the knowledge and skills of the students, and conducive to continuous learning.

        Technology. Use and engage students in learning to use appropriate technological resources to expand
         their learning.




                                                           5
         Curriculum. Engage students in a research-based curriculum that is consistent with state and national
          goals and appropriate for the students’ needs, abilities and interests.

         Social Context. Effectively collaborate with peer, family, and community resources to facilitate the
          learning and development of students.

         Reflection. Develop the habit of a reflective practitioner, reflecting on their teaching practices and
          enabling students to become reflective learners.

         Professional Practice. Participate in a professional community: improving practice through personal
          education and development, community outreach, mentoring of new colleagues, guiding pre-service
          teachers, contributing to research, and collaborating with colleagues to improve educational practices.

4.   Recruitment and Admission Requirements

     a.   Is the proposed program intended primarily to provide another program option to students who are already
          being attracted to the institution, or is it anticipated that the proposed program will draw students who
          would not otherwise come to the institution?

The proposed program is intended to primarily provide another program opportunity to students who are already
being attracted to OSU. The program will be available to all at OSU but will initially target current students in
mathematics, science, engineering, and other applied sciences. There has been close collaboration with Linn-Benton
Community College and Chemeketa Community College staff in the development of the proposed program. As the
specific articulation agreements are finalized with these and other community colleges, it is anticipated that
additional community college students will be attracted to OSU. It is anticipated that once the Education degree is
approved, the School of Education will implement a dual degree (using the same undergraduate coursework) for
HDFS students interested in preparing for an Early Childhood Education teaching authorization.

Dr. David Imig, President and CEO of the American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education (AACTE) notes
in his letter of support, “Attracting students enrolled in mathematics, the sciences, and engineering to teacher
education is a challenge when we ask them to extend their program to a 5th or 6th year. The 40-quarter hour
program you propose appears to be of high quality and should result in more K-12 teachers with the requisite
skills, knowledge, and ability to make a difference in the nation’s classrooms.” (See Appendix A).

     b.   Are any requirements for admission to the program being proposed that are in addition to admission to the
          institution? If so, what are they?

Participation in the program is a three-step process listed below:

         There are no additional requirements to enroll in the three Core Education Courses (8 credit hours).
         In order to obtain Provisional Admission into the program the student must: have positive evaluations from
          early field experiences, have a 3.0 GPA in the Core Education Courses and in their primary degree area,
          have a passing score on the CBEST exam have a successful background check (i.e., fingerprinting, criminal
          records review, and moral character questionnaire and have two letters of recommendation (one from the
          primary degree area and one related to working with youth or adults, as appropriate).
         In order to obtain Professional Admission into the program (i.e., complete student teaching) the student
          must: have a 3.0 GPA in the Professional Education courses and have a passing score on the relevant
          PRAXIS exam(s) required by TSPC to obtain an Initial Teaching License.

     c.   Will any enrollment limitation be imposed? If so, please indicate the specific limitation and its rationale.
          How will students be selected if there are enrollment limitations?

No, there will not be any enrollment limitation imposed. The initial 8 credit hours of the program would be open to
all students. Although the 8 credit hours of the program are open to all students, the additional requirements for
provisional and professional admission discussed above may limit enrollment.
                                                            6
5.   Accreditation of the Program

     a.   If applicable, identify any accrediting body or professional society that has established standards in the area
          in which the proposed program lies.

At the present time, the School of Education’s Professional Teacher and Counselor Education Programs are
nationally accredited through the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE). The Oregon
Teacher Standards and Practices Commission (TSPC) have approved all of the Education licensure programs at
OSU. The School of Education intends to continue with this approval process for the new Education degree
program leading to initial licensure. Both NCATE and TSPC Standards are included in the proposed program.

     b.   If applicable, does the proposed program meet professional accreditation standards? If it does not, in what
          particular area(s) does it appear to be deficient? What steps would be required to qualify the program for
          accreditation? By what date is it anticipated that the program will be fully accredited?

In early 2002, teams representing National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) and the
Oregon Teacher Standards and Practices Commission (TSPC) conducted their regularly scheduled accreditation visit
to OSU. Annual follow-up progress reports are required to be produced and the next scheduled on-site visit by
NCATE and TSPC will occur in 2007.

     c.   If the proposed program is a graduate program in which the institution offers an undergraduate program, is
          the undergraduate program accredited? If not, what would be required to qualify it for accreditation? If
          accreditation is a goal, what steps are being taken to achieve accreditation?
          This proposed Education degree program is not a graduate level program.


Need

6.   Evidence of Need

     a.   What evidence does the institution have of need for the program? Please be explicit. (Needs assessment
          information may be presented in the form of survey data; summaries of focus groups or interviews;
          documented requests for the program from students, faculty, external constituents, etc.)

Several sources of data were examined to determine if there is a need for the program and possible student interest in
pursuing the proposed program, if it were available. There is clear and convincing national, regional, and Oregon
need for this program and students are very interested in pursuing dual major or double degree programs. A
November 17, 2002 article in the New York Times (For Students Seeking Edge, One Major Just Isn’t Enough)
describes the rapidly increasing and very large number of students across the country pursuing dual majors, double
degrees, and even triple majors. OSU data indicates a slight increase over the past ten years in the number of
students completing double degrees even though the opportunity for pursuing a double degree is quite limited at
OSU. However, OSU data regarding dual majors does mirror the data cited in the New York Times article.

OSU faculty and student input was solicited to determine the need for the proposed Education degree program and
possible student interest in the program and obtaining a double degree, if it were available. During August 2002, a
survey instrument was developed and approval was obtained from the OSU Research Office and Institutional Review
Board to administer the survey. The 12-item survey instrument was piloted with approximately 100 students
participating in the Student Retention and Orientation (START) program in September 2002. The 12-item survey
instrument was modified slightly and distributed to students during orientation programs sponsored by the Residence
Halls and Greek Life. A total of 3,000 surveys were distributed and a total of 1,624 completed surveys were
returned for a response rate of 54 percent.

Highlights of the students’ responses are:
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        861 of the 1,624 (53%) respondees have considered teaching in a school, community, or work place setting
         as a career;

        275 of the 1,624 (17%) respondees definitely intend to pursue teaching in a school, community, or work
         place setting.

        656 of the 1,624 (40%) respondees indicated they would pursue the Education undergraduate, double
         degree program (strongly agree and agree) if it were available.

        When asked to identify the academic area(s) they would be most interested in teaching, mathematics,
         sciences, and technology were most often selected. Science was selected 235 times, Mathematics was also
         selected 233 times, and Technology Education was also selected 54 times.

Faculty input was solicited through a series of weekly “conversations” (open forums) that were held once a week
during July, August, and September about a possible Education undergraduate double degree program. These
conversations were held on different days of the week and at different times of the day in an attempt to make the
conversations more accessible. As the development work progressed into the design phase of the Education degree
program, faculty and staff from throughout OSU, local community colleges, and local K-12 schools participated.

    b.   Identify statewide and institutional service-area employment needs the proposed program would assist in
         filling. Is there evidence of regional or national need for additional qualified individuals such as the
         proposed program would produce? If yes, please specify.

Our nation’s schools will need 2.2 million new teachers over the next decade, and these teachers need to be well
prepared to teach all students to reach the highest standards. While the demand for teachers varies somewhat from
state to state and across subject areas, there are several areas that consistently report a high need for qualified
teachers. According to The Urban Teacher Challenge: Teacher Demand and Supply in the Great City Schools:

        98% of districts have an immediate need for science teachers;
        95% of districts have an immediate need for mathematics teachers;
        80% of districts have an immediate need for male teachers at the elementary level;
        73% of districts have a need for bilingual teachers.

In addition, while America’s school-aged population is becoming more multicultural and multi-ethnic, its teaching
workforce reflects a trend in the opposite direction. Teachers of color make up approximately 14% of all current K-
12 teachers. However, children of African American, Hispanic and Latino, Asian, and Native American descent
make up 36% of the K-12 student population – and that percentage is increasing each year.

Oregon faces challenges similar to those at the national level. According to the recent study conducted by the
Oregon University System Office of Academic Affairs, the Oregon School Principals’ Study: Teacher Preparation
and Shortages, nearly half of the public school principals in Oregon reported difficulty in recruiting enough
candidates for teaching positions. Principals in the north coast, eastern Oregon, Salem/Keizer, and Columbia
Gorge/central Oregon areas reported the most difficulty. The following table summarizes the current shortage areas
in Oregon:

Specialties in which Oregon Principals Cited Difficulty          Elementary            Middle              High
Recruiting Candidates                                              Schools             Schools            Schools

Counseling                                                            X                                      X
ESL/Bilingual                                                         X                   X
Mathematics                                                                               X                  X
Media/Library                                                         X
Music                                                                 X                   X                  X
Science                                                                                   X                  X
Second Languages                                                                                             X
Special Education                                                     X                   X                  X

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Similar to the national trends, student populations in Oregon K-12 schools are becoming increasingly ethnically
diverse but the K-12 teaching staff is not. During the 2000-2001 school year, approximately 22% of the K-12 public
school students were ethnic minorities while only about 4% of the current teachers are members of an ethnic minority
group. Oregon colleges/universities have made small gains in this area but only about 7% of the newly licensed
teachers in 2000-2001 from Oregon teacher preparation programs were minorities. One of the goals of the
Education degree program is to recruit a more diverse pool of candidates into the teaching profession.

    c.   What are the numbers and characteristics of students to be served? What is the estimated number of
         graduates of the proposed program over the next five years? On what information are these projections
         based?

The proposed program will initially target areas of high need by Oregon K-12 schools (i.e., mathematics, science,
technology, and ESL/bilingual education) and areas of high student interest (elementary education). For the high
need areas by Oregon K-12 schools, students will be recruited from applied science areas at OSU (e.g., engineering,
forestry, agriculture, oceanography, computer science, mathematics, physics, chemistry, environmental sciences,
natural resources). For the high student interest area, students will be recruited from Liberal Arts and Human
Development and Family Sciences programs. The pathway will also target students in articulated community college
programs between OSU and Linn-Benton Community College and between OSU and Chemeketa Community
College.

It is expected that student participation in the Education degree program will increase each year. Based on the
student interest survey cited above in question 6(a), the goal is to have a total of 300 students (Corvallis campus plus
OSU – Cascades campus) participating in the program within five years. Dr. John Carnahan, President of Linn-
Benton Community College notes in his letter of support, “Linn-Benton Community College has several hundred
education majors who will benefit from this new double degree. Your proposed program will provide an
alternative pathway to teacher preparation for our transfer students, and specifically benefit our dual enrollment
students” (See Appendix A).

    d.   Are there any other compelling reasons for offering the program?

Each year Oregon school districts hire approximately 3,600 new teachers. Approximately 2,200 of these are
graduates from Oregon colleges/universities (public and private). The remaining 1,400 new teachers are hired from
outside of Oregon. In 2001-02, OSU had only 129 students graduate with an Initial Teaching License. Historically,
OSU’s School of Education has had a much larger number of graduates. Clearly, OSU can and should be producing
a larger number of graduates with an Initial Teaching License.

    e.   Identify any special interest in the program on the part of local or state groups (e.g., business, industry,
         agriculture, professional groups).

The proposed Education degree program is supported by other local and state groups. The program is supported by
the Deans of Education at peer institutions, the OUS Deans of Education, the CEO of OSU Cascade Campus, local
community colleges presidents, and local school district superintendents. Copies of letters of support are included in
Appendix A.

    f.   Discuss considerations given to making the complete program available for part-time, evening, weekend,
         and/or placebound students.

The proposed Education degree program will be responsive to the needs and issues of students in several ways. It is
anticipated that the Core Education Courses will be offered during the summer and other courses in the Education
degree program will be available in the summer if there is a need. In addition, courses will also be offered in
alternative times and formats (e.g., evenings, a series of Friday evening and all day Saturday classes). The program
will also be available at the OSU-Cascades campus in Bend. Dr. Jay Casbon, CEO of the OSU-Cascades campus,
“If approved, this new program will be added to the programmatic offering at the branch campus as early as
September of 2003.” (See Appendix A).
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Outcomes

7.   Program Evaluation

     a.   How will the institution determine the extent to which the academic program meets the objectives (section
          2a) previously outlined? (Identify specific post-approval monitoring procedures and outcome indicators to
          be used.)

The School of Education will initiate a program evaluation designed to collect and report information for a variety of
purposes and users. The primary users of the program evaluation are the School of Education faculty and others at
Oregon State University interested in the Education Double Degree program, local community college staff, and
local school district personnel and will be used for program improvement purposes.

The program evaluation plan outlines information that will be collected during the following periods: upon
provisional admission to the program, upon full admission to the program, during the program, and at the conclusion
of the program. The annual program evaluation will include both qualitative and quantitative sources. In addition,
faculty members have expressed interest in a longitudinal study that would follow these students during the first
several years of their teaching careers.

The School of Education is required by TSPC to submit an annual program evaluation report. This annual report
includes items such as: identifying any changes to the School of Education mission statement, long term strategic
goals, short term strategic goals, modifications to existing programs, and evidence of continual review of the
programs including input from current and former students. The annual program evaluation is conducted in
conjunction with the Teacher and Counselor Education Licensure Curriculum Committee (OSU faculty) and the
Teacher and Counselor Education Consortium (OSU faculty, local school administrators and teachers, and OSU
students currently in a teacher preparation program). The program evaluation includes planning program
improvement activities. The program evaluation of the proposed Education degree program will be a part of this
established format and procedures.

     b.   How will the collected information be used to improve teaching and programs to enhance student learning?

Data sources will include surveys of student teachers and cooperating teachers, student self-assessment and
reflections, student grades (GPA), national standardized tests (e.g., CBEST, PRAXIS II), supervised observations in
practicum and student teaching situations by cooperating teachers and university supervisors, along with faculty self-
assessments. Data will be collected annually and summarized in the annual report to TSPC. Highlights of the report
will also be shared with the School of Education’s Teacher and Counselor Education Consortium, the School of
Education Academic Affairs Committee, and other interested groups at Oregon State University. These committees
will assist in reviewing the data and planning annual program improvement activities. The specific goals, outcomes,
and measures are listed in the table on the following page.




                                                          10
                                          Education Double Degree
                                          Program Evaluation Plan

                Goals                                Outcomes                                Measures

ACCESS
Provides a multiple-entry pathway to     Undergraduate pathways approved       Meeting minutes to document
teacher preparation, available to all    and implemented.                      approvals and students matriculating
OSU students.                                                                  in the program

DIVERSITY
Promotes opportunities to recruit        More diverse candidates complete      Demographic report of candidates
from more diverse pool of students.      program.                              entering and completing the program.

QUALITY
Ensures strength and integrity of both   Candidates have strong disciplinary   Student GPA at provisional
disciplinary content and professional    content and professional education    admission;
education preparation.                   content and experiences.              Student GPA at full admission to the
                                                                               program;
                                                                               Completion of primary content
                                                                               degree;
                                                                               Passing scores on the relevant
                                                                               PRAXIS II content exams
QUANTITY
Prepares more OSU grads to teach in      More candidates in areas of high      Demographic report of candidates
areas of high need and high student      need (e.g., math, science, and        entering and completing the program.
interest.                                technology) and high student
                                         interest.

ENGAGEMENT
Facilitates university-wide              More OSU Colleges have students       Demographic report of candidates
engagement with teaching and             participating.                        entering and completing the program.
learning at all levels.

EFFICIENCY
Generates efficiencies of scale.         More cost efficient and cost          Financial report.
                                         effective program for students and
                                         for OSU.




8.   Assessment of Student Learning

     a.   What methods will be used to assess student learning? How will student learning assessment be embedded
          in the curriculum?

All the proposed courses will be organized around an outcome/standards-based student assessment system required
by TSPC and NCATE. Students will be evaluated through a variety of assessment strategies including the following:
written examinations, project-based cooperative learning activities, self assessments, development and
implementation of instructional plans that include written reflections, research papers, student teaching/practica
observation by the cooperating teacher in the school and by a university supervisor, and preparation of a professional
portfolio as part of the capstone event as students complete the program. In addition, student must have a passing
score on the relevant PRAXIS II teacher licensure exam(s) required by TSPC to obtain an Initial Teaching License.




                                                         11
     b.   What specific methods or approaches will be used to assess graduate (completer) outcomes?

The School of Education will monitor graduate (completer) outcomes in several ways including examining
employment rates of graduates, conducting periodic post-graduation surveys of completers, and analyzing student
performance on the PRAXIS teacher licensure exam(s) required by TSPC to obtain an Initial Teaching License.

     c.   Is a licensure examination associated with this field of study?

Yes, the licensing agency for teachers in Oregon, the Teacher Standards and Practices Commission, requires several
additional items beyond a degree in education. Among the items required are: a passing score on the CBEST exam
(basic skills test), a passing score on the appropriate PRAXIS II test (subject matter test) for the level and subject the
candidate is interested in teaching, and a criminal background check including fingerprinting and moral character
questions prior to beginning student teaching.


Integration of Efforts

9.   Similar Programs in the State

     a.   List all other closely related OUS programs.

The University of Oregon, Western Oregon University, and Eastern Oregon University have undergraduate teacher
preparation programs but these programs are structured very differently from the proposed Education degree
program and target a different student population. The target population for the proposed Education degree program
is existing OSU students especially those students in engineering, mathematics, science, and other applied sciences
such as forestry.

     b.   In what way, if any, will resources of other institutions (another OUS institution or institutions, community
          college, and/or private college/university) be shared in the proposed program? How will the program be
          complementary to, or cooperate with, an existing program or programs?

The proposed Education degree program has been articulated with local community colleges. Staff members from
local community colleges were members of the task forces that designed the Education degree program. The eight
(8) hours of Core Education Courses in the program, or their equivalent will be available at the local community
colleges and ultimately at all Oregon community colleges. These eight (8) hours are directly transferable into the
Education degree program.

The Deans of Education at the OUS institutions are supportive of the Education degree program. (See selected
letters of support in Appendix A).

     c.   Is there any projected impact on other institutions in terms of student enrollment and/or faculty workload?

There is no projected negative impact on other OUS institutions. Dr. Martin Kaufman, Dean, College of Education
at the University of Oregon welcomes this proposal and in his letter of support he states specifically, “I believe your
proposal will not have adverse impact on private or public institutions given the critical shortage needs in our
schools. The UO College of Education welcomes this added resource capacity to addressing the needs of the
state’s school systems.” (See Appendix A).




                                                            12
Resources

10. Faculty

    a.   Identify program faculty, briefly describing each faculty member's expertise/specialization. Separate regular
         core faculty from faculty from other departments and adjuncts. Collect current vitae for all faculty, to be
         made available to reviewers upon request.

Please refer to Appendix C for information on the School of Education faculty likely to be involved the Education
degree program.

    b.   Estimate the number, rank, and background of new faculty members who would need to be added to initiate
         the proposed program in each of the first four years of the proposed program's operation (assuming the
         program develops as anticipated). What commitment does the institution make to meeting these needs?

No new additional faculty will be added at the OSU campus in Corvallis. The School of Education intends to
reallocate the current resources and some faculty loads to initiate the Education degree program. For example, the
number of students (i.e., Elementary Education) in the MAT in Education program will be reduced by half and some
of the loads of faculty members currently assigned to the MAT in Education will be reallocated in order to
implement the Education degree program. Additional adjunct faculty will be used as described in the budget
document.

The Education degree program will also be offered in Bend at the OSU-Cascades campus. Funding for the initial
faculty member to support the Double Degree program in Bend will be provided through the OSU Cascades campus
budget.

    c.   Estimate the number and type of support staff needed in each of the first four years of the program.

The School of Education acknowledges that student advising in the Education degree program will be different than
in the current MAT program. The School of Education intends to reallocate and supplement the current resources
and support staff to initiate the Education degree program and provide access to additional advising services. This
reallocation and supplementation of resources is noted in the budget document.

11. Reference Sources

    a.   Describe the adequacy of student and faculty access to library and department resources (including, but not
         limited to, printed media, electronically published materials, videotapes, motion pictures, CD-ROM and
         online databases, and sound files) that are relevant to the proposed program (e.g., if there is a recommended
         list of materials issued by the American Library Association or some other responsible group, indicate to
         what extent access to such holdings meets the requirements of the recommended list).

The current resources in the library support the current MAT and PhD programs in the School of Education and will
be marginally sufficient to also support the proposed Education degree program. Nearly all of the students
participating in the proposed program are current OSU students and are already using the library services. Modest
additional library resources are necessary and are noted in the budget document.

    b.   How much, if any, additional financial support will be required to bring access to such reference materials
         to an appropriate level? How does the institution plan to acquire these needed resources?

Modest additional library resources are necessary and are noted in the budget document.




                                                          13
12. Facilities, Equipment, and Technology

    a.   What unique resources (in terms of buildings, laboratories, computer hardware/software, Internet or other
         online access, distributed-education capability, special equipment, and/or other materials) are necessary to
         the offering of a quality program in the field?

No new unique resources will be necessary to offer the proposed degree program. Each course in the program will
include a Blackboard component and students will need easy access to computers, the Internet, and other online
resources currently available to all OSU students. In addition, some courses will be held in local schools (e.g.,
Corvallis, Albany, Philomath).

    b.   What resources for facilities, equipment, and technology, beyond those now on hand, are necessary to offer
         this program? Be specific. How does the institution propose that these additional resources will be
         provided?

No new unique resources are necessary to offer the program.


13. If this is a graduate program, please suggest three to six potential external reviewers.

This is not a graduate program.

14. Budgetary Impact

    a. On the “Budget Outline” sheet (available on the Forms and Guidelines Web site), please indicate
    the estimated cost of the program for the first four years of its operation (one page for each year). The “Budget
    Outline Instructions” form for filling out the Budget Outline is available on the Forms and Guidelines Web site,
    as well.

    b.   If federal or other grant funds are required to launch the program, describe the status of the grant
         application process and the likelihood of receiving such funding. What does the institution propose to do
         with the program upon termination of the grant(s)?

No federal or other grant funds are required to launch the program. However, the Education degree has attracted
external grant funds, foundation support, and endowments to provide scholarships to selected students in targeted
academic areas (e.g., areas of high need – mathematics, science, technology, and middle level teaching). The
funding source, duration of the grant, and the amount of the grant are listed below:

        Ella P. Hill & William W. Hearn Endowed Scholarship, Technology Education, $50,000 annually.
        Transition to Teaching Grant, federal Title II funds, student scholarships in high need academic areas,
         $100,000 annually, 2002-2007.
        Oregon Quality Assurance in Teaching I Grant, federal Title II funds, staff time for development of the
         B.A./B.S. in Education and initial implementation, $74,839, Sept. 2003 – Sept. 2004.
        Oregon Quality Assurance in Teaching II Grant, federal Title II funds, student scholarships in high need
         areas and for those willing to teach in high need schools, $80,000 annually, 2002-2005.




                                                          14
    c. If the program will be implemented in such a way as to have little or minimal budgetary impact, please provide a
    narrative that outlines how resources are being allocated/reallocated in order that the resource demands of the new
    program are being met. For example, describe what new activities will cost and whether they will be financed or
    staffed by shifting of assignments within the budgetary unit or reallocation of resources within the institution.
    Specifically state which resources will be moved and how this will affect those programs losing resources. Will the
    allocation of going-level budget funds in support of the program have an adverse impact on any other institutional
    programs? If so, which program(s) and in what ways?

The program will be implemented in such a way as to have little or minimal budgetary impact. The following guiding
principles will be used to reallocate existing resources, faculty, and staff to support the proposed Education degree
program:

   The current cohort of Initial Teaching License MAT students in the School of Education (i.e., Elementary
    Education) will be reduced by half and faculty loads will be reallocated to support the new Education degree
    program.
   Selected courses in the School of Education MAT program (i.e., Elementary Education) will be taught by adjuncts
    (i.e., current teachers and administrators from local school districts).
   The School of Education’s Initial Teaching License MAT program (i.e., Elementary Education) will be moved to a
    self-support model and partnerships with K-12 schools and districts.
   Many of the Core Education Courses (8 hours) in the Education degree program will be taught by adjuncts (i.e.,
    current teachers and administrators from local school districts) or by doctoral students. Senior and tenure-track
    faculty will teach upper division courses.
   The School of Education will seek out opportunities for closer collaboration within the School of Education faculty
    (e.g., Teacher Education, Counseling, Adult Education, 4-H programs) and other units at OSU to implement courses
    in the Education degree program.
   Summer school revenue (in excess of costs) will be allocated to the proposed program to assist with start-up
    activities in the first year of the proposed program.




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