Docstoc

COST OF SERVICE AND RATE OF RETURN REGULATION

Document Sample
COST OF SERVICE AND RATE OF RETURN REGULATION Powered By Docstoc
					Regulator with limited information

COST OF SERVICE AND RATE OF
RETURN REGULATION

                                     109
                      Questions
• What if regulator does not know costs?
   – Traditional approach: S/He must find out!
• Particular problem: Capital cost
   – What is the allowed rate of return on capital?
   – Rate of return regulation (ROR)
• Second problem: Firms may act strategically, given ROR
   – Averch‐Johnson model
• This capter: How are these problems dealt with by
  regulators traditionally?
                                                      110
       Cost of service regulation
• Approach when the regulator has limited 
  information, the firm is much better informed
  and may act strategically
• „cost of service“ or „rate of return regulation“
⇒Benchmark against alternative mechanisms, 
  used widely in the 20th century
⇒Modern approaches complement this
  approach

                                                 111
  Cost of service regulation in practice
• Uniform system of accounts
⇒Standardized cost reporting rules
⇒Yardstick regulation possible (EU: benchmarking!)
⇒Costs may be disallowed („reasonable costs“ (BNetzA))
• Regulatory lag
   – Prices are not adjusted continuously, but are triggered only after 
     requests from interested parties
   – Lag might be quite long
   ⇒Incentive effects
• US regulatory practice: rate case with two phases:
   – Determination of revenue requirement or total cost of service
   – Rate design or tariff structure phase (Ramsey prices, peak load, 
     etc.)

                                                                     112
         Cost of service components
a) Operating costs (e.g. fuel, labor, materials and supplies) ‐‐‐ OC
b) Capital related costs that define the effective “rental price” for 
   capital . These capital related charges are a function of:
   a)   the value of the firm’s “regulatory asset base” or its “rate base” 
        (RAV)
   b)   the annual amount of depreciation on the regulatory asset base (D)
   c)   the allowed rate of return (s) on the regulatory asset base
   d)   income tax rate (t) on the firm’s gross profits
c) Other costs (e.g. property taxes, franchise fees) ‐‐‐ F
Total cost of service or regulated revenue requirement in year t: Rt
        Rt = OCt + Dt + s(1+t)RAV + Ft

                                                                      113
          Rate of return regulation: 
         The value of the capital stock
• Major issues with ROR regulation:
   ⇒How to value the firm’s assets (invested capital)
   ⇒How to determine depreciation rates
   ⇒How to determine the allowed rate of return on investment
• Basic problem when setting the prices the firm can charge 
  and the associated revenues that it will realize to meet the 
  firm’s overall budget constraint:
   – Regulated firm makes investments in long‐lived capital 
     facilities. Regulators must determine how consumers will pay 
     for the costs of these facilities over their economic lives. 
   ⇒A stock (the value of capital investments) must be transformed 
     into a flow (stream of cash flows or annual rental charges over 
     the life of the assets)

                                                                114
           Rate of return regulation: 
          The value of the capital stock
• Basic legal principle for price regulation (in the US)
   – Regulated prices must be set at levels that give the regulated firm a 
     reasonable opportunity to recover the costs of the investments it 
     makes efficiently to meet its service obligations and no more than is 
     necessary to do so
• (Simple) Operationalization
   – present discounted value (PDV) of future cash flows should be at 
     least equal to the cost of the capital facilities (“investments” 
     financed by equity, debt, preferred stock ), i.e.
   ⇒            K0 ≤ ∑nt = 1 πt /(1+r)t
       • r:  the firm’s risk adjusted cost of capital
       • πt = cash flow in year t = Revenues – operating costs – taxes and other 
         expenses
       • K0 = the “reasonable” cost of an asset added by the utility in year t
                                                                                115
           Rate of return regulation: 
           The rental price of capital
• Problem: 
   – Infinitely many streams of cash flow yield the PDV
   – Profile of stream does not matter only if there is no 
     competition and the firm is free to choose the necessary 
     prices
• What is the appropriate profile of the cash flow 
  stream?
   ⇒Economic principles  to value the assets
   – Pattern of rental prices in a competitive market
   – Taking into account inflation, technical progress and 
     depreciation
                                                              116
       The rental price of capital
    according to economic principles
• Assumptions:
  – a machine producing a homogeneous product 
  – Depreciates (physically) at a rate d per period 
    (number of units of output decline at a rate d over 
    time)
  – operating costs are zero.
  – Competitive rental value for a new machine at any 
    time s: v(s). 
  – Firm’s discount rate (cost of capital): r
                                                       117
        The rental price of capital
     according to economic principles
• Rental value on an old machine bought in a previous 
  year t  in year s:
                                  v(s)e‐d(s‐t)
• Present value of the rental income in year s discounted 
  back to year t is
              e‐r(s‐t)v(s)e‐d(s‐t) = e(r+d)tv(s)e‐(r+d)s
• Competitive market price for a new machine purchased 
  in year t [P(t)] = present discounted value of future 
  rental values: PDV(t) = P(t)
                                          ∞
         PDV ( t ) = e   ( r + d )t
                                              v ( s) e                  ds = P ( t )
                                                         −( r + d ) s
                                      ∫
                                      t
                                                                                       118
         The rental price of capital
      according to economic principles
• Price changes over time (Time pattern):  Differentiate P(t) w.r.t. 
  time t 
               dP(t)/dt = (r+d)P(t) – v(t)
                    v(t) = (r+d)P(t) – dP(t)/dt
• With dP(t)/dt due to exogenous changes in the price of new 
  machines over time because of general inflation (i) and 
  technological change (δ)
               v(t) = (r+d)P(t) – (i ‐ δ)P(t)
                        = (r + d ‐ i + δ)P(t)
⇒basic formula for setting both the level and time profile of the 
  capital cost component of user prices for this single‐asset 
  regulated firm
                                                                119
            The rental price of capital
• Problems of the simple economic approach described above:
   – Requires knowledge of rate of technological progress and of inflation
   – Assumes perfect competition and absence of lumpiness of
     investments
   – Does not allow for sunk costs and asset specificity
   – Can lead to stranded costs, if there is large uncertainty about future
     path of demand and technology (Option value)
   – Is dominant paradigm in EU regulation: 
       • Forward looking long‐run (average) incremental cost (FLR(A)IC)
       • Kosten der effizienten Leistungsbereitstellung
• Implementation problems: 
   – Original cost, reproduction costs, or fair value?
   – Depreciation of rate base: linear or how else? (Brandeis formula)
   – How should price path look like?

                                                                          120
               The rental price of capital
                   Implementation
• Determination of the allowed rate of return
   ⇒WACC: weighted average of the interest rate on debt, preferred stock 
    and an estimate of the firm’s opportunity cost of capital, taking the 
    tax treatment of interest payments and the taxability of net income 
    that flows to equity investors. 
• Regulated firm with the following capital structure
   –   Instrument;     average coupon rate; fraction of capitalization
   –   Debt                   8.0%                      50%
   –   Preferred stock        6.0%                      10%
   –   Equity                  N/A                      40% 
⇒Firm’s weighted average cost of capital (net of taxes)
                 r = 8.0*0.5 + 6.0*0.1 + re*0.4 
   – re is the firm’s opportunity cost of equity capital
   ⇒ Determined via CAPM (β)

                                                                         121
           Rate design or tariff structure
•   Regulatory statutes prohibit “unduly discriminatory” prices, but flexibility due to  
    the arbitrariness of allocating joint costs among different groups of customers
•   Historically, income redistribution and political economy considerations played a 
    very important role in the specification of telephone services. 
     – Local rates were generally set low and long distance rates high, just the opposite of 
       what theories of optimal pricing would suggest 
     – prices in rural areas where set low relative to the cost of serving these customers 
       compared to the price cost margins in urban areas. 
     – The joint costs associated with providing both local and long distance services using 
       the same local telephone network made it relatively easy for federal and state 
       regulators to use arbitrary allocations of these costs to “cost justify” almost any tariff 
       structure that they thought met a variety of redistributional and interest group 
       politics driven goals
•   Non‐linear prices have been a component of regulated tariffs for electricity, gas 
    and telephone services since these services first became available. 
•   Formal application of the theoretical principles behind Ramsey‐Boiteux pricing, 
    nonlinear pricing, and peak‐load pricing has been used infrequently by U.S. 
    regulators, while these concepts have been used extensively in France since the 
    1950s
•   Germany: state‐owned enterprises with politically determined tariff structure
                                                                                             122
      The Averch‐Johnson Model
• Aim:  
  – Highlight potential effects of rate of return regulation 
    on the behavior of a regulated monopoly. 
• Setup
  – profit‐maximizing monopoly firm 
  – neoclassical production function q = F(K,L) 
  – inverse market demand curve p = D‐1(q). 
  – Firm invests in capital (K) 
  – opportunity cost of capital r (the price of capital is 
    normalized to unity and there is no depreciation) 
  – hires labor L at a wage w. 

                                                              123
       The Averch‐Johnson Model
• The regulated firm 
   – monopoly’s profits are given by:
                         Π = D‐1(q)q – wL ‐ rK
   – Rewriting in terms of inputs K and L , using firms total revenue 
     R = R(K,L) = D‐1(F(K,L)) F(K,L)
                         Π = R(K,L) – wL – rK
• The regulator 
   – one instrument at it’s disposal to control the monopoly’s prices:
   ⇒set the firm’s “allowed rate of return” on capital s (r < s < rMonopoly)
   – The regulator has no particular objective function 
   – has no other information about the firm than its cost of capital r; 
     firm’s production function, it’s costs or its demand are unknown to 
     regulator. 
                                                                       124
       The Averch‐Johnson Model
• Rate of return constraint:
        [R(K,L) – w L – s K] ≤ 0       or      Π ≤ (s‐r)K 
• The firm’s optimization problem
• Max Π * = R(K,L) – w L – r K – λ [R(K,L) – w L – s K]  → (K*, L*, 
  λ*) 
• First order conditions: 
         ∂Π
            = RK − r − λ ( RK − s ) = 0, with RK = MRq ∂F / ∂K
         ∂K
        ∂Π
            = RL − w − λ ( RL − w ) = 0 ⇒ RL = w
         ∂L
        ∂Π
            = R ( K , L ) − wL − sK = 0
         ∂λ                                                    125
        The Averch‐Johnson Model
 • From the second order condition: 0 < λ < 1.
                                           λ
 • From the foc:        R       = r −            (s   − r   )
                                        1 − λ
                            K


 • The marginal rate of technical substitution
                          ∂F / ∂K   r   λ (s − r )
           M R TKL      =         =   −
                          ∂F / ∂L   w   (1 − λ ) w
Key A‐J‐result: 
    ⇒ the regulated monopoly does not minimize costs, 
       input proportions are distorted. 
    ⇒ MRTKL < r/w  (0 < λ < 1)
    ⇒ capital using bias of rate of return regulation (regulated firm 
       uses too much capital relative to labor)
                                                                 126
          The Averch‐Johnson Model: 
                Further results
• The A‐J firm does not “waste” inputs: all inputs hired are 
  put to productive use. Firm produces at the boundary of 
  its production function; no “X‐inefficiency”
• As the allowed rate of return s approaches the cost of 
  capital r, the magnitude of the input distortion increases. 
• There is an optimal value s* for the allowed rate of return 
  that balances the benefits of lower prices against the 
  increased input distortions from a lower allowed rate of 
  return. However, calculation would require knowledge 
  about production function, input prices and demand
• “Regulatory lag” reduces the magnitude of the input bias. 
                                                          127
                The Averch‐Johnson Model: 
                        Evaluation
•   Major conceptual innovation of A‐J type models:
     – Regulatory mechanisms could create incentives for regulated firms to produce inefficiently and  
       to adopt organization forms (e.g. vertical integration) and pricing strategies (e.g. peak load 
       pricing) that are not optimal. 
•   Shortcomings:
     – Results depend upon extreme asymmetry of information between regulated firm and regulator: 
       regulator knows essentially nothing about firm’s cost opportunities, realized costs, or demand. 
     – There are significant deviations between the assumptions of A‐J‐type models and how regulators 
       actually regulate. 
     – Efforts to introduce dynamics and incentive effects through regulatory lag have been 
       cumbersome within this modeling framework. 
     – Empirical tests have not been particularly successful (Joskow and Rose (1989)). 
     – Kind of inefficiency identified by the model (inefficient input proportions) is quite different from 
       the kind of managerial waste and inefficiency that concerns policymakers and has been revealed 
       in the empirical literature on the effects of regulation and privatization:
     ⇒ X‐inefficiency:  imperfections in managerial efforts to minimize the costs of production, leading 
       to production inside the production frontier and not just at the wrong location on the production 
       frontier.                                                                                     128

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:13
posted:11/8/2012
language:English
pages:20