Executive Summary by pMx5WXu

VIEWS: 8 PAGES: 59

									“Organization of the 1st Pacific-EU Business Forum
               on the fringes of the
        ACP-EU Joint Council of Ministers”
                    in Vanuatu



               Summary Proceedings


                     June 2012
         “Organization of the 1st Pacific-EU Business Forum
                        on the fringes of the
                ACP-EU Joint Council of Ministers”
                              in Vanuatu

                Reference No: BizClim (10 ACP RPR 15)
                      Project No. WP1.10.1-4.080


                   Government of Vanuatu and PIPSO



                                  Prepared By

                              Ms. Teresa Thorp:
                                Team Leader



                                Submitted by
                               AGORA’ 2000 Srl




                         A project implemented by




This document has been produced with the financial assistance of the European Union.
   The views expressed herein can in no way be taken to reflect the official opinion
             of the European Union nor of those of the ACP Secretariat.
Report Cover Page

           Contracting Authority       Project Partners                              Contractor

Name:      BizClim -   Programme       Government of Vanuatu and                     AGORA’2000 Srl
           Management Unit             PIPSO

Address:   Rue Belliard, 205           Embassy of Vanuatu                            Viale Mazzini, 114B
           1040 Brussels – Belgium     Avenue de Tervueren 380                       00195 Rome
                                       Chemin de Ronde                               Italy
                                       1150 Brussels
                                       Belgium


                                       Pacific Islands Private Sector Organisation
                                       Middle Floor Lynica House
                                       3 Goodenough St Suva
                                       P O Box U30 Suva, Fiji

Tel.       +32 2 669 98 25             Embassy of Vanuatu, Brussels,                 +39 06 3241719
number:                                +3227717494


                                       PIPSO, Fiji, +679 7736 303

Fax        +32 2 669 97 86             Embassy of Vanuatu, Brussels,                 +39 06 94359541
number:                                + 3227717494


                                       PIPSO, Fiji, +679 330 5105

Email      catherine@acpbusinessclim   rjoy@vanuatuembassy.net                       mail@agora2000.it
address:   ate.org
                                       maakek@pipso.org.fj

Contact    Ms. Catherine               HE Roy Mickey JOY                             Giuliano ROSCIGLIONE
persons:   DELADRIERE                  Ambassador to the European Union              (project coordinator)
                                       and the Kingdom of Belgium                    Ambra         GIORGI
                                                                                     (contact person

                                       Ma'ake KOMAILEVUKA,
                                       Programme Officer, PIPSO




Date of report:                                   16 June 2012. Version: Draft 0.8
Author of report:                                 Ms. Teresa Thorp
Date of AGORA’2000 contract signature:            5 May 2012
Start of performance period:                      15 May 2012
Project completion:                               Scheduled for 15 August 2012




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Table of Contents

I.                Executive Summary ......................................................................................................................................... 1
II.               Day 1: Pacific – EU Business Opportunities ................................................................................................... 3
       1.             Opening Addresses .................................................................................................................................... 3
            1.1        Welcome - Ambassador Roy Mickey Joy................................................................................................ 3
            1.2        Mr. Ham Lini Vanuaroroa; Deputy Prime Minister of the Republic of Vanuatu and Minister of
                       Trade, Commerce, Industry, Tourism, Investment and Business Development ................................. 4
            1.3        Mr. Hafiz Khan, Chairman, PIPSO .............................................................................................................. 5
       2.             Panel 1. Overview of the Pacific-EU Business Forum ............................................................................ 5
            2.1        Origin of the Forum, Objectives, Programme Overview and Potential Outcomes .......................... 5
            2.2        Pacific Overview – Challenges and Opportunities ................................................................................ 6
            2.3        Panel Discussion........................................................................................................................................... 9
       3.             Panel 2. Opportunities for Private Sector Development .................................................................. 10
            3.1        CTA Support to the Private Sector in the Pacific Region .................................................................... 10
            3.2        CDE - Private Sector Assistance .............................................................................................................. 11
            3.3        National Bank of Vanuatu: Access to Rural Finance .......................................................................... 12
            3.4        Panel Discussion......................................................................................................................................... 13
       4.             Panel 3. Sectoral Opportunities for Private Sector Development ................................................... 14
            4.1        Fisheries ....................................................................................................................................................... 14
            4.2        Kava and Other Commodities from the Pacific .................................................................................. 15
            4.3        Tourism: Marketing and Developing Tourism in the Pacific ................................................................ 15
            4.4        Panel Discussion......................................................................................................................................... 16
       5.             Panel 4. Renewable Energy, Environment and Climate .................................................................... 16
            5.1        Renewable Energy, Environment and Climate Issues for the Pacific ............................................... 16
            5.2        Promotion of Energy Security in Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands and Vanuatu .................. 18
            5.3        UNIDO: Energizing the Private Sector in the Pacific ............................................................................. 19
            5.4        Vanuatu : Enabling Rural Tourism Operators to Better Access and Utilise Renewable Energy .... 20
            5.5        Panel Discussion......................................................................................................................................... 21
III.              Day II: Modalities for Implementation ........................................................................................................ 23
       1.             Opening Addresses .................................................................................................................................. 23
            1.1        European Union Delegation to Vanuatu............................................................................................... 23
            1.2        Statement Delivered by the Co-Chairs of the Business Forum ........................................................... 25
            1.3        Statement Delivered by the European Business Council for Africa and the Mediterranean
                       (EBCAM) ...................................................................................................................................................... 27
       2.             Investments and Partnerships ................................................................................................................. 27
            2.1        Investments and Partnerships : EIB activities in the Pacific Region .................................................... 27
            2.2        EIB’s Activities in the Pacific ..................................................................................................................... 28
            2.3        EIB Partnerships in the Pacific .................................................................................................................. 29
            2.4        An Integrated Business/ODA Perspective ............................................................................................. 29
            2.5        Panel Discussion......................................................................................................................................... 30
       3.             One to one business meetings ............................................................................................................... 31
       4.             South Pacific Engagement in Europe and the Future of the Pacific – EU Forum I ......................... 31

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          4.1        What do Private Companies Need to do to Improve Collaboration? ............................................. 31
          4.2        EPA Opportunities in Europe, Market Access and Trade Facilitation ............................................... 32
          4.3        Panel Discussion......................................................................................................................................... 34
     5.             South Pacific Engagement in Europe and the Future of the Pacific – EU Forum II ........................ 35
          5.1        Pacific – EU Private Sector Statement – Group Outcomes ................................................................ 35
          5.2        Group 1 ....................................................................................................................................................... 36
          5.3        Group 2 ....................................................................................................................................................... 36
          5.4        Group 3 ....................................................................................................................................................... 37
          5.5        South Pacific Tourism Organisation ........................................................................................................ 38
     6.             Pacific – EU Private Sector Statement – Consolidated Outcome .................................................... 38
     7.             Closing ........................................................................................................................................................ 39
I.              Annexes ........................................................................................................................................................... 41




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Abbreviations and References


ACP            Africa, Caribbean and Pacific

APR            Activity Performance Report

               ACP Business Climate Facility (an ACP-EU joint initiative financed under the
Bizclim
               10th European Development Fund)

               Center for the Development of Enterprises. CDE is an ACP (African,
CDE            Caribbean and Pacific)/EU joint institution created in the framework of the
               Cotonou Agreement

               Technical Centre for Agricultural and Rural Cooperation.
CTA            CTA is an ACP (African, Caribbean and Pacific)/EU joint institution created
               in the framework of the Cotonou Agreement

EC             European Commission

EDF            European Development Fund

EIB            European Investment Bank

EPA            Economic Partnership Agreement

EU             European Union

FACT           Facilitating Agricultural Commodity Trade

IACT           Increasing Agricultural Commodity Trade

Mode 4
               Mode 4: Presence of a natural persons
Services

PACP           Pacific ACP countries

PIPSO          Pacific Islands Private Sector Organisation

R&D
               Research and Development


REI            Regional Economic Integration

RSPO           Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil

SMEs           Small and Medium Enterprises

TMNP           Temporary Movement of Natural Persons

ToR            Terms of Reference


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UNIDO          United Nations Industrial Development Organization

WTO            World trade Organization




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Acknowledgements

The funding for the forum was provided by the European Development Fund through
the Programme Management Unit, Bizclim.
Appreciation goes to the Government of Vanuatu for hosting the first Pacific – EU
Business Forum.
We would like to acknowledge the support of all participants and their active
participation during discussions at the workshop




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I.    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

A first ever Pacific – European Union (EU) business forum delivered in collaboration
with PIPSO (Pacific Islands Private Sector Organisation) and the Government of
Vanuatu took place in Port Vila from the 11-12 June 2012. Sixty representatives of the
private sector and supporting agencies participated.
The main purpose of the two-day business forum held on the fringes of the ACP-EU
Joint Council of Ministers meeting was to facilitate Public – Private Dialogue on
private sector development issues that will support ACP-EU business endeavours. The
forum was important for Pacific and EU businesses. It provided opportunities for
talented entrepreneurs who want to build a successful business.
The Forum created awareness about the Pacific – EU Economic Partnership
Agreement and the opportunities it provides for private sector development and
growth. European countries and 14 Pacific ACP States have pinned their hopes on a
new EU-Pacific Economic Partnership Agreement (EPA) that will bring together two
regions and go beyond the current, sometimes limited, trading arrangements for
Pacific goods and services entering the European Union. There is untapped
potential to increase economic inter- action between Europe and the Pacific.
In order to reap the benefits of any enhanced cooperation framework between
Europe and the Pacific region, traders and investors need clear, stable and
transparent rules by which to do business. Simplifying and harmonising rules across
an economic area will make business prospects even more attractive.
The organization of a first Pacific-EU Business Forum, on the fringes of the upcoming
Joint Council of Ministers meeting, provided business representatives an unrivalled
opportunity to voice their concerns, hopes and aspirations.
Participants agreed that business driven reforms ought to boost the business climate
and prospects for enhanced cooperation between European and Pacific
businesses. Future activities, like study tours and a Pacific Expo will provide Pacific
and EU businesses with the opportunity to engage with potential clients, investors,
distributors and partners from Europe and the Pacific.
The Forum marked an important milestone to support and encourage Pacific
economic integration. For the Pacific’s Private Sector, the Chairman of PIPSO, Mr
Hafiz Khan stated that the forum provides an opportunity for business people from
the Pacific to assess business opportunities in the EU and whether opportunities can
be taken under the EPA Agreement or any other available instruments. At the same
time participants recognised that Pacific Businesses are not on equal footing with
businesses in the more developed EU countries. Capacity building, technical support
and access to capital are therefore important in order for businesses and their
products to have access to EU markets. Mr Khan hopes that under the new EU-
Pacific Economic Partnership Agreement, that there will be specific allocation to
assist the capacity of the private sector in the Pacific.
On behalf of the Vanuatu Government, the Director General of the Ministry of Trade,
Mr. Marokon Alilee, emphasised that: “the Government fully supports this initiative.
The Forum presents a window of opportunity for Pacific businesses to dialogue and
discuss partnerships as well as business ventures. Vanuatu is currently engaged in
constructive negotiations with the EU for an Economic Partnership Agreement and

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the Government encourages the private sector to participate fully in the Forum.
Vanuatu is already exporting 30% of its merchandise towards EU countries. The Forum
provides a golden opportunity for Vanuatu’s entrepreneurs to deepen the already
healthy business relations with their EU counterparts, promote export of high-quality
goods and services to the EU market and showcase the unique cultural features of
their pristine country.”
Centred on a structured concept note, the forum explored several topics deemed of
interest to the private sector. Participants examined opportunities and challenges
presented by the Economic Partnership Agreement; opportunities for private sector
development; access to finance; sectoral opportunities in fisheries, kava and other
commodities, and tourism; and renewable energy, environment and climate issues.
Prudent management of resources will ensure that the Pacific develops in an
environmentally friendly way; but the private sector also needs access to finance to
capitalise on a plethora of opportunities.
Four core themes were developed in detail, these being opportunities and
challenges for Pacific – EU business endeavours; opportunities for private sector
development, an overview of support mechanisms (CDE, CTA, UNIDO, and EIB) and
best practice (EBCAM); sectoral opportunities (fisheries, kava and other
opportunities, and tourism); and renewable energy, environment and climate
change. The modules delivered, and the issues highlighted and discussed are
summarised herein.
Turning ideas into tangible results is pivotal for success. A cohesive private sector
platform is essential to support commercial and economic development activities,
such as, tourism and investment in physical infrastructure and energy needed to
promote social well being and raise living standards.
Participants identified key messages for presentation to the ACP-EU Joint Council of
Ministers meeting in Vanuatu. In addition, they structured a comprehensive joint
statement of intent, which included modalities for implementation and identified
future activities.
There was strong support for ongoing dialogue. Participants agreed to a sustainable
platform for conducting a structured business dialogue on relevant business
environment issues and business and investment opportunities. They recommended
convening Pacific – EU Business Forums on an annual basis, with Europe perhaps
hosting the next forum.
The private sector statement reaffirms participant’s commitment to engage in joint
business endeavours and to create conditions for sustainable development. It calls
for greater emphasis on industry, technology transfer, capacity building and
economic growth.          It reinforces the importance of export development,
microfinance and servicing remote and rural areas. It encourages the continuation
of negotiations on the EPA; highlights the importance of quality infrastructure and
compliance to international trade rules; encourages the lifting of the kava ban;
supports efforts to create a regional green economy and emphasises the need to
support carbon finance strategies. Participants also recommended establishing a
United Nations Industrial Development Organisation (UNIDO) office in the Pacific.
Finally, in view of the widespread support for this Forum, participants invited EU/ACP
Ministers to provide their support for a second Forum to be hosted in Europe in 2013.


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II.    DAY 1: PACIFIC – EU BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES

1.     Opening Addresses

1.1    Welcome - Ambassador Roy Mickey Joy

His Excellency, Ambassador Roy Mickey Joy delivered a welcome address that
paved the way to Honourable Ham Lini Vanuaroroa; Deputy Prime Minister of the
Republic of Vanuatu and Minister of Trade, Commerce, Industry, Tourism, Investment
and Business Development, officiating the opening of the first Pacific – EU Business
Forum.
His Excellency praised the work of Bizclim in supporting the forum and expressed
sincere appreciation of dedicated projects being launched throughout the Pacific
region to benefit the people of the Pacific.
In his opening address, His Excellency highlighted the historical significance of Pacific
– EU cooperation and acknowledged that in terms of ACP relations, the Pacific
needs to play a greater part. His Excellency emphasised the need for the Pacific to
secure an equal and accordant share in ACP relations. The Pacific’s private sector
ought to become and remain an integral part of any future relations between the
Pacific and the EU.
Ambassador Joy introduced and welcomed the Forum’s two Co-Chairs, Mr.
Marokon Alilee, Director General, Ministry of Trade, Commerce, Industry, Tourism,
Investment and Business Development, Republic of Vanuatu; and Mr. Hafiz Khan,
Chairman, PIPSO. His Excellency welcomed all delegates and solicited support from
other stakeholders.
Last Friday, 8 June, the Supreme Court of Vanuatu invited the Head of State to
assent the Bill for the Protocol of Accession to the WTO, effectively removing the last
obstacle to Vanuatu’s accession to the WTO as the 156th Contracting Member State
after Samoa. The WTO currently has 6 Pacific Island Member States. It is essential to
capitalize on accession as a means of addressing issues of great importance to small
island states and global integration.
Stressing the paramount importance of small island development, His Excellency
highlighted the significance of Rio +20 to be held in Brazil and the impact of climate
change and other calamities on island states, not only those in the Pacific but also
nations in the Caribbean.       Developing cohesive and unified frameworks for
development will be key to success in these areas.
In concluding, His Excellency advised delegates that the Statement prepared by the
First Pacific – EU Business Forum will be submitted to the Joint ACP-EU Ministerial
Council.
In encompassing the exchange of insights and experiences between the Pacific and
EU private sectors, the statement could provide for at least two important initiatives:
first, an annual Pacific EU Business Forum of this nature; and, second, that the EU,
through EDF sourcing, should be able to provide a substantial package of support to
private sector SMEs to be facilitated through PIPSO or the Business Forum.
His Excellency welcomed the Honourable Deputy Prime Minister to grace the
meeting and officially opened the first ever first Pacific – EU Business Forum.

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1.2    Mr. Ham Lini Vanuaroroa; Deputy Prime Minister of the Republic of Vanuatu
       and Minister of Trade, Commerce, Industry, Tourism, Investment and Business
       Development

Mr. Ham Lini Vanuaroroa officiated the opening of the Forum.
The Forum brings together a significant group of private sector representatives on
topics that are central to Pacific - EU relations. Ensuring that the people of the
Pacific benefit from trade and investment is a priority. Trade, investment and the
environment are mutual interests that connect entrepreneurs from the Pacific and
the EU.
Honourable Vanuaroroa conveyed the Government of Vanuatu’s vision for the
forum: the forum is to unite and deliver core business successes for European and
Pacific businesses. The importance of trade and investment for development has
become more evident.
Fisheries and tourism are two of the main drivers of South Pacific economies but the
Pacific offers entrepreneurs and businesses many other opportunities for investment,
including trade in goods (kava, cocoa), services (telecommunications and finance)
and renewable energy.
Honourable Vanuaroroa emphasized the importance of a coherent and clear
roadmap for implementation. The global market represents new challenges but it
also provides opportunities to link EU and Pacific businesses. The local market is also
very important but market structures must be globally competitive.
The Pacific has a fragile and volatile environment. Sustainable development is not
possible without elevating attention to environmental issues, climate change and
eco-business.
Leveraging the Economic Partnership Agreements (EPAs) also provides a key driver
to improve market access and engage EU-Pacific businesses in eco and
developmental friendly outcomes. The EPAs are not only about funding. They also
concern how the Pacific may provide a basin for commercial endeavour via a
predictable and secure business environment.
While larger industrial countries may provide openings for economies of scale and
productive manufacturing development, many of the Pacific’s markets are niche
markets. Innovation, brand positioning and market channels are imperative. Trade
facilitation is another issue where business could flourish. Upgrades are required to
ports, roads, and telecommunications.
The interim EPA already concluded by some Pacific nations, and the EPA to be
finalised by all Pacific countries, ought to lead to further integration and economic
development. Transparency of trade and investment rules introduced by the EPA set
preconditions for the provision of a predictable and secure business environment,
which will benefit Pacific and EU private sectors. It is essential to ensure that aid for
trade is available for Pacific countries. Already at this forum, several European
businesses expressed a keen interest in investing in the Pacific region; and the Pacific
welcomes others.
As in all these endeavours, equitable ownership and partnership are central. The
Pacific needs to engage and is eager to do so.


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WTO Accession is an important aspect of Vanuatu’s business strategy. As part of its
WTO accession package, Vanuatu has taken liberalisation commitments on around
50% of its service sectors as it believes that this will promote a sustainable flow of
development-enhancing foreign investments.
Going forward, it will be beneficial to institutionalise this type of dialogue. Future
business forums should take place, and perhaps with the next forum could be
convened in Europe.
With these words, Honourable Ham Lini Vanuaroroa declared the forum open.

1.3    Mr. Hafiz Khan, Chairman, PIPSO

The Pacific has 10 million people at best dispersed across thousands of miles.
Compounded by disappearing islands, climate change, and the sheer lack of
numbers, the challenges facing the Pacific are much greater than those facing
others in Africa or Asia.
Whereby industry in Asia, Africa and India may benefit from economies of scale,
such opportunities are not readily available to the Pacific. Asia, Africa and India are
striving because they have such large numbers of people to feed. The Pacific can
produce goods but has small numbers and therefore lacks a local market. The
Pacific needs to produce for a larger and wider market regionally and
internationally. There is no lack of education or willingness. There is just a desire by
the people of the Pacific to have a sense of belonging, a sense of respect and to
know that they have something meaningful for their lives. Human dignity is
paramount.
Access to capital is one of the Pacific’s greatest weaknesses. Normal banking
institutes are not able to cope with the Pacific. The Pacific needs seed funding and
hand holding. It needs to upskill traditional and cultural skills. It needs to use natural
resources for the betterment of the local and international economy. The Pacific
also needs to be able to compete with other goods seen in New Zealand, Australia
and other markets.
Mr. Khan welcomed delegates to the forum. The statement to result from the two-
day business forum ought to put an effective methodology on the ground to assist
the private sector.

2.     Panel 1. Overview of the Pacific-EU Business Forum

2.1    Origin of the Forum, Objectives, Programme Overview and Potential
       Outcomes

Mr. Marokon Alilee – Director General, Republic of Vanuatu, Ministry of Trade,
Commerce, Industry, Tourism, Investment and Business Development
Mr. Alilee set out the origin and objectives of the Forum. He provided an overview of
the programme and outlined the potential outcomes.
The establishment of a Pacific-EU Business Forum emerged as a clear request from a
Bizclim initiative that took place in Port Vila in January 2012. Vanuatu’s Ministry of
Trade took the lead in developing and submitting a proposal for a Pacific – EU
Business Forum to be coordinated by PIPSO.

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Mr. Alilee remarked that around 11% of South Pacific exports go to the EU.
Opportunities exist for further development of business ventures on both sides.
Sectors of mutually beneficial engagement include fisheries, palm oil, coconut oil,
sugar, coffee, renewable energy, carbon trading, tourism, utilities, business services,
and so on. These opportunities will magnify in the context of the forthcoming EPA,
which will provide a set of clear rules to facilitate trade and investment flows and will
contribute to identify the most productive use of Aid-for-Trade funds under EDF 11.
The Forum anticipates the following outcomes:
         Creation of sustainable business ventures to increase Pacific exports to
          Europe, and to boost European investments in the Pacific;
         A clear understanding and leveraging of the assistance tools to boost
          competitiveness of Pacific businesses;
         The specification of a very clear roadmap to create a permanent institutional
          structure for the Pacific - EU Business Forum; and
         An enhanced visibility of mutually advantageous EU-Pacific business
          opportunities by showcasing outcomes of the Forum to the ACP-EU Council of
          Ministers.

2.2       Pacific Overview – Challenges and Opportunities

Ms. Andie Fong Toy; Deputy Secretary General (Economic Governance & Security);
Pacific Islands Forum Secretariat
Ms. Andie Fong Toy updated the participants on EPA negotiations, private sector
development and challenges and opportunities from a Pacific perspective.
The Pacific Islands Forum Secretariat was established in 1972. The Member States of
the Pacific Islands Forum are Australia, Cook Islands, Federated States of Micronesia,
Fiji, Kiribati, Nauru, New Zealand, Niue, Palau, Papua New Guinea, the Republic of
the Marshall Islands, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu and Vanuatu.
Exporting from the Pacific to EU markets has its own challenges. Challenges also
provide opportunities. They provide openings for investment.
The high costs of freight and access to shipping routes are an issue for most PACPS
(Pacific ACP countries). While little can be done about the physical distance
between the Pacific and the EU, the freight costs can be addressed to some extent
by creating larger trade volumes so that costs can be reduced. There are significant
investment opportunities in the transport and freight sector. EU investors may wish to
consider these opportunities.
As part of regional integration, there are specific initiatives under the Pacific Plan to
assist Smaller Island States. Providing intra-Pacific routes for air and maritime
transport represent real opportunities.
Numerous supply side constraints also exist. Pacific producers experience many
challenges including natural disasters, such as, extreme weather events and
cyclones, that can affect crops and therefore disrupt businesses. While there is an
inbuilt resilience to deal with such disruptions, other supply side constraints exist
including access to modern production methods, farming equipment, modern
machinery, technology and affordable finance.

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Another significant challenge for the Pacific is the difficulty to meet the EU’s
technical standards and Sanitary and the Phyto-Sanitary measures. Investments in
specific technical areas are needed so that Pacific exporters can meet the
technical requirements of export markets.
The absence of adequate trade infrastructure is another challenge. It is also an
opportunity for investors. Private Public Partnerships (PPP) and joint ventures may
form to invest in ports, roads, bridges, communications, renewable energy and to
upgrade utilities through the Build, Own, Operate and Transfer (BOOT) mechanisms.
These investments are strategic and will ensure produce and goods can get from the
producer to markets in a more effective manner.
Capacity constraints in factors of production, such as access to land, labour and
capital is an ongoing challenge. These challenges demonstrate opportunities for
professionals such as engineers and industry specialists. EU counterparts can make
investments to deal with the market gaps in these areas and help in increasing the
overall efficiency of Pacific business operations. Investments in information and
communications technologies, appropriate training, lending institutions, marketing
and distribution networks are a few examples through which the EU counterparts can
interact with the regional private sector to add value to supply chains.
A key demand side challenge is access to updated information on opportunities and
seasonal demands in EU markets for exportable products and services from the
Pacific. It is hoped that many of the challenges can be addressed through the EPA
engagement.
Ms. Andie Fong Toy provided a brief overview of the current trading arrangements
between the EU and Pacific countries, and highlighted information of relevance to
the private sector.
The Everything But Arms (EBA) and the Generalised System of Preferences (GSP)
trading arrangements although beneficial in allowing duty free and quota free
access to LDCs, and concessionary duty rates to developing countries respectively,
are unilateral arrangements and the EU can make changes to these commitments.
In this regard, these instruments do not provide long-term certainty of that
investments require. Conversely, the EPA is a treaty. It is therefore legally binding on
both parties in terms of their respective obligations.
The rules of origin for the EBA and GSP schemes are restrictive as they are largely
based on Cotonou rules of origin. Under the EPA, there is an improvement in the
rules of origin, particularly for fish, textiles and some agricultural products.
Furthermore, the EBA and GSP do not have a development dimension and do not
cover trade in services. The EPA’s development dimension is reflected in trade rules
and important principles, such as, the principle of special and differential treatment,
as well as the duty to provide assistance to PACPS to address adjustment costs in
implementing the EPA. Trade in services are important to PACPS. Tourism, financial
services, ICT and remittances have become significant contributors to the GDP of
PACPS. The PACP EPA has a rendezvous clause that will facilitate negotiations on
trade in services after negotiations on trade in goods are concluded.
Several supplementary points may be made as to the comprehensive EPA currently
being negotiated with the EU. The comprehensive EPA builds on the interim EPA
signed by PNG and Fiji in 2009, which allows for duty free and quota free entry of

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their products into the EU. These two countries signed the interim EPA primarily to
avoid disruption of trade for key commodities, notably, canned tuna and sugar.
All 14 PACPS are currently negotiating a comprehensive EPA, and a number of
contentious issues are yet to be resolved. The Pacific countries are seeking an EPA
that is a development-oriented agreement that addresses the special and defining
characteristics of the PACPS. The development dimension must be fully reflected in
binding legal commitments, and should accommodate the Pacific needs on the
pace of implementation.
A key demand by the PACPS is a relaxation of the rules of origin for fresh, chilled and
frozen fish. A relaxation of the rules of origin, in the form of a request for global
sourcing similar to that obtained for canned tuna and cooked loins, will allow the
PACPS, particularly smaller island states, to participate in trade with the EU. These
products are more suited to their particular circumstances and development needs.
Leaders have mandated that the PACPS conclude negotiations this year (in 2012)
and the Pacific awaits a formal response from the EU on the PACP proposals
submitted in July 2011.
The EPA can benefit the private sector as follows:
The EPA will allow for Duty Free & Quota Free (DFQF) market access into the EU for all
products, except for sugar, which is in transition until 2015.
Trade related rules in the EPA will address issues such as the protection of PACP infant
industries. Having clear trade related rules increases transparency and predictability
and ensures that there is no “shifting of the goals” and both parties ought to be on
the same page on a particular issue.
Improved rules of origin for exports to the EU could open up new opportunities for
trade and investment for both PACP and EU businesses.
EPAs are trade agreements, but they aim to achieve development objectives
including the promotion of regional integration, the gradual integration of PACP
countries into the world economy, capacity building in trade policy and trade
related issues, and supporting the conditions for increased investment. The
development dimensions link to assistance available from the EU to address
adjustment costs and deal with trade infrastructure issues.
The EPA provides legal avenues for dispute settlement and thereby helps to ensure
that issues are addressed in a transparent and accountable manner. Special bodies
and mechanisms are proposed to discuss and arbitrate on trade issues. The Joint
Council and Trade and Development Committee, for instance, are responsible for
implementation and monitoring of the EPA.
The EPA allows for technical cooperation between a number of agencies involved in
the implementation of the agreement, such as on customs, bio-security issues
relating to certification of origin and SPS issues. It ensures that there is effective
communication and timely flow of information to avoid any unnecessary disruption
to trade.
The EPA provides the private sector with predictable rules and transparent
application of these rules.



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Unlike any other current trading arrangements in place with the EU, the EPA expects
to cover both the trade in goods and services. It helps to ensure the diversification of
exports and promotion of both trade and investment opportunities.
EPA opportunities exist in fisheries, agro-processing and manufacturing.
The EPA provides opportunities for the private sector but needs to be accompanied
by: i. appropriate legislative and institutional measures to address bottlenecks and
facilitate trade; ii. development cooperation and aid-for-trade; and, iii. market
information and linkages to opportunities.
Cognisant of the need for Pacific exporters to access market information, the
Secretariat has also developed the Pacific Islands Trade and Invest (PT&I) network,
which has offices in Auckland, Sydney, Beijing, and Tokyo. European presence sets
out the latest addition to the PT&I network and a presence has been established in
Geneva.
The Secretariat’s ongoing partnership with PIPSO and other regional organisations in
promoting Pacific exports is being strengthened.

2.3   Panel Discussion

Participants engaged in a lively discussion on the Pacific’s comparative advantages
in fisheries, niche markets, kava, and cultural tourism.
One participant highlighted the concerns about trade opportunities for the Tongan
private sector: at times, policy makers put too low an importance on strategic
industries like fisheries.
Participants sought to understand the main focus of the Pacific Islands Forum
Secretariat. The Secretariat emphasised the importance of trade facilitation,
including improved flight links and transport.
Many private sector participants indicated that they had heard about PIPSO but
never heard from PIPSO.         A common concern was expressed that PIPSO’s
engagement in policy and international exchanges should change and that PIPSO
ought to focus more on developing the private sector rather than political
endeavours. In addition, many expressed the concern about a break down in
communication between the government and the private sector. Participants were
particularly vocal on these points going as far to say that “there is no contact or
dialogue with the Government and the private sector is fed up with the current
system”. One participant suggested that PIPSO be restructured in order to be
accountable to the private sector rather than government; and, if not, a competent
regional Chamber of Commerce ought to be established to serve the interests of the
Pacific private sector (there was consensus amongst all participants on this point).
Participants expressed concern about trade restrictions on kava. They highlighted
the need for projects to improve quality, processing and to set up a regional testing
facility.
One suggestion was that the Business Forum ought to present itself in each European
country.
EU businesses encouraged each Pacific country to focus on one particular niche
market that each could use as a point of differentiation. The recent financial crisis

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has highlighted that niche specialist products are not in crises and this is where
Pacific enterprise should develop innovative products.      PIPSO responded by
highlighting the need to develop niche markets, and gave examples: Fiji Water, Pure
Fiji, Body Shop Samoa (sells a “green” shower gel).
The economic division of each Pacific Embassy ought to strengthen.
A one-stop shop is required for private sector communication. The private sector
ought not to be concerned with meeting several different Ministers in order to do
business.
There was a clear message from the private sector to government: give us access
and inform us as to how to develop our products and we will produce.
One participant asked for feedback from the Pacific Islands Forum Secretariat as to
the main message that the Secretariat seeks to be fed into the statement to be
presented to the ACP-EU Joint Ministerial Council. Ms. Andie Fong Toy responded
that a comprehensive EPA is pivotal. The Pacific Leaders have been ready to return
to the negotiating table since June 2011. They have fulfilled all requirements
demanded by the EU but the EU keeps stalling leading the Forum to believe that the
EU does not want to conclude a comprehensive EPA. The Pacific needs to highlight
to ACP States the need for a comprehensive EPA and aid for trade.

3.        Panel 2. Opportunities for Private Sector Development

3.1       CTA Support to the Private Sector in the Pacific Region

Ms. Isolina Boto, Head, Technical Centre for Agricultural and Rural Cooperation
(CTA), Brussels Office
The Technical Centre for Agricultural and Rural Cooperation (CTA) is a joint
international institution of the African, Caribbean and Pacific (ACP) Group of States
and the European Union (EU). It was established in 1983. CTA operates under the
framework of the Cotonou Agreement and is funded by the EU.
CTA’s mission is to advance food and nutritional security, increase prosperity and
encourage sound natural resource management by providing access to information
and knowledge, facilitating policy dialogue and strengthening the capacity of
agricultural and rural development institutions and communities in ACP countries
CTA has three strategic goals:
         To support well informed, inclusive agricultural policy processes and strategies
          in each ACP region that empower smallholder producers, women and youth;
         To promote innovation, value addition, investments, trade and markets that
          nurture the development of ACP priority value chains, especially for
          smallholder producers; and
         To strengthen the information, communication and knowledge management
          capacities of ACP institutions and networks

Ms. Boto noted that the Pacific Islands face several disadvantages: they have a
small land base; require good management, which does not always happen; and
there is very little documentation regarding projects.


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CTA approaches its work in small islands through the following actions:
         It builds resilience and converts vulnerabilities into opportunities;
         It shares expertise and up-scales best practices;
         It addresses special vulnuerabilities and will have increased resources to purse
          these activities under the 11th EDF;
         It takes a regional approach and is active in Rio +20 and greening the
          economy;
         It builds interlinkages between sectors (agriculture, tourism, ICTs…);
         It has strategies to attract young people into agriculture;
         It provides added value support through helping with branding and
          developing distinctive and differentiated products/markets; and
         It promotes new financing models for development.
         CTA emphasised the need to improve the management of social capital,
          circular migration (institutional capacity) and remittances.
         Tourism also needs to be integrated into value chains in order to reach the
          people in the Pacific and provisions need to be made for sustainable farming.

3.2       CDE - Private Sector Assistance

Mr. Jean-Pierre Mathey, Head of Regional Field Office for the Pacific
The CDE, Centre for the Development of Enterprise, is based in Brussels. CDE is an
international institution of the European Union and ACP Group of States. It was
created within the framework of the Cotonou Agreement. CDE aims to contribute to
sustainable development and does so by providing the ACP private sector with the
necessary help to promote development activities in the private sector.
Concerning access to finance, CDE signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU)
with the European Investment Bank in 2011.
In terms of access to markets, CDE needs a good understanding of what is needed,
country by country.
The private sector needs partners in order to leverage opportunities.
CDE focuses on the following Key Sectors :
         Aquaculture (fish feed, fish farming, crab farming, prawn farming and
          seaweed);
         Eco Tourism & Sustainable Tourism;
         Capacity Building;
         People are looking for more cultural tourism; and
         Agro Industry.

Regionalism is an important part of CDE’s programme. Opportunities exist for the
private sector to reinforce business linkages at the regional level.
Mr. Mathey reviewed the importance of green energy and energy efficiency
programmes for the Pacific. Studies are underway to explore alternative sources of
energy. One such programme involves conducting an audit.

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The private sector needs to know more about how to access the services provided
by CDE and how they may be eligible for assistance.

3.3       National Bank of Vanuatu: Access to Rural Finance

Mr. John A. Aruhuri, Head of Rural Banking, National Bank of Vanuatu (NBV)
Mr. Aruhuri outlined the history and development of the National Bank of Vanuatu
(NBV) within the context of government initiatives. Through its policy directions, the
Government of Vanuatu focuses on two main sectors, agriculture and tourism.
Harmonizing legislative changes will help to enable a conducive business
environment.
Mr. Aruhuri gave an account of private sector development issues facing Vanuatu.
He discussed the benefits of SOE reforms and NBV’s perspective on Rural Banking
Services, Access to Rural Finance, Financial Literacy Education and Rural Electronic
Banking.
Benefits of SOE reforms. Vanuatu National Provident Fund has been able to build up
extensive liquidity. The National Bank of Vanuatu operates profitably and extends
throughout the country. Restructuring has occurred within International Airline
Services (Air Vanuatu), which has led to an increase in the number of tourists.
Reforms in Telecommunications (Telecom Vanuatu Ltd), have also benefited the
country by increasing coverage by up to 90%.
Prospective growth potentials include Tourism; Agriculture – Beef, Kava, Timber;
Fisheries; Wholesale/Retail Trade; Off-shore Financial Services; Construction; Real
Estate; and Residential Property Investment.
Perspective from NBV:
NBV’s Vision is to be competitive, profitable, focused on the needs of the people of
Vanuatu and capable of continuous improvement in products and services.
To achieve this vision, the banks mission is two-fold:
         To provide commercially viable banking services that contribute to the
          economic growth of Vanuatu; and
         To lead the country to develop accessible rural banking services whilst
          capitalizing on opportunities within business markets.

The bank plays a fundamental role in assisting remote communities, stimulating
growth and development. NBV has 25 branches national wide and agencies in rural
areas. The bank has a presence in every province and all population centres in
Vanuatu.
Savings remains one of the main problems resulting in repayment problems.
Examples of educational programmes include training people to transform activities
in fisheries, timber, and cash crops into forms of money, which also helps people to
be able to pay off loans. These initiatives are part of the banks broader contribution
to financial literacy.
NBV is conducting workshops around the country on financial literacy. The financial
literacy programme will run for the next 3 years. Modules include training people to


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increase savings and the bank is demonstrating how to use savings as collateral from
which to borrow.
Rural Electronic Banking. Telecommunication costs have reduced greatly. As a
result, the bank has been able to deliver new electronic banking services to the rural
poor.
New services have been introduced by new technologies, e.g., VSAT. Customers
can check on account balances 24/7 by phone and make money transfers by
phone. The bank plans to launch internet banking.
Mr. Aruhuri explained the merits of micro finance.

3.4    Panel Discussion

One participant expressed an interest in integrated food and energy production and
referenced timber. Is timber an export for Vanuatu? Is there an opportunity for bio
mass conversion through reforestation or a timber production system?
Mr. Aruhuri explained that Vanuatu launched a reforestation programme in 2002.
There has been a substantial amount of replanting around the country, with resulting
timber products becoming available on the market around 2020. Replanting in
Sandalwood is significant. Forestry developments provide the potential to import
and export timber. The bank assists by offering credit access to individuals and long-
term investment solutions for businesses.
Several participants highlighted the need to integrate women in business. Others
expressed concern about the small numbers of women participating in the business
forum and encouraged PIPSO to ensure greater representation of women in
business.
Participants requested a Business Environment Strengthening programme for the
Pacific.
One participant requested information about managing exports of people, e.g.,
rugby players, into Europe.
Mauritius has developed a regional brand for fisheries and there was a shared view
that a regional brand should be developed for the Pacific. General discussions took
place relating to the True Pacific Brand.       The participants requested more
engagement from PIPSO on developing a regional brand. CTA suggested that
Geographical Indicators could be used in a far better way. Participants urged PIPSO
to understand the private sector and branding.
Participants were of the view that there should have been a Pacific Shop in
Auckland and that an opportunity still exists here.
Funding. The main concerns expressed about funding related to the functioning of
the 11th EDF. Participants doubted whether society would really see tangible benefits
stemming from the 11th EDF. Concerns were expressed about the functioning of
intermediary organisations; and, in particular, their focus on policy rather than
pragmatic business issues was seen to detract from development. The private sector
expressed concerned about the operation of CTA and CDE insofar as there not
being sufficient support for local entrepreneurs. A general sentiment was shared
amongst participants that EIB lending rates are too high, the criteria for funding is too

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stringent and that opportunities are simply not available for small local businesses.
Specific concern was expressed about foreign investors establishing local
commercial presence and benefitting directly from the EDF and EIB programmes at
the detriment of “authentic” local businesses. Local businesses voiced concern
about being pushed to one side and not really benefitting from aid assistance at all.

4.        Panel 3. Sectoral Opportunities for Private Sector Development

4.1       Fisheries

Mr Peter Philipson, Pacific Islands Forum Fisheries Agency, FFA.
Mr. Philipson presented on private sector investment opportunities in the regional
tuna fisheries sector.
Opportunities - General
Investment opportunities exist in Fisheries in the Pacific. The Pacific islands have spent
the last 30 years gaining resources. Inwards investment into the regional fisheries
sector has exceeded US$200 million in the last 12 months.
FFA is conducting a series of “Calls for Expressions of Interest” for resource
development partnerships on behalf of regional resource owners. These EoIs have
attracted substantial interest from Asian investors, but none from the EU as yet.
Opportunities - Catching
Available fishing effort in the Western and Central Pacific Ocean (WCPO) is already
excessive. The Pacific has a “sustainable tuna catch, which refers to the amount
harvested in global terms. Vessel numbers will be reduced and there is little scope
for new effort.
Any new investment in catching will be:
         Linked to regional processing; or
         A displacement of existing effort.

Opportunities - Processing
There is a natural fit between the region and EU processors who could invest in
regional processing of loins. The Pacific has control over significant raw material and
abundant labour. EU investors in regional loin production could secure both raw
material and intermediate products (loins) for further processing and marketing in the
home country.
Kiribati is harvesting over 200 tones per year. It is therefore not practical to process
within Kiribati. All catch is processed elsewhere. Asia has expressed a substantial
interest but there has been no interest from EU enterprise as yet. As the EU is the
world’s largest consumer of processed tuna it is surprising that no EU processing plant
has expressed interest. If the EU does not realize the opportunity now, then it will be
lost.
Opportunities – Regional SMEs
         Creation of substantial investment will create thousands of jobs. Smaller
          enterprises will benefit greatly from working alongside large enterprises.

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         Significant linkages will exist for SMEs to support large scale processing
          investments.
         A typical regional loining plant will employ around 1,000+ persons.
         The plants will generate many and varied business opportunities for local SMEs.

4.2       Kava and Other Commodities from the Pacific

Mr. Edward Lotasiano Wilson, Chairman-International Kava Executive Council,
Managing Director-Wilex-Samoa Group
The export of Agriculture and Agro-Value added products from the Pacific is
becoming more and more difficult, if not impossible. This is due in part to an increase
in globalization and the imposition of non-tariff restrictions by stronger trading
partners. In essence, the Pacific Agro-Trade and Export business operates in an
environment that is best described as “swimming against the tide”. With climate
change issues, the tide gets stronger every day.

4.2.1      Opportunities
         There are opportunities to develop natural products for health care and
          organic certification. Other opportunities exist to develop natural alternatives
          to synthetic medicines.
         Fair Trade should be emphasised and, in terms of unique products, registration
          of Geographic Indicators could assist to develop the Pacific private sector.

4.2.2      Challenges
         WHO’s evaluation of the kava industry concluded that Pacific kava is safe but
          restrictions are still placed on kava.
         The capacity to implement quality standards and processes is a challenge as
          are certain other aspects associated with product and market development.
          Supply chain constraints are of note.

4.3       Tourism: Marketing and Developing Tourism in the Pacific

Mr. Petero Manufolau, South Pacific Tourism Organisation
The South Pacific Tourism Organisation (SPTO) is the mandated regional body for the
tourism sector in the region. SPTO has 15 Government members: Cook Islands, Fiji,
Kiribati, Marshall Islands, Nauru, New Caledonia, Niue, Samoa, Solomons, Tahiti
(French Polynesia), Tonga, Tuvalu, Vanuatu and Papua New Guinea (PNG). The
People's Republic of China is also a country member of the SPTO. SPTO has 200
private sector members.
Pacific Tourism is overwhelmingly made up of SME’s. They have limited capacity to
compete globally and struggle with access to capital, e-commerce capability and
market awareness and visibility. Notwithstanding, a number of opportunities exist, for
instance, cruise ship tourism will increase in the coming years. (The worldwide cruise
market is expected to carry over 20.3 million passengers in 2012).



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SPTO is the implementing agency for the Pacific Regional Tourism Capacity Building
Programme, which operates under the 10th EDF and has a timeframe of 4 years (2011
– 2014).
SPTO focuses on three key result areas: i. sector planning and policy development; ii.
market research and marketing; and iii. human resource development.
SPTO markets and develops tourism in the region. It has launched a South Pacific
Specialist Programme and programme concentrated on SME Tourism Development.
SPTO is engaged in a number of other specific activities, including the audit and
assessment of SMEs; improving market access and e-marketing; and raising
awareness about the importance of digital marketing and the role of social media in
shaping future marketing strategies. SPTO is actively engaged in launching e-
commerce websites for participating SMEs. Investment is needed to encourage
sustainability and income generation renewable energy.

4.4   Panel Discussion

Kava: Participants stressed the importance of kava to the region overall and the
need to develop a quality export product. The EU has asked for new studies and
clinical evidence to prove that kava is safe for human consumption.
Questions were also asked about the preparedness of the Pacific to export kava
even if the European market were to be open for trade. Businesses should target the
two main kava industries: beverages and pharmaceuticals. Several participants
stressed the need for the Pacific private sector to do the necessary ground work so
that good quality kava products meet international standards and are ready for
export.
South Pacific indigenous nuts: The Australian government invested heavily to obtain
necessary research information on canarium nuts and the Pacific needs to do the
same for kava before any advance may be made.
Intellectual Property. Discussion ensued on the need to patent new products in the
Pacific.
SPTO announcement: SPTO announced that it will be launching a trade exhibition on
the side of the London Olympics. Space has been acquired at St Katherine’s Docks
and a pontoon will be decorated as a Pacific Village. SPTO welcomed Pacific
businesses to participate. Information is available from SPTO.
Regional Commodities Organisation. Participant’s highlighted the good work of
SPTO and recommended that a regional commodities organisation be established
along similar lines.

5.    Panel 4. Renewable Energy, Environment and Climate

5.1   Renewable Energy, Environment and Climate Issues for the Pacific

Ms. Teresa Thorp: Team Leader, AGORA’ 2000
The presenter opened by introducing the link between development and
environmental law in the context of Pacific SIDS (Small Island Developing States). The
crux of the introduction was to highlight how Pacific businesses could turn

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vulnerabilities into opportunities via mobilising international legal norms (principles,
rules and standards).
Next, Ms. Thorp outlined the nature of normative principles that reside at the nexus
between environmental law, water governance, climate law, renewable energy
and sustainability; and she discussed their relevance for the private sector. Private
sector provisions in the Stockholm Declaration, Agenda 21 and the Rio Declaration
were illustrated as a lead in to provide examples of private sector engagement in
renewable energy projects that operate through the UN Compact and other
mechanisms.
The United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change provided the basis
for reviewing climate change norms. The impact of five key principles on the private
sector covered, i. equity (substantive and procedural responsibility of the private
sector); ii. solidarity (distributive fairness, interdependence and the relationship with
mutual insurance mechanisms for disaster recovery); iii. precaution (adaptation and
mitigation programmes for the private sector, including voluntary reporting); iv.
sustainable development (in terms of right conduct and results integrated at the
national level); and, v. the good neighbour principle (no harm and no arbitrary
discrimination in trade).
As to Kyoto Mechanisms, there is no specific provision for renewable energy but
Article 2 of the Kyoto Protocol sets out a provision for research and promotion of
renewable energy. There is also an opportunity for developing renewable energy
technologies (RETs).
An outline of specific instruments covered international emissions trading, joint
implementation and the clean development mechanism (CDM). The speaker
highlighted several opportunities and challenges associated with the CDM.
As to reducing emissions, the private sector may consider various measures, including
increasing efficiency in provision and end-use of energy, and a switch towards
carbon-free (renewable) and less carbon intensive (e.g., natural gas) resources.
As to private sector engagement through the Convention, the presentation
addressed the role of constituencies, including the Business and Industry
Nongovernmental Organizations (BINGO). BINGO’s engagement was illustrated in
the context of outputs from the United Nations Climate Change Conference, Durban
2011.
Going forward, it will be important for the private sector to make a connection
between renewable energy, a green economy and trade in goods and services.
Irrespective of Kyoto II, two key issues for Rio +20 ought to be development towards a
green economy and an institutional framework for sustainable development.
Examples were outlined of local options for the Pacific, such as, strengthening cross
national partnerships throughout the region, adopting voluntary emissions targets at
the firm level, and so on.
Other options focused on financing and investment avenues. Consideration could
be given to implement feed in tariffs to support the financial return on renewable
energy projects. Feed-in tariffs could also be supported by a trust fund model or
bank guarantees. A climate registry for the Pacific could help technology and
infrastructure financing. One of its uses could be to help investors identify credible
investment opportunities. Relevant information could be vetted, organised and

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posted on the Registry. A Pacific Climate Registry could also provide a tool to
facilitate the availability of more innovative financing schemes (environmental
bonds, white certificates, etc). Another action would be to facilitate training and
capacity building funding needed to implement new renewable energy
technologies. The Climate Registry could provide space to disseminate best practise
cases; promote funding by the UNFCCC or through public sector finance; and
provide support to local initiatives on operating and maintaining new technologies.
Where to Next? As to the way forward, the private sector could request further
support and technical assistance to launch sustainable projects in renewable
energy. There is a need to empower enabling organisations and the private sector
to be prepared for future business models. Increasing private sector participation in
climate, renewable energy and sustainable development projects helps to cement
these key messages and to facilitate the shift from a vulnerable to a valuable South
Pacific.

5.2       Promotion of Energy Security in Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands and
          Vanuatu

Mr. Stuart King, Economics Consultant, Equinoccio
Mr. King presented on a Bizclim project that will promote Energy Security in Papua
New Guinea, Solomon Islands and Vanuatu. The project started a month ago and
aims to look at incentives for small-scale energy investments, including hydro and
solar. The project aims to assess whether there is potential for renewable energy
development in the Pacific; or, if not, to ascertain the nature of barriers to such
investment.
The Asian Development Bank has already launched renewable energy projects in
rural areas and the World Bank is conducting a study.
The project team will speak to government agencies to see whether there is a drive
to introduce renewable energy projects in the Pacific and a report will be prepared
to cover the three target countries.
Donors and developers will gather in July 2012 to talk about potential projects.
Project Objectives. There are three principle components to the project:
         Develop energy balances for each target country (i.e. develop an annual
          demand – supply picture of energy services)
         Review the energy policy and regulation framework and how it:
         Encourages or discourages (privately financed) renewable energy
          developments;
         Encourages or discourages energy efficiency promotion.
         Make recommendations as to how this policy and regulation framework might
          be adjusted to facilitate private sector involvement in the energy sector and
          improve the energy supply and demand balance.

5.2.1      Papua New Guinea, PNG
         PNG is the only oil producer in the region. Historically, it was a net exporter
          until recently but is now a net importer.

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         PNG has the only domestic oil refinery in the region.
         PNG gas has some potential and PNG also has hydro capacity in place. The
          scheme is tied to big mining projects.
         In terms of electricity policy, if a committee is formed then it will create
          momentum.
         The target is to ensure that 70% of the population has access to electricity. It is
          a hugely ambitious target.

5.2.2      Solomon Islands
         The Solomon Islands is the least developed of the three countries under study.
         Apart from biomass, the Solomon Islands is entirely dependent on imported oil
          for transport fuels and electricity generation.
         Utilities will be back to profit making this year. Commercial losses will be
          reduced.
         The Asian Development Bank has already identified the opportunity to
          develop three large scale schemes for electricity.

5.2.3      Vanuatu
         Apart from biomass, Vanuatu is almost entirely dependent on oil imports for
          transport fuels and electricity.
         Unlike PNG and the Solomon Islands, electricity generation and distribution is
          undertaken by the private sector.
         There is no formal electrification plan.
         Santo presents an opportunity to develop hydro and diesel projects.

5.3       UNIDO: Energizing the Private Sector in the Pacific

Mr. Florian Peter Iwinjak, Programme and Liaison Officer, UNIDO
Mr. Iwinjak sees the private sector as the main driving force for the government.
UNIDO has 54 offices around the world. UNIDO aspires to reduce poverty through
sustainable industrial development. UNIDO wants every country to have the
opportunity to develop a flourishing productive sector, to increase their participation
in international trade and to safeguard their environment.
In terms of its private sector engagement, UNIDO concentrates on three main areas,
which are as follows:
         Inclusive industry (poverty reduction through productive activities)
         Competitive industry (trade capacity building)
         Green industry (environment and energy)

UNIDO established a relationship agreement with the EU in 1993; and a relationship
agreement with the ACP in 2011. For the ACP, UNIDO provides the following services:
         Supports inclusive industries, particularly agro-industries, for job creation and
          poverty reduction;


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         Strengthens competitive industries, the private sector and trade capacity
          building; and
         Develops environmentally friendly industries for sustainable development

UNIDO participated in the 3rd Europe-Africa Business Forum, held in Tripoli in 2010. It
also engages with the ACP Council.
UNIDO and the Pacific
         UNIDO member states in the Pacific are Fiji, New Zealand, Papua New
          Guinea, Samoa, Tonga, Tuvalu, and Vanuatu.
         UNIDO engages in constant dialogue with Member States and regional
          bodies.
         UNIDO has several programmes (fisheries and energy) in the pipeline.
         UNIDO is engaged in projects in Samoa, the Solomon Islands (solar energy)
          and the Cook Islands (hydrogen for productive use project Aitutaki).

Mr. Iwinjak highlighted the importance of energy freedom. UNIDO defines energy
freedom as the freedom to move freely without dependency on energy.
Renewable energy can be a catalyst to a sustainable future based on quality.
UNIDO hopes to engage in the right type of partnership with the Pacific.
In concluding, Mr. Iwinjak shared some philosophic guidelines:
         “It doesn’t really matter how fast you’re going if you’re heading in the wrong
          direction.” – Stephen Covey
         “The future depends on what we do in the present.” – Mahatma Gandhi
         “It is better to be roughly right than precisely wrong.” - Maynard Keynes

Many tools are already available to work for a better future.

5.4       Vanuatu : Enabling Rural Tourism Operators to Better Access and Utilise
          Renewable Energy

Mr. Frank Pool, Consultant
Mr. Pool is involved in delivering a Bizclim project on Private-Public Partnership for
access to renewable energy in rural areas of Vanuatu.
The project seeks four project results, which are as follows:
         To develop a typology of rural tourism and define appropriate models of
          renewable energy access (financial and technical);
         To focus on meeting the needs of rural tourism based on Rural Electrification
          programmes; including integrating with current activities, in particular the
          Vanuatu Electrification for Rural Development (VERD) project that is now
          awaiting its implementation, and the development of a Vanuatu Energy Road
          Map (VERM) exercise that is now underway;
         To develop a Public Private Partnership (PPP) mechanism to link private
          renewable energy suppliers with rural tourism operators, and with donor
          projects and programs; and

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         To disseminate the project’s results.

The project team has conducted a needs assessment and identified the following
development needs for Rural Tourism Development:
         The need to improve physical flights, shipping, road access and frequency;
         The need to improve marketing, booking systems, and responsiveness to
          enquiries;
         The need to improve communications: working mobile connection, 3G mobile
          for internet, WiFi for guests, laptop for guests, mobile charging;
         The need to improve accommodation characteristics: décor, furniture,
          lighting etc.;
         The need to improve attention to detail, service quality, cleanliness, training;
         The need to improve links to local attractions: e.g. horse riding,
          diving/snorkelling, jungle walks, etc.;
         The need to improve restaurants, especially refrigeration at lower
          accommodation levels for cold beer, reliable supply of beef/fish/chicken for
          meals; and
         The need to improve the focus on ecological/environmental issues : green
          materials, use of renewable energy, recycling, natural materials, local food,
          etc.

5.5       Panel Discussion

Participants discussed the importance of developing carbon financing mechanisms
for the Pacific and agreed that projects should be launched to improve facilities for
carbon financing.
The private sector requested support to develop expertise in thermal development.
Participants emphasised the need to integrate energy development in national
strategies and agreed that this should link to the principle of sustainable
development outlined in the presentation on climate change.
The private sector expressed an interest in being part of the energy business.
The private sector expressed a keen interest to engage in Climate Change
(UNFCCC) constituencies. According to the participants, PIPSO ought to provide an
avenue for such engagement.
Feed-in tariffs. Participants requested more information on feed-in tariffs. Ms. Thorp
provided an overview of the nature of feed-in-tariffs and several trade disputes
under consideration in this regard. She reviewed the electricity part of what is
sometimes called Clean Energy Cashback and discussed the nature of small-scale
low carbon electricity generation. She outlined the link between generation tariffs,
export tariffs and energy savings. Some further issues were highlighted with respect
to the relationship between feed-in tariffs and WTO (World Trade Organisation)
subsidies (a WTO dispute was lodged in September 2010 relating to a controversial
domestic content provision). Another issue in determining whether a financial
contribution constitutes a prohibited subsidy is whether the implementing entity is a
public or private entity. The WTO’s Appellate Body found in one case (US-Definitive

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Antidumping and Countervailing Duties on Certain Products from China) that an
entity must possess, exercise or be vested with ‘governmental authority’ in order to
qualify as a ‘public body. There are also questions about the legal order and the
nuances in domestic laws and regulations. The investigation also extends to other
important issues, such as GATT Article XX exception clauses. Participants voiced
interest in further training and capacity building on these subjects.
Interest was expressed in the types of bank guarantees available. Ms. Thorp briefed
participants at a very general level on the nature of multilateral and regional
guarantees. As to European Investment Bank (EIB) guarantees, the EIB will be
present on day two and further discussion is encouraged directly with EIB as to new
proposals that may eventuate under the 11th EDF. Some guarantee schemes have
not been well supported but part of the reason may relate to their suitability for the
private sector and the need for increasing competency of development banks in
the field of SME guarantees. Credit risk and weak collateral capacity are two
specific problems that face SME’s and often lead to high provisioning requirements
for banks. In addition, Ms. Thorp observed that there may be an opportunity to
develop guarantee schemes further. While many instruments offered in Sub-Saharan
Africa may have had an element of being a subsidised scheme, new solutions could
be investigated that could even consider mixed funds, say blending European equity
funding and guarantees from other banks (even from private sector banks); or
blending guarantees with lines of credit.
Questions were asked about activities in this regard in other island states. In
response, Ms. Thorp presented a comparative example from the Caribbean as
announced by the EIB in February 2012. In brief, the EIB will provide USD 65 m for a
dedicated Climate Action lending programme through the Caribbean
Development Bank in 18 Caribbean small island states. Projects eligible for funding
from the new Climate Action lending programme include climate adaptation,
renewable energy, sustainable transport, forestry, low-carbon innovation and
climate change innovation initiatives. Establishing a regional investment bank for the
Pacific has been a recurrent theme but the Pacific needs to do a lot of work before
this will eventuate. In the meantime, the Pacific may benefit from a workshop, similar
to that held in the Caribbean, on climate action in the Pacific: a request would have
to be processed through the appropriate channels.
One participant requested information about the classification of least developed
countries. Ms. Thorp reviewed the nature of the Kyoto Protocol’s industrialised
countries Annex and LDC classification. In essence, to be on the LDC list, a two-
stage test applies. First, a country’s population must not exceed 75 million. Second,
a country must meet all three criteria as defined by the Committee for Development
Policy (CDP): a low-income criterion, a human capital status criterion, involving a
composite Human Assets Index (HAI) based on specified indicators; and an
economic vulnerability criterion, involving a composite Economic Vulnerability Index
(EVI). In 2007, the CDP submitted to the United Nations General Assembly (UNGA)
that Samoa was ready to graduate; but in September 2009, a devastating tsunami
struck Samoa. As a result, a UN General Assembly resolution 64/295 of 7 September
2010 has deferred Samoa’s graduation until 1 January 2014.
In terms of energy technologies, Mr. Pool observed that PV Technology is becoming
better and will compete against diesel energy.


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In terms of decision-making, Mr. King highlighted that as part of his project there will
be a review of different scenarios, best-case scenarios and pessimistic scenarios and
an assessment of viable options.
The private sector expressed concern about the absence of UNIDO from the region.
UNIDO aspires to support the Pacific but this will not be achieved unless UNIDO is in
the region. One participant put it this way: “Please come to the Pacific and set up
here. You were needed and are still needed.”
Day 1 concluded with a cocktail and business-networking event.

III.   DAY II: MODALITIES FOR IMPLEMENTATION

1.     Opening Addresses

1.1    European Union Delegation to Vanuatu

Mr. Robert De Raeve, Charge d'Affaires of the EU Delegation to Vanuatu opened
the second day of the Pacific – EU Business Forum.
The 1st Pacific-EU Business Forum on the Fringes of the ACP-EU Joint Ministerial
Council in Vanuatu marks yet another milestone of the ACP Business Climate Facility
(BizClim).1 Funded by the European Development Fund, Bizclim is a joint initiative of
the ACP Secretariat and the European Commission.2
The success of the first phase of the BizClim programme prompted the launch of
BizClim II in August 2010 for a total budget of 10 million Euros. Bizclim II has a duration
of 2 and a half years and is based on the first phase of the Facility (2006 – 2009). The
Bizclim programme aims to consolidate the results of the first phase by:
Empowering key stakeholders to undertake business environment reforms;
Enabling public-private dialogue on private sector development issues; and
Strengthening the capacity of regional organisations, among others, in the area of
resource mobilisation.
European countries and Pacific ACP States have pinned their hopes on a new EU-
Pacific Economic Partnership Agreement (EPA) to bring together two regions and go
beyond the current trading arrangements. The EU (of 27) is the 5th major trading
partner of the Pacific ACP countries; and, as at 2010, accounts for about 5.3% of
Pacific ACP trade.3 There is untapped potential to increase trading relations
between Europe and the Pacific ACP countries and overseas territories.
In order to reap the benefits of any enhanced cooperation framework between
Europe and the Pacific region, traders and investors need clear, stable and




1
       African Caribbean Pacific/European Union Conference|Vanuatu June 2012; available at
       http://acpeuvanuatu2012.org/; last viewed 10 June 2012.
2      Private Sector Enabling Environment Facility 10 ACP RPR 15. Financing       Agreement:
       REG/FED/2009/021-679.
3      Source: IMF (DoTS) DG TRADE; European Union: 27 members. 21-Mar-12; p. 6.

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transparent rules by which to do business. Simplifying and harmonising rules across
an economic area will make business prospects even more attractive.
The first Pacific-EU Business Forum provides business representatives an unrivalled
opportunity to voice their concerns, hopes and aspirations. The Forum intends to do
much more than this though. Business driven reforms need to boost the business
climate and prospects for enhanced cooperation between European and Pacific
businesses. The aspirations fit with the EU’s “Agenda for Change”.
On 13 October 2011, the EU Commissioner for Development, Andris Piebalgs,
presented the 'Agenda for Change',4 (a EU Development policy) and a new policy
for EU budget support.5 The new policy acknowledges the “scope for the EU to work
more closely with the private sector, foundations, civil society and local and regional
authorities as their role in development grows”.6 Within this context, “the EU should
support the development of competitive local private sectors including by building
local institutional and business capacity, promoting SMEs and cooperatives,
supporting legislative and regulatory framework reforms and their enforcement
(including for the use of electronic communications as a tool to support growth
across all sectors), facilitating access to business and financial services and
promoting agricultural, industrial and innovation policies. This will also allow
developing countries, especially the poorest, to harness the opportunities offered by
globally integrated markets. Better and more targeted Aid for Trade and trade
facilitation must accompany these efforts”.7
BizClim complements EU initiatives in addressing private sector constraints. CDE and
the European Investment Bank (in the context of the Investment Facility), also
provide instruments for private sector development.
Mention must also be made of the 11th European Development Fund (EDF).8 “The
European Development Fund (EDF) is the main instrument for delivering EU assistance
for development cooperation under the Cotonou Agreement with ACP States and
for financing EU cooperation with the Overseas Countries and Territories under the




4     EuropeAid          News;         Agenda         for        Change;             available   at
      http://ec.europa.eu/europeaid/news/agenda_for_change_en.htm ; last viewed 10 June 2012.

5     European Commission - Press Release; EU Development Policy: Commission to increase aid
      impact, concentrating on fewer sectors, focusing on countries most in need; Brussels, 13
      October 2011
6     European Commission; Brussels, 13.10.2011; COM(2011) 637 final; Communication From The
      Commission To The European Parliament, The Council, The European Economic And Social
      Committee And The Committee Of The Regions; Increasing the impact of EU Development
      Policy: an Agenda for Change; {SEC(2011) 1172 final}; {SEC(2011) 1173 final}; p. 3.
7     Ibid. p. 8.
8     European Commission; Brussels, 7.12.2011; COM(2011) 837 final; Communication From The
      Commission To The European Parliament And The Council; Preparation of the multiannual
      financial framework regarding the financing of EU cooperation for African, Caribbean and
      Pacific States and Overseas Countries and Territories for the 2014-2020 period (11th European
      Development Fund); {SEC(2011) 1459 final}; {SEC(2011) 1460 final}. See also European
      Development                       Fund;                       available                    at
      http://ec.europa.eu/budget/biblio/documents/FED/fed_en.cfm; last viewed 10 June 2012.

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Overseas Association Decision”.9 The 10th EDF runs from 2008 to 2013 and has a
budget of €22 682 million.10 Negotiations are continuing on the 11th EDF.
Mr. Robert De Raeve encouraged delegates to make maximum use of the facilities
available and congratulated the Government of Vanuatu and PIPSO on launching
the first Pacific – EU Business Forum.
The Pacific business community has expressed its desire to dialogue and do business
with European businesses. The private sector has expressed enthusiasm about
hosting a trade expo in Europe, possibly next year. While work is underway to
develop products for market, the South Pacific Tourism Organisation will be hosting
an event in London (next to St. Katherine’s Docks) on the side of the Olympics
Games and the EU encourages private companies to participate. (While in the UK,
we hope you take the opportunity to visit other markets in Europe).
It is important to bear in mind that this is the first ever Pacific-EU Business Forum. While
the Forum provides a platform to discuss relevant topics, the effectiveness of the
Forum will hinge on building momentum and enlisting strong interest from the private
sector to make the Forum work.
Should the Forum succeed to structure itself, the organization of the 2nd meeting
could take place in Brussels. This would give the Pacific business community the
opportunity to meet a much larger number of European businesses and to organize
B2B meetings and exhibit its products and services.
The EU values its deep and friendly relationship with the Pacific. It will continue to
advance mutually beneficial economic development and cooperation. The EU
looks forward to welcoming Pacific businesses in Europe for one of their ensuing
business forums. In closing, Mr. De Raeve congratulated the private sector on its
fruitful outcomes and wished European and Pacific businesses every success in their
future deliberations.

1.2    Statement Delivered by the Co-Chairs of the Business Forum

In summarising the first day’s deliberations and setting the scene for day two, Mr.
Marokon Alilee, co-Chair of the Business Forum spoke on behalf of the Government
of Vanuatu and PIPSO.
Three key points can be said in summarising day 1.
The Pacific – EU business community expressed its desire to do business together.
There is a need to leverage core competencies in both regions.
Participants conveyed their intent to structure the Pacific – EU Business Forum as a
sustainable forum that can spearhead private sector development, act as a type of
think tank, develop a platform to discuss and implement relevant issues and give
direction to mobilise PIPSO to take the lead as a regional facilitator of private sector
trade.


9      Ibid. p. 2. Note also that the EDF was established by the Treaty of Rome (1957) and first
       launched in 1959.
10     European              Development             Fund;              available             at
       http://ec.europa.eu/europeaid/how/finance/edf_en.htm; last viewed 10 June 2012.

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The issues raised during the first day could be summarised in a 10 point action plan.
      Product Development. The Pacific ought to develop quality kava products
       that meet required SPS standards and are fit for consumption both in the
       Pacific and EU markets. Consideration should be given to a regional testing
       facility. The Pacific has a regional tourism body but needs a regional
       standards body.
      Trade facilitation and infrastructure. Improve trade facilitation and
       infrastructure, including flight connections.
      Intellectual property. What do businesses need to know? How can GI’s be
       developed for the Pacific? Update patent laws.
      Climate Registry. Establish a climate registry that could also advise on carbon
       financing for Pacific business requirements and facilitate relations with
       international institutions. Engage with UNFCCC constituencies, e.g., BINGO.
      Regulation. Address anti competitive issues and ensure that proper regulatory
       bodies are in place.
      Marketing. Develop a regional brand, elevate the quality of Pacific products,
       improve distribution channels in the Pacific and Europe. Launch a Trade Expo
       in Brussels. The South Pacific Tourism Organisation has organised a
       comprehensive programme on the side of the Olympics and welcomes
       Pacific businesses to participate. Another opportunity could exist in terms of
       delivering a joint event on the side of the Olympics in conjunction with several
       Caribbean countries.
      Economic Partnership Agreement. Continue negotiations towards a “win-win”
       comprehensive EPA.
      Knowledge database. PIPSO was advised to develop a one-stop shop that
       supports Pacific businesses. Businesses should be able to obtain information
       about the services available to them regionally. A database to be
       developed and maintained by PIPSO, should be integrated into national
       programmes and operated by the likes of Chambers of Commerce.
      PIPSO. There were requests from participants for PIPSO to take an active role
       in private sector development. The participants set out their expectations
       clearly throughout the forum. The most pressing concern is that PIPSO is not
       visible to the private sector. There is a need for a uniform intermediary
       platform to give the private sector a voice. PIPSO ought to be established as
       an agent of the private sector and with a revised mandate that makes it
       accountable to the private sector.
      EDF. Private sector proposals need to be developed from the ideas and
       requests set forth during the forum. Now is the time to formulate private sector
       requests for capacity building and specific support instruments. If these
       requests and actions are not included in the EDF, the Pacific will remain
       marginalised.




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Day two focused on the modalities for implementation. The Chair encouraged all
participants to engage actively in developing a comprehensive statement that will
encapsulate the voice and demands of the Pacific – EU private sector.

1.3   Statement Delivered by the European Business Council for Africa and the
      Mediterranean (EBCAM)

Mr Fernando Matos Rosa, Secretary General, EBCAM
The European Business Council for Africa and the Mediterranean (EBCAM) was
founded in 1973. Through its members, EBCAM represents some 4,000 European
companies with interests in the African continent. From the Maghreb to South Africa,
EBCAM represents over 300,000 employees. EBCAM’s activities cover the complete
range of commerce and industry, including agriculture, mining, transport, banking
and all service sectors.
Mr. Matos Rosa began his intervention by expressing a sincere appreciation of the
Pacific and the Pacific private sector. The Pacific is a friendly region where we can
do business in a friendly manner. Mr. Matos Rosa drew the participant’s attention to
the benefits of the Pacific – EU Business Forum. He stressed that the forum is the
participant’s voice in Europe. The Forum is the vehicle for expressing requests in
Europe that will compliment European business endeavours and make the Pacific’s
private sector known to Europe.
EBCAM has an enormous network of companies that take the initiative and
contribute to European trade and exports. EBACM is a confederation of private
sector enterprises in Europe; but it also includes Norway and Switzerland. Turkey will
join soon. EBCAM is a powerful and influential body that should be used to full effect
by the Pacific’s private sector.
Mr. Matos Rosa encouraged the participants to make the Forum a sister organisation
of EBCAM in Europe. He conveyed the interest of European businesses for the Pacific
to launch a trade expo in Europe. EBCAM has more than 4000 companies and
many of these firms have an interest in trading with developing countries and are
enthusiastic about investing in the Pacific. Please consider that EBCAM is there to
offer help to launch the expo (possibly in Brussels but also in other places in Europe).
EBCAM is glad to support this initiative.
EBCAM has followed the EU’s “Agenda for Change” policy closely and made
comments and contributions already. Mr. Matos Rosa encouraged the Business
Forum to do the same.
The European Investment Bank, present in the forum, is a natural partner for trade
financing and should be used to the fullest extent by Pacific businesses.
EBCAM has very good relationships with its sister organisations in Canada, the USA
and has a similar interest in strengthening Pacific – EU relationships.

2.    Investments and Partnerships

2.1   Investments and Partnerships : EIB activities in the Pacific Region

Mr. Jean-Philippe de Jong, Head of EIB, Pacific Regional Office


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EIB expressed a strong interest in operating in the Pacific. EIB knows the region well.
It opened a regional office in 2007, which has facilitated EIB’s work in developing
investment opportunities throughout the Pacific.
The presentation honed in on two main topics:
         EIB’s Activities in the Pacific; and
         Partnerships and EIB Cooperation in the Pacific.

2.2       EIB’s Activities in the Pacific

EIB extended an invitation for participants to visit the wind power farm at Devil’s point
on Wednesday 13 June 2012 (several delegates participated).
In 2010, the focal sectors for EIB under the Cotonou Agreement and OCT Overseas
Association Decision were infrastructure (44%) and the financial sector (56%). EIB’s
priorities are private sector support, regional dimension/integration, climate action,
co-financing and green growth.
EIB provides lines of credit to local financial institutions. In terms of renewable energy
projects, solar, hydro and wind power are important in this region. When EIB finances
a project that specific investment has a catalytic affect on commercial banks.
From 2004-2011 the EIB approved +/- EUR 170 million for the Pacific. Examples
include, but are not limited to, the Pacific Islands Financing Facility, Kula Fund II, a
regional rollout for Digicel Pacific, Novotel Denarau, Fiji Power, Samoa Venture
Capital Fund, Kolombangara Forestry Project, Socredo – Environmental, BCI –
Environmental, UNELCO, Banque de Polynésie.
Case Study: Digicel Pacific
Total project cost: USD 129 million
EIB financing: USD 40 million
Countries: Fiji, Vanuatu, Tonga and Cook Islands
Description: expansion of existing telecommunications networks and introduction of
competition in several markets
Objectives: improved coverage and service levels in mobile communication; and
development of a competitive GSM mobile network.
Case Study: Environmental Lines of Credit
Banque de Polynésie: EUR 10 m
SOCREDO I & II: EUR 10 m
Description: Provision of subsidised financing resources for investments in renewable
energy and energy efficiency
Objectives: Supports SMEs in pursuing environmentally sustainable business practices
Eligible Beneficiaries:
         Private entrepreneurs and commercially-run public sector enterprises
         Investment funds and other financial intermediaries
         ACP and international entrepreneurs

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         Large enterprises, SMEs and Microfinance

Mr. De Jong reviewed the banks due diligence process and information required
from the private sector.

2.3       EIB Partnerships in the Pacific

In terms of turnover, the EIB is the world’s largest financial institution.
The European Commission is a close partner – externally and internally.
The EIB has close cooperation with EC Delegations in the Pacific and contributes to
the EU’s development and cooperation policies in the Pacific Region, which is
crucial to fulfil Cotonou targets.
The strategic focus is on co-financing in renewable energy, water and sanitation.
EIB also engages with other EU partners (CDE and Member States).
Mr. De Jong reviewed local projects in the Pacific funded under the 10th EDF (2008-
2013), e.g., Kiribati (Renewable Energy / Water and Sanitation); PNG (Education /
Human Resources Development and Rural Economy).

2.4       An Integrated Business/ODA Perspective

Oliver Clark, Economic Consultant
The 2008 financial crises brought the bottom billion, the poor, to the forefront as a big
market opportunity. The private sector virtually invisible in some developing countries
is the core component of all Economic Value Creation and Trade. There is
momentum to broaden the concept of Official Development Assistance (ODA) to
include a plethora of actors: the media, public, corporate social responsibility actors,
NGOs and others.
ODA is often geared to development (capacity building) or economic growth.
Going forward, there will be a need to consider both components.
Mr. Clark outlined that ODA is an effective response to many obstacles to private
sector development. Wealth distribution, health, education, environmental issues,
and so on, all benefit from ODA.
The Pacific has been influenced by several different development models:
In the 1980s, MI.R.A.B : Migration, Remittances, Aid & Bureaucracy;
In the 1990s, P.R.O.FI.T : People considerations, Resource Management, Overseas
Engagement, Finance, Transportation; (…immaterials, remittances, licences, fishing
rights…); and
In the 2000s, S.I.T.E : Small-island tourism Economy.
There is one common problem to all Pacific Nations : investments are too low and
too unstable. In 2005, Hausmann, Rodrik and Velasco, identified three bottlenecks to
investment: inadequate returns, poor private “appropriability”, and the high cost of
finance. In the new development context, the private sector is an indispensable
partner and there is a move towards collaborative development instruments. Mr.



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Clark discussed several different models: a consortium model and the challenge
fund model.
Conclusions and recommendations:
         Define and Quantify Business Needs and their Development impact
         Ensure clear expression of interest between partners
         Demonstrate the Leverage of Investment and/or Grant Funds for
          Development
         Adopt Value Chain approach, to identify potential and roles (for large-scale
          companies and SMEs)
         Strategic focus on collective negotiating industrial and trade relations (EPAs)
          with EU
         Balance risks with co-funding and avoid market distortion
         Address the reputational risk in terms of fraud / corruption
         Facilitate blending / combination of financial instruments

Some of the big challenges for the EU:
         Justification for a special Pacific Status in EU Development strategies ?
         Guidelines and Safeguards about “financing the private sector” ?
         Issue of “human rights & Governance” parameter to involvement ?
         Standardised evaluation tools for EU ODA, at programme & project level.
         Traceability of EU funding.

2.5       Panel Discussion

The private sector sought to understand more fully how the bank assesses the impact
of investment projects on local business (Digicel Tonga and the Kula Fund were
cited). In particular, participants expressed a degree of frustration at the cost of EIB
finance, which was seen as too expensive for small businesses.
The EIB is definitely present in Tonga and has been financing smaller enterprises in
Tonga through Tonga Development Bank for more than ten years.
The last line of credit to Tonga dates back 3 years.
The main reason why smaller companies do not use this service [EIB’s service] is
because China and New Zealand committed themselves to rebuild infrastructure for
the Private and Public sectors following the 2006 riots in Nuku’alofa. EIB support was
not really sought due to alternative funding from China and New Zealand.
The EIB has been trying to fund SMEs. Tonga’s economy is not growing dramatically
however EIB does have a line of credit with Tonga Development Bank.
The private sector expressed appreciation of EIB’s engagement with the Pacific – EU
Business Forum and requested whether there were opportunities for new approaches
to aid the private sector. Participants expressed concern about the difficulties in
accessing funds via local development banks. Other concerns were expressed
about foreign investment leading to a bypass of investment opportunities for smaller
local entrepreneurs.


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In responding, the EIB conveyed that it is happy to help no matter the size of the
business. EIB has been present and has financed a multitude of small organizations.
EIB’s line of credit is also available to finance smaller projects driven by the private
sector. The EIB is present in the Pacific and has set up lines of credit.
EIB does not get involved in decision making for local development banks.
EIB encouraged the Forum to consider the types of approaches that would like seen
to benefit the private sector and emphasised that the bank is happy to support
investment at the microfinance level.
Agro Processing Samoa - What is the banks interest rate for the Pacific? What was
Digicel required to do to set up in the Pacific as far as EIB was concerned? What are
your security rates? Can an individual get funding? Interested was expressed in
understanding how to manage currency risk.
EIB can assist directly if the project is above 5 million Euros. The project must meet
the banks criteria to be eligible for funding. The EIB encouraged discussion on the
project and expressed their interest in providing support. The EIB can lend in different
currencies.
One participant is trying to find solutions in food and energy in small island
developing states. Based on successful projects in Africa and the Caribbean – is the
EIB interested in longer-term partnerships to identify SID projects in Vanuatu?
Furthermore, does the bank manage equity funding?
The EIB responded that it has the capacity to provide support to develop food and
energy projects. The bank does not have resources to handle equity resources.

3.        One to one business meetings

A series of one to one business meetings were set up following the results of a
matchmaking service that had been launched by the project team on the first day.
Institutional support was on hand from CTA, CDE, UNIDO, the National Bank of
Vanuatu, the EIB and others to assist in structuring tailored dialogue.

4.        South Pacific Engagement in Europe and the Future of the Pacific – EU Forum I

4.1       What do Private Companies Need to do to Improve Collaboration?

Mr. Selim El-Gheriani Piñol, Director of the Foreign Trade Department, Official
Chamber of Commerce, Industry and Navigation of Santa Cruz de Tenerife.
Mr. Piñol started his presentation by placing Tenerife and the Canary Islands on the
map and conveyed the interest of his members in doing business with the Pacific.
Mr. Piñol described the meaning of collaboration and explained how good
collaboration is indispensible to small business development. Small businesses ought
to focus on the service aspect, quality and niche markets. Collaboration benefits
the private sector, amongst others, by:
         Reducing risk and costs
         Facilitating access to new markets
         Facilitating “know-how”

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         Facilitating the consolidation and expansion of cooperative enterprise.
         Investment optimisation.

The private sector can also work in collaboration with intermediate organisations.
Notwithstanding, the private sector must insist on three main things:
         Increasing private sector initiative
         Competitiveness
         Facilitating access to private sector collaborative instruments

In these areas, a regional Chamber of Commerce ought to take initiative so that it
serves the objectives of its members.
Intermediary organisations can also play a role in filtering information and ensuring
that SME’s, often pressed for resources, receive timely and quality information
tailored to their needs. If SME’s are not informed, they will not have access to new
markets.
Training is needed to increase awareness. SME employees also need to know how to
work with other SMEs. Collaboration does not come automatically.
Collaboration is also useful in international tendering. SME’s could interact to
develop consortiums. It is better to have economic groupings that would offer a
specific project in specific regions at specific time.
Another idea is for the Pacific-EU Business Forum to have a Joint-Presidency (one
from the Pacific and one from the EU). The Forum could thus assume an advisory role
for developing a competent regional private sector body. Structures must be
managed by the private sector and not outsourced. Ideally, PIPSO and the private
sector would contribute to the content and topics to be discussed by the Business
Forum.
The Forum could also introduce a committee function to identify difficulties
encountered and transfer information to intermediary bodies and to the public
sector. It is important the committee structure be recognised by intermediary
organisations and by the public sector.
The main message is that collaboration between private sectors in the EU and the
Pacific is possible but it should be based on new strategy.        Private sector
development should be focused and organized according to specific themes. SMEs
are the building block of the economy but far more needs to be done at the
regional level to ensure a cohesive and collaborative partnership.

4.2       EPA Opportunities in Europe, Market Access and Trade Facilitation

Mr. Kaliopate Tavola, Fiji's former Ambassador to the EU
Opportunities in PACP – EU Relations
Mr. Tavola stressed the importance of concluding negotiations by end 2012 on a
Comprehensive EPA: this will raise confidence. If this target is not achieved then
Alternative Trade Agreements ought to be negotiated promptly.
The Pacific ought to signal positive aspects of Mode 4 Services and the Temporary
Movement of Natural Persons (TMNP) in future relations.

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Political will is required.
The Business Forum ought to learn from other ACP-EU Business Forums. Best practices
from the other forums ought to be extracted and used to full effect by the Pacific –
EU Business Forum.
Discussions ought to continue to manage the impacts of EC Regulation 1528/2007 or
any amendments thereto effectively.         Regulation 1528 currently provides
preferences to African, Caribbean and Pacific (ACP) countries, so that they have
duty-free and quota-free market access to the EU market. It gives cover to ACP
exporters as these countries are in the process of negotiating the Economic
Partnership Agreements (EPAs) with Europe. The EPAs are effectively free trade
agreements.
Global sourcing.
As part of the EU - Pacific EPA (initialled by Papua New Guinea (PNG) and Fiji in 2007,
then signed in 2009, but ratified and applied by PNG only), a special derogation to
the standard Rules of Origin (RoO) for processed fish was negotiated. This
derogation, often referred to as ‘global sourcing’, permits Pacific ACP countries
(PACPs) to source raw material from any vessel regardless of flag or where it was
caught, provided it has been ‘substantially transformed’ by a PACP-based
processing facility into canned tuna or frozen cooked loins.
This was a one-off and specific exception offered exclusively to PACPs because of
their geographical isolation and distance from the EU market. In addition, there was
consideration of the limited fishing capacity of PACP fishing fleets which resulted in a
lack of RoO compliant fish under the previous RoO, reduced processing capability
due to physical and economic factors as well as a low identified risk of destabilising
the EU market.
Opportunities in Market Access
       High value low volume goods
       Certified organic products
       Certified Fairtrade products
       Other niche market products
       Create specialized demands and build networks of consumers
       Requirements to capitalise on opportunities in EU markets
       Remove NTBs (Non Tariff Barriers to Trade)
       Remove residual tariffs
       Effective trade facilitation measures
       Simplified and effective measures to compensate erosion of preferences
       Simplify trade rules
       The Pacific must say no to WTO+ demands: this is totally unfair and undermines
        the development dimension of the Cotonou Agreement
       Regionalize concessions offered to other ACP regions
       Requirements in PACPS to capitalise on opportunities
       Technical Assistance in creating an enabling environment for PSD (private
        sector development)


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         Effective use of AfT (Aid for Trade) for trade structures and facilities, other
          supply-side constraints
         Reduce costs of doing business in PACP through reforms, training, technology
         Special line of microfinance, micro insurance for SMEs in special export lines
         Increased allocation of the EDF to Pacific economies, including but not limited
          to FACT (Facilitating Agricultural. Commodity Trade)/ IACT (Increasing
          Agricultural Commodity Trade) , CDE, CTA, BizClim
         Build value add, servicing and regulatory industries out of global sourcing
         R&D in industries
         Increased PPP investment in infrastructures to reduce costs of doing business
         Venture capital for new green industries
         Greening of plantation industries linked to special market access, e.g. RSPO
         Increased EDF in REI to strengthen and deepen Pacific Regionalism for a
          Future Pacific
         Includes managing sub-regionalism to consolidate Pacific Regionalism
         The critical consideration is not the quantity of capacity building but rather
          that Pacific engagement in Europe will increase with a growing Pacific
          regional economy. Economic growth must be a key indicator of success for
          private sector development.
         Reaching out to Europe and the Future of Pacific Relations
         ACP-EU future is uncertain come 2020
         Regionalism may prevail over multilateralism
         PACP-Asia relations can flourish
         PACP-EU can acquire new strategic importance
         Pacific (PIC)-EU relations?
         Pacific can offer features of critical global interests/concerns
         Fisheries resources
         Stewardship of the biggest ocean
         Mitigation and adaptation of climate change
         Undersea mining
         Undersea volcanoes and tectonic plates
         Opportunities exist. Now is the time to build Pacific (PIC)-EU relations!!

4.3       Panel Discussion

One participant expressed concern about access to Europe. Regionalism is another
concern and offers preferences to Fiji over and above other PACPS.
European institutions have time-consuming rules and procedures that are not
conducive to the private sector.
EBCAM congratulated Mr. Tavola on his presentation: it touched on the right points
and needs to be incorporated within the record. Mr. Matos Rosa strongly advised
the Pacific to be prepared for changes in the future. Europe too now needs aid for
trade. But the Pacific also needs to organise itself in a way that the business forum
can be self-funding and prepared to take responsibility: the EU will not always be

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there to support the Pacific financially. It is essential that intermediary organisations
learn to be productive now. For this to happen, intermediaries can no longer rely on
technical assistance alone. They need to engage. They need to take charge.
EBCAM is at the ready to help PIPSO become an effective voice for the private
sector in the Pacific.
Participants agreed that the Forum needs to organise itself so that the private sector
can respond to future challenges. The need for change agents was discussed.
There was a widely held view that regional intermediary organisations that are
supporting SME’s should be more concerned with the smaller questions that affect
businesses on a daily basis rather than promoting a broader political agenda.
The Participants agreed that one of the key lessons is to have a second follow up
Forum with more participation from the private sector and government. Next time,
regional intermediate organisations supporting the private sector ought to be
involved in the planning and structure of the Forum. They ought to play a full part in
engaging the private sector. Mr. Khan, Chairman of PIPSO, acknowledged the
requests from the private sector.
The participants agreed that the Business Forum ought to focus on three or four key
themes of relevance to the private sector.
Participants also endorsed the presentation delivered by Mr. Piñol.
One delegate proposed that the Forum ask the EU through the ACP-EU Joint
Ministerial Council to launch a regional project to address EU restrictions with respect
to drying equipment and mechanisms for farmers. Such a project would impact
hugely on product quality and value and infrastructure patterns because product
could then be properly stored.
Perhaps the lesson from kava restrictions is that the Pacific is not able to protect itself
from trade barriers and should perhaps look for other markets.

5.     South Pacific Engagement in Europe and the Future of the Pacific – EU Forum II

Mr. Khan, Chairman of PIPSO chaired the modules that led to the development of a
consolidated statement of Pacific – EU private sector intent. The participants
structured into three groups to discuss the nature of South Pacific engagement in
Europe and the Future of the Pacific. Continuing to work in breakout groups, each
group prepared a statement to be presented to the ACP-EU Joint Ministerial Council.
A rapporteur from each group then presented the outcomes, which were
consolidated in plenary into a statement to be presented to the ACP-EU Joint
Ministerial Council.

5.1    Pacific – EU Private Sector Statement – Group Outcomes

The agenda of ensuing plenary session was to receive the reports on the breakout
sessions. There were three (3) reports submitted by the moderators of the breakout
sessions:
These reports are provided below.




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5.2       Group 1

Requirements
Mapping and Structuring of local/national private sector association using EU
resources
Establishment of a Regional competent authority using PIPSO and reinforcing of its
capacities.
Strengthening of the private sector growth at both national and regional level on
industry identification, technology transfer and development
Setup of a national business forum in each country incorporating all the business
organizations where common problems are addressed and transmitted to the
authorities with the assistance of CDE. EBCAM is available to provide experience
and expertise from its members.
PIPSO to provide the technical assistance for the setup of these business forum
EU to provide advice and support in relations to investment and policies under the
clean development mechanisms including carbon finance strategy
The next forum to be hosted in Europe with a good representation from the Private
Sector EU-PACIFIC.
Sectoral Recommendations
Clear understanding of supply and demand within the Pacific
One stop shop per country and transparent fast track process for corporate
registration ,licensing and permitting
Consideration of fiscal initiatives (Tax holidays, fiscal incentives) in the Private Sector
Development strategy of each country
Single point of contact in each country for renewable energy and climate change
initiatives.

5.3       Group 2

Key considerations for the ACP ministers from the Private Sector
         Main themes
         Market Access
         Replication of “Africa’s Investment Monitoring Platform” to make a “Pacific
          Investment Monitoring Platform” (UNIDO to work with PIPSO)
         (Online platform for Business-to-Business networking and information sharing.
          Also for the various aid/development agencies to have information available
          on this platform.)
         Promote Joint ventures
         Support for Trade Promotion (Fairs, Missions, match-making and business
          development)
         Seek to encourage further dialogue on the lifting of the kava ban amongst
          our political leaders.


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         Access to Capital/Finance
         Rural microfinance/micro insurance schemes
         Capacity building for Dev Banks to assess the risk of bankable export
          propositions
         Support for development and commercial banks with a further focus on rural
          areas (and support for existing schemes)
         Accessible finance for Small & Medium Enterprises with Export capacity.
         Value addition
         Support for Agro-processing and any value added chain processes.
         Support for establishment of a regional quality infrastructure (Metrology,
          Certification, Accreditation) e.g. ISO/IEC,HAACP.
         Targeted support for SME with export capacity to upgrade to meet
          international market/consumer requirements.
         Technical know-how transfer
         Provide support for technology transfer Export oriented enterprises (training,
          expertise in specific areas)
         Establishment of a UNIDO office in the pacific.
         Energy for productive uses
         Creation of Regional Centre for the promotion of renewable energies for
          energy efficiency similar to the ECREEE: ECOWAS Centre for Renewable
          Energy and Energy Efficiency model
         Promote regulations, policy directions for renewable energy.
         National energy access and energy efficiency action plans.

5.4       Group 3

         The European Partnership Agreement (EPA) negotiations need to continue
          between the EU and the Pacific in order to finalise a lasting and constructive
          deal.
         Acknowledge that under the principle of aid for trade, 25% of funding under
          EPA should be set aside for the private sector to facilitate trade and
          investment.
         Reform the European Development Fund’s 15% reserve for Non State Actors
          (NSA) in order to ensure that at least 5% is set aside for private sector activities.
         In order to ensure the effective dispersal of the European Investment Bank’s
          funds are set aside for private sector investment, this should be handled
          through at least two banks and preferably more in order to ensure
          competitive rates.
         Ensure that European development activities use local private sector
          stakeholders as intermediaries where possible as an alternative of going
          through government actors.
         Ensure that infrastructure is made available to ensure that market compliance
          with sanitary and phyto-sanitary and technical standards are assessed and


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           assured in a commodity’s country of origin to ensure efficient and long-term
           trade with Pacific countries.
          Provide assistance for a mutual insurance fund that would cover the entire
           Pacific region in order to ensure security for SMEs.
          Recognise that the delegates of the EU-Pacific Business Forum support efforts
           to create a regional green economy in the Pacific and ensure that this be
           communicated by EU and ACP Ministerial stakeholders at the Rio +20
           conference.
          Establish mechanisms in current EU and ACP development tools that set aside
           resources for the development of a green economy.

5.5        South Pacific Tourism Organisation

The South Pacific Tourism Organisation also prepared a specific statement for
consideration as detailed below.

              SPTO Statement to the Pacific – EU Business Forum, 12 June 2012


The South Pacific Tourism Organisation requests that the ACP-EU Business Forum
Statement to the ACP-EU Joint Ministerial Council takes into account the following
considerations:
      1. The request to have trade in services be an integral part of this business Forum
         in the future, this is to say, identify investment and development opportunities
         in the Pacific’s Tourism Sector.
      2. The South Pacific Tourism Organisation is happy to discuss the potential of the
         inclusion of tourism products in the planned trade expo in 2013 in Europe.
      3. The Issue of Airline Carbon emissions
      4. Invitation to Pacific Trade partners to consider participation at the upcoming
         South Pacific Promotion during the London Summer Olympics.
Vinaka
Petero Manufolau
South Pacific Tourism Organisation
Suva, Fiji
Membership – 200 private sector members
The SPTO is interested in participating in future forums at an organizational and
executive level.

6.         Pacific – EU Private Sector Statement – Consolidated Outcome

The Statement approved by the Pacific – EU Business Forum is incorporated below.
(Please do not alter).

           Private Sector Statement of the 1st Pacific-EU Business Forum 2012
(to be presented to the ACP EU Ministerial Council, 14 June 2012)

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A first ever Pacific-EU Business Forum took place on 11-12 June 2012 in Port Vila, Vanuatu.
As participants of the Pacific EU Business Forum, we reaffirm our commitment to bring
together entrepreneurs, investors and policymakers to explore and create conditions for
enhanced trade and investment between Europe and the Pacific regions and to create
conditions for sustainable economic development and growth in the Pacific region.
We firmly believe that a comprehensive win-win partnership between the Pacific Region and
the European Union can deliver the policies, infrastructure and access to finance that is
needed to harness the Pacific region’s considerable economic resources and bring growth
to its private sector. The Forum has made detailed recommendations in key relevant areas of
private sector development that will be disseminated and advocated through appropriate
channels, notably through PIPSO.
We hereby propose the following:
In strengthening private sector growth in the Pacific at national and regional level, we call for
greater emphasis to be placed on industry, technology transfer, capacity building and
economic growth.
Noting requirements for strengthening of export development and microfinance in remote
and rural areas, and in order to ensure the effective dispersal of the European Investment
Bank’s funds for private sector investment, we request the establishment of a Regional
Development Bank in the Pacific.
We encourage the continuation of negotiations on a European Partnership Agreement (EPA)
and emphasise the need for development and technical assistance to upgrade businesses
capabilities and improve access of products to EU Markets to be included.
We propose that the European Development Fund’s 15% reserve for Non State Actors (NSA) is
reformed in order to ensure that a minimum allocation is set aside for private sector activities.
In seeking to ensure efficient and long-term trade between Europe and the Pacific countries,
support should be provided to quality infrastructure in order to ensure compliance with
standards (including sanitary and Phytosanitary measures and removal of technical barriers
to trade).
Noting the economic importance of kava for the Pacific Region, we encourage further
dialogue within the EU-ACP Joint Ministerial Council on the lifting of the kava ban.
In recognising that the delegates of the EU-Pacific Business Forum support efforts to create a
green economy in the Pacific region, we seek to ensure that this be communicated by EU
ACP Ministerial stakeholders at the Rio +20 Conference.
In supporting efforts to create a regional green economy in the Pacific we encourage
European support in relation to investment in the Pacific under the Clean Development
Mechanism (including carbon finance strategies)
Recognising UNIDO’s expertise, we recommend the establishment of a United Nations
Industrial Development Organisation (UNIDO) office in the Pacific.
Finally, in view of the widespread support for this Forum, we invite EU/ACP Ministers to provide
their support for a second Forum to be hosted in Europe i[n 2013.
Pacific-EU Business Forum
12 June 2012


7.     Closing




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In closing, His Excellency Joy Ambassador to the European Union and the Kingdom
of Belgium, expressed gratitude to Bizclim for supporting the Forum and to
AGORA’2000 for implementing the Forum.
His Excellency Joy congratulated the participants on developing a comprehensive
statement that will now be presented to the 37th session of the ACP-EU Council of
Ministers – the highest decision-making body of the ACP-EU partnership – which is to
be held on the 14th and 15th of June.
Included on the agenda are ACP declarations on specific products such as cotton
and sugar ,the Economic Partnership Agreements (EPAs), preparations for the United
Nations Rio+20 conference in Brazil, and a performance review of the 10th European
Development Fund (EDF) cycle, which finances development programmes in
African, Caribbean and Pacific countries from 2008 to 2013.The Joint Council will also
take a decision on the accession of South Sudan to the ACP-EU Partnership
Agreement, which would take ACP Group membership up to 80 countries.
His Excellency voiced interest in the Business Forum taking on a more permanent and
influential role in Pacific – EU relations. Ambassador Joy acknowledged the role of
Mr. Khan, Chairman PIPSO and Mr. Alilee, Director General, Ministry of Trade,
Commerce, Industry, Tourism, Investment and Business Development, Republic of
Vanuatu, as Co-Chairs of the first Pacific – EU Business Forum; and encouraged PIPSO
to take the lead in positioning the private sector throughout the region.
Opportunities also exist for the private sector to engage in the EU-Caribbean Business
Forum to take place in London as a co-event on the margins of the upcoming
Olympic games in London. At the same time, the South Pacific Tourism Organisation
will be launching a comprehensive promotional event at St. Katherine’s Docks.
Some representatives from the private sector could be selected to participate in
these events.
The Pacific is divided. It needs a stronger voice in ACP politics. Likewise, there is a
role for the private sector. The private sector is the engine of Pacific economic
growth.
A Press Conference and media interviews followed the Closing Ceremony.
The forum concluded with a cocktail, dinner and business networking opportunity.




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 I.        ANNEXES

 Workshop Programme

Monday 11 June 2012
Day 1 – Pacific – EU Business

Time            Agenda Item

08H00-
                Registration of Participants
09H00

09H00-          Opening Addresses and Introduction to the Forum
09H30           Welcome – Forum Chair
                Honourable Ham Lini Vanuaroroa; Deputy Prime Minister of the Republic of
                Vanuatu and Minister of Trade, Commerce, Industry, Tourism, Investment and
                Business Development
                Mr. Hafiz Khan, Chairman, PIPSO

09H30-          Tea/Coffee/Comfort Break
10H00           Official photos

10H00-          Panel 1. Overview of the Pacific – EU Business Forum
10H30           Origin of the Forum, Objectives, Programme Overview and Potential Outcomes
                Mr. Marokon Alilee – Director General, Republic of Vanuatu, Ministry of Trade,
                Commerce, Industry, Tourism, Investment and Business Development


                Pacific Overview – Challenges and Opportunities
                Ms. Andie Fong Toy; Deputy Secretary General (Economic Governance &
                Security); Pacific Islands Forum Secretariat


                Panel Discussion

10H30-          Panel 2. Opportunities for Private Sector Development
11H45           CTA Support to the Private Sector in the Pacific Region
                Ms. Isolina Boto, Head, Technical Centre for Agricultural and Rural Cooperation
                (CTA), Brussels Office
                Centre for the Development of Enterprise (CDE) - Private Sector Assistance
                Mr. Jean-Pierre Mathey, Head of Regional Field Office for the Pacific
                Access to Rural Finance
                Mr. John A. Aruhuri, Head of Rural Banking, National Bank of Vanuatu (NBV)


                Panel Discussion


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Monday 11 June 2012
Day 1 – Pacific – EU Business

11H45-          Panel 3. Sectoral Opportunities for Private Sector Development
13H00           Fisheries
                Mr Peter Philipson, Pacific Islands Forum Fisheries Agency, FFA.
                Kava and other Commodities from the Pacific
                Mr. Edward Lotasiano Wilson, Chairman-International Kava Executive Council
                Tourism: Marketing and Developing Tourism in the Pacific
                Mr. Petero Manufolau, South Pacific Tourism Organisation
                Tourism, Rural Development and Poverty Reduction
                Mr. George Borugu, Director, Department of Tourism Vanuatu
                Panel Discussion

13H00-
                Lunch
14H00

14H00-          Panel 4. Renewable Energy, Environment and Climate
14H45           Renewable Energy, Environment and Climate Issues for the Pacific
                Ms. Teresa Thorp; Team Leader, AGORA' 2000
                Promotion of Energy Security in Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands and
                Vanuatu
                Mr. Stuart King, Economics Consultant, Equinoccio
                UNIDO Energizing the Private Sector in the Pacific
                Mr. Florian Peter Iwinjak, Programme and Liaison Officer, UNIDO
                Panel Discussion

14H45-          Tea/Coffee/Comfort Break
15H00

15H00-          Panel Discussion: Implementation Proposals
16H00           The purpose of this session to for participants to develop concrete business
                proposals. Discussion in plenary.

16H00-          Experiences from Other Business Forums
16H30

16H30-          Round-Up Session
17H00           Discussion. Questions and Answers.

17H00-
                Cocktail : Business Networking Opportunity
19H00


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Tuesday 12 June 2012
Day 2 – Modalities for Implementation

Time           Agenda Item

08H30-         Opening and Welcome to Day 2
08H45          Mr Robert De Raeve, Chargé d' Affaires of the Delegation of the European Union
               to Vanuatu.

               Summary of Day 1 – Forum Chair
08H45-
               Statement from EBCAM
09H00
               Mr. Fernando Matos Rosa, Secretary General, EBCAM

               Investments and Partnerships
               European Investment Bank - Activities in the Pacific Region
09H00-
               Mr. Jean-Philippe de Jong, Head of the EIB Pacific Regional Office
09H30
               An Integrated Business / ODA Perspective
               Mr. Oliver Clark, Economic Consultant

09H30-         One to One Business Meetings
10H00

10H00-         Tea/Coffee/Comfort Break
10H30

10H30-         South Pacific Engagement in Europe and the Future of the Pacific – EU Forum I
10H45          What do Private Companies Need to do to Improve Collaboration?
               Mr. Selim El-Gheriani Piñol, Director of the Foreign Trade Department, Official
               Chamber of Commerce, Industry and Navigation of Santa Cruz de Tenerife.

10H45-         EPA Opportunities in Europe, Market Access, Trade Facilitation
11H00          Mr. Kaliopate Tavola, Fiji's former Ambassador to the EU

11H00-         South Pacific Engagement in Europe and the Future of the Pacific – EU Forum II
12H30          The purpose of this session is for participants to discuss the way forward
               Example topics:
               Business mobility, Business Expo in Europe,
               Future of the Pacific – EU Business Forum
               Institutional and Relational Structures
               Pacific-EU Business Forum Media Tools – logo, website
               Organisation Committee to Launch Trade Pasifika in Europe.
               Structure: Group Discussions with a presentation from the participants at the end

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12H30-         Lunch
13H30

Tuesday 12 June 2012
Day 2 – Modalities for Implementation

13H30-         Pacific – EU Private Sector Statement I
15H00          The objective of this session will be for participants to prepare a statement to be
               presented to the ACP-EU Joint Ministerial Council
               Optional content: Recommendations, Way Forward and Roadmap
               Structure: Group Work

15H00-         Tea/Coffee/Comfort Break
15H15

15H15-         Pacific – EU Private Sector Statement II
16H15          Structure: Each Group will present their proposals to plenary and a collective
               decision will be made as to the final Statement
               The Statement to be presented to the Council of Ministers will be drafted.

16H15-         Assessment Survey and Feedback
16H45

16H45-         Going Forward
17H00          Final remarks from dignitaries and the organisers

17H00-         Closing Ceremony followed by a Press Conference
18H00

18H00
               Cocktail/Dinner : Business Networking Opportunity
21H00




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  Speakers Bios



                      Ms. Andie Fong Toy
                      Deputy Secretary General (Economic Governance & Security)
                      Pacific Islands Forum Secretariat
                      Ms. Fong Toy's extensive experience incorporates research on
                      Pacific legal issues and working in a civil society organisation in
                      New Zealand and experience in election observation missions,
                      encapsulating vast knowledge and understanding of regional
                      and international issues.
                      Ms. Fong Toy served as Director for the Forum Secretariat's
Political Governance and Security Programme until 2008. Prior to her appointment as
Director she also served the Secretariat as International Legal Adviser and Legal &
Political Officer.
Ms. Fong Toy holds a Bachelor of Laws from the Victoria University in New Zealand and
Masters in International Relations from Deakin University, Australia.

                        Ms. Isolina Boto
                        Head, Technical Centre for            Agricultural   and   Rural
                        Cooperation (CTA), Brussels Office
                        Isolina Boto is the Head of the CTA Brussels Office since 2004.
                        She was previously at headquarters (Wageningen, the
                        Netherlands) in charge of technical interventions in the areas
                        of agriculture and rural development (ARD) in ACP regions.
                         Her current work in Brussels focuses on the ACP-EU policies of
relevance to CTA’s work on food policies, value chains and ICTs. She works closely with
the EC, the ACP Group and the development community in Brussels to have
agriculture and food security high in the policy agenda through various key
interventions such as high-level policy dialogues. She works with the ACP-EU Joint
Parliamentary Assembly in providing input to the resolutions on ARD. She develops
strategic financial and technical partnerships in the areas of work of CTA with major
leading groups in food policies.
She has 25 years of experience in development related issues, especially in the context
of the ACP-EU relations. She has studies economics and philology and enjoys arts,
music and reading.

                        Mr. Jean-Pierre Mathey
                        Head of Regional Field Office for the Pacific, CDE


                          Jean-Pierre Mathey is currently the Head of the Pacific
                          Regional Field Office since 2011 where he manage the CDE
                          network in the region, acquire a clear understanding of the
                          local situation and enable the Centre to deliver a service
                          adapted to local private sector needs. He is providing
technical assistance to Intermediary Organisations and the Private Sector in the Pacific
and participating to numerous conferences and seminars on the Private Sector

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Development and Business Development Services.
Degree in Business Economics and Master in Information Systems.

                     Mr. John A. Aruhuri, Head of Rural Banking, National Bank of
                     Vanuatu (NBV)




                              Mr Peter Philipson, Pacific Islands Forum Fisheries
                              Agency, FFA.
                              Peter, an accountant by profession, has worked for the
                              last thirty years in various commercial and advisory roles
                              in the fisheries sector in a number of developing and
                              industrialised countries, but particularly in the Pacific
                              Islands region. He began his career in the sector as
                              Corporate Planning Manager at Sealord Products Ltd.
                              in Nelson, New Zealand.
He has obtained extensive experience in commercial, financial and economic
management, evaluation, and implementation at the project level, including extensive
work with Pacific regional private sector enterprises while employed as Fisheries
Specialist by the World Bank Group Pacific Enterprise Development Facility in Sydney,
Australia, 1993 - 2005.
Peter served as Project Economist at the Forum Fisheries Agency during the period 1985
– 1989, and has now resumed work there as the Manager, Regional Economic
Integration in Tuna Fisheries.

                  Mr. Edward Lotasiano        Wilson,   Chairman-International     Kava
                  Executive Council
                  Eddie Lotasiano     Wilson-Chairman-International    Kava   Executive
                  Council
                  President-Samoa Association of Manufacturers & Exporters 1996 to
                  2010
Managing Director-Wilex Samoa Group
Expertise: Agro-Processing and Export Marketing Development for over 25 Years
Websites: www.ikec.org
           www.wilexsamoa.net
           www.same.ws
Qualifications: Graduate in Commerce-Majors in Accounting, Economics & Law-
University of Canberra. Australia.




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                     Mr. Petero Manufolau, South Pacific Tourism Organisation
                     Petero Manufolau has 13 years of experience in the tourism sector
                     in the area of Airline operations and hotel and destinational
                     marketing.
                      As Marketing Manager of the South Pacific Tourism Organisation
                      (SPTO), Petero is responsible for the effective marketing and
                      promotion of SPTO’s 14 tourism destinations with a special interest
                      in Aviation, Cruising and tourism SME development in the region.
                      His portfolio includes the planning and coordination of SPTO’s and
the Pacific Islands’ participation at key international trade shows, especially in the long
haul markets of UK/Europe, USA and Asia.
Prior to joining the South Pacific Tourism Organisation in October 2011, he worked at the
Shangri-La's Fijian Resort then the Warwick Fiji Resort & Spa where he was largely
responsible for Sales and Marketing. In both roles, he was directly involved in the
planning, coordination, and execution of promotional activities of these resorts which
included the soliciting of businesses from their traditional short haul markets, the long
haul North American and European markets and as well as the emerging markets
including China and India.
Petero was also a member of Fiji's Conferences and Incentive Action Group (CIAG)
which was responsible for the drafting and implementing Fiji's first MICE market
marketing and promotional strategies.
He holds a B.A. Degree in Management and Public Administration from the University of
the South Pacific where he is currently pursuing a Master of Arts Degree in Diplomacy
and International Relations.

                    Ms. Teresa Thorp; Team Leader, AGORA' 2000 is the company
                    responsible for delivering the First Pacific – EU Business Forum
                     Jurist by profession, Teresa is a researcher in environmental law at
                     Utrecht    University   (Centre     for  Environmental     Law     and
                     Policy/Netherlands Institute for the Law of the Sea). She is a Director
                     of the NGO InsightInt, which predominantly offers pro bono services
                     in trade, environmental law and sustainable development to the
                     ACP Group. Teresa has worked throughout the South Pacific for
more than 20 years and has been a trade and investment legal advisor within the EAC,
COMESA and SADC Secretariats and Chief Technical Advisor to the Government of
Zanzibar. In the private sector, Teresa has led corporate finance transaction teams and
chaired a number of executive committees, including, corporate social responsibility
committees. She has been Manager of Strategy (Vodafone), Head of Global
Programmes (BT) and a Vice President and Worldwide Manager of UNISYS. Teresa has
degrees in engineering (telecommunications), business (executive MBA, Duke),
economics and law (New Zealand, London and Paris). She is a member of the
International Bar Association, International Law Association, Honourable Society of
Gray’s Inn and Amnesty.

                      Mr. Stuart King, Economics Consultant, Equinoccio
                      Stuart King has twenty-three years experience working as a
                      business strategy specialist and economist. Much of this time has
                      been spent advising companies and governments active in the
                      infrastructure sector where he has advised extensively, in both
                      developed and developing countries, on regulation, financing,
                      restructuring and PSP initiatives as well as proposals for enhancing

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operational performance. This breadth of experience incorporates the following key
areas of capability and knowledge:
Developing investment plans and associated financing initiatives for infrastructure
development.
Helping reform and develop the institutional framework governing electricity and water
sector operations, including the establishment of regulation authorities.
Assisting with privatisation and other forms of private sector participation (PSP) initiatives
on behalf of both government and utility clients.
Reviewing and assessing the operational performance of utilities either as part of a
business strategy development process or as part of a tariff design and implementation
exercise.

                  Mr. Florian Peter Iwinjak, Programme and Liaison Officer, UNIDO
                     Florian Peter Iwinjak has been working for the United Nations Industrial
                     Development Organization (UNIDO) for almost two years. As a
                     programme and liaison officer in Brussels he advocates for UNIDO’s
                     expertise, provides policy advice and monitors EU funded UNIDO
                     programmes. Moreover, he liaises and coordinates with key partners
                     such as the United Nations Brussels Team, the EU institutions or the ACP
                     secretariat. He started his career with the United Nations as a
                     programme and research assistant at the UNDP’s Bureau for Crisis
Prevention and Recovery (BCPR) in Geneva focusing on mainstreaming Disaster Risk
Reduction into development planning. Prior to that, he worked in commercial
management departments of Robert Bosch (automotive industry) in Spain and
Oerlikon-Schlafhorst (textile industry) in China. Furthermore he was conducting strategic
market research and consulting of Austrian exporters in the Austrian Trade Commission
in Brazil. Finally, he also volunteered with civil society in Kenya and for many years with
the Red Cross in Austria. Academic background: Florian holds three master degrees
from universities in Austria, in Export-Oriented Management, in International
Development Studies and Political Sciences. His scientific research work concentrated
on the obstacles to sustainable development in Latin America, climate change and
energy in the EU development cooperation as well as climate change and vulnerability
in Africa. He has studied 11 languages and is fluent in German, English, Spanish, Italian,
Portuguese and French.

                    Mr. Frank Pool, Consultant, Bizclim
                      Frank Pool is a Mechanical Engineer and a Fellow of the Institution of
                      Professional Engineers New Zealand. Frank has 34 years international
                      experience in the applied research, policy development, technical
                      management, project design, project management and evaluation
                      of clean energy and climate change mitigation policies, programs
                      and projects. Frank has worked on clean energy and climate
                      change mitigation projects for nearly 40 countries for clients
including ADB, APEC, EC, UNDP, UNIDO and SDTC (Canada). Until 2001 Frank was the
New Zealand government’s chief clean energy policy, technical and research advisor;
Chairman of the APEC Expert Group on Energy Efficiency and Conservation; and New
Zealand’s Representative at the Australia and New Zealand Minerals and Energy
Council’s Energy Management Task Force. Recently Frank has worked as: Energy
Engineer, Carbon Market Initiative at ADB; Principal Consultant, Sustainable Energy, at
Parsons Brinkerhoff; and as Sustainable Energy Development Specialist at ADB. From
July 2012 Frank will be working as Chief Technical Advisor of the UNDP-UNIDO GEF
Turkish Industrial Energy Efficiency project. Frank’s research background is in the actual

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energy performance of buildings. Frank has authored or co-authored 27 peer-refereed
papers, over 40 reports, and the academic book “Energy Performance of Buildings”
published in the USA.

                   Mr. Jean-Philippe de Jong, Head Of Pacific Regional Office,
                   European Investment Bank
                   Jean-Philippe de Jong, a Dutch national, is a graduate of the
                   Nijenrode University in Breukelen, the Netherlands, with a Master
                   Degree of Business Administration. Jean-Philippe has had 5 years of
                   commercial banking experience with Crédit Lyonnais, a major
                   French bank, and 25 years with the Luxembourg-based European
                   Investment Bank for which he still works today.
With this last employer, Jean-Philippe has been working in various geographical
operational divisions covering the financing of EIB operations in ACP countries under
successive mandates. While he has covered in the past the Caribbean and West-
African regions, Jean-Philippe has been managing EIB's Regional Office for the Pacific
since 2007. The Sydney-based office covers the 19 countries and territories of the Pacific
region under the Investment Facility, a € 2.2 billion risk-bearing revolving fund,
established to promote the development of the private sector and commercially-run
enterprises in the ACP countries.

                   Mr. Oliver Clark, Economic Consultant
                   Oliver Clark has been active as a Development economist and
                   management expert for 25 years, working as an independent expert
                   in the framework of Bilateral aid, World Bank, EU and USAID
                   assignments, as well as for private companies and NGOs.
               His extensive fieldwork in project design, implementation,
               management and audit has given him the capacity to understand
               the specific requirements of Development projects, and to offer
concrete management support and expertise in a wide variety of circumstances.
Over the course of missions to over 40 countries, he has worked efficiently with Private
Sector multinationals and SMEs, supplying pragmatic know-how and strategic
management expertise to industrial and administrative organisations, both private and
public.
Mr Clark has acquired a high level of know-how and expertise in the field of Innovative
Development Instruments (IDIs), in the conception of Development Tools using Private
Sector & Trade as well as in PPPs applied to Development. In the scope of his
responsibilities, he has also carried out hundreds of management training seminars for
senior executives and high-level civil servants, and is frequently asked to speak in high-
level public fora on the topics above. He works fluently in English, French, Spanish and
Italian.

                    Mr. Selim El-Gheriani Piñol, Director of the Foreign Trade
                    Department, Official Chamber of Commerce, Industry and
                    Navigation of Santa Cruz de Tenerife.
                    Expérience de Travail :
                    2000 - 2004: Technicien du Département de Commerce Extérieur
                    de la Chambre de Commerce de Santa Cruz de Tenerife
                 Depuis 2005: Directeur du Département de Commerce Extérieur de
la Chambre de Commerce de Santa Cruz de Tenerife.

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2006-2008: Collaborateur dans les Cours PUDE de l’Université de La Laguna.
2008-2011: Professeur au Master de Direction de Commerce International de l’Université
de La Laguna.
Formation: Technicien Supérieur de Commerce International.

                         Mr. Kaliopate Tavola, Fiji's former Ambassador to the EU
                         Kaliopate Tavola worked for 11 years as a civil servant in the
                         Ministry of Agriculture Fisheries and Forests, rising to the rank of
                         Chief Economist. He joined Fiji Sugar Marketing Co Ltd, and
                         represented that company for 4 years in London and continued
                         to do company work in Brussels for 3 years.


                          During that period, he was also a diplomat, firstly as a
                          Commercial Counsellor in London and as Head of Mission in
Brussels. He worked for 10 years altogether in Brussels, representing Fiji to the EU, Belgium,
France, Luxembourg, Spain, Portugal, The Netherlands, Greece and Italy. He was also
Fiji’s Representative to FAO, GATT/WTO, UNESCO, OPCW, WCO, IFAD, MFO and PCA.


He returned to Fiji after 14 years and re-joined FSM Co Ltd as its Deputy Chief Executive,
before he went into politics as Minister for Foreign Affairs & External Trade from 2000 to
late 2006. Currently, he operates as a consultant.




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