ANNEX A by 1Q9uOIA

VIEWS: 7 PAGES: 20

									                   UNITED NATIONS DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME
                        GLOBAL ENVIRONMENT FACILITY


                     PROPOSAL FOR FUNDING FOR THE PREPARATION OF
                 A NATIONAL ADAPTATION PROGRAMME OF ACTION (NAPA)




Country Name:                   MALAWI

Project title:                  National Adaptation Programme of Action (NAPA) for
                                Malawi

GEF Implementing Agency:        UNDP

GEF operational focal point:    R.P. Kabwaza, Director of Environmental Affairs

Climate change focal point:     R.P. Kabwaza, Director of Environmental Affairs

National executing agency:      Environmental Affairs Department, Ministry of Natural
                                Resources and Environmental Affairs

Country eligibility:

       (i) LDC status:          Malawi is listed as an LDC

       (ii) Date of UNFCCC
       ratification:            24th April 1994

GEF financing:                  US$ 200,000

Government contribution:        US$ 10,000 in kind

Estimated total budget:         US$ 200,000

Estimated starting date:        May 2003

Duration:                       18 Months
Introduction

Malawi has developed this proposal for a National Adaptation Programme of Action (NAPA) 1 in line
with Decision 28/CP7 of the Conference of Parties (COP) of the United Nations Framework Convention
on Climate Change (UNFCCC). As a Least Developing Country (LDC), Malawi has a low adaptive
capacity, hence needing immediate and urgent support for adapting to climate change.

The Malawian NAPA, as the end-product of this project, will specify a list of priority activities based on a
set of criteria. The criteria provided in the NAPA guidelines will be used to formulate Malawi’s NAPA.
While the NAPA is not an end in itself, it provides a communication channel for a programme of action
for responding to adaptation needs. Delay in the implementation of the NAPA will lead to increased
vulnerability of the country to climate change resulting in further socio-economic hardships. Once
completed, Malawi’s NAPA will be presented to multilateral, bilateral donors and national funding
sources, as appropriate.

During the preparation process of this NAPA proposal of most the following material and issues have
been considered: (1) national development strategies, environmental action plans, Agenda 21, poverty
reduction strategies, disaster preparedness and emergency response plans as well as development
assistance frameworks, and sectoral plans; (2) synergies among multilateral environmental agreements in
the following areas: institutional (e.g. intergovernmental, national, and local planning committees), cross-
sectoral linkages (e.g. emergency preparedness and responses strategies, water shed management,
agricultural practices, natural resource management), reporting and data requirements; (3) research and
education programmes; (4) national and international financing processes; (5) and a preliminary
assessment of barriers to adaptation.

The review of these and other relevant materials will continue during the implementation of the project.

1. BACKGROUND

Malawi has a total area of 11.8 million hectares of which 80% is land. The remainder, about 2.4 million
hectares, is covered by water (lakes, rivers and aquifers), the bulk of which is Lake Malawi, covering 2.3
million hectares. The major rivers and the three relatively small lakes of Chilwa, Malombe and Chiuta
account for the rest of the water area. The population of Malawi is estimated at 10 million people with an
average population density of 104 people per km2. Altitude varies from 50 meters above sea level in the
lower Shire River to 3000 meters on Mulanje Mountain in the south, and 2600 meters on the Nyika
Plateau in the north. The country has a wide range of relief, which is a major determinant of the climatic,
hydrological and edaphic conditions. The interactions of slope, soil, geology and climatic variables have
resulted in at least 19 distinct vegetation communities. Generally, Malawi is divided into four main
physiographic zones: highlands, plateaux, escarpment and rift valley plains. About 60% of the country
has been modified by human activity with only 36% under natural vegetation. The country lies wholly in
the tropical region between latitudes 09030’and 17030’ South and longitudes 320and 350 East. It is affected
by extreme climate events such as drought, floods, strong winds, and land slides every rainy season.
These events adversely affect food production systems resulting in famine, human health, damaged
infrastructures, and migration of the indigenous population.
1
  In this document terminology is defined as follows:
NAP process, NAPA proposal or NAPA project refers to this Enabling Activity for which GEF funding is sought.
Napa or NAPA document refers to the end product of the 18 months Enabling Activity project and is equivalent to
the Action Plan which includes the project profiles.


                                                                                                                  2
Malawi is one of the least developed countries in the world with an estimated annual per capita income of
US$2000 in 1999. The Human Development Report of 2000 by UNDP ranks Malawi as one of the lowest
in terms of the Human Development Index (HDI), at number 163 out of 173 countries in the world. The
percentage of people living below the poverty line was 65% in 1998 while 29% were under absolute
poverty. A significant proportion of the population is engaged exclusively in rain fed subsistence farming,
60% of which in the 2001/2002 season were food insecure. Female-headed households shoulder greater
burden of poverty. The poverty is due to low economic productivity of the land, labour, capital and
technology including high vulnerability to extreme climatic events with low adaptation capacity. In
addition, these are exacerbated by rapid environmental degradation, inadequate knowledge and skills in
productive use of land and natural resources, inadequate access to land, poor health status including
HIV/Aids, rapid population growth and gender inequalities.

The following are some national and sectoral plans supportive of the NAPA process:

National Vision: In 1998 Malawi launched the Vision 2020, which articulates the country’s aspiration for
sustainable economic growth and development including sustainable utilization of natural resources and
the environment. In May 2002, the government of Malawi launched the Malawi Poverty Reduction
Strategy Paper (MPRSP) for poverty reduction through socio-economic and political empowerment of the
poor. The MPRSP was developed through wide participation of a broad range of stakeholders at national
and district levels. The Strategy identifies and incorporates several cross-cutting issues relevant to the
NAPA, including environment, science and technology.

National Plans: After the Earth Summit in Rio, Brazil in 1992, Malawi launched the National
Environmental Action Plan (NEAP) in 1994 that was developed through consultations at all levels. The
NEAP is Malawi’s operational tool for implementation of Agenda 21. The NEAP identified several
environmental issues: high soil erosion, soil fertility loss, deforestation, over-fishing, loss of biodiversity,
water resource degradation and depletion, human habitat degradation, air pollution and climate change.

Malawi has participated at UN Commission on Sustainable Development (UNCSD) conferences. It was
involved in the World Summit on Sustainable Development (WSSD), where a national paper was
presented in August/September 2002. The country is in the process of compiling a second NEAP 2002,
which incorporates recommendations from the WSSD.

Policies: The National Environment Policy (1996) established the central principles of environment and
natural resource management policy. The Environment Support Programme (1998) also grew out of the
NEAP and integrates environmental concerns into the socio-economic development of the country.
Capacity development and enhancement for sustainable development is addressed in a number of sectoral
policies: for example, Wildlife, Forestry, Fisheries, Water and Land Resources, and Science and
Technology. There is a devolution process being undertaken and a National Decentralization Policy
(NDP) was approved in 1998, which established Local Authorities in 39 Assemblies. The Environmental
Affairs Department has been instrumental in developing a Decentralized Environmental Management
(DEM) Strategy, devolving Environmental Natural Resource Management (ENRM) to local authorities in
line with Vision 2020, the MPRSP, and Local Government Act. This strategy is presently supported by
the Community Based Natural Resources Management (CBNRM) that empowers communities in
sustainable natural resource management and is consistent with National Land Resources Management
Act (NLRMA) and Strategy (2000). The Forest Policy of 1996 and the Act of 1997 and the National




                                                                                                              3
Forest Program of 2000 seek to empower CBNRM through community management plans and private
sector involment in forest plantation.

Legislation: The Malawi Environmental Management Act (EMA, 1996) is the instrument through which
the National Environment Policy (NEP) is implemented. The NEAP of 1994 led to the review of several
national and sectoral policies and Acts including the Forestry (1996), Fisheries and Aquaculture (2001),
National Parks and Wildlife (2001), Energy (2001), Decentralization (1998), Land (2002), Irrigation
(2000), Water Resources and Management (1994), and Land Use and Management (1996). Other new
Acts include the Local Government Act (1998), Fisheries Conservation and Management (1997). Malawi
established the Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) Guidelines and Standards in 1994. In 2001,
sector-specific EIA Guidelines and Standards were developed in Irrigation, Waste Management,
Sanitation and Mining. The University of Malawi now offers certificate course in EIAs. Professionals
with cross-sectoral backgrounds have been trained.


2. INSTITUTIONAL CONTEXT

Malawi has initiated a number of institutional reform policies and programs to combat environmental
degradation and ensure sustainable utilization of the environment and natural resources. The Ministry of
Natural Resources and Environmental Affairs has a Strategic Plan for the period 2001-2006. Its goals
include providing guidance and direction in matters to environment and natural resources, harmonizing
implementation of environmental and natural resources policies by its departments, and representing
Malawi in environment conferences, conventions, treaties, and other forums.

The Environmental Affairs Department (EAD, 1994) is charged with promoting sustainable use and
management of environment and natural resources, strengthening the legal and institutional framework. It
also coordinates and assists line ministries and other stakeholders to integrate environmental issues into
national socio-economic policies and programs. The EAD is the Focal point for the United Nations
Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD)
and the Convention to Combat Desertification (CCD).

To ensure efficient and effective implementation, the Environment Management Act has established the
National Council for the Environment (NCE) and a technical arm, the Technical Committee on the
Environment (TCE): The NCE comprises Principal Secretaries from various government departments
and is responsible for advising the Minister of Ministry of Natural Resources and Environmental Affairs
on all matters affecting the protection and management of the environment and natural resources. The
NCE deals with activities related to climate change in general, and vulnerability and adaptation in
particular.

Issues on vulnerability and adaptation to climate change are new in the country. Experience in the issue is
therefore limited at present. The following institutions are relevant stakeholders: Agriculture, Water,
Fisheries, Meterorological Department, National Parks and Wildlife, Forestry, Energy, Ministry of
Gender, Youth and Community Service, Cabinet Committee on the Environment and National Climate
Change Committee. Other institutions include Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) and
academic institutions: Wildlife Society, CURE, World Vision, Action Aid (Malawi), University of
Malawi, Mzuzu University, National Herbarium and Botanical Gardens of Malawi.




                                                                                                         4
In 2000, the National Climate Change Committee (NCCC) was re-constituted with a mandate for all
climate change activities such as policy and programmes, Enabling Activities, and other public awareness
activities. The NCCC is chaired by the Meteorological Department of the Ministry of Transport and
Works, while the Environmental Affairs Department (EAD) in the Ministry of Natural Resources and
Environmental Affairs is the Secretariat. Other members of the NCCC are: Ministry of Agriculture and
Irrigation, Ministry of Water Development, Ministry of Economic Planning and Development,
Department of Energy, Department of Forestry, Department of National Parks and Wildlife, University of
Malawi (Bunda College of Agriculture, Chancellor College, and the Polytechnic), CURE-NGO, Malawi
Chamber of Commerce and Industry, Local City Assemblies (Blantyre and Lilongwe). The NCCC works
in liaison with the National Council on the Environment (NCE) and the Technical Committee on the
Environment (TCE).


3. OBJECTIVES, AND LINKAGES TO ONGOING ACTIVITIES

a)         Objectives of the project

The objective of this project is to develop a NAPA document consistent with Decision 28/CP.7:
“National adaptation programmes of action will serve as simplified and direct channels of
communication for information relating to the urgent and immediate adaptation needs of the LDCs.”

Specific objectives include:

              to identify list of priority activities
              to formulate priority projects for adaptation
              to build capacity to adapt to longer-term climate changes; and
              to raise awareness about the urgency to adapt to adverse effects of climate and climate
               change.

In order to achieve the above, Malawi will undertake activities driven by local stakeholders, such as
government institutions, NGOs, academia, religious groups and the private sector. The project will also
target highly vulnerable local communities throughout the country. Table 1 gives details of climate-
related adverse effects, areas and sectors affected and impacts on vulnerable communities in Malawi. The
project will target those parts of the country and systems that are most at risk to climate related adverse
effects.

Table 1: Climate Related Adverse Effects, Sectors and Impacts in Malawi (Source: Initial National Communication)

   Climate
    Related                    Area/Sector Impacted                                          Impacts
Adverse Effect
Floods            Low lying areas: Shire River Valley and Lake           Loss of life, crops, animals and human and animal
                  Malawi. In year 2001 floods affected 18 out of 27       habitats; outbreaks of pests and diseases;
                  districts in Malawi.                                    destruction of fish and wildlife habitants;
                                                                          displacement of people; and environmental
                                                                          degradation.
Droughts          Low lying areas up to mid-altitude areas (0 to         Crop failures, water scarcity, heat waves, drying of
                  1000 metres amsl). During the 1948/49 and               water reservoirs (dams, fish ponds, lake levels,
                  1991/92 intense and widespread droughts, over           rivers), famine, loss of human and animal lives, loss
                  80% of the country was affected.                        of biodiversity, environmental degradation.



                                                                                                                             5
Strong Winds     Country-wide but especially during the rainy       Loss of life from collapsing structures.
                 season from residual tropical cyclones and         Damage to structures (rural community houses,
                 tornado type wind systems.                          school blocks, hospitals, etc) due to sub-standard
                                                                     constructions.
                                                                    Destruction of crops, forest plantations & natural
                                                                     trees.
                                                                    Bush fire enhancement in the dry season.
                                                                    Upwelling especially over lake Malawi causing fish
                                                                     mortality. In 1999 outbreak of fish death occurred
                                                                     in many areas of lake Malawi.
                                                                    Loss of vessels over the lake and loss of life.
Landslides and   Over fragile mountainous systems of Shire          Loss of life. Over 500 people perished in landslides
flash floods     highlands (Zomba Mulanje and Phalombe areas).       and flash floods in Phalombe and Mulanje in 1991.
                                                                    Destruction of infrastructures (bridges, roads,
                                                                     houses).
                                                                    Loss of crops, vegetation and animals.


b)       Links to Enabling Activities (Climate Change (CC), Biodiversity (BD) and Convention to
         Combat Desertification (CCD))

Malawi received UNDP/GEF financial assistance for its Enabling Activity under the UNFCCC. The EA
started in September 1999. Components were: Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Inventory, Vulnerability and
Adaptation (V&A) Assessments, Mitigation/Abatement Analysis and finally the compilation of the Initial
(First) National Communication of Malawi to the Conference of Parties (COP). The GHG Inventory,
based on the year 1994, covered Energy, Industrial Processes, Agriculture, Land Use Change and
Forestry, and Waste Management. The V&A Assessment was undertaken in Agriculture, Water,
Fisheries, Forestry and Wildlife. The Mitigation Analysis was in the sectors of Energy, Forestry and
Agriculture. All these studies were conducted by national teams and underwent public consultations by
relevant stakeholders through workshops. The Initial National Communication underwent a participatory
and consultative process, including the TCE and NCE, and had its own editorial committee. The
Communication is being printed following governmental approval. The Communication will be submitted
soon to the UNFCCC Secretariat. There is a second phase of the initial project which will end in February
2003. The main components deal with capacity building in priority areas, such as climate change
technology transfer and needs assessment, systematic observations etc. All of these activities are finalized
through consultative processes.

Malawi also had funding from UNDP under the CCD and a National Action Plan was developed. Under
the CBD, a National Strategy and Action Plan are being implemented. Both action plans were developed
through participatory approaches and are operational. Table 2 below provides action-oriented adaptation
options from the Initial National Communication which are relevant to the NAPA.




                                                                                                                       6
       Table 2:        Initial National Communication (V&A Assessment)


            SECTOR                  SUGGESTED ADAPTATION ACTIVITIES

                                   Construction of small dams
                                   Introduction of rainfall harvesting techniques
                                   Public awareness campaigns in water conservation measures
    Water
                                   Construction of dykes and canals to re-direct/divert overflows in vulnerable townships
                                   Rehabilitate flood forecasting and warning systems
                                   Mapping of flood and drought prone areas
                                   Promote other uses of water weeds
    Fisheries                      Breed tilapias and catfish for restocking programmes
                                   Management of river barrage at Liwonde, Shire river to maintain fish habitats for breeding
                                   Develop seed bank for drought resistant species
    Forestry
                                   Promote traditional tree species
                                   Translocation techniques of wildlife
    Wildlife
                                   Provision of artificial water supplies
                                   Promotion of drought tolerant crop varieties and livestock in drought vulnerable areas
                                   Promotion of crop growing using residual moisture especially along dambos. 2
                                   Development of infrastructure for irrigated agriculture
    Agriculture
                                   Monitoring and control of migratory and seasonal pests and diseases
                                   Promotion of yield increasing technologies e.g. manure and other crop and animal husbandry
                                    practices
                                   Strengthen capacity in long-term climate forecasting
    Meteorology/Hydrology          Promote the uptake and use of meteorological information and warnings especially in disaster
                                    prone areas


Table 3:               The status of previous related activities such as NEAPs, NEMPs, NSSDs, NAPs (CCD), NBSAPs
                       (CBD), GEF funded EAs in climate change, biodiversity, biosafety, POP’s etc.

                                              Executing agency
                                                                                        Outputs relevant to
                Previous related activities      (and project           Status
                                                                                              Napa
                                                     team)
                NEAP (National                Environmental         Operational      National Environmental
                Environmental Action Plan)    Affairs                                Action Plans: Vols. I&II
                                              Department (EAD)
                NEMP (National
                Environmental Management            EAD             Operational      Investment program
                Plan)
                NSSD (National Strategy for
                Sustainable Development)            EAD             Operational                -
                NAP (National Action          Forestry
                Program, under CCD)           Department            Operational      National Action Plan
                NBSAP (National               National
                Biodiversity Strategy and     Herbarium      and    Operational      National Biodiversity
                Action Plan, under CBD)       Botanical Gardens                      Strategy Plan
                GEF funded EA in climate            EAD             Operational      Initial National
                change                                                               Communication



2
 Kenya's Rift Valley has a geologic feature called dambos. These are shallow depressions, often located near rivers, which fill
with water during the rainy season. Due to the frequent presence of water, tall grasses are associated with dambos. A dambo can
be a kilometer in length and several hundreds of meters in width.


                                                                                                                                   7
                                        Executing agency
                                                                           Outputs relevant to
          Previous related activities     (and project        Status
                                                                                 Napa
                                             team)
         GEF funded EAs in
         biodiversity, biosafety            EAD            Operational   To be assessed
         GEF funded EAs in POP’s            EAD            Ongoing       To be assessed



c)      Status of other on-going activities
    .
NCSA: Malawi is preparing a proposal to seek funding from GEF for a National Capacity Self
Assessment. Relevant stakeholders were involved during June 2002. The proposal will be submitted
through UNDP.


4. PROJECT ACTIVITIES AND OUTPUTS

OUTPUT 1: National NAPA team with a lead agency established, including its composition and
mandate

Activity 1.1: Create and formalize institutional arrangements
Please refer to section 5. b).

Activity 1.2: Hire the project management team
Please refer to TORs attached.

Activity 1.3: Hold project initiation workshop to review the NAPA proposal and workplan.

Activity 1.4: Finalize workplan for implementing this project.

OUTPUT 2: Multidisciplinary integrated assessment team assembled

During the UNFCCC Enabling Activity, five (5) sectors were assessed for the V&A chapter. The NAPA
multidisplinary team will continue to work on these five sectors. There will be one team which is
comprised of experts representing different disciplines. However, during the preparation of this proposal
it became clear that Health and Energy are sectors that need to be added, in addition to a cross-sectoral
component (Gender). This NAPA will use an integrated approach to ensure that an adaptation in one
sector will not make the country more vulnerable in another.

The NAPA team will comprise sectoral experts representing the different disciplines, plus a social
scientist for the cross-sectoral component. The Project Manager will define the appropriate TORs of each
assessment, taking care that no new work, or original research, is commissioned. As part of UNDP-GEF’s
regular monitoring and backstopping function, TORs will be submitted to UNDP Malawi and the UNDP-
GEF regional coordination unit for Southern Africa for comments and inputs.

Activity 2.1: Define TOR and scope of work for each task
Activity 2.2: Identify and contract assessment team experts




                                                                                                       8
OUTPUT 3: Available information on adverse effects of climate change synthesized

As part of the TOR of the multidisplinary integrated assessment team, available information on the
adverse effects of climate change will be collected and synthesized for priority sectors as described under
output 2. The kind of data/information that will be collected and synthesized for each of the sectors needs
to be identified carefully during the start-up phase of the project. The assessment teams will engage in
identification of affected sectors and communities, and collated relevant information in an easily-
accessible knowledge system. For these assessments Participatory Rural Appraisal (PRA) Techniques
will be used and applied. An expert in PRA will be co-opted into each team/group as needed.

Activity 3.1: For the 7 sectors and 1 cross-cutting theme (Gender), identify the most vulnerable
regions/sub sectors
Activity 3.2: Within the regions/sub-sectors review, collect and synthesize all documented sources of
climate information.
Activity 3.3: Collect additional information using GIS techniques, early warning, and food security, flood,
drought and vulnerability mapping, where appropriate
Activity 3.4: Identify information gaps for further assessment in future projects, where possible.
Activity 3.5: Identify stakeholders in each vulnerable sub-sector, area or community for tapping into
traditional knowledge and experiences regarding coping strategies.
Activity 3.6: Summarize adverse effects of projected climate change

For further information on vulnerability assessment, see Technical Paper 3 of the Adaptation Policy
Framework (http://www.undp.org/cc/apf_outline.htm).


OUTPUT 4: Vulnerability to current climate variability and climate change assessed in a
participatory fashion

The assessment teams will develop appropriate mechanisms (such as PRA techniques) for consulting with
key stakeholder groups particularly regarding their exposure to climate risks and adaptive capacity to
cope with current climate variability. The teams will also identify socio-economic and policy constraints
faced by the stakeholder groups as well as existing adaptation measures. It is important to stress that
collection and assessment of raw data needs to be avoided which is beyond the scope of the NAPA.
Rather, the NAPA assessments are stocktaking exercises.

Activity 4.1: Identify appropriate mechanisms and methods (such as PRA techniques) to dialogue with
respective stakeholders
Activity 4.2: Undertake interviews/surveys to assess vulnerability to current climate variability within
priority sectors and identified communities/ regions.
Activity 4.3: Undertake interviews/surveys to assess current coping strategies and practices for current
climate variability within priority sectors and identified communities/regions.
Activity 4.4: Review existing damage surveys for recent climate events over at least 2 decades, where
practicable
Activity 4.5: Summarize vulnerability to current climate variability and climate change, current coping
strategies and adaptive capacity




                                                                                                         9
See T. L. Malua ‘Public Consultation in the NAPA Process’, LEG workshop, (Dhaka, Bangladesh, 18-21
September 2002). For further information on stakeholders and stakeholder processes, see Technical Paper
2 of the Adaptation Policy Framework (http://www.undp.org/cc/apf_outline.htm). Technical Papers 4 and
5 contain useful information on how to assess current and future climate risks. Technical Paper 6 provides
guidance on assessing socio-economic trends.


OUTPUT 5: Key adaptation measures identified

Before identifying adaptation measures it is important to assess adaptation needs and barriers, an activity
which will be part of this component. Based on the above and adaptation measures already identified in
the INC, the assessment teams will identify adaptation measures to address critical needs for action from
existing knowledge. Most likely these measures will include education and raising awareness, capacity
building, institutional co-ordination, policy development or reform, and integration of findings into
sectoral policies and programmes. The teams will also derive risk profiles in the different components,
where appropriate.

Activity 5.1: Identify adaptation needs and barriers
Activity 5.2: Identify adaptation measures to address critical needs for action which includes review of
available /existing institutional, policy and legislative measures in each sector
Activity 5.3: Derive risk profiles for each sector, community or area (i.e. drought and flood mapping),
when and where appropriate.
Activity 5.4: Summarize adaptation needs, barriers and measures.


OUTPUT 6: Country driven criteria for selecting priority activities to address the adverse effects of
climate change identified and agreed upon

Criteria will be based on, but not restricted to, the following factors: loss of life and livelihood, human
health, food security, water availabity and quality, biological diversity, and income generation/poverty
reduction. These criteria will be refined and agreed upon during the NAPA process by the National
Climate Change Committee (NCCC) on a sector by sector and also cross-sectoral basis. The process to be
used for agreeing on the criteria will be established – in line with the UNFCCC guidelines – by the
NCCC. UNDP Malawi and UNDP-GEF Southern Africa will be consulted in this process.

Activity 6.1: The NCCC sets up a framework for identifying and ranking national priorities
Activity 6.2: The NCCC defines criteria for selecting priority activities
Activity 6.3: Hold consultative workshop for reaching consensus on criteria and approaches, and for
ranking priority activities and target communities

The annotated NAPA guidelines and the Technical Paper 8 of the Adaptation Policy Framework suggest
ways to rank priorities. However, other approaches are equally valid depending on the actual measures to
be evaluated. Many adaptation measures will require an assessment of policy-making frameworks. Such
measures will be less conducive to quantitative classical cost-benefits analysis unlike more
technologically-focused adaptations. The advantages and disadvantages of methodologies will be
carefully assessed by the NAPA team. UNDP will advise the project in this process.




                                                                                                        10
OUTPUT 7: Profiles for priority activities developed

Based on the criteria as identified under output 6 the Project Manager, with the assistance from the
assessment teams and NAPA team will develop project profiles. These profiles will address priority needs
and describe specific actions. The project profiles will be in line with UNFCCC Guidelines. During this
activity, the NAPA team will also review the structure of the 5-page NAPA document.

Structure of NAPA document
 Introduction
 Framework for adaptation programme
 Identification of key adaptation needs
 List of priority activities
 NAPA preparation process

For general information, contact Paul Desanker@virginia.edu for NAPA primer. This publication
contains many resources for preparing a NAPA. Copies are free for LDC.

Activity 7.1: Develop a short list of ranked project profiles for the NAPA document


OUTPUT 8: NAPA document reviewed by government and civil society representatives, and
endorsed by the national government

The draft NAPA document will be subjected to a comprehensive peer review process. Public comments
resulting from meetings with representative community groupings in each sector such as: beach village
committees in fisheries; village natural resources committees in forestry and wildlife; community action
groups in villages; and Extension Planning Areas (EPA) in agriculture, will be incorporated. The
approach will also be through District Assemblies and the mass media (print, radio and television). The
NAPA document will finally be subjected to a government and civil society review in the following
order:
     NAPA team and National Climate Change Committee
     Environmental Affairs Department
     Ministry of Natural Resources and Environmental Affairs
     Cabinet Committee on the Environment

Activity 8.1: Form a NAPA Document Editorial Committee comprising of various experts
Activity 8.2: Hold NAPA editorial meetings
Activity 8.3: Review NAPA document in NEC and TCE and other, as described above
Activity 8.4: Hold a consultative workshop with all stake holders on the NAPA Document


OUTPUT 9: NAPA document publicly disseminated (including translation as necessary) and
submitted to the UNFCCC Secretariat

The following dissemination and submission process will be followed:
    The NAPA document will be translated into main vernacular languages where possible to
        effectively communicate with local communities
    UNDP office in Malawi and Regional UNDP-GEF center in Pretoria, South Africa


                                                                                                     11
       Government will submit NAPA document to UNFCCC Secretariat
       The NAPA document will be posted on the Climate Change Home Page and other websites
       The National Archive will keep custody of the NAPA document

Activity 9.1: Conform NAPA document to UNFCCC guidelines
Activity 9.2: Translate NAPA into main vernacular languages
Activity 9.3: Publicize NAPA on mass media
Activity 9.4: Submit NAPA document to the UNFCCC and implementing agency


5. INSTITUTIONAL ARRANGEMENTS FOR OVERSIGHT AND COORDINATION
.
(a) High level political oversight, coordination and policy integration

The following high level political oversight and co-ordination of the NAPA process is envisaged:
    The Cabinet Committee on the Environment will approve the final NAPA document
    The National Council on the Environment will review the draft final NAPA document
    Malawi WSSD committee co-ordinated by Environmental Affairs Department will be consulted
    MPRSP Co-ordination Committee will be used to review NAPA document

(b) Project Management and operational coordination

The EAD will be the Secretariat of the NAPA, while the Meteorological Department will chair the
implementation of this NAPA project as the lead agency. The NAPA team will comprise members of the
present Climate Change Enabling Activities Project Steering Committee which include the following
stakeholders: Agriculture, Fisheries, Forestry, Energy, Wildlife, Water, University of Malawi (Chancellor
College, the Polytechnic and Bunda colleges), CURE, MCCI and City Assemblies. The team’s
membership will be expanded to include Gender, Energy, Health and Population stakeholders. Both
technical and policy experts will be in the NAPA team. The executing agency, EAD, together with the
NAPA team will be responsible for monitoring the project on a continuous basis. The NAPA team will
also guide the implementation of the project to ensure that the results will be disseminated to and
evaluated by stakeholders. Furthermore the NAPA team will oversee smooth transition from the NAPA
activities to any other follow-up measures.

A project management team will be put in place which consists of a project manager, a national expert to
assist the project manger on short-term consultancy basis, and a secretary.

(c) Coordination with climate change team for the country’s national communication to the
UNFCCC

The climate change team completed many of its activities in GHG-Inventory, V&A assessment and
Mitigation analysis. The team has been fully active in the preparation of this NAPA proposal and will be
active during the Napa process. The Napa team, as described above, will be composed of all members of
the current EA steering committee plus additional members. This is to ensure that there will be full co-
ordination with the project management team of the present Expedited Phase II (top-up) which is to be
completed in February 2003.

(d) Coordination with other teams for the preparation of national reports (CBD, CCD, others)


                                                                                                      12
The experiences obtained in EA UNFCCC will aid the NAPA process greatly. Similarly, experiences
gained by other institutions will be utilized where appropriate to seek synergy and avoid unnecessary
overlaps from the following:
               CBD co-ordination unit
               CCD NAP
               MPRSP Committee
               NSSD
               NCCC

6.       Timetable

        Implementation of this project is estimated at 18 months
        6-weeks by 6-weeks timeline is attached as Annex 1




                                                                                                  13
ANNEX I
Timeline NAPA Process – Activities and Outputs corresponding to section 4: Project activities and Outputs



                      ACTIVITY                                      MONTHS 1-18                     RESPONSIBLE
                                                                   (6 WEEKS INTERVALS)                 PARTY

 Output 1: National NAPA team with a lead agency
 established including its composition and mandate.
                                                          x
 Activity 1.1: Create and formalize institutional                                              Executing Agency/ UNDP
 arrangements
                                                          x x
 Activity 1.2: Hire project management team                                                    Executing Agency/ UNDP
                                                              x
 Activity 1.3: Hold project initiation workshop                                                PM/ Exec. Agency/ UNDP
                                                              x
 Activity 1.4: Finalize work plan                                                              PM in consultation with NAPA
                                                                                               PSC

 Output 2: Multidisplinary integrated assessment
 teams assembled
                                                          x x
 Activity 2.1: Define TOR and scope of work for each                                           PM/NAPA PSC/EAD/UNDP
 task
                                                                  x x
 Activity 2.2: Identify and contract assessment team                                           PM/NAPA PSC/EAD/UNDP
 experts

 Output 3: Available information on adverse
 effects of climate change synthesized
                                                                  x x x                        Assessment Team
 Activity 3.1: For the 7 sectors and 1 cross-cutting
 theme (Gender), identify the most vulnerable
 regions/sub sectors
                                                                  x x x x                      Assessment Team
 Activity 3.2: Within the regions/sub-sectors review,
 collect and synthesize all documented sources of
 climate information
                                                                    x x x x                    Assessment Team
 Activity 3.3: Collect additional information using GIS
 techniques, early warning, and food security, flood,
 drought and vulnerability mapping, where appropriate
 Activity 3.4: Identify information gaps for further                      x x                  Assessment Team
 assessment in future projects, where possible.
                                                                                               NAPA PSC/PM
 Activity 3.5: Identify stakeholders in each vulnerable
 sub sector, area or community for tapping into
 traditional knowledge and experiences regarding
 coping strategies
 Activity 3.6: Summarize adverse effects of projected                        x                 Assessment Team
 climate change




                                                                                                                   14
                                                                                       RESPONSIBLE
                     ACTIVITY                                  MONTHS 1-18
                                                                                          PARTY
Output 4: Vulnerability to current climate
variability assessed in a participatory fashion
                                                             x x                   Assessments Team/PM
Activity 4.1: Identify appropriate mechanisms and
methods (such as PRA techniques) to dialogue with
respective stakeholders
                                                             x x x x x             Assessment Team
Activity 4.2: Undertake interviews/surveys to assess
vulnerability
Activity 4.3: Undertake interviews/surveys to assess         x x x   x             Assessment Team
current coping strategies and practices for current
climate variability within priority sectors and identified
communities/regions.
Activity4.4: Review existing damage surveys where            x x X x x             Assessments Team
applicable
Activity 4.5: Summarize vulnerability to current                     x             Assessment Team
climate variability and climate change, current coping
strategies and adaptive capacity
Output 5: Key climate change adaptation measures
identified
Activity 5.1: Identify adaptation needs and barriers                 x x           Assessment Team

Activity 5.2: Identify adaptation measures to address                x x           Assessments Team/NAPA PSC
critical needs for action which includes review of
available/existing institutional, policy and legislative
measures in each sector
Activity 5.3: Derive risk profiles for each sector,                  x x           Assessment Team
community or area (i.e. drought and flood mapping),
when and where appropriate.
Activity 5.4: Summarize adaptation needs, barriers and                   x         Assessment Team
measures.
Output 6: Country driven criteria for selecting
priority activities to address the adverse effects of
climate change identified and agreed upon
                                                                         x         NCCC/PM/NAPA PSC
Activity 6.1: The NCCC sets up a framework for
identifying and ranking national priorities.
                                                                         x         NCCC/PM/NAPA PSC
Activity 6.2: The NCCC defines criteria for selecting
priority activities.
Activity 6.3: Hold consultative workshop for reaching                        x     NCCC/PM/NAPA PSC
consensus on criteria and approaches, and for ranking
priority activities and target communities
Output 7: Proposals for priority activities developed
                                                                             x x   PM/Teams/NAPA PSC
Activity 7.1: Develop a short list of ranked project
profiles for the NAPA document




                                                                                                      15
                                                                                    RESPONSIBLE
                    ACTIVITY                               MONTHS 1-18
                                                                                       PARTY
Output 8: NAPA document reviewed by
government and civil society representatives and
endorsed by the national government.
                                                       x                       PM/NAPA PSC
Activity 8.1: Constitute /form a NAPA Document
editorial committee comprising of various
experts/stakeholders
                                                             x     x     x     PM/ Committee
Activity 8.2: Hold NAPA editorial committee meetings
                                                                         x     PM/NCE/TCE
Activity 8.3: Review NAPA document in NCE and
TCE and other, as described above.
                                                                         x     PM/NAPA PSC/Exec.
Activity 8.4: Hold consultative workshop with all                              Agency/UNDP
stakeholders on the NAPA document

Output 9: NAPA document publicly disseminated
(including translation as necessary) and submitted
to the UNFCCC Secretariat
                                                                         x x PM/Ed.Committee
Activity 9.1: Conform NAPA document to UNFCCC
guidelines.
                                                                             x PM/Ed.Committee/NAPA
Activity 9.2: Translate NAPA into main vernacular                              PSC/UNDP/Exec. Agency.
languages.
                                                                         x x PM/Exec. Agency/PSC/UNDP
Activity 9.3: Publicize NAPA on mass media
                                                                             x Executing Agency/PSC/PM
Activity 9.4: Submit NAPA document to the UNFCCC
and implementing agency.




                                                                                                   16
ANNEX II
Budget (US $)


                          ACTIVITY                             STOCKTAKING      PROCESS:         PRODUCT:      TOTAL
                                                                              (ASSESSMENTS,     ASSESSMENT
                                                                             CONSULTATIONS,      REPORTS/
                                                                             WORKSHOPS, ETC.)   STRATEGY AND
                                                                                                 ACTION PLAN


 Assessment and prioritization

 4)        Information gathering and synthesis,
      assessment of vulnerability

      i)          Synthesis of available information on
            adverse effects of climate change and coping          1500            4500              1000       7000
            strategies

      ii)         Participatory assessment of
            vulnerability to current climate variability
                                                                                  32000             3500       35500
            and extreme weather events, and associated
            risks

 2)         Identification of adaptation measures, and
      criteria for priority activities

      i)    Identification of past and current practices for
             adaptation to climate change and climate             4500            5000              1500       11000
             variability

      ii) Identification of key climate change
                                                                  2000            1500              500        4000
           adaptation measures

      iii) Identification and prioritization of criteria for
                                                                   500            1500              500        2500
            selecting priority activities

 Sub-TOTAL
                                                                  8500            44500             7000       61000
 (Assessment and prioritization)

 Development of proposals for priority activities

 1)   National/ sub-national consultative process for
                                                                                  10,500            3500       14000
      short listing potential activities

 2)   Selection and identification of priority activities
                                                                                  5500              3000       8500
      on the basis of agreed criteria

 3)   Prepare profiles of priority activities in the
                                                                                  7500             17000       24500
      prescribed format

 Sub-TOTAL
                                                                                  23500            23500       47000
 (Development of proposals for priority activities)

 Preparation, review and finalization of the NAPA
                       ACTIVITY                          STOCKTAKING      PROCESS:         PRODUCT:           TOTAL
                                                                        (ASSESSMENTS,     ASSESSMENT
                                                                       CONSULTATIONS,      REPORTS/
                                                                       WORKSHOPS, ETC.)   STRATEGY AND
                                                                                           ACTION PLAN


1)   Public review                                                          11500             1500            13000

2)   Final review by government and civil society
                                                                            3500              1000            4500
     representatives

3)   Printing, publishing and translation of the final
                                                                                             12500            12500
     NAPA document

4)   Dissemination                                                          3000              2500            5500

Sub TOTAL
                                                                            18000            17500            35500
(Preparation, review and finalization of NAPA)

Technical assistance

1)   Other technical assistance                                             21500                             21500

Sub-TOTAL
                                                            1000            20000             500             21500
(Technical assistance)

Project coordination and management

Sub-TOTAL
                                                                                             36000            36000
(Project coordination and management)                         -               -


GRAND TOTAL                                                 9500           106000            84500         200000




                                                                                                         18
ANNEX III: JOB DESCRIPTIONS

PROJECT MANAGER

Duties:
The project manager in liaison and consultation with the NAPA Steering Committee (NAPA/SC) will be
responsible for the day-to-day management, co-ordination and supervision of the implementation of the
project. The project manager’s duties will include among others:

   to prepare a detailed work plan for the project and draft terms of reference for the subcontracts (in
    consultation with NAPA/SC, EAD and UNDP);
   to organize and supervise the workshops and training needed during the project;
   to identify and hire/subcontract the national experts and institutions (in consultation with NAPA-SC);
   to liaise with relevant ministries, national and international research institutions, NGOs, and other
    relevant institutions in order to involve their staff in project activities, and to gather and disseminate
    information relevant to the project;
   to prepare periodic progress reports of the project;
   to control the expenditures and to ensure otherwise an adequate management of the resources
    provided for the project;
   to summarize the results of the project;
   to finalize the NAPA process together government personnel and national experts; and
   to initiate and mobilize resources for the potential follow-up activities.


Qualifications:
 Advanced degree (at least M.Sc) in energy, environmental management or natural sciences;
 A minimum of 10 years of working experience in the area relevant to the project;
 A demonstrated ability in managing projects, and liaisoning and cooperating with all project
   personnel including government officials, scientific institutions, NGOs and private sector;
 Fluency in the government’s official language; and
 Computer literacy is vital.


SHORT TERM CONSULTANTS

Expert in Social Sciences (3 to 6 months)

Duties:
 To undertake cross sectoral analysis in the various NAPA sectors;
 To assist the Project Manager in organizing and coordinating the information exchange between the
   various NAPA integrated teams, participating institutions nationally and internationally;
 To organize training for the various integrated assessment teams in various techniques such as PRA,
   GIS etc.

Qualifications:
 B.Scdegree or higher in social sciences or related field;
 At least five years working experience in relevant field;
 Fluency in government working languages;
 Computer literacy is recommended.



                                                                                                           19
Expert in energy, environmental management or related field (3 to 6 months)

Duties:
To assist the Project Manager to summarize and disseminate the results of the project, to finalize the
project menu, to prepare a draft national action plan, and to finalize the NAPA process including national
NAPA report for submission to the COP of the UNFCCC.

Qualifications:
 B.Scdegree or higher in relevant field;
 At least five years working experience in relevant field;
 Fluency in official government languages;
 Computer literacy is recommended.


International Technical Advisor (10 working days)

The technical advisor will work in close consultation with the NAPA project manager, the climate change
focal point and the NAPA Steering Committee on how to achieve a successful NAPA process. The expert
will give proper guidance so that Malawi achieves the objective of the NAPA process under the Decision
28/CP 7 of the UNFCCC. The duties of the expert among others will include:

   Review the background materials compiled and prepared by the integrated assessment teams.
   Provide guidance to the integrated teams on the various activities being undertaken under NAPA
    process to achieve the best results.
   Review the list of project listings for immediate needs and actions so that sourcing of international
    donor assistance is obtained with minimum constraints.
   Provide advice on the final national NAPA report before submission to COP of the UNFCCC.

Qualifications:
 M.Sc or higher degree in environmental or natural sciences
 Ten years or more of working experience in the relevant field especially in preparation of reports
   under GEF funding
 Experience in LDC situations and activities relevant at national and UNFCCC levels.
 Experience in facilitating multi-sectoral consultative processes; and
 Computer literacy recommended.




                                                                                                            20

								
To top