Redbridge Employment by HC121107163431

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									        Pilot Project
         to create
        Sustainable
        Employment
            For
Disabled People in Redbridge


 OUTLINE BUSINESS CASE
      FEBRUARY 2012
Contents


Executive Summary                                 Page 3

Introduction                                      Page 7

Learning from Getting a Life – echoed in Redbridge Page 9

Redbridge Demographics                            Page 10

Redbridge Services                                Page 12

Learning from Kisheron, Norwood, NAS, Ellingham,
RCHL and others                                  Page 15

Benefits and welfare reform                       Page 19

Gaps to sustainable employment in Redbridge       Page 21

Project Plan with costings Y1 - 3                 Page 25

Challenges                                       Page 31



Annex A Fair Access to Care Criteria                   Page 32

Annex B Redbridge demographics - detail                Page 34

Annec C      Outcomes from Getting a Life              Page 49
Executive Summary

This project will create a business led Disability Employment Network in
Redbridge that has as its objective increasing the number of disabled
people in work.

Our ambition is that the Disability Employment Network (DEN) project will
act as a beacon of best practice in the field of disability employment and
vocational rehabilitation in Britain; we will demonstrate how a systemic
approach to disability employment issues in one locality can, over time,
achieve a profound cultural shift in attitudes, behaviours and outcomes.

The DEN will provide leadership and oversight for the work, creating and
sharing a vision of what change will look like and working with existing
providers, services and others to deliver it. We recognise that to be
sustainable such a project must be embedded in the local community
through the voluntary and business sectors. We aim to encourage a local
business culture where employing disabled people is the norm rather than
the exception.

The approach is broad reflecting both the complexity of the area and the
challenges that change will pose. It also recognises that in Redbridge, as
elsewhere, many of the key building blocks for change around employment
for disabled people are already in place but require new impetus,
investment and a real change in culture to be able to really deliver their
potential. We will not reinvent the wheel or pay again for services that are
already provided. The Redbridge DEN project will deliver visible and high
profile leadership, across the business sectors, local authority and voluntary
sectors. It will require partnership and joint working across many
organisations in Redbridge statutory and voluntary. The DEN will also
closely focus upon the issues that act as a barrier to employment in a way
that systematically removes them, we will additionally hold to account
organisations that make commitments around employment and fail to
deliver them. We are not saying that DEN will change the world overnight,
rather that we believe that over time incremental cumulative change
sustained over a period of years will deliver the profound shift that is
required.

We have a vibrant business community in Redbridge and a commitment to
and momentum for change, evidenced by changes in children’s services
achieved through Aiming High for Disabled Children, and in adult services,
where the development of the community based services means that they
are already are well placed to develop ways of working that support people
into employment.

By changing employment outcomes for disabled individuals we will also
change the way in which the community perceives disability, replacing fear,
anxiety and discrimination with acceptance, inclusion and a recognition of
shared humanity.

The ethos and approach would be to support Redbridge to become a
national demonstrator site in this field demonstrating gains to local disabled
people and their families as well as the local and national economies, to
show how local change can produce national lessons. We can show how
changing the focus of schools, colleges, social enterprises, sheltered
employment opportunities, social entrepreneurship can deliver disabled
young people who are ready and able to work. We can also demonstrate
how working with employers we can, over time, show the economic
contribution that disabled people can make to an enterprise and how they
can make excellent employees.

Key to achieving this is engaging with key stakeholders across business,
local authority and the voluntary sector to produce a local Disability
Employment Strategy that will:

 Increase incrementally levels of employment for disabled people year on
  year, as they have done successfully in other places
 Significantly change the culture of low expectations and negative
  impressions of disabled people
 Use existing services and opportunities where they arise
 Develop a multi strand approach – involving schools, voluntary sector,
  public and private sectors
 Focus on real and meaningful work, using different routes and supports
  to employment
 Direct engagement and involvement by private sector as employers
 Build on existing national and local knowledge – e.g. Getting a Life
 Ensure intelligent commissioning decisions will be informed so as to
  avoid duplication and ensure all funding sources were leveraged
 Address market failure in employment of disabled and in particular
  learning disabled people and those with autism and aspergers syndrome

Bring a Community focus to:
       promote value of disabled people, increase visibility and reduce
        isolation
       recognise the opportunities and the limitations of independent
        travel training
       recognise the high levels of ongoing support learning disabled
        people and those with autism and aspergers syndrome require
        from their families and communities
       increase social responsibility within the business and wider
        community for disabled people.

To succeed this project must be business led. The project will seek to
achieve these aims through three main strands of work:

 First, establishing the Redbridge Disability Employment Network (DEN)
  to
       Address the pull factors that prevent employment of disabled
         people
       Create job opportunities within the local business communities
       Ensure partnerships are created that will deliver jobs

 Second, address the push factors that prevent employment of disabled
  people
      through direct work with schools and colleges
      looking to establish a new Vocational College in Redbridge as a
        local hub for excellence, learning and apprenticeships

 Third, examine and facilitate the strengthening of existing and the
  creation of new social enterprise models to provide supported
  employment or pathways to support disabled people into work taking
  account of
       Improvements to what exists already
       Gaps in meetings the needs of the local disabled population
       The right legal and other structures to achieve these aims
 The summary project plan with costings1 is set out below:

Year      Tasks                                                  Cost
Year 1    Develop Redbridge Disability Employment                (i) £50k + own
          Network with plans for structure, roles,               funds
          costings, negotiations with providers on gaps,
          recruit coordinator and build links to local
          business community
          Develop new pathways to jobs for disabled              (ii) Own funds
          people                                                 (iii) LA
          Independent Travel Training                            commissioned
          Look for new local supported employment                (iv) Business
          opportunities for those within and without adult       volunteers
          social care services
          Support up to 20 young people into                     (v) £70k
          employment who would not access adult social
          care
Year 2    Workforce development including                        (i) £50k (est)
          schools/colleges
          Support up to 40 young people into                     (ii) £140k (est)
          employment who                  would not access
          adult social care                                      (iii) £70k (est)
          Support up to 20 young people into
          employment who would access adult social
          care
          Examine viability of and funding options for
          creating new Vocational College in Redbridge
          (e.g. new or a campus in Redbridge from an
          established College)
Year 3    Support up to 60 young people into                     (i) £210k (est)
          employment who would not access adult social
          care                                                   (ii) £140k (est)
          Support up to 40 young people into
          employment who would access adult social
          care
TOTAL                                                            £730k

 1
   The costings are estimated based mainly on what we know of how much it costs to
 place disabled people into jobs by some of the providers we spoke to as part of this
 project. It is possible that those figures may contain services that already exist in
 Redbridge or that the money could go further with momentum arising from a cross
 Borough approach with local businesses.
Introduction

A lot has been researched, written and spoken about the barriers to
employment for disabled people in the UK. These apply equally in
Redbridge to other parts of the UK. Most recently the national programme
Getting a Life2 sought to demonstrate what needs to happen so that young
people with a severe learning disability achieve paid employment and full
lives when they leave education. Despite this and national programmes run
through Job Centre Plus, the problems remain.

This is not perhaps surprising since:

 employment is generally designed to require fast deployment of many
  skills at once in particular around verbal and non verbal communication
 there is a lack of visibility of disabled people, in particular those with
  learning difficulties and disabilities, autism and aspergers syndrome, in
  our wider society
 education, leisure and other services are often segregated, with a focus
  on offering specialist services, rather than requiring universal services to
  open up
 there is a lot of store put in society on how we look and behave which
  many disabled people challenge
 disabled people, in particular those with learning difficulties and
  disabilities, autism and aspergers syndrome, are very vulnerable and are
  very susceptible to and to experiencing negative comments, negative
  reporting and hate crime
 these people are not generally seen to have value
 these are complex and difficult issues with no quick fix solutions.

According to the Foundation for People with Learning Disabilities:

“Children with learning disabilities such as autism, Down’s Syndrome and
cerebral palsy face multiple barriers when it comes to finding employment
after they leave school: a lack of expectation from teachers and families
that they will be successful in getting a job, assumptions by employers that
they are not capable, low self-esteem and feeling they have nothing to offer
and therefore the expectation of a life on benefits. There is also a lack of
opportunity for apprenticeships and the mechanisms that target other kids



2 The Getting a Life programme ran from April 2008 to the end of March 2011, as part of
the Valuing People Now employment work http://www.gettingalife.org.uk/
often pass them by, such as work experience organised by the school they
attend.
Through our extensive work with learning disabled children in numerous
programmes we have seen a common pattern for them: special school with
no or late preparation for leaving school, a lack of opportunity in college, a
lack of post 16 education and life skills courses that lead nowhere. Children
with learning disabilities become isolated and can’t enter the world of work.
Government work programmes are ambitious and have so far built a great
foundation to support people with learning disabilities into work. However
they are not yet sufficiently practical in their outcomes and we believe they
do not provide enough depth and intensity for people with learning
disabilities to get to work.”

However, it is not just young people with severe learning difficulties who
struggle to find employment. Those who fall outside of the Fair Access to
Care (FAC) criteria3 (and will not access adult social care services) also
struggle for the same reasons. In Redbridge, as in most other local
authorities, the threshold for access is very high – only those within critical
and upper substantial levels are eligible (see Annex A).

The various services that have been developed to support young disabled
people into work tend to be only partially successful at best and tend to
work mainly with the “low hanging fruit” of those young people who are
relatively easy to place in jobs. They also tend to work in relative isolation,
rather than working together strategically to produce joined up solutions that
systematically address all aspects of the local employment market for
disabled people. In Redbridge there has been an acknowledgement for
some years that joined up solutions, through a cross agency Employment
Group are needed.

In the absence of clear pathways to employment the planning process for
young disabled people focuses upon leisure and social care opportunities.
Person Centred Planning for young disabled people can deliver innovative
and creative responses for disabled people in terms of employment only if
the preparatory work in developing market conditions has been undertaken.
Without this option services will continue to have low expectations of what
they can do and will not be challenged to produce young people who are
ready for work.



3
 http://www.dh.gov.uk/prod_consum_dh/groups/dh_digitalassets/@dh/@en/@ps/docum
ents/digitalasset/dh_113155.pdf
Our ambition in Redbridge is to deliver a sustainable, long term
employment project for disabled people. This needs to include both those
who meet and those who fall outside the FAC criteria but because of their
special needs fail to benefit from national and local initiatives employment
initiatives4. We can see that real change is possible and the lessons are out
there to be learnt.

There are significant questions about how such a programme should be
organised and run, it could either be coordinated by the Local Authority (LA)
or through a registered charitable company, either new or existing such as
Redbridge Forum5 (Charity No 1090850), working with other bodies as a
joint venture.

Learning from Getting a Life – echoed in Redbridge

Much of the learning from the twelve demonstration sites6 is relevant to
Redbridge:

 The young people working with Getting a Life (GAL) have high
  aspirations. Through GAL they have been able to say what jobs and
  careers they would like now and in the future. Many have said they want
  to work, even if they cannot do the jobs they really want

 Families do not believe that the current systems can deliver equal life
  chances for their children – especially a home and a job

 There is not currently a pathway into employment for these young
  people. Most go to college after school, where they repeat a sixth form,
  and then go on to a life on benefits, and into day services where they are
  expected to stay. There are very low expectations and a lack of
  knowledge and information across the systems about what is possible.
  No agency has responsibility for employment, and all tend to consider it
  to be another agency’s responsibility
4
  Such as the Work Redbridge virtual hub – provides information about how to access
employment, training, volunteering and business support in Redbridge by bringing
together a range of information about local providers and services
5 Redbridge Forum was established in 1992 and is a Registered Charity 1090850 and
Company Limited by Guarantee 4295370. It works with children and young people with
a learning disability and autism and their families. It is also, as part of the Redbridge
Disability Consortium, a Strategic Partner with the LA.
6 Manchester, Oldham, Herefordshire, Torbay, Somerset, Medway, Kent, London
Borough of Richmond-upon-Thames, Norfolk, Lincolnshire, North-East Lincolnshire and
North Tyneside.
 Young people with learning disabilities do not often have community-
  based year 10 work experience as others do

 There could be more opportunities to integrate elements of supported
  employment into the curriculum from the beginning of Key Stage 4

 Many workers in the system do not know about the personalisation
  agenda or how it impacts on their work.

 Education funding is driven by qualification and “progress” outcomes
  rather than life outcomes such as getting a job. Transition planning does
  not usually include employment

 There is no agreed approach between agencies towards supporting
  young people to plan their lives. Person-centred transition planning and
  support planning are not being combined to achieve paid employment
  and other key life chances, so each agency starts from scratch and
  focuses on its own priorities. Time and opportunities are wasted, and
  young people miss out

 Equalities legislation tend to be seen as being about physical access;
  reasonable adjustments such as curriculum differentiation and
  accessible information about best practice are often not made.

 Supported employment services are not usually commissioned to work
  with people under 18. Evidence shows7 that support from a supported
  employment agency significantly improves employment outcomes for
  young people in transition. Supported employment agencies generally do
  not have the capacity to support people with learning disabilities,
  especially those with complex disabilities

 Money is invested in services that do not result in paid employment or
  life chances.

Redbridge Demographics

Redbridge is an outer London borough with a population of approximately
267,700 residents in mid 2009, an estimated 12% increase since the 2001
census. It is the ninth most diverse borough in the country and

7
approximately 40% of its population hail from a minority ethnic background.
It is estimated that there are 71,100 children aged 0 – 19 within the
borough, making up 26% of the total population. Redbridge also has high
levels of deprivation and affluence with Clementswood ward being
considered the most deprived area and Monkhams ward being the most
affluent. Males and females are equally represented in the borough.

In regards to numbers of disabled children, it is estimated that there are
approximately 4,000 disabled children in the borough, 1,500 disabled
children who would need some additional support to access some services
and 853 severely disabled children that would need significant support to
access services8.

This growth has placed significant pressure on school places in Redbridge.
Although generally educational attainment is high; Redbridge is consistently
ranked in the UK’s top 10 regions for GCSE results, data on the attainment
of those with learning disabilities and autism difficult to quantify.

A detailed analysis of the demographic profile of disabled children and
young people in Redbridge is given in Annex B. Whilst there is very robust
data for children age 16 and under, there are significant gaps in the data for
adults with disabilities.

In summary, however the main learning points detailed are:-

 There has been an overall increase of 32% in the numbers of children
  with Special Educational Needs. This exceeds the general rate of
  increase in the overall numbers of children in the borough.

 The numbers of children with disabilities on the school census have risen
  from 2,742 in 2006 to 3,747 in 2011.

 The caseload of the Children with Disabilities Team (Social Workers) has
  risen from 346 in 2003 to 589 in 2011. Of that caseload 39% have a
8
  “Estimates for the number of disabled children in the UK and England vary from 5% to
7% of the child population. Figures obtained through Disability Living Allowance tend to
be used for the group of children that the Local Authorities should be prioritizing, (as this
group of children have historically not been in receipt of services). The number of
severely disabled children is approximately 17% of the total number of disabled children,
or 1.2% of the total local child population. The 1.2% can be used to provide a ‘ball park’
figure for the number of severely disabled children in a given area.” Transforming Short
Breaks: What information do we need and how do we use it – Together for Disabled
Children.
   diagnosis of Autism or Autistic Spectrum Disorder and an additional 19%
   have a diagnosis of a learning disability.

 Roughly 50% of the young people known to the Children with Disabilities
  Team who are undergoing Transition to Adult Services have a diagnosis
  of Autism/Autistic Spectrum Disorder. At the moment most will go onto
  College and then into adult social care.

 In Redbridge the Connexions Service (the careers education,
  information, advice, guidance and support service for young people with
  special needs up to the age of 25) has 860 young people aged 16 to 25
  on their caseload of which only 100 are expected to achieve
  employment, 71 are NEETS and the rest are directed in to education. Of
  those directed into education a significant percentage will go onto adult
  day care services or become long term unemployed.

 Employment statistics for the Learning Disabled or those with Autism are
  difficult to quantify as neither the local Job Centre Plus, London Borough
  of Redbridge or NHS Redbridge differentiate between those with a
  physical or medical disability and those with a learning disability or
  autism.

All the data points towards the conclusion that there are significant numbers
of young people who need additional support and training to gain
employment and these needs are increasing. School Census data indicates
that there are increasing numbers entering education which in turn will out
further pressures on services.

Redbridge Services

The services on offer to young disabled people who will fall within the FAC
criteria are:

 Person Centred Transition Planning (with no or limited focus on
  employment) from Year 9

 Section 139a plan at 16/18 for college (with little or no focus on
  employment)

 College places in Waltham Forest, Havering, Epping Forest etc
 Individual budgets (IBs) or service packages which are funded (i) in part
  from the individual’s benefits and (ii) from social care budgets under
  huge financial strain, providing individual support based on needs and
  aspirations of young person, which may include accessing community
  hubs, but could also be used for the employment opportunities you then
  list below, as well as individual support workers, to support in whatever
  way necessary.some of the following:

Local Authority and third sector provided adult social care services provided
through community hubs, focussing on leisure and other activities in the
community

Local Authority and third sector provided supported volunteering (for a very
small number) in

        Lambourne End
        Elhap
        Inclusive Communities

Local Authority and third sector provided supported employment (for a very
small number) in

          Woodbine Café
          Link Place Print Shop
          DJ for Groovy Cats/children's parties
          Steel Band
          shop corner in café

Individual support workers, to support in whatever way necessary

For those who do not fall within FAC, but who have a Statement of Special
Educational Needs or are at School Action Plus, they will access:

        (providing they are known to children with Disabilities Team)
           Person Centred Transition Planning (with no or limited focus on
           employment) from Year 9

        Section 139a plan at 16/18 for college (with little or no focus on
           employment)

        College places in Waltham Forest, Havering, Epping Forest etc
           Access to specialist employment support through Job Centre Plus
            who might/might not refer them on for specialist support e.g.
            through Ellingham; or Prospects for those with autism/aspergers
            syndrome who can travel; or the Richmond Fellowship for those
            with mental health needs

The Job Centre Plus cannot offer 1-1 or tailored support and only those
more job ready and travel trained are likely to access work schemes. The
national statutory schemes for getting disabled people into work include9:

Work Choice: Work Choice is a specialist support programme, to help
people with disabilities fulfil their potential in the workplace. This
government supported employment programme is designed specifically for
people who may find it difficult to find or keep a job, due to their disability.

Work Programme: The Work Programme provides support to people who
are long-term unemployed (or are at most risk of becoming so) to help you
find work. We are delivering specialist support to people with disabilities
who require extra help or support. Our aim is to help you on your journey
into work, and to help you to stay in work.
Access To Work: Despite clearly having the skills and potential required,
there may still be practical problems for disabled people to overcome in the
workplace. Access to Work is available to help overcome these problems.

Much if not all of the support for these and many other young disabled
people has to come from families (e.g. finding voluntary or paid employment
opportunities for their own children), who will have been caring already for
18 years. Many young people stay at home with nothing to do at all, or find
it difficult to leave home because of their disability. Many develop mental
health crises as a result causing an even greater cycle of despair. It is
envisaged that this pilot would avoid such expensive crises occurring and
also allow carers to go back into work, thus benefiting the local and national
economy.

Children’s services have recently begun to focus on independent travel
training. This is to promote travel on public transport and to reduce reliance
on school transport for those who meet certain criteria. Travel training is
also a very important aspect for employment.




9
    Ellingham website
The whole system is very complex, information is not widely available and
families and young disabled people do not understand generally how it all
works or who the players are especially in relation to the employment route.

Learning from Kisheron, Norwood, NAS, Ellingham, RCHL
and others

Kisheron

The focus is very much on value of disabled people, doing meaningful work
and community engagement and involvement and visibility of disabled
people in the community.

The 4 businesses are professionally run with disabled young people who
meet FAC criteria using their IBs to come and work there. They have
identified structured and very specific tasks for these users and they also
allow more disabled people to make shorter visits (of an hour or so). They
see a need to keep social care based activities and “work” very separate as
different requirements apply.

They suggested getting retired business people involved in the businesses
and that SMEs are more approachable for jobs locally as you can speak to
the boss direct and build relationships quickly. They are looking for
businesses to carve out paid jobs around the needs of FAC clients (e.g.
photocopying, car washing etc). They have managed to place to place 30
people in this way over 4 years into very part time paid positions. They also
have to be travel trained to get there (though the journey lengths will be
limited) and Kisheron provide that training as part of the package. They
have requests for help from non FAC young people but have to turn them
away.

Norwood

Norwood offer a comprehensive model of job coaching, training for young
people - using a specific model directly related to breaking work down into
small chunks called Training in Systematic Instruction (TSI) - and for
employers – including about dealing with inappropriate behaviours, finding
jobs (recognising that these roles all require different still sets – they are
being helped by a new Trustee who is big in recruitment) and finding jobs in
their own organisation (head office, shops etc).

The supported employment service comprises:
1.     Work Preparation and the Work Experience Programme
Norwood works with partners in the corporate sector to offer adults with
learning disabilities a Work Experience Programme. This programme
provides the opportunity for adults with learning disabilities to work in six
different fields of employment for at least half a day each. The aim is to
enable individuals to make informed choices about their next steps, based
on this experience. Each of the placements is fully supported by a Norwood
Job Coach who provides on-the-job training as well as an assessment of
the skill base and suitability of the candidate to that particular area of work.
The outcome of the Work Experience Programme is that Norwood can
provide a better job match. The Job Coach gets a better understanding of
each individual’s skill set and each individual finds out what type of work
they want to do. The fields of work are: Catering, Retail, Administration,
Industrial, Domestic Services, Delivery Services. Each field of work offers a
variety of placements in order to suit the needs of each person we support.

2.     Education and Training
The Deli at Norwood’s Kennedy Leigh Children and Family Centre supports
trainees with learning disabilities to work in the catering service programme.
We are developing this programme to offer accreditation towards a Food
and Hygiene Certificate and Workright Award and achieve vocational
qualifications for work experience, paid employment and social enterprise
schemes in order to help those we support to develop skills and have these
skills officially recognised. Work Skills and Community Safety Workshops
have also been provided to offer information about the interpersonal, social
and practical skills needed for work. These workshops provide information
about the interpersonal and social skills needed for work such as:

    How to behave
    What to wear
    What conduct is and is not appropriate
    Where to look for employment
    How to create a CV
    Importance of being on time
    Unwritten rules of work
    Travel training

3.     Creative Employment Opportunities

In order to provide employment Norwood has developed two social
enterprises:
 Norwood Future Clean is an environmentally friendly car wash venture,
  specifically designed to provide training and where possible, employment
  opportunities for adults with learning disabilities.
 Norwood Gifts is an online gift shop selling the creations of the people
  who use our services. Glass sculptures, chequer sets, greeting cards,
  jewellery and paintings are sold in our retail charity shops and local
  shopping centres. It is planned that as the venture becomes more
  established, each artist will earn a commission from the sale of their
  work.

4.    Paid Work and Voluntary Work

Following training, individuals have the opportunity to choose to be
supported by a Job Coach in either paid or voluntary work. The aim is
always to achieve paid employment but voluntary work can sometimes be a
springboard into paid employment. An adult with learning disabilities, who
may never have worked before, may opt for volunteer work initially.

They also use a mix of charity, donor and statutory funding (e.g. work
choice funding) – it is part of their role to leverage funding from different
sources. They understand the challenges of the journey through school and
college to employment. They cover FAC and non FAC young people –
costing approx £3242 per person per year. Using their model has got 18-19
young people into employment in Year 1; and 60-70 over 2 years.

National Autistic Society (NAS)

Prospects is the NAS specialist supported employment service for people
with autism. It has offices in London, Glasgow and Cardiff and provides a
range of services to jobseekers, employers and employees, ranging from
individual advice and workplace assessments, to job coaching, to internship
schemes.

Prospects is a specialist service as people across the autistic spectrum
need specialist employment support because their condition means that
they find it difficult to understand the unwritten rules of the workplace. This
can make relationships with colleagues or clients more difficult and a literal
interpretation of instructions may mean that jobs are not completed as
expected.

Current funding arrangements place a focus on Graduate placements;
typically these service users are motivated to secure employment. This
Transitions Programme offers an individualised pre-employment training,
job tasters and support in job finding, interviews etc. Service users need to
be travel trained to access this service. Typically the average cost of
securing employment for a service user of the Transitions service is £4,000.

Prospects does have programmes focusing on job readiness for service
users who are not yet ready to start looking for a job such as Access to
employment, Preparation for Employment courses or Brighter Horizons to
help secure supported voluntary placement.

Employers benefit from receiving specialist consultancy advice on
supporting people with autism to help anticipate and avoid any potential
pitfalls, make sure the workplace is as accommodating as possible to the
employee with autism and promote understanding throughout the
organisation. Prospects provides consultancy and workplace assessments
for employers providing specialist guidance on inclusive procedures and
practices. Prospects also work with employers to promote the
understanding that people with Autism and Aspergers have characteristic
that make them reliable and productive employees.

Ellingham

Ellingham is a local provider of services to young disabled people, running
many supported employment opportunities for those who fall within FAC in
Waltham Forest and wider support for some Redbridge young people
through Work Choice and the Work Programme. Only Work Choice offers
the support package that disabled people need to get into work.

They also have a year contract to run the learning disability provision for
Redbridge College funded by the Skills Funding Agency of a rolling 6 week
work programme for groups of 6- 8 (at entry levels 2-3).

The Work Choice programme has a target of getting 58% of disabled
people into paid employment of 16 + hours per week and therefore onto in
work benefits. This is very challenging in the current economic climate. It
is also complicated by the fact that Access to Work (e.g. providing a travel
buddy) is available only to those with physical and sensory disabilities
indefinitely – those with learning disabilities/difficulties and other disabilities
only receive it for six months.

They currently support the following clients from Redbridge:
 Work Programme                        1 (in vocational preparation)
 Work Choice                           107 (in a range of services from
  vocational preparation to in-work support)
 Redbridge College franchise           9 to date, but a rolling programme

Redbridge Community Housing Limited (RCHL)

RCHL is a Redbridge based not-for-profit sector organisation. Their
services support adults with a learning disability and those who use mental
health services across Essex, Redbridge, Waltham Forest, Tower Hamlets
and Newham. As part of this they created a Community Interest Company
two years ago to operate and manage Ray Park Café and to develop other
supported employment opportunities both within RCHL and the community.
Called 'RCHL Pathways to Employment', it runs the café and builds links
with local employers and is soon to operate another café in Tower Hamlets.
Others
We have additionally met, spoken to and/or sought information from:
Redbridge adult social care officials, Connexions, the Transition social
worker, Job Centre Plus, Foundation for Learning Disability, Downs
Syndrome Association (who have their own jobs matching site for
employers and job seekers - http://www.dsworkfit.org.uk/), the Work
Redbridge lead and others.

Benefits and welfare reform

Benefits are a big issue for disabled people. The system is extremely
complicated with few if any people actually understanding it in its entirety.
Given the enormous barriers to accessing work and keeping a job, many
disabled people fear losing benefits for employment opportunities that may
come to nothing or come to an end soon after starting a job. And there are
examples of this happening – young disabled people are sometimes offered
a trial period without pay and are let go at the end of that. Many learning
disabled people and those with autism and aspergers syndrome also have
low self esteem and failure hits them and their families very hard, leading
many to crises.

There are also major changes to the benefits system with DLA for 16+ year
olds being replaced by Personal Independence Payments and the youth
element of Employment Support Allowance (ESA) - Contributory ESA – for
young people with a limited capacity to work, who at the moment if not in
education can receive contributory ESA – a non-means tested benefit. The
Government intends to abolish Contributory ESA so that only the means
tested benefit remains.

We would want to work with Department for Work and Pensions to explore
the flexibilities required to make the transition to employment by disabled
people more sustainable.
Gaps to sustainable employment in Redbridge

Against this background, our research locally in Redbridge has uncovered a number of gaps to
sustainable employment for disabled people, namely:

Nature of        Area of need                          Why does it matter?
gap
Lack of          There is a lack of focus on           This is discriminatory, it creates institutional
pathways to      employment in schools, in the         disadvantage and an expectation of a life of
paid             transition planning process, in the   dependency and on benefits.
employment       college planning process and in
                 college courses. This reflects:
                          a desire not to raise
                           expectations which cannot
                           be delivered
                          lack of expertise
                          lack of opportunity
Lack of          The vast majority of learning         Benefits of independent travel training at an earlier
provision        disabled young people and those       age will be lost. Huge costs of transport to out of
in/interest by   with autism and aspergers attend      Borough colleges.
local College    out of Borough colleges in Waltham    Lack of focus for disabled community for post 16-18
                 Forest, Epping, Havering, Barking     education in Borough.
                 and Dagenham and (increasingly)       Lack of share of national funding for college places
                 Oaklands in St Albans.                coming to Redbridge.
                                                       Costs to local organisations of working with Our of
                                                       Borough colleges.
                                                       No local learning and development hub for
                                                          apprenticeships
Lack of job       There are identified gaps in jobs for   It is better use of resources to support people into
opportunities,    young people                            work than to a day centre or to a life on benefits. At
whether paid      1.     With Autism and aspergers        the same time these groups face huge challenges in
full/part time,   syndrome                                traditional employment roles.
or offering       2.     With learning disabilities who
job               fall outside FAC
opportunities     3.     Severely learning disabled
through           within FAC
FACS
eligible
services
Low capacity More jobs could be created in                Existing facilities are under-utilised. Opportunities
within       existing Local Authority and third           for leveraging in outside funding are lost given
existing     sector supported employment                  limited capacity in and/or legal structures of some
FACS         facilities for those who fall within         existing services.
employment   FAC. The constraints are lack of
opportunitiesfunding, capacity and specialist
             expertise.
No capacity  New supported employment                     Waste of lives of young people and families.
in supported opportunities could be created for           Opportunities for leveraging in outside funding are
employment those within FAC and outside of                lost. Some young disabled people will find it easier
for certain  FAC, in for example:                         to find a paid job in or through this route.
areas/groups 1.      IT
of need      2.      Accountancy/book keeping
             (linked to Accountancy for
             Community Enterprises)
             3.      Fashion
             4.      Bike maintenance (linked to
                 the cycling centre)
                 5.    Sporting activities and keep fit
                 (linked to local drives to reduce
                 obesity)
                 6.    Photography
                 7.    Specialist employment venue
                 and work for those with aspergers
                 syndrome
Limited job      There is more that can be done to        It is better use of resources to support people into
opportunities    create jobs in large local employers     work than to a day centre or to a life on benefits.
in large local   including                                It would be good for our community to share the
employers        1.    NHS                                responsibility of caring for our most vulnerable.
and local        2.    LA                                 This would be a more sustainable model for the
SMEs and to      3.    Corporation of London              longer term than targeting only single or a limited
self             4.    Local branches of national         number of employers.
employment       supermarket chains

                 There is more that can be done to
                 create jobs in local SMEs across
                 our diverse community.

                 There is more that can be done to
                 support self employment.

                 There is also a lack of supported
                 volunteering opportunities as part of
                 pathways to employment.

No one is        There is a need to support the           It is better use of resources to support people into
tasked to        development of a new business led     work than to a day centre or to a life on benefits.
focus on         and business focussed Disability      One organisation is needed to pull all of the strands
employment       Employment Network, including:        together, provide leadership, leverage additional
for this group   Local Authority                       funding and engage with local employers both
within           Expertise and skills from existing    individually and through business fora such as the
Redbridge        organisations involved in providing   local Chambers of Commerce and Business
                 employment services                   Improvement Districts in Ilford and Hainault.
                 Expertise and skills from existing
                 organisations involved in providing
                 supported volunteering and other
                 local services

Gaps in          There is a need to create capacity    It is better use of resources to support people into
existing         to support a new business led and     work than
national and     business focussed employment          to a day centre or to a life on benefits.
local            network to develop, including:        One organisation is needed to pull all of the strands
schemes to       Coordinator                           together, provide leadership, leverage additional
help disabled    Job coaches (specially trained)       funding and pull in expertise from other providers
people into      Schools and college coordinator(s)    through a Joint Venture arrangement.
work             Employment champion(s) (could be
                 retired business people)
                 Routes to self employment
Project Plan with costings Y1 - 3

  Year 1 Tasks                                                                   Costs
  Create Redbridge Disability Employment Network                                 Existing organisations
  Umbrella organisation                                                          to fund from own
  Oversee assessment of individual need and movement through service             costs?
  options to employment
  Not vertically integrated, but a joint venture arrangement bringing together
  partners
  Commission new services as needed – e.g. new social enterprises for
  employment opps
  Effective partnership with local business to deliver jobs
  Oversee and effect real change in culture at all levels
  Tailored approach to disability/common needs
  Effective marketing for existing businesses for disabled people
  Drive up quality in local services, including those for non FAC

  Develop detailed plans for structure and costings using and developing         Existing organisations
  existing networks and services in Redbridge and identifying gaps               to fund from own
  There is a need to consider how best to structure this Network and develop     costs?
  links between the range of organisations involved so as to:
  Deliver jobs for young disabled people
  Avoid duplication
  Maximise and draw on the skills available
  Ensure buy in and commitment from local business community
  Ensure disabled people are visible in and part of our local community in
  Redbridge
     Involving schools, Connexions, LA transition and adult social care teams,
     Job Centre Plus, Volunteering ops, supported volunteering ops, NAS,
     Norwood, Ciil, Redbridge Disability Consortium, St Barnabas, Beechwood
     and other organisations
     Negotiations with organisations on their role(s) and filling gaps and deciding Existing organisations
     on structure of umbrella organisation and whether it should be:                to fund from own
     (i)LA led                                                                      costs?
     Led by newly created registered charitable company, or an existing
     charitable company such as Redbridge Forum10 (Registered Charity
     1090850) or
     Other

     Develop Job Descriptions for key roles and identify which should be paid or
     volunteers
     Recruit for key new roles, including
     Coordinator (including office and admin)                                                                  £50k
     Job coaches (specially trained)
     Schools and college coordinator(s)
     Supported volunteering coordinator(s)
     Employment champion(s) (could be retired business people)
     Self employment experts

     LA to decide on arrangements for expanding employment opportunities
     within existing LA provided employment services and how these should be
     structured and whether
10
  Redbridge Forum was established in 1992 and is a Registered Charity 1090850 and Company Limited by Guarantee 4295370. It works with
children and young people with a learning disability and autism and their families. It is also, as part of the Redbridge Disability Consortium, a
Strategic Partner with the LA.
(i)    LA led
Led by newly created registered charitable company or
Other legal structure

Consider new supported employment opportunities could be created for          These will all require
those within FACS and outside of FACS, in for example:                        start-up funding
IT
Accountancy/book keeping (linked to Accountancy for Community
Enterprises)
Fashion
Bike maintenance (linked to the cycling centre)
Sporting activities and keep fit (linked to local drives to reduce obesity)
Photography
Specialist employment venue and work for those with aspergers syndrome
Develop new pathways to employment for young disabled people,                 Existing organisations
document process and change PCP process to reflect this.                      to fund from own
Will include:                                                                 costs?
PCP at Year 9 reviews and work experience opportunities sourced and
matched to young disabled people
Connexions and Transition Team produce detailed plan with young person
future post 18 with view to employment, from menu of options:
Direct employment (including job coaching, support etc as needed)
College and employment
College and supported or unsupported volunteering
Supported or unsupported volunteering
Others?
Hand over to relevant service in Redbridge Disability Employment Network
Job coaching/support
Volunteering/supported volunteering
      Direct as appropriate to other employment services run by Job Centre Plus
      or Ellingham (nationally funded)
      Careful management of young people to ensure they do not get blocked
      (e.g. in volunteering) and move through to employment
      Independent Travel Training provider appointed                              LA commissioned
      Launch Redbridge Disability Employment Network
      Support up to 20 young non FACS disabled people into employment             £70k11
      YEAR 1 TOTAL                                                                £120k




11
     Estimated at £3.5k per young person
Year 2 Tasks                                                                     Costs
Workforce development and training including                                     £10k (est) + own
PCP                                                                              funds?
TSI
Managing appropriate behaviours
Work with schools                                                                £20k (est) + own
Schools have to buy in to increasing expectations that disabled and learning     funds?
disabled people can work and have careers
Need to increase their commitment and engagement at highest levels
Have to source genuine work placements as they are not happening at the
moment
Person centred planning and high aspirations
Work with colleges                                                               £20k (est) + own
Colleges have to buy in to increasing expectations that disabled and learning    funds?
disabled people can work and have careers
Need to increase their commitment and engagement at highest levels
Look at course content and need for commissioning new courses related to
employment
Person centred planning and high aspirations
Examine viability of creating new Vocational College in Redbridge, taking into
account
Available national and other funding streams
Transport and other savings
Value to local community
Possibility of establishing campus from an established College in Redbridge
Support up to 40 young non FAC disabled people into employment                   £140k
Support up to 20 FAC disabled people into employment                             £70k
YEAR 2 TOTAL   £260k
  Year 3 Tasks                                                           Costs
  Support up to 60 young non FAC disabled people into employment         £210k
  Support up to 40 FAC disabled people into employment                   £140k
  YEAR 3 TOTAL                                                           £350k


Challenges
Engagement across different partners and genuine buy-in
Influencing across different partners with different legal frameworks, priorities and budget pressures
Effecting change of attitudes to disabled and especially learning disabled people
Getting real and meaningful buy-in from business
Capacity and funding
                                                 Annex A
FAIR ACCESS TO CARE CRITERIA

Critical - when

 life is, or will be, threatened; and/or
 significant health problems have developed or will develop; and/or
 there is, or will be, little or no choice and control over vital aspects of the
  immediate environment; and/or
 serious abuse or neglect has occurred or will occur; and/or
 there is, or will be, an inability to carry out vital personal care or domestic
  routines; and/or
 vital involvement in work, education or learning cannot or will not be
  sustained; and/or
 vital social support systems and relationships cannot or will not be
    sustained; and/or
 vital family and other social roles and responsibilities cannot or will not be
  undertaken.

Substantial – when

 there is, or will be, only partial choice and control over the immediate
  environment; and/or
 abuse or neglect has occurred or will occur; and/or
 there is, or will be, an inability to carry out the majority of personal care or
  domestic routines; and/or
 involvement in many aspects of work, education or learning cannot or will not
  be sustained; and/or
 the majority of social support systems and relationships cannot or will not be
  sustained; and/or
 the majority of family and other social roles and responsibilities cannot or will
  not be undertaken.

Moderate – when

 there is, or will be, an inability to carry out several personal care or domestic
  routines; and/or
 involvement in several aspects of work, education or learning cannot or will
  not be sustained; and/or
 several social support systems and relationships cannot or will not be
  sustained; and/or
 several family and other social roles and responsibilities cannot or will not be
  undertaken.

Low - when

 there is, or will be, an inability to carry out one or two personal care or
  domestic routines; and/or
 involvement in one or two aspects of work, education or learning cannot or
  will not be sustained; and/or
 one or two social support systems and relationships cannot or will not
  sustained; and/or
 one or two family and other social roles and responsibilities cannot or will not
  be undertaken.
Redbridge demographics - detail                                                   Annex
B

Redbridge is an outer London borough with a population of approximately
267,700 residents in mid 2009, an estimated 12% increase since the 2001
census. It is the ninth most diverse borough in the country and approximately
40% of its population hail from a minority ethnic background. It is estimated that
there are 71,100 children aged 0 – 19 within the borough, making up 26% of the
total population. Redbridge also has high levels of deprivation and affluence
with Clementswood ward being considered the most deprived area and
Monkhams ward being the most affluent. Males and females are equally
represented in the borough.

It is estimated that there are approximately 4,000 disabled children in the
borough, 1,500 disabled children who would need some additional support to
access some services and 853 severely disabled children that would need
significant support to access services12.

This growth has placed significant pressure on school places in Redbridge.
Although generally educational attainment is high - Redbridge is consistently
ranked in the UK’s top 10 regions for GCSE results - data on the attainment of
those with learning disabilities and autism is difficult to quantify.

As part of a review of Special Education Needs in 2011, a detailed review was,
conducted which concluded that from 2006 to 2010 there was 32% increase in
the numbers of children with Special Educational Needs, this is
disproportionately higher than overall growth in the child population. A
breakdown is provided below.

Comparison of the relative growth between Redbridge, School, Special School
and Statemented populations from 2001 to 2010 (Pupils on LA School Census)




12
  “Estimates for the number of disabled children in the UK and England vary from 5% to 7%
of the child population. Figures obtained through Disability Living Allowance tend to be used
for the group of children that the Local Authorities should be prioritizing, (as this group of
children have historically not been in receipt of services). The number of severely disabled
children is approximately 17% of the total number of disabled children, or 1.2% of the total
local child population. The 1.2% can be used to provide a ‘ball park’ figure for the number of
severely disabled children in a given area.” Transforming Short Breaks: What information do
we need and how do we use it – Together for Disabled Children.
All indications are that there are significant numbers of young people who need
additional support and training to gain employment and these needs are
increasing. School Census data indicates that there are increasing numbers
entering education.

The key for the following tables is:-

ASD – Autistic Spectrum Disorder
BESD      - Behaviour Social Emotional Disability
HI   – Hearing Impaired
MLD – Moderate Learning Disability
MSI – Multi Sensory Impairment
OTH – Other
PD – Physical Disability
PMLD       – Profound and Multiple Learning Disability
SLCN – Speech, Language and Communications Disorders
SLD – Severe Learning Disability
SPLD       – Specific Learning Disability

Primary disabilities only are listed so pupils with multiple diagnoses are not
double counted. Historically there has been a reluctance to diagnose Autism
and there is anecdotal evidence that pupils with a label of SLCN or MLD and in
some cases SLD are also on the Autistic Spectrum.

The pupils with a declared disability listed on the Annual Schools Census has
risen from 2, 742 in 2006 to 3,747 in 2011. A detailed year on year breakdown is
given by year group below, demonstrating that Redbridge is in a good position
to plan ahead for demand. The data also indicates that the profile of Redbridge
population is becoming “needier.” Out of Borough children are not included in
these figures; however children from neighbouring boroughs who are in
Redbridge Schools are included in these figures.

School Census 2011
Year ASD BESD         HI   MLD    MSI   OTH   PD    PMLD   SLCN    SLD   SPLD   VI   Total
N1     0    1         4    0      0     0     0     2      6       0     0      0    13
N2     11   12        3    5      0     7     1     11     50      1     1      1    103
R      16   19        11   5      0     8     11    6      64      5     3      5    153
1      21   30        3    19     0     6     10    3      77      1     11     6    187
2      24   43        2    46     0     8     17    5      76      4     12     5    242
3      24   44        8    58     2     11    21    2      79      7     22     3    281
4      31   62        10   71     1     11    10    7      71      3     31     4    312
5      28   65        8    71     0     6     13    6      75      7     35     8    322
6      16   90        7    80     0     3     13    6      63      4     50     3    335
7      24   57        7    97     0     8     9     6      67      10    24     3    312
8      17   72        5    130    0     3     9     5      40      18    26     4    329
9      5    95        4    153    0     4     10    5      32      21    23     4    356
10     14   90        8    112    1     2     11    6      37      10    18     0    309
11     14   119       5    92     0     3     9     5      24      7     14     0    292
12     8    14        4    54     1     7     10    3      8       8     8      3    128
13     4    5         2    18     0     2     6     3      4       8     5      1    58
14     1    0         0    2      0     0     0     6      1       5     0      0    15
Total 258 818         91   1013   5     89    160   87     774     119   283    50   3747
School Census 2010
Year ASD BESD        HI   MLD    MSI   OTH   PD    PMLD   SLCN   SLD   SPLD   VI   Total
N1     3    0        2    1      0     0     0     2      5      3     0      0    16
N2     7    5        7    2      0     2     4     4      29     2     1      0    63
R      19   15       4    13     0     8     7     2      55     0     5      5    133
1      23   30       2    31     0     13    17    6      64     2     10     2    200
2      21   53       7    33     2     10    18    0      82     4     14     4    248
3      27   60       9    59     1     4     12    7      72     6     24     5    286
4      25   58       6    62     1     3     11    9      69     7     34     7    292
5      17   78       7    84     0     6     13    5      57     4     39     3    313
6      20   66       7    103    0     4     14    4      45     14    49     7    333
7      15   66       3    142    0     3     9     3      33     21    28     4    327
8      5    91       4    167    0     5     11    5      35     21    21     4    369
9      10   94       8    122    1     4     11    7      36     11    22     0    326
10     13   104      3    117    0     4     7     5      23     6     17     0    299
11     15   104      7    111    1     13    13    3      14     7     18     2    308
12     7    19       4    50     1     1     8     3      8      9     7      2    119
13     6    5        1    18     0     1     1     6      5      6     6      1    56
14     0    0        0    2      0     0     1     1      0      7     0      0    11
Total 233 848        81   1117   7     81    157   72     632    130   295    46   3699
School Census 2009
Year ASD BESD        HI   MLD   MSI   OTH   PD    PMLD   SLCN   SLD   SPLD   VI   Total
N1     1    2        3    1     0     1     0     1      2      1     0      0    12
N2     5    4        4    1     1     5     3     1      25     0     4      2    55
R      19   22       1    17    0     7     11    4      44     1     8      2    136
1      18   31       6    19    1     6     12    3      64     5     4      4    173
2      24   39       8    40    1     4     10    8      72     6     16     5    233
3      21   49       5    50    1     2     13    9      62     6     26     7    251
4      15   59       6    74    0     3     12    8      59     5     38     4    283
5      20   49       7    86    0     3     16    3      44     11    51     5    295
6      14   68       4    75    1     7     8     4      37     6     44     3    271
7      5    54       4    128   0     3     11    5      35     23    26     3    297
8      13   76       8    109   1     5     8     9      36     12    18     1    296
9      11   94       3    105   0     5     7     5      30     7     22     0    289
10     17   68       7    101   1     5     15    4      14     9     20     1    262
11     12   70       4    108   1     6     9     3      18     11    27     1    270
12     6    13       3    23    0     3     3     6      9      6     12     1    85
13     8    2        1    19    0     0     4     1      2      8     7      2    54
14     0    0        0    1     0     0     0     3      1      3     0      0    8
Total 209 700        74   957   8     65    142   77     554    120   323    41   3270
School Census 2008
Year ASD BESD        HI   MLD   MSI   OTH   PD    PMLD   SLCN   SLD   SPLD   VI   Total
N1     0    0        0    0     0     1     0     3      1      0     0      0    5
N2     6    4        0    4     0     2     2     1      21     0     4      1    45
R      11   18       3    7     1     4     6     2      57     6     4      2    121
1      25   33       7    17    1     4     6     6      66     4     7      3    179
2      22   39       5    32    1     2     14    8      64     2     16     3    208
3      16   48       7    67    0     3     8     8      54     6     23     4    244
4      21   41       8    74    0     2     15    2      56     11    40     5    275
5      12   65       3    64    1     4     9     3      39     6     42     3    251
6      20   65       8    82    1     3     15    5      45     14    46     6    310
7      12   66       9    92    1     3     8     5      38     11    16     1    262
8      11   81       5    88    0     4     8     3      37     13    19     0    269
9      16   63       7    80    1     4     15    6      17     8     19     2    238
10     16   72       4    98    1     4     8     4      17     11    25     1    261
11     7    59       4    74    0     7     6     6      20     7     22     5    217
12     11   4        4    29    0     3     6     2      6      7     9      1    82
13     3    5        3    13    0     1     3     3      2      3     5      1    42
14     0    0        0    1     0     0     2     3      0      6     1      0    13
Total 209 663        77   822   8     51    131   70     540    115   298    38   3022
School Census 2007
Year ASD BESD        HI   MLD   MSI   OTH   PD    PMLD   SLCN   SLD   SPLD   VI   Total
N1     0    0        0    0     0     0     1     0      2      0     1      0    4
N2     3    4        2    6     0     1     3     1      18     4     0      1    43
R      19   18       4    11    1     2     3     5      48     2     6      1    120
1      20   27       4    12    0     2     11    10     48     5     10     1    150
2      18   39       7    32    1     3     9     4      56     7     16     4    196
3      19   39       8    58    0     1     14    3      50     11    28     6    237
4      16   41       5    51    0     3     11    3      39     6     36     3    214
5      18   57       5    75    1     3     15    6      42     16    43     5    286
6      12   76       9    85    0     1     11    4      36     13    44     2    293
7      9    75       5    85    0     6     7     3      43     10    21     1    265
8      13   66       7    81    1     3     13    5      18     8     15     2    232
9      13   77       5    95    1     4     8     4      17     9     23     1    257
10     6    62       5    88    0     5     7     6      22     8     22     3    234
11     9    48       4    71    0     6     6     3      18     4     26     1    196
12     5    12       4    36    0     1     2     3      4      5     8      2    82
13     2    2        1    3     0     1     5     3      1      8     7      0    33
14     0    0        0    0     0     0     1     7      0      2     0      0    10
Total 182 643        75   789   5     42    127   70     462    118   306    33   2852
School Census 2006
Year ASD BESD        HI   MLD   MSI   OTH   PD    PMLD   SLCN   SLD   SPLD   VI   Total
N1     3    0        1    0     1     0     1     2      6      1     0      0    15
N2     10   4        2    9     0     3     2     3      17     3     1      0    54
R      10   20       4    2     1     2     11    7      38     1     5      1    102
1      15   29       8    19    0     4     12    7      59     4     11     4    172
2      16   31       11   35    1     1     19    1      49     11    18     6    199
3      11   34       3    44    0     4     9     4      40     6     27     3    185
4      18   50       6    81    1     3     16    5      48     14    29     3    274
5      11   52       8    82    0     0     10    4      37     13    45     3    265
6      17   69       1    88    1     3     7     2      29     9     43     2    271
7      13   52       7    87    1     2     12    5      13     7     15     2    216
8      11   63       6    102   1     1     8     7      17     8     25     2    251
9      6    48       5    84    0     3     6     5      18     5     22     3    205
10     10   62       4    85    0     7     7     4      18     6     29     1    233
11     4    56       1    83    0     1     3     4      9      4     33     3    201
12     4    3        3    19    0     1     5     3      3      8     8      0    57
13     2    1        3    8     0     0     5     7      1      4     4      1    36
14     0    0        1    3     0     0     0     1      0      1     0      0    6
Total 161 574        74   831   7     35    133   71     402    105   315    34   2742
In parallel to this growth the numbers of children accessing Social Care through
the Children’s with Disabilities Team (CWDT) in Redbridge Children’s Trust has
also significantly increased. These are those with high levels of need and are a
small proportion of the overall numbers as reported in the Schools Census data.
                 Numbers of Children Known to the CWDT

  700

  600                                                                                               589
                                                                                 542      563
  500                                                       507      518
                                   431          451
  400                   383
           346
  300

  200

  100

   0
        2003         2004     2005       2006         2007        2008     2009        2010     2011

Source: Administrative Data

Of these numbers the largest group have a diagnosis of Autistic Spectrum
Disorders.
                                                       Disabilites




                                        2% 1%
                                   3%
                              3%




               19%
                                                                           39%                   Autistic Spectrum
                                                                                                 Complex Health
                                                                                                 Cerebral Palsy
                                                                                                 Downs Syndrome
                                                                                                 Health
                                                                                                 Learning Disability
                                                                                                 Learning and Physical Disability
           0%                                                                                    No Disability
                                                                                                 Physical Disability
                                                                                                 Sensory
                8%




                            9%
                                                      16%
NB - No Disability – refers to siblings who need additional Social Worker
support.

Transition

The Children with Disabilities Team has one Transition Social Worker who
works with young people making the transition from Children’ s Services to Adult
Services, although she starts to work with the children at age 14. These generally
represent the highest level of need where families require additional support
from Social Workers, and are a small proportion of the overall disabled child
population. Over the past 2 years she has tracked young people’s destinations
in the school leaving year, at the moment most of this cohort will qualify for Adult
Social Care, although that may change if the Adult Social Care budgets are
stretched.

Transition Destinations

2010
College                      15 - 2 of whom were excluded
Day Service                        6
Residential College                3
NEET
Specialist Residential Placement 1
Other - 1 young person was engaged in a learning opportunity with a work
focus.

2011
College      17 - 1 of whom was excluded, 1 who did not like it and left, 1 went on
to university.
Day Service                        12
Residential College                4
NEET                               1
Specialist Residential Placement 3

Expected 2012
College                      21
Day Service                        9
Residential College                3
NEET                         1
Specialist Residential Placement 1
Projected Figures
Total                        Included in total with autism
2012-13          29                15
2013-14          30                15
2014-15         48                 25
2015-16          38                17
2016-17         34                 13

Total:                       179            85

Many of the young people going to college also receive a social care package
for the days they are not at college. Those that are excluded from college
usually go on to receive a bigger care package. 2012 is obviously based on
expected destinations at this point in time.

Connexions

When young people with LDD13 (Learning Disability/Difficulty) leave school or
college, typically they are channelled to a local Connexions service, whose
services they can access up to age 25. Details of their current caseload are
detailed below.

LDD is the term used in legislation while 'learners with learning difficulties and/or
disabilities' is a deliberately wide definition in common usage in the FE system,
and includes people with mental health difficulties, autistic spectrum conditions,
dyslexia, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, behavioural emotional or social
disorders, physical, sensory and cognitive impairments and other identified and
non-identified difficulties in learning. All of these conditions could fall within the
definition of learning difficulties for the purpose of a Learning Difficulties
Assessment.


13
  The definition of learning difficulties is set out in Section 15ZA(6) and (7) of the Education
Act 1996 (as inserted by section 41 of the ASCL Act).A person has a learning difficulty if

     (a) he has a significantly greater difficulty in learning than the majority of persons of his
         age, or
     (b) he has a disability which either prevents or hinders him from making use of facilities of
         a kind generally provided by institutions providing post-16 education or training.

But a person is not to be taken to have a learning difficulty solely because the language (or
form of language) in which he is or will be taught is different from a language (or form of
language) which has at any time been spoken in his home.
Service Users are not always tracked after FE College or Higher Education so it
is impossible to ascertain how many of those go onto employment but anecdotal
evidence suggests very few leave local FE colleges to go on to .gainful
employment, a significant number go onto day care or benefits, however data
from Job Centre Plus has been difficult to obtain.

Unfortunately none of the adult services collect data which breaks down into
different types of disability.

The caseload of the Transition Social Worker typically would also be included in
this data.
Connexions Distribution by current Age

Yp_Age LDD (not             Statemented Grand
       statemented)                     Total
16     4                    72          76
17     6                    117         123
18     12                   115         127
19     23                   112         135
20     10                   93          103
21     33                   74          107
22     29                   59          88
23     12                   44          56
24     9                    32          41
25     2                    2           4
Grand  140                  720         860
Total


Statemented/non-Statemented Distribution by current Destination

Destination_Type_Code LDD (not              Statemented Grand Total
                      statemented)
Employment            21                    79            100
FE College            74                    331           405
Higher Education      20                    69            89
NEET                  11                    60            71
School Sixth Form     3                     156           159
Sixth Form College    4                     5             9
Training              7                     20            27
Grand Total           140                   720           860
NEET Distribution by Ward

Ward_Description                    NEET    Grand Total
Aldborough                          8       8
Barkingside                         3       3
Bridge                              2       2
Chadwell                            3       3
Church End                          3       3
Clayhall                            2       2
Clementswood                        5       5
Cranbrook                           1       1
Fairlop                             6       6
Fullwell                            6       6
Goodmayes                           1       1
Hainault                            9       9
Loxford                             9       9
Mayfield                            1       1
Newbury                             2       2
Seven Kings                         3       3
Snaresbrook                         2       2
Valentines                          4       4
Wanstead                            1       1
Grand Total                         71      71

It would be proposed to develop the data provided by the Transitions Team and
by Connexions to provide a barometer of success of any project, by measuring
it’s impact on the numbers entering employment either after school, college or
university.

Also savings to the economy should be quantified by not only getting the person
with a disability into paid employment and off benefits but also the savings in
terms enabling parents to re-enter gainful employment and off carers allowance.

Employment Prospects

The Foundation for people with Learning Disabilities estimates that on average
across the UK, 7% of people with learning disabilities are in employment while
65% of them want to a job.
A National Autistic Society survey indicates that around 15% of adults with
autism nationally are in full time employment and 9% are in part time
employment. If we apply these figures locally, on average there will be 229 are
in full time employment and 138 are in part time employment.14 Estimates are
that some 79% of those with autism on Incapacity Benefit want to work.

In Redbridge it has proved difficult to establish the numbers of people with a
learning disability and/or autism in employment. Job Centre Data does not
distinguish between those with a physical or medical disability and those with a
learning disability and employers rely on employees declaring a disability.

Government Indicator NI146

The Government indicator NI146 asks what proportion of people with learning
disabilities had paid work when they last had a review with their social worker.
For each local authority, the indicator shows the number per thousand, of
people with learning disability, who have

 any paid job,
 any voluntary job, or
 any paid or voluntary job.

Unfortunately there is no count of people who do not have either a paid or
voluntary job, so it is impossible to tell how many people the local authorities
don't know about.

On this indicator in 2009/10 Redbridge is estimated to have 14.1% of people
with Learning Difficulties who are in paid or voluntary employment, in 2008/9 the
indicator was at 30.7%.

Although the absolute figures are misleading as it only includes people with a
Social Worker it is interesting to note that this figure is going down rather than
up, which is against the trend in other London Boroughs. We have Adult
Services to examine this information as we suspect that there has been
anomalies in the submissions of data.




14
  Based on average 139,000 people of working age (16-64) in each local authority area
(ONS) multiplied by 0.011 (based on the NHS prevalence study figures for autism)
Outcomes   Annex C

								
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