Functional Text - PowerPoint

Document Sample
Functional Text - PowerPoint Powered By Docstoc
					            Laine Ferguson
            4th Grade Class
Literacy Facilitator: Susan Huntington
       Frank Tillery Elementary
               Rogers, AR
            January 19, 2012
   GANAG is a lesson structure that allows
   teachers to plan for student use of research
   based instructional strategies.

G= goal
A= access prior knowledge
N= new information
A= application
G= generalize the goal
                                  Creating the Plan
Topic: Functional/Practical Text
Framework: R. 10.4.18-Read a variety of functional/practical text, including brochures, newspapers, and magazine articles.
Learning Objective: SWBAT use functional text in everyday situations to gain new information/knowledge.
Language Objective: SWBAT read and discuss functional text with group members using realia, and begin writing and analyzing information
    independently using text cards.
Common Core Standard RI.4.7 : Interpret information presented visually, orally, or quantitatively and explain how the information
    contributes to an understanding of the text in which it appears.

G-Goal Setting for the Learners
Students will fill in the first section of the “goal setting” sheet, scoring themselves on their ability to use functional text in everyday situations to
     gain new information.
______________________________________________________________________________
A-Access Prior Knowledge
Students will begin thinking about functional text by discussing the questions: “What do we know about functional text?” and “What can we learn
     from functional text that helps us in our everyday lives?” Select students will then share their thoughts aloud with the class.
______________________________________________________________________________
N-Acquire New Knowledge
Students will be introduced to the four categories of functional text:
-We read to follow directions.
-We read to gain information.
-We read to use references.
-We read to fill in forms.
*Students will fill in notes as each type of functional text is introduced.
Students will then be given different types of realia in small groups and will talk about each type of realia, discussing which category their realia
     falls into. Students will also choose one piece of realia and will write down 3 “cool facts” they learned by reading the text found on the realia.
     Students will choose one spokesperson to share their “cool facts” with the class.
______________________________________________________________________________
A-Apply Knowledge
Students will be given a practical text card depicting various forms of functional text and will answer comprehension questions about their
     functional text. Some students will work independently while others work with a partner (based on ability level).
______________________________________________________________________________
G-Revisit the Goal
At the end of the lesson, students will re-score themselves based on their ability to use functional text to gain new information. Students will also
     name one thing that they learned during the lesson.
 Purpose of the GANAG Structure
 To give students the opportunity to actively use the
 nine high-yield strategies:
  (2) Identifying Similarities and    (7) Cooperative Learning
  Differences
                                      (8) Setting Objectives and
  (3) Summarizing and Note Taking     Providing Feedback

  (4) Reinforcing Effort and          (9) Generating and Testing
  Providing Recognition               Hypotheses

  (5) Homework and Practice           (10) Cues, Questions and Advance
                                      Organizers
  (6) Nonlinguistic Representations
Setting the Objective
G- Goal
I can use functional text in everyday situations to gain new information.




                                       Students were asked to score
                                       themselves on the lesson objective.

                                        (8) Setting Objectives and
                                        Providing Feedback
A-Access Prior Knowledge
 “What do we know about functional text?”
 “What can we learn from functional text that helps us in our everyday
  lives?”




                                            (10) Cues, Questions and Advance
                                            Organizers
 N-New Information
  Students took notes over the 4 types of functional text and discussed examples in
  cooperative learning groups . One representative was chosen from each group to
  share their examples with the class.

(3) Summarizing and Note Taking




                                                     (7) Cooperative Learning
N-New Information types of realia and were
In cooperative groups, students were given various
asked to choose six items and identify the category of functional text each
piece represented.




(6) Nonlinguistic Representations                (7) Cooperative Learning




                      (3) Summarizing and Note Taking
N-New Information
Students were then asked to choose one product of interest as a group,
write three interesting facts they learned from the document, and
have a representative share those facts with the class.




(4) Reinforcing Effort and                  (2) Identifying Similarities and
Providing Recognition                       Differences
A- Application
Students were asked to apply critical thinking skills and complete
comprehension questions using text cards. Students worked in pairs or
independently to complete the task.




   (5) Homework and Practice         (7) Cooperative Learning
G- Generalize the Goal
 Based on new information and application, students revisited the
 goal and scored themselves on their ability to use functional text
 in everyday situations. Students stated one fact they learned from
 the lesson.




                   (8) Setting Objectives and Providing
                   Feedback
Marzano, R. J., Pickering, D. J., & Pollock, J. E. (2001). Classroom
instruction that works: Research-based strategies for increasing student
achievement. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum
Development.



Pollock, J. E. (2007). Improving student learning one teacher at a time.
Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.




Pollock, J. E., & Ford, Sharon M. (2009). Improving student learning one
principal at a time. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and
Curriculum Development.

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:219
posted:11/7/2012
language:Latin
pages:13