Literary Miscellany - William Reese Company.pdf

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					Literary
Miscellany
A Spring Selection from the
16th through 21st Centuries
Poetry and Prose
Manuscripts, Fine Printing,
Screenplays and Theatre Scripts,
Illustrated Books and Bibliography




Catalogue 269



WILLIAM REESE COMPANY
409 TEMPLE STREET
NEW HAVEN, CT. 06511 USA
203.789.8081
FAX: 203.865.7653
litorder@reeseco.com
www.reeseco.com
                                           TERMS
Material herein is offered subject to prior sale. All items are as described, but are considered
to be sent subject to approval unless otherwise noted. Notice of return must be given within
ten days unless specific arrangements are made prior to shipment. All returns must be made
conscientiously and expediently.

Connecticut residents must be billed state sales tax. Postage and insurance are billed to all
non-prepaid domestic orders. Orders shipped outside of the United States are sent by air or
courier, unless otherwise requested, with full charges billed at our discretion.

The usual courtesy discount is extended only to recognized booksellers who offer reciprocal
opportunities from their catalogues or stock.

We have 24 hour telephone answering and a Fax machine for receipt of orders or messages.
Catalogue orders should be e-mailed to: litorder@reeseco.com

We do not maintain an open bookshop, and a considerable portion of our literature inventory is
situated in our adjunct office and warehouse in Hamden, CT. Hence, a minimum of 24 hours
notice is necessary prior to some items in this catalogue being made available for shipping or
inspection (by appointment) in our main offices on Temple Street.

We accept payment via Mastercard or Visa, and require the account number, expiration date,
CVC code, and full billing name and address in order to process payment. Institutional billing
requirements may, as always, be accommodated upon request.

_________________________________________________________________________

                       We invite you to visit our website
                              www.reeseco.com
        where over thirty-five thousand items from our inventory are
         searchable and may be ordered directly via a secure server.
    Significant new acquisitions will be posted to our own web site before
                they appear on any of the collective databases.

         Those wishing to receive e-mail notification of the posting of
          new catalogues and lists to our website may request same
                  by forwarding expressions of interest to
                             info@reeseco.com

_______________________________________________________________________

                                 William Reese Company
                                  409 Temple Street
                                New Haven, CT. 06511
                                         USA

                              Phone: 203.789.8081
                                Fax: 203.865.7653
                           e-mail: litorder@reeseco.com

                              Members ABAA and ILAB
1. Adams, Andy: A TEXAS MATCHMAKER. Boston & New York: Houghton Mifflin, 1904.
Gilt pictorial brown cloth. Frontis and plates by E. Boyd Smith. First edition of the author’s
second novel. Skiff and Doheny bookplates, otherwise a fine, bright copy, though without
the dust jacket.
SMITH A-51.                                                                              $65.

2. [Albee, Edward]: Van Vechten, Carl: Original Portrait Photograph of Edward Albee.
[New York]. 18 April 1961. Original borderless gelatin silver print, 25.3 x 20.5 cm (9 7/
8 x 8 7/8 inches). Somewhat amateurishly matted. Small spot on verso, else fine.

A striking and characteristic portrait by Van Vechten of the American dramatist, seated,
semi-profile, with smile and cigarette, dating from the year prior to the first performances
of Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? With Van Vechten’s studio stamp on the verso, and
with his manuscript subject identification, negative number and date in ink. Another image
from the same session was collected in Portraits (1978), and another is present in the
LC Van Vechten Portrait archive, but not this image.
KELLNER G17.                                                                          $1250.

3. [Albee, Edward]: Lehman, Ernest [screenwriter]: EDWARD ALBEE’S “WHO’S AFRAID
OF VIRGINIA WOOLF?” SCREENPLAY BY.... Burbank, CA: Warner Bros. - Chenault
Co., 30 July - 23 November 1965. [3],153 leaves plus lettered inserts. Quarto. Mechanically
reproduced typescript, printed on rectos only of pale green and blue paper stocks. Bradbound
in printed studio wrappers. Studio stamp on upper wrapper circled in pencil, a few faint
creases, smudges and one small nick to lower wrapper, title written on spine, otherwise
near fine.
One of the most significant adaptations to film of an American play produced in the 1960s.
Denoted the “Final Draft,” but with revises on blue paper dated as late as 23 November.
Lehman also served as producer for the 1966 film, which was directed by Mike Nichols,
and starred Elizabeth Taylor, Richard Burton, George Segal and Sandy Dennis. The resulting
cinematic tour-de-force was nominated for a wide array of Academy Awards and Golden
Globe Awards (including nominations for Lehman’s screenplay), and in spite of the controversy
attending its production, won in five of the Academy Award categories.                $1250.

4. [Alechinsky, Pierre]: Kenan, Amos: LES TIREURS LE LANGUE. Torino & Paris: Edizione
d’Art Fratelli Pozzo / Chez Guy la Prat, [ca. 1961]. Oblong quarto. Cloth, with pictorial
onlay. Plates and decorations. Tips a bit worn, otherwise about fine.
First edition, trade issue, of this translation by Christiane Rochefort. Illustrated with lithographs
and drawings by Alechinsky. One of a total edition of 2000 copies. This copy bears Alechinsky’s
signed presentation inscription (dated 10 V 63) incorporating one of the drawings on the
title-page.                                                                                     $300.

5. Algren, Nelson: LE DESERT DU NEON. [Paris]: NRF/Gallimard, [1969]. Printed wrappers.
Fine, and largely unopened.
First edition in French of The Neon Wilderness, translated by J.-L. Muller and M. Rambaud.
One of 37 numbered copies on vélin pur fil.                                           $85.

                                 Two Pre-Production Drafts
6. Allen, Woody: “PLAY IT AGAIN, SAM” SCREENPLAY BY ... BASED ON A PLAY BY....
[Los Angeles]: Paramount Pictures, [nd. but no earlier than 30 September 1971]. [1],120
leaves. Quarto. Mechanically reproduced typescript, printed on rectos only of white stock,
with a single inserted dated revise on blue paper. Bradbound in printed studio wrappers.
A few smudges to wrappers, otherwise very good.
A “revised shooting script” of Allen’s own adaptation of his play to the screen. This copy
has a single blue inserted revise, dated 30 September 1971 - the remainder of the draft
is undated. The film, released in May 1972, was directed by Herbert Ross, and starred
Allen, Diane Keaton, Tony Roberts, Jerry Lacy, Viva, Joy Bang, et al. This copy is
accompanied by a rather worn copy of an earlier draft (again formally undated), [1],98 leaves,
plus lettered inserts, boltbound in stamped Studio Duplicating Service wrappers, which
bears frequently significant annotations in an unknown hand by a careful and critical reader
of the time, including suggestions, criticisms, scene blocking notes, etc. It differs in many
ways from the shooting script, and bears an ink manuscript date ‘7/2/71’ (corrected from
‘72’). Actual pre-production scripts by Allen tend to be rather uncommon, their circulation
being largely confined to those actually involved directly in production.              $1750.

7. ANATHEMA AN UNORTHODOX QUARTERLY. Boston: Satyr Press, April/June 1935
through Jan/March 1936. I:1-4 (all published under this title). Printed wrappers and self-
wrappers. Slight tanning, nick to one fore-edge, very good or better.
Edited by David Page and William Fitzgerald. In these early issues, no political measure
was applied to contributors, but beginning in April 1936, the title was changed to The
Monarchist Quarterly, and the content rapidly shifted to reactionary political concerns.
Sherry Mangan, John Wheelwright, Howard Blake, R.P. Blackmur and David C. deJong
appear in these issues.
HOFFMAN, et al, p.329.                                                             $100.

8. [Anthology]: PICTURES FROM SOCIETY. GRAVE AND GAY. London: Sampson, Low,
Son and Marston, 1866. viii,226pp. plus plates. Large, thick octavo. Publisher’s green cloth,
elaborately decorated in gilt, with decorative inlays in red, blue, white and purple, a.e.g.
Extensively illustrated with plates. Fore-edge of one board has a short strip of fraying, light
occasional foxing, bookplate, modest edgewear; a good copy.
First edition of this substantial selection of text and illustrative matter gleaned from the
pages of London Society, including work by Millais, Watson, Du Maurier, Crane, et al.
REID, p. 168 etc.                                                                       $85.

9. [Anthology]: Macleod, Norman [ed]: CALENDAR: AN ANTHOLOGY OF 1940 POETRY.
Prairie City: The Press of James A. Decker, [1940]. Printed wrapper over stiff wrappers.
Spine slightly chipped and mended, otherwise a very good copy.
First edition of this offshoot of the YMHA Poetry Center, including work by Williams, Auden,
Hughes, Patchen, Devlin, Kreymborg, Davidman, Ford, Jolas, et al, much of it published
for the first time in book form.                                                        $75.
                          Signed by Many of the Contributors
10. [Anthology]: Nemerov, Howard [ed]: CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN POETRY.
[Washington]: Voice of America Forum Lectures, [1965]. Printed wrappers. White wrappers
somewhat soiled and rubbed, bookplate of a noted collector/bookseller, but otherwise very
good.
First edition, first printing, published solely for distribution outside the U.S. and including
some contributions appearing for the first time in book form. This copy has been signed
(most at their contributions), by Nemerov, Marianne Moore, Barbara Howes, Robert Duncan,
May Swenson, Richard Wilbur, Gregory Corso and William Jay Smith.                         $300.

11. [Anthology]: Cooney, Seamus, et al [eds]: BLAST 3. [Santa Barbara]: Black Sparrow
Press, 1984. Folio. Cloth and decorated boards. Plates. Portraits. Facsimiles. Fine in plain
paper wrapper, as issued, with record laid in.
First edition, limited issue, of the premiere number of the reincarnation of Blast, under
the editorship of Cooney, Brad Morrow, Hugh Kenner and Bernard Lafourcade. Includes
the first book publication of Roy Campbell’s study of Wyndham Lewis, letters and speeches
by Pound, and other contributions by Davenport, Loy, Oates, Eshleman, Dorn, Clark, Creeley,
Olson, Sanford, Bowles, Roditi, et al. One of 400 numbered copies (of 426), specially bound.
Includes reproductions (some in color) of art work by Lewis, Gaudier-Brzeska, Ayrton, et
al.                                                                                    $125.

12. [Anti-Catholic Literature]: THE FRENCH CONVERT; BEING A TRUE RELATION OF
THE HAPPY CONVERSION OF A NOBLE FRENCH LADY, FROM THE ERRORS AND
SUPERSTITIONS OF POPERY, TO THE REFORMED RELIGION, BY MEANS OF A
PROTESTANT GARDENER, HER SERVANT, WHEREIN IS SHEWN, HER GREAT AND
UNPARALLELED SUFFERINGS, ON THE ACCOUNT OF HER SAID CONVERSION: AS
ALSO HER WONDERFUL DELIVERANCE FROM TWO ASSASSINS, HIRED BY A POPISH
PRIEST TO MURDER HER: AND OF HER MIRACULOUS PRESERVATION IN A WOOD
FOR TWO YEARS.... Hartford: Printed by John Babcock, 1798. 107pp. 12mo. Original quarter
calf and paper over birch boards. Somewhat darkened and foxed, as usual, occasional mild
discolorations, binding worn but quite sound; actually, a quite well-preserved copy.
One of many North American reprintings of this widely popular and lurid tale, accompanied
by the usual prefatory letter of transmittal signed “A. D’Aurborn.” The first London edition
reported in ESTC appeared in 1696, and the first definitively identified North American printing
cited there (after a 1708 printing that may, in fact, be Dutch), is dated 1725. Many colonial
and post-revolutionary reprints followed, including printings by Dunlap, and Franklin and
Hall. It has been, at various times, attributed to Defoe and to John McGowan, among others.
ESTC locates ten copies, all in North America.
ESTC W12322. EVANS 33323.                                                                $250.

13. Ashbery, John: THREE MADRIGALS. [New York: Poet’s Press, 1968]. Purple wrappers,
printed in black. First edition. In addition to 150 numbered copies and 12 author’s copies,
this is one of an unknown number of out of series copies, marked with an asterisk, and
signed by the author. Spine faded, as often, otherwise fine.                         $150.

14. Auden, W.H.: THE PLATONIC BLOW. New York: Fuck You Press, [1965]. Small quarto.
Printed wrappers. First edition. One of three hundred copies comprising the trade issue.
Fine.                                                                             $300.

15. Auden, W.H., and Brank Brusar [trans]: POEMS IN A CHILD’S EYES PJESME U OCIMA
DJECE. Kripplebush, NY.: Nadja, 1998. Plain wrappers, printed label. Introduction by Robert
Wilson, prefatory note by Edward Mendelson. First edition. One of one hundred numbered
copies, from an edition of 156 copies. As new, with prospectus laid in.               $125.
16. Austen, John: “ALCIBIADES.” Original Wood Engraving, Signed. [Np: The Artist,
ca. 1925]. Original wood engraving, printed on tissue. Image 20 x 14 cm, with large margins.
Old mounting tape in extreme upper corners of margin, some creasing to tissue, but very
good.
Denoted a “trial proof” for an edition of twenty-five copies (plus proofs), titled and signed
by the artist in blue pencil in the lower margin. A striking profile portrait of the Athenian
captain, with a caption in Greek in the lower portion of the image.                      $75.

17. Ballard, J.G.: EMPIRE OF THE SUN. London: Gollancz, 1984. Black cloth, stamped
with Rising Sun vignette on upper board. Fine, in lightly corner-worn slipcase.
First edition, limited issue. One of one hundred numbered copies, specially bound, and
signed by the author. This copy additionally bears Ballard’s presentation inscription to a
British specialist bookseller involved in a publication-day party for Ballard and the book:
“...Very many thanks for everything that you & Forbidden Planet did for the book....” Two
pieces of ephemera related to the event are laid in.                                 $750.

18. Barnes, Djuna: VAGARIES MALICIEUX TWO STORIES. New York: Frank Hallman,
1974. Large octavo. Cloth. Extreme fore-tips dusty, else fine, without printed dust jacket,
as issued.
First edition in this format of two pieces first published in The Double-Dealer. One of
five hundred numbered copies.                                                      $50.
                             By the Writers of Casablanca
19. [Barrie, J.M.]: Epstein, Julius J., and Philip G. Epstein [screenwriters]: ROSALIND.
[Los Angeles]: Paramount Pictures Corporation, 3 January - 30 September 1952. [3],130pp.
plus lettered revises. Quarto. Mimeographed typescript, printed on rectos only of white,
blue and goldenrod stock. Bradbound. Title leaf and terminal blank a bit frayed and creased,
with a few relevant ink and pencil notes to former, otherwise very good.
Denoted a “Final White Script,” but including a multitude of revised leaves on colored stock
spanning the dates above. An adaptation to the screen by the Epstein brothers of J.M.
Barrie’s play, “Rosalind,” eventually released in 1954 as Forever Female, under the direction
of Irving Rapper, starring Ginger Rogers, William Holden and Paul Douglas. The Oscar-
winning Epsteins were prolific and successful screenwriters, known for their adaptations
of stage properties, the most notable among them being Casablanca.                     $400.

20. [Barry, Phillip]: [Jackson, Horace, et al (screenwriters)]: ANIMAL KINGDOM. [Los Angeles]:
Warner Bros., 15-22 September 1943. [3],138 leaves (modified somewhat by inserted revises
on colored papers). Quarto. Mimeographed typescript, printed on rectos only. Bradbound
in wrappers with studio rubberstamps and captions. Wrappers quite chipped, cast and title
information inked on upper wrapper in later hand, internally very good.
A very curious script, denoted “revised final,” paving the way for the 1946 retranslation to
the screen of Barry’s play, eventually released under the title One More Tomorrow. A
prefatory note explains the process evident in this script: “The crossed-out sections in
this script designate the material from the old version that has been shot and will be reused.
Anything not crossed out will have to be re-shot.” Evidently, the studio intended to rely
heavily on the original 1932 script by Jackson, Edward Griffith and Adela Rogers St. John,
as well as footage from that film. However, those plans may have been discarded, as the
1946 film was credited to an entirely new roster of screenwriters, leaving this curious hybrid
behind.                                                                                  $350.

21. Bassett, James: HARM’S WAY. Cleveland & New York: World, [1962]. Cloth. Trace
of dustiness at top and fore-edges, otherwise a fine copy in bright, unfaded dust jacket
with two trivial surface nicks at lower edge.
First edition of this novel based in the Pacific Theater in WWII. Adapted as a motion picture
by Wendell Mayes, directed by Otto Preminger, under the title In Harm’s Way. This copy
has a presentation slip from Preminger laid in.                                        $125.

22. [Bataille, George]: “Lord Auch” [pseud]: HISTOIRE DE L’ŒIL. “Burgos” [i.e. Paris].
1941 [i.e. 1951]. Printed wrappers. Occasionally moderate foxing to text and wrappers,
otherwise a very good copy.
The definitive text edition of Bataille’s controversial 1928 fiction masterpiece of violence
and eroticism, here printed in an edition of five hundred numbered copies for subscribers.
This copy bears Bataille’s six-line signed presentation inscription on the half-title to art
dealer/collector Julien Levy. Until Pauvert’s public edition of 1967, editions in French and
English continued to appear pseudonymously.                                           $1250.

23. Beagle, Peter S.: THE LAST UNICORN. New York: The Viking Press, [1968]. Cloth
and boards. First edition of the author’s third book, and second novel, the basis for the
1982 film. Fine in very near fine dust jacket.                                     $650.

24. Beals, Carleton: TASTE OF GLORY A NOVEL. New York: Crown, [1956]. Publisher’s
three quarter red morocco and marbled boards, t.e.g. First edition. A special copy,
characteristically bound by the publisher for the author. A bit dusty and lightly foxed at
edges, very good.                                                                    $75.
                                   Manuscript Archive
25. Beals, Carleton: THE GREAT REVOLT AND ITS LEADERS THE HISTORY OF POPULAR
AMERICAN UPRISINGS IN THE 1890s. New York: Abelard-Schuman, [1966]. The original
production archive for this work by the American novelist and crusading journalist, comprised
of the following:
         a) Beals’s provisional outline consisting of three chapters, titled tentatively “The
         Grass Roots Revolt,” 109 leaves, quarto, original typescript, with manuscript
         corrections and insertions;
         b) an original typescript for the entire work, 454 leaves, with very heavy authorial
         and editorial corrections and revisions, along with typesetter’s annotations,
         accompanied by approximately 100 leaves of prelims, indices, bibliography and
         associated matter, typescript, carbon typescript and photocopy;
         c) the author’s set of long, uncorrected galleys, on 116 folio galley slips, with
         manuscript corrections, revisions and insertions;
         d) the master set of galley proofs, with very heavy annotations, editorial and other
         (one leaf frayed and mended); and finally,
         e) a complete set of trimmed, corrected page proofs, with a few scattered corrections.
         All items good to very good, consistent with use.                               $850.

26. Beardsley, Aubrey: UNDER THE HILL AND OTHER ESSAYS IN PROSE AND VERSE.
London & New York: John Lane The Bodley Head, 1904. Quarto. Blue cloth, elaborately
decorated in gilt. Portrait and plates. Spine extremities a bit rubbed, small residue of
bookseller’s description tipped to front pastedown, otherwise a very good, bright copy.
First edition, ordinary issue, in the traditionally preferred binding of blue cloth, with ‘John
Lane’ as the spine imprint. A varied collection of Beardsley’s literary and artistic remains,
including the title piece which spurred an inventive continuation by John Glassco.
LASNER 141.                                                                              $400.
27. Beerbohm, Max: ROSSETTI AND HIS CIRCLE. London: Heinemann, 1922. Quarto. Gilt
cream cloth, a.e.g. Frontis and 22 mounted color plates. Some heavy offsetting to endsheets,
otherwise a very good or better copy in defective (but uncommon) dust jacket.
First edition, limited issue. One of 380 numbered copies (350 for sale), specially bound,
and signed by the author.
GALLATIN & OLIVER 18.                                                               $450.

28. Beerbohm, Max: A PEEP INTO THE PAST. [New York]: Privately Printed, 1923. Large
quarto. Linen and boards, pictorial label. Illustrations. Small tipped-in bookplate, otherwise
fine in lightly chipped glassine and slipcase (back panel missing).
First edition in book form (unauthorized), limited to three hundred copies printed on Japan
vellum. The unsigned introduction was written by Ernest Boyd.
GALLATIN & OLIVER 20.                                                                 $300.

29. Bell, Marvin: STARS WHICH SEE, STARS WHICH DO NOT SEE. New York: Atheneum,
1977. Plastic ringbound page proofs. Near fine.
Page proofs of the first edition, accompanied by two t.ls.s. from Atheneum editor Harry
Ford, 17 November 1976 and undated (but 1976), to poet William Meredith, praising the
book and asking Meredith for a wrapper blurb. Enclosed in an unrelated enveloped addressed
to Meredith, but captioned in his hand.                                              $100.

30. [Belloc, Hilaire]: LAMBKIN’S REMAINS. By “H.B.” Oxford: Published by the Proprietors
of the J.C.R. at J. Vincent’s, 1900. 12mo. Gilt decorated pictorial cloth. First edition. Small
ink name and date on endsheet, minor foxing to endsheets, otherwise fine and bright in
near fine dust jacket with closed tears at the lower corners of the front panel.          $200.

31. Belloc, Hilaire: CAUTIONARY TALES FOR CHILDREN DESIGNED FOR THE ADMONI-
TION OF CHILDREN BETWEEN THE AGES OF EIGHT AND FOURTEEN YEARS. London:
Evelyn Nash, [nd. but ca. 1908]. Small quarto. Pictorial gray boards, printed in black and
red. Illustrations by Basil T. Blackwood. First edition. A few slight smudges to boards,
usual tan offset to endsheets, otherwise an unusually nice copy, near fine, with the ownership
signature of book historian Thomas Balston.
NCBEL III:1008.                                                                         $175.

32. Bewick, Thomas: FIGURES OF BRITISH LAND BIRDS, ENGRAVED ON WOOD ...
TO WHICH ARE ADDED, A FEW FOREIGN BIRDS, WITH THEIR VULGAR AND SCIENTIFIC
NAMES ... VOL. I. Newcastle Upon Tyne: Printed by S. Hodgson, for R. Beilby and T.
Bewick..., 1800. [4]pp. plus 133,[1] leaves. Large octavo. Late 19th century gilt morocco,
t.e.g., raised bands, gilt extra. Joints quite rubbed, but sound, incoming and receding tan
discoloration in top margin of leaves 6-51, foretips rubbed, some occasion light marginal
smudges, but a good copy, with the bookplate of Jean Hersholt.
First edition in this format, being the figures from the 1797 History of British Birds, without
the explanatory text, and with the addition of the fourteen foreign birds that were not reprinted
until 1817. Only this volume was published, as it was not commercially successful, and
Roscoe quotes Atkinson that five hundred copies were printed. The vignette at leaf [134]
of the man defecating in the pig slough is, as usual, present, and is in the original state
without the occasionally encountered ‘bars’ obscuring the nasty bits. Roscoe sensibly argues
against the claims made for this plate’s suppression or rarity.
ROSCOE 16.                                                                                 $850.

33. [Bird & Bull Press]: Sumner, James: THE MYSTERIOUS MARBLER. North Hills, PA:
Bird & Bull Press, 1976. Small quarto. Quarter morocco and marbled paper over boards
by E.G. Parrot. Fine.
First edition. Historical introduction, notes and eleven original marbled paper samples by
Richard J. Wolfe. One of approximately two hundred and fifty numbered copies printed on
B&B handmade paper.                                                                 $450.

34. [Bird & Bull Press]: Barrett, Timothy: NAGASHIZUKI THE JAPANESE CRAFT OF HAND
PAPERMAKING. North Hills, PA: Bird & Bull Press, 1979. Small quarto. Quarter morocco
and decorative Japanese paper over boards by E.G. Parrot. Illustrations by Robert Flavin.
Trace of darkening at extremities, else about fine.
First edition. One of three hundred numbered copies printed on B&B Nagashizuki paper.
Includes fourteen samples of original Japanese papers.                          $450.

35. [Bird & Bull Press]: Schmoller, Hans: MR GLADSTONE’S WASHI A SURVEY OF
REPORTS ON THE MANUFACTURE OF PAPER IN JAPAN >>THE PARKES REPORT OF
1871<<. Newtown, PA: Bird & Bull Press, 1984. Quarto. Quarter morocco and marbled
paper over boards by Gray Parrot. Plates and facsimiles. Fine in lightly scuffed slipcase
with separate portfolio of loose plates.
First edition. One of five hundred numbered copies printed on Hahnemühle paper, with
the facsimile woodcuts printed on Japanese paper.                            $350.

36. [Bird & Bull Press]: Morris, Henry [compiler, editor, and so much else]: THE PRIVATE
PRESS-MAN’S TALE. Newtown, PA: Bird & Bull Press, 1990. Quarto. Cloth backed
pastepaper over boards with gold decorative overlay, gilt spine label. Illustrations by Lili
Wronker. Fine.
First edition. One of 230 numbered copies, printed on Arches in Van Dick types composed
by Michael Bixler, and bound by Barbara Blumenthal. A collection in prose and verse related
to the book arts, with contributions by Sidney Berger and correspondence and reviews by
others, an imaginary interview with William Morris, a poem about Fine Print, and articles
about book scouts and book fairs, nestled in the context of Morris’s own text.       $350.

37. Bishop, Elizabeth: THE COMPLETE POEMS 1927 - 1979. New York: Farrar, [1983].
Cloth. First edition of this expanded collection. Pencil inscription in corner of pastedown,
else about fine in dust jacket.                                                        $100.

38. Bishop, Elizabeth: THE COLLECTED PROSE. New York: Farrar, [1984]. Cloth. First
edition. Edited with an Introduction by Robert Giroux. Pencil inscription in corner of pastedown,
else about fine in dust jacket.                                                             $100.

39. [Black Sparrow Press]: Cooney, Seamus [comp]: A CHECKLIST OF THE FIRST HUNDRED
PUBLICATIONS OF THE BLACK SPARROW PRESS ... WITH 30 PASSING REMARKS
BY ROBERT KELLY. Los Angeles: Black Sparrow Press, 1971. Small octavo. Cloth and
printed boards, printed spine label. Top edge a bit dust-marked and darkened, but a very
good copy, with supplied acetate dust jacket.
First edition, deluxe issue. One of fifty numbered copies, specially bound, and signed by
the compiler, Kelly, and twenty-six other authors published under the imprint to that point,
including Duncan, Purdy, Clark, Creeley, Meltzer, Jess, Brainard, Bukowski, Morris, Dawson,
Antin, Wakoski, Malanga, et al.                                                       $450.
                                     Presentation Copy
40. [Black Sun Press]: Crosby, Harry: RED SKELETONS. Paris: Editions Narcisse, 1927.
Large quarto. Original wrappers, printed in red and black. Illustrated with nine plates in
black and orange by Alastair. Small chip from toe of spine, with three tears across spine
(no loss), mild hand-soiling to wrappers, otherwise a very good copy, internally fine, in
custom cloth and board slipcase with printed spine label.
First edition. One of 333 numbered copies printed on Hollande Van Gelder Zonen, from
a total edition of 370 copies. Inscribed on the front endsheet by Harry Crosby: “For Madame
Marcelle Tinayre in friendship and admiration from Harry Crosby Paris 1927.” Marcelle
Tinayre (1870 - 1948) was a prolific French novelist, essayist and biographer. Several of
her works were published in the U.K. and U.S. and her Madame de Pompadour: A Study
in Temperament enjoyed some popularity in 1925. She was married to the painter, Jean
Paul Louis Tinayre.
MINKOFF A4.                                                                           $1500.

41. [Black Sun Press]: Carroll, Lewis [pseud. of C.L. Dodgson]: ALICE IN WONDERLAND.
Paris: The Black Sun Press, 1930. Oblong small quarto. Printed wrappers. A fine, nearly
untouched copy, without foxing, in glassine wrapper and somewhat worn and soiled publisher’s
slipcase and chemise.
First edition in this format. Illustrated with six original color lithographs by Marie Laurencin
printed by Desjobert of Paris. From a total edition of 790 copies, this is one of 350 copies
on Rives (of 420) for distribution in the United States.
MINKOFF A34. MONOD 2304.                                                                 $3500.

42. [Blue Sky Press]: Peattie, Elia W.: HOW JACQUES CAME INTO THE FOREST OF
ARDEN AN IMPERTINENCE.... Chicago: The Blue Sky Press, [1901]. Small octavo. Pictorial
boards, paper spine label. Plates by Walter J. Enright. Initials by H.E. Townsend, handcolored
by Barbara Peattie. A near fine copy of a fragile book.
First edition. One of seven hundred numbered copies on handmade paper (of 728).
RANSOM 15. SMITH P-214.                                                     $100.

43. [Blue Sky Press]: Stevens, Thomas Wood, and Alden Charles Noble: THE MORNING
ROAD A BOOK OF VERSES. Chicago: The Blue Sky Press, 1902. Collated, unbound,
untrimmed signatures. Pictorial double-spread title page. Fine.
First edition. One of two hundred copies on handmade paper, from a total edition of 215.
This copy is not numbered. Stevens was one of the principals of the press.
RANSOM (BLUE SKY) 24).                                                            $150.

44. [Blue Sky Press]: Blanden, Charles G.: THE UNREMEMBERED GOD & OTHER POEMS.
Chicago: The Blue Sky Press, 1903. Narrow octavo. Cloth and gilt boards. Fore-tips a bit
scraped, otherwise very good, internally fine.
First edition. One of 150 numbered copies printed on Ingres, from a total edition of 165,
and initialed by the publisher.
RANSOM 28.                                                                         $150.

45. [Blue Sky Press]: Erskine, Payne: THE HARPER & THE KING’S HORSE A TALE.
Chicago: The Blue Sky Press, [1905]. Large octavo. Quarter cloth and boards. Spine ends
a bit rubbed, otherwise a very good, or better, largely unopened copy.
First edition. Illustrated by Sarah K. Smith. Designs by Thomas Wood Stevens. One of
five hundred copies printed on handmade paper (of 525). This copy is numbered (#117),
though many were not.                                                           $90.

46. [Blue Sky Press]: Crow, Martha Foote: THE WORLD ABOVE A DUOLOGUE. Chicago:
The Blue Sky Press, [1905]. Decorated gilt cloth. Decorative title-border. Extremities rubbed
and tips a trifle frayed, small chip from fore-edge of free endsheet, else a good copy.
First edition of this “duologue” set in “The Darker Realm” by the educator/critic. One of
five hundred numbered copies on Van Gelder, from an edition of 525 copies. Not in Ransom’s
checklist of the press.                                                               $85.

47. Bly, Robert: THE LIGHT AROUND THE BODY. New York: Harper, [1967]. Printed boards.
First edition, boardbound issue. Toe of spine a trifle rubbed, else near fine in very good
dust jacket with small spot and closed edge tear. Winner of the 1968 National Book Award
for Poetry                                                                            $65.

48. BOOK HANDBOOK AN ILLUSTRATED QUARTERLY FOR DISCRIMINATING BOOK-
LOVERS. London: The Book Centre [later:] The Dropmore Press Ltd., 1947 through December
1951/March 1952. Volume one, numbers 1-8/9 plus 1947 supplement; volume II, numbers
1-4 (all published). Printed wrappers. Plates (some folding), illustrations and facsimiles.
Some mild darkening and hand smudging to wrappers, otherwise a very good set.

A complete run of this distinguished periodical, edited by Reginald Horrox, attempting to
resurrect in the post-war years a periodical of a caliber akin to Symons’s and Flower’s
Book Collector. Contributors include Flower, Duveen, Shanks, Muir, Cockerell, et al. The
Dropmore Press imprint appears with the first number of the second volume.         $200.

49. [Bookplates]: Talbot, Clare Ryan: HISTORIC CALIFORNIA IN BOOKPLATES. Los
Angeles: Graphic Press, 1936. Linen and boards, paper spine label. Heavily illustrated.
Spine label a bit sunned and nicked, otherwise near fine.
First edition, trade issue. One of 470 copies thus. Introduction by Robert E. Cowan, and
with one of his bookplates tipped-in as a frontis. Inscribed and signed by the author in
1939. Original prospectus laid in.                                                $150.
                             Pretty Set of the Dublin Edition
50. Boswell, James: THE LIFE OF SAMUEL JOHNSON, LL.D. COMPREHENDING AN
ACCOUNT OF HIS STUDIES AND NUMEROUS WORKS.... Dublin: Printed by John Chambers
[& John Exshaw, & Robert Rhames for second and third volumes respectively] for R. Cross,
et al, 1792. Three volumes. xxxiv,536;[2],605;573pp. plus two folding plates. Contemporary
speckled calf, spines gilt extra, gilt green morocco lettering pieces. Occasional minor soiling,
narrow crack at toe of lower joint of 2nd volume, narrow short worm track (largely marginal
but touching a few letters) in 2Q of 2nd volume, but a very good, crisp set, in a handsome
contemporary binding.
First Dublin edition, set up from the first London edition and incorporating corrections to
some of the errata, but introducing other errors. Though undertaken for the same group
of booksellers, the task of printing was doled out to three separate printers, with consequent
variations in the imprint. An unusually nice set of this edition, noted by Pottle as “cheaply
and rather poorly printed, evidently to undersell the genuine edition, which must, however,
have been nearly, if not quite, exhausted when it appeared. It is now listed by the booksellers
as ‘very rare’, which is perhaps justified, as there is no copy in the British Museum, the
Bodleian, or the National Library of Scotland” - Pottle. As this edition predated the second
London edition by almost a year, its appearance had, no doubt, a considerably greater
effect on the sales of that edition than it had on the first. Pottle’s collation places the “Round
Robin” plate as a frontis to the first volume; in this set, it appears in company with the
manuscript facsimile at the end of the third, perchance as issued.
POTTLE 80.                                                                                  $1750.

51. Bowles, Paul: IN TOUCH THE LETTERS OF PAUL BOWLES EDITED BY JEFFREY
MILLER. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, [1994]. Large, thick octavo. Navy cloth,
stamped in turquoise and gilt. Plates. First edition, limited issue. One of two hundred
fifty numbered copies (of 276) signed by the author. Fine in publisher’s slipcase. $250.
52. [Bradley, Will]: THE PHELPS PUBLISHING CO., DESIGNERS, PHOTO-ENGRAVERS,
ELECTROTYPERS.... Springfield, MA: Phelps Publishing Co., [ca. 1897]. [32]pp. Oblong
small quarto. Pictorial wrappers, printed in three colors. Extensively illustrated. A few tiny
tears and creases at overlap edges, two spots to upper wrapper also affecting slightly the
blank recto of the first leaf, but a very good copy.
A lavish catalogue/sample book for the firm, “Arranged and printed...By Will Bradley at
the Wayside Press.” Bambace cites three different similar productions, but with variant
titles.
BAMBACE, p.197(ref).                                                             $225.

53. [Brassaï]: Miller, Henry: QUIET DAYS IN CLICHY. Paris: The Olympia Press, 1958.
12mo. Stiff decorated wrappers. Illustrated with full-page photographs by Brassaï. Second
edition (impression?), after the first of 1956. Spine a bit rolled, light use to wrappers and
a bit of foxing to front endsheet and edges, small dent in top edge, otherwise a very good
or better copy.
S&J A100c.                                                                              $400.

54. Breton, Andre MANIFESTOES OF SURREALISM. Ann Arbor: Univ. of Michigan Press,
[1969]. Cloth. First edition of these translations by Richard Seaver and Helen R. Lane,
based on Pauvert’s collected edition of 1962. Fine in very lightly used dust jacket. $75.
                          “Readies” for the Reading Machine
55. Brown, Bob [ed & pub]: READIES FOR BOB BROWN’S MACHINE. Cagnes-sur-Mer:
Roving Eyes Press, 1931. Original printed front wrapper (spine and rear wrapper replaced
with a semblance of matching paper). Plate. Two pencil ownership signatures erased, some
small chips to forecorners of front wrapper and lower forecorner of first several leaves creased,
a bit tanned, as usual, but a sound copy of a book intended to be dismantled.
First and only edition of this remarkable anthology, printed in an edition of three hundred
copies. Includes contributions by C.H. Ford, Jolas, Pound, Marinetti, Cunard, Stein, Neagoe,
Boyle, Bowles, McAlmon, Putnam, Williams, Farrell, Hiler, Vail, et al, most contributions
having been written expressly for this volume. Born of a curious melding of the visual impact
of the Armory Show and Brown’s stint as a Wall Street investor huddled over ticker-tape
machines, the Reading Machine was his attempt at a mechanism that would present the
printed word in a continuous linear progression. Brown published this anthology of prose
tailored for use on the Reading Machine, a “fourth dimensional” literature that might match
the dynamism and visual vitality of the age. His attempts to patent and market his Reading
Machine were unsuccessful, though not without some competition. In the end, his idea
might be simply a curious, but anticipatory, stab at a novel way of text presentation more
in tune with the latter half of his century than the first.
WALLACE B16. GALLUP B26. MILLER B1.                                                     $750.

56. Bryant, William Cullen: Autograph Letter, Signed, To James R. Osgood. New York.
3 May 1875. One page, in ink, on folded quarto letter-sheet. Folded for mailing, otherwise
about fine.
An unusually charming letter, responding to Osgood’s request that Bryant contribute to
a thematic anthology: “It would be as impossible for me to write a poem on Bunker Hill
as to hold a conversation with an Orientalist in Sanscrit [sic] of which I do not know a
word. I am glad, however, to learn that your eminent poets of Massachusetts do not find
any such difficulty in their way, and am sure that what they undertake to do they will do
well. By my declining to write, you have been saved the mortification of being obliged to
pay for a stupid poem. Yours very truly, W.C. Bryant.”                             $550.

57. Buchanan, Robert [ed]: WAYSIDE POSIES: ORIGINAL POEMS OF THE COUNTRY
LIFE.... London: Routledge, 1867. [14],91,[2] leaves, printed on rectos only. Thick small
quarto. Full contemporary forest green pebbled morocco, raised bands, elaborately gilt extra,
gilt inner dentelles, a.e.g. Spine tips and shelf-edges rubbed, half-title foxed, otherwise
a very good copy.
First edition of this lavish gift book, with twenty full-page wood-engraved plates and twenty
vignettes by G.J. Pinwell, J.W. North and Frederick Walker, all engraved by the Brothers
Dalziel. A sequel to A Round of Days, published the previous year, and among the works
engraved by the Dalziels Ray singles out as “represent[ing] the illustrators of the sixties
at their most characteristic.”
Ray, THE ILLUSTRATOR AND THE BOOK IN ENGLAND 154. REID, p.151ff.                        $500.

58. Buñuel, Luis, and “Philip Ansell Roll” [pseud. of Hugo Butler] [screenwriters]: ULTRAMAR
FILMS, S.A. PRESENTS “ROBINSON CRUSOE” BY DANIEL DEFOE ADAPTED FOR THE
SCREEN BY.... Mexico City, DF: Ultramar Films, 1952. [1],95 leaves. Small folio (legal
format). Mimeographed typescript, printed on rectos only, stapled in left margin. Some
marginal tanning, lacking wrappers, creased marginal tear to several leaves around one
staple (with no loss), otherwise a very good copy of a fragile script.
An unspecified, but pre-production, draft of this film adaptation of Defoe’s novel, cowritten
by master director Buñuel, and Hugo Butler, then working in self-imposed exile in Mexico
in company with his wife and Dalton Trumbo, and writing under various pseudonyms as
a consequence of the effects of the Blacklist. The faithful yet stylistically imaginative adaptation
starred Daniel O’Herlihy as Crusoe and Jaime Fernández as Friday. It was Buñuel’s first
color film, and is one of the central productions of his Mexican period. O’Herlihy was nominated
for a Best Actor Oscar for his role after United Artists took on theatrical distribution for
the film in the U.S. Laid in is a t.l.s., 6 November 1952, from producer Edward L. Alperson
discussing potential distribution of the as yet unfinished film, and returning this copy of
the script.                                                                                 $1500.

59. Burgess, Anthony: A CLOCKWORK ORANGE. London: Heinemann, [1962]. Gilt black
cloth. First edition, first binding. Small literary ownership signature on front free endsheet,
a couple small faint spots to two facing pages, top edges of last thirty leaves show an
intermittent shallow discoloration, otherwise a very good copy in like first state dust jacket
(creased tear, without loss, in corner of front panel, but unfaded).                    $2500.

60. Burns, Robert: LOVE SONGS OF ROBERT BURNS. London: T. Fisher Unwin, 1892.
Narrow octavo. Full publisher’s parchment over boards, spine lettered in gilt, upper board
stamped in brown. Frontis portrait. Early bookplate of George Kitchin, minor darkening to
the extremities, otherwise an unusually nice copy.
First edition, limited issue, of this selection, with introduction and notes by Sir George
Douglas, issued in Unwin’s famous “Cameo Series.” One of only thirty numbered copies,
specially printed and bound.                                                         $200.

61. Cable, George W.: THE GRANDISSIMES A STORY OF CREOLE LIFE. New York:
Scribner, 1880. ix,[1],448,[8]pp. Gilt decorated olive green cloth. First edition of the author’s
second book. Modest rubbing at edges, but a very good, bright copy.
BAL 2331. WRIGHT III:868.                                                                  $100.

62. Cable, George W.: THE SILENT SOUTH TOGETHER WITH THE FREEDMAN’S CASE
IN EQUITY AND THE CONVICT LEASE SYSTEM. New York: Scribner, 1885. vi,[2],180,[4]pp.
Maroon cloth. Portrait frontis. Cloth modestly hand-soiled, two tiny nicks at crown of spine,
edges a trifle dusty, a few faint spots to lower board, otherwise a very good copy.
First edition. One of 1500 copies printed. An important work by the novelist, including a
scathing review of aspects of the penal system in the South, particularly Texas.
BAL 2342.                                                                          $100.
63. Caldwell, Erskine: POOR FOOL. New York: Rariora Press, 1930. Large octavo. Gilt
cloth. Illustrated with facetious drawings by Alexander Couard. Fine, without printed dust
jacket, as issued.
First edition of Caldwell’s second book, issued in an edition of one thousand numbered
copies. Laid in is a one page a.l.s., 28 Jan. 1956, from Caldwell, in regard to then present
matters with his publisher, Duell, Sloane and Pearce.                                  $350.

64. Caldwell, Erskine: SOUTHWAYS STORIES. New York: Viking Press, 1938. Cloth.
Binding faded and a bit dusty, clipping of Lewis Gannett’s NYHT review affixed to endsheets,
else a good, sound copy.
First edition. An excellent association copy, with the separate ownership signatures of
Caldwell’s parents, J.S. and Carrie Caldwell, dated 1 July 1938, and J.S. Caldwell’s notation:
“From Erskine.”                                                                        $150.

65. Caldwell, Erskine, and Margaret Bourke-White: NORTH OF THE DANUBE. New York:
Viking Press, [1939]. Small quarto. Cloth. Photographs. First edition. Edges a trifle dust
marked, shallow discoloration at toe of spine mirrored on verso of dust jacket, otherwise
a very good copy in lightly edgeworn dust jacket.                                   $150.

66. Capote, Truman: OTHER VOICES OTHER ROOMS. New York: Random House. [1948].
Cloth. Very faint darkening to endsheet gutters, otherwise a very near fine copy in very
good, edge-tanned dust jacket with a few short, creased, closed tears to upper edge, minor
nicks to corner tips, and a small chip to the toe of the lower joint.
First edition of the author’s first book. With a quote by Marguerite Young and the controversial
Harold Halma portrait of Capote on the jacket’s rear panel.                              $600.

67. Capote, Truman: SELECTED WRITINGS OF.... New York: Random House, [1963]. Cloth.
First edition of this selection, with an introduction by Mark Schorer. Signed by Capote
on the free endsheet. Publisher’s review slip. Fine in very good dust jacket with pen stroke
through price, and two internally mended tears at top edge.                           $850.

68. Casement, Roger: SOME POEMS OF ROGER CASEMENT. Dublin & London: Talbot
Press / T. Fisher Unwin, 1918. 12mo. Printed wrappers. Portrait. Usual uniform tanning
to text block, otherwise an unusually nice copy of a fragile book, near fine.
First edition of this selection, issued as a Talbot Press Booklet, with an Introduction by
Gertrude Parry.                                                                      $250.

69. Cather, Willa: MY MORTAL ENEMY. New York: Knopf, 1926. Small quarto. Linen and
boards, paper spine label. Trace of darkening to spine, bookplate of a noted collector, pencil
erasure from corner of endsheet, else about fine, unopened, in broken and worn slipcase.
First edition, limited issue. One of 220 numbered copies (200 for sale) printed after a design
by Dwiggins by the Pynson Printers, and signed by the author.                            $750.

70. Cather, Willa: SHADOWS ON THE ROCK. New York: Knopf, 1931. Large octavo. Gilt
red-orange vellum, t.e.g. Spine faded, natural mottling to the vellum, but a very good copy,
without slipcase and wrapper.
First edition, deluxe limited issue. One of 199 numbered copies printed on Japan vellum
and specially bound, in addition to 619 copies on handmade paper differently bound, all
signed by the author.                                                             $600.
71. Cather, Willa: OBSCURE DESTINIES. New York: Knopf, 1932. Quarter vellum and
decorated boards, foil label, t.e.g. Noted collector’s bookplate, else fine in modestly tanned
dust jacket with tear across top of spine panel. and bit darkened and corner worn slipcase.
First edition, limited issue. One of 260 numbered copies, specially printed on Japan vellum,
and signed by the author.                                                             $750.

72. [Censorship]: Guanzelli, Giovanni Maria: INDICIS LIBRORUM EXPURGANDORUM IN
STUDIOSORUM GRATIAM CONFECTI TOMUS PRIMUS. IN QUO QUINQUAGINTA
AUCTORUM LIBRI PRÆ CÆTERIS DESIDERATI EMENDANTUR Rome: Ex Typographia
R. Cam. Apost., 1607. [16],742,[1]pp. Octavo. Contemporary limp vellum, gilt spine label.
Woodcut vignette on title, the latter printed in red and black. Early private ownership signature
at base of title, ink inscription on pastedown, light scattered foxing and trivial soiling, three
tiny holes in title margin, vellum a bit soiled and label worn, otherwise a very good copy.




First edition, and the only volume published. Guanzelli (1556/7 - 1619), styled ‘Fr. Jo. Maria
Brasichelli’ on the title leaf, was from Brisighella, and shortly after the publication of this
work, was appointed Bishop of Polignani by Paul V. As part of his official duties, he set
to work on this index of expurgations in works condemned by the Church which, in expurgated
form, were thought still useful to scholars and in that form could be circulated with approval.
The prefatory matter reprints the Trent Rules relating to expurgation, as well as the second
division of the Instruction of Clement VIII. The main text treats fifty-one works, including
four not in the Index of 1596 (but condemned by edicts in 1603 and 1605) and three books
of the Benedictine Montanus (editor of Plantin’s Polyglot Bible). According to a note in
his text, Guanzelli was well along in his work on a second volume at the time this volume
was published, but the publication of this first volume raised sufficient controversy — not
because of the practice of expurgation, but rather because of a lack of sufficient expert
censors and because publishing such an index revealed a practice that was best accomplished
by more subtle and non-public means — that the second volume never appeared. Efforts
were evidently made to quietly suppress reprints made in Bergamo in 1608 and in Antwerp
in 1611. OCLC/Worldcat locates fifteen copies of this edition internationally.
Putnam, THE CENSORSHIP OF THE CHURCH OF ROME AND ITS INFLUENCE UPON
THE PRODUCTION AND DISTRIBUTION OF LITERATURE, pp. 271ff.                               $1950.
73. [Chagall, Marc]: Van Vechten, Carl: Original Portrait Photograph of Marc Chagall.
[New York]. 4 July 1941. Original borderless gelatin silver print, 25.3 x 17.5 cm (10 x 6
7/8 inches). Small crease across upper left corner, with residue of matting tape at extreme
tips, otherwise near fine.
A fine portrait by Van Vechten of the artist, half-length, looking to his right in semi-profile.
With Van Vechten’s studio stamp on the verso, and with his manuscript subject identification,
negative number and date in ink. Another image from the same session was collected in
Portraits (1978), and five others are present in the Library of Congress Van Vechten Portrait
Archive, but not this image.
KELLNER G230.                                                                           $1250.

74. Char, René: RETOUR AMONT POÈMES. [Paris]: nrf / Gallimard, [1966]. Large octavo.
Printed wrappers. Trace of darkening at wrapper edges, otherwise very good or better.
Prospectus laid in.
First edition. One of 250 numbered hors commerce copies on vélin bouffant alfa, from an
edition of 3630 copies. With the author’s signed presentation inscription to critic/biographer
Germaine Brée.                                                                          $350.

75. Char, René: DANS LA PLUIE GIBOYEUSE POÈME. [Paris]: nrf / Gallimard, [1968].
Large octavo. Printed wrappers. Trace of darkening at wrapper edges, otherwise very good
or better. Prospectus laid in.
First edition. One of 3500 numbered copies on vélin bouffant alfa, from an edition of 3695
copies. With the author’s signed presentation inscription to critic/biographer Germaine Brée.
                                                                                       $350.

76. Chatto & Windus: A CHATTO & WINDUS ALMANACK 1926. London: Chatto & Windus,
1926. Gilt cloth and decorated boards, fore and bottom edges untrimmed. Illustrations.
Boards faintly dusty, else a very good or better copy.
First edition, limited issue. One of 250 numbered copies printed on handmade paper. Text
by Owen, Huxley, Strachey, Hughes, Montague, Fry, Proust, Bell, et al, with illustrations
by Rutherston, Henderson, Craig, Rothenstein, et al.                               $125.

77. Chayefsky, Paddy: THE TENTH MAN. New York: Random House, [1960]. Cloth. Fine
in very good dust jacket with shallow loss at crown of spine and a bit of rubbing at the
toe.
First edition. With the author’s half-page presentation inscription, dated Dec. 1960, to
the celebrated columnist, Leonard Lyons, and his wife: “To Sylvia & Leonard You were
in on it from the beginning - Love Paddy.” Accompanied by a one page a.l.s., 3 Jan. 1960,
from Chayefsky to the same recipients, conveying holiday greetings and indicating “There
are two other books arriving at your house as soon as I can get copies....” Signed “Love,
Paddy.”                                                                             $300.

78. [Cheloniidae Press]: Poe, Edgar Allan: THE BLACK CAT. [Williamsburg, MA]: Cheloniidae
Press, [1984]. Large octavo. Handmade paper wrappers. Wood engravings by Alan James
Robinson. Light offset to endsheets from wrappers, else fine, with the prospectus (initialed
by the artist) laid in.
First printing in this format, regular issue. One of 250 copies, printed on Rives Lightweight,
French-folded, and hand-sewn by Po Crest Robinson into hand-made paper wrappers, from
a total edition of 325 copies. The text for this edition was taken from the 1845 Wiley-Putnam
edition, illustrated with eleven superb wood engravings by Alan James Robinson. Briefly
inscribed and signed by Robinson on the limitation page.                                $250.
79. Chubb, Ralph: A FABLE OF LOVE & WAR A ROMANTIC POEM. Curridge: Printed
by E. R. Chubb and Published by R. N. Chubb, 1925. Octavo. Linen and boards, paper
labels. Frontis, plate and illustrations printed from woodcuts by Chubb. Light occasional
foxing, otherwise a fine copy.
First edition, clothbound issue. Copy #29 of two hundred numbered copies, initialed by
the author/artist. A substantial portion of the edition appeared in printed wrappers.
D’ARCH SMITH (LOVE IN EARNEST), p.242.                                             $500.

80. [Clemens, Samuel]: MARK TWAIN’S (BURLESQUE) AUTOBIOGRAPHY AND FIRST
ROMANCE. New York: Sheldon & Co., [1871]. Plum cloth, stamped in gilt and blind.
Illustrations. Spine and edges a shade sunned, a couple minor spots to endsheets, faint
ghost of an early ink name on free endsheet, otherwise an unusually nice copy, very good
or better.
First edition, BAL’s state 1, without the advert for Ball, Black & Co. on the verso of the
title.
BAL 3326.                                                                           $475.

81. Cobb, Humphrey: PATHS OF GLORY. New York: Viking, 1935. Gilt cloth. Spine gilding
a bit dull, as usual, ink name and date (1935) on free endsheet, otherwise a very good
copy in lightly spine-sunned dust jacket with modest fraying at edges and tips, and a light
spot of color bleed on verso.
First published edition of the author’s first and only novel, an account of the victimization
of three French line soldiers by commanders intent on saving their own reputations. Preceded
by five hundred promotional copies in wrappers, untitled. Sidney Howard undertook a dramatic
adaptation of some note in 1935, but the 1957 film adaptation by Stanley Kubrick did much
to remind the post-war public of its virtues. It remains one of the most widely known anti-
war novels of the pre-WWII years.                                                      $200.




82. [Cobb, Humphrey]: Original Studio Publicity Campaign Pressbook for PATHS OF
GLORY. [New York]: United Artists Corp., [1957]. 20pp. Folio. Pictorial self-wrappers. Profusely
illustrated. Old fold, light wear to the spine, a couple of tiny nicks, light dustmarking along
top edges and spine of wrappers, otherwise a very good, bright copy.
An original studio publicity campaign pressbook for Stanley Kubrick, Jim Thompson and
Calder Willingham’s masterful adaptation to the screen of Humphrey Cobb’s novel about
a mutiny against command by French soldiers during WWI. The film was released in 1957,
when Kubrick was only 29, and starred Kirk Douglas in his most important screen role.
The collaboration between Kubrick, Thompson (who had contributed dialogue to Kubrick’s
earlier film, The Killing) and Willingham was a fortunate melding of talents. An unusually
elaborate and attractive pressbook, with illustrations of all the available paper and extensive
background information on the main participants. The spectacular wrapper art features Douglas
leading the charge against the German gun emplacements, the same art as appeared on
the one-sheet and 24-sheet posters. Uncommon.                                            $300.

83. Coffey, Brian: THIRD PERSON. London: The Europa Press, [1938]. Cloth. First edition,
ordinary issue. One of 275 copies, from a total edition of three hundred (this copy not numbered,
as often). Fine in dust jacket.                                                            $125.

84. Cole, Peter: RIFT. New York: The Grenfell Press, 1986. Small quarto. Woodcut wrapper
by Joel Shapiro. Fine.
First edition of the 2007 MacArthur Fellow’s first book. One of 135 numbered copies (of
150), signed by the poet and artist.                                             $175.

85. Coleridge, Samuel Taylor [trans]: THE PICCOLOMINI, OR THE FIRST PART OF
WALLENSTEIN, A DRAMA IN FIVE ACTS. TRANSLATED FROM THE GERMAN OF
FREDERICK SCHILLER BY... [bound with:] THE DEATH OF WALLENSTEIN. A TRAGEDY
IN FIVE ACTS.... London: Printed for T. N. Longman and G. Rees, 1800. Two volumes
bound in one. [4],214,[2];[6],157,[1]pp. Large octavo. Full polished calf by Riviere, t.e.g.
Portrait. Joints a bit worn, with narrow cracks at head and toe of upper joint, else a very
good copy.
First edition of both parts of Coleridge’s translation of Schiller’s work, bound up with the
extra general title present in the second work, the half-title for the first (none called for
in the second), and the ad leaves for both. Though Coleridge undertook this translation
as a commission from Longman, who was intent on capitalizing on the publication of the
German text in 1799, he “later considered it one of his finest achievements” - Holmes.
WISE (COLERIDGE) 16 & 17. TINKER 684.                                                $1500.

86. Coleridge, Samuel Taylor: OSORIO A TRAGEDY AS ORIGINALLY WRITTEN IN 1797....
London: John Pearson, 1873. xxiv,204pp. Large octavo. Original paper boards, printed spine
label. Boards darkened and a bit soiled, short cracks at head and toe of spine, small bookplate,
else internally near fine. Folding cloth case.
First edition. One of fifty special copies, printed on large paper. Edited by Richard Herne
Shepherd, with critical apparatus. The first printing of the preliminary form of the tragedy
later published as Remorse. According to Wise, some of the fifty large paper copies were
bound in cloth uniform with the ordinary copies.
WISE (COLERIDGE), 98.                                                                  $400.

87. Collins, William: THE POETICAL WORKS OF ... ENRICHED WITH ELEGANT
ENGRAVINGS. TO WHICH IS PREFIXED A LIFE OF THE AUTHOR, BY DR. JOHNSON.
London: Printed by T. Bensley, for S. Harding, 1798. xiv,[2],165,[1]pp. Octavo. Full
contemporary red morocco, gilt extra, boards ruled with an attractive sequence of stringed
bead-like lines, a.e.g. Early bookplate, extremities a bit rubbed, but a very good copy.
First edition in this format, reprinting Johnson’s life, and with an array of pictorial head
and tail vignettes engraved by Edward Harding after Gardiner, Platt et al.
COURTNEY & SMITH, p.150. ESTC T125340.                                                 $500.
88. Conrad, Joseph: THE POINT OF HONOR A MILITARY TALE. New York: McClure,
1908. Pictorial green cloth, stamped in gilt and white. Frontis and plates by D.S. Groesbeck.
Spine extremities a bit rubbed, a few marginal smudges, but a good, bright copy.
First separate edition, first binding, of this tale first published in book form as “The Duel”
in A Set of Six. The source novella for the 1977 Ridley Scott costume film, scripted by
Gerald Vaughan-Hughes, starring Albert Finney, Harvey Keitel and Keith Carradine.
CAGLE A13c. KEATING 83.                                                                 $175.

89. [Conrad, Joseph]: JOSEPH CONRAD’S LORD JIM A VICTOR FLEMING PRODUCTION
[caption title]. New York: Paramount / Famous Players Lasky Corp, [1925]. Original 14
x 11 inch color-tinted pictorial lobby card. Small pencil eraser-size spot in blank lower
margin, otherwise an unusually well-preserved copy.
A visually striking, and very uncommon, lobby card for the first adaptation to the screen
of Conrad’s novel. The adaptation was by John Russell and George C. Hull, and Victor
Fleming directed, with Howard Hawks serving as production manager. Percy Marmont played
Lord Jim, Raymond Hatt played Cornelius, and Noah Berry played Captain Brown. The image
on this card features Hatton and Beery in a moment of high tension. Publicity paper associated
with this silent film is highly uncommon. This was the second adaptation of a Conrad text
to the screen, preceded by the 1919 version of Victory, also from Paramount. $350.

90. [Conrad, Joseph]: McNutt, William Slavens, and Grover Jones [screenwriters]: VICTORY
BY JOSEPH CONRAD SCREENPLAY AND DIALOGUE BY.... Hollywood: Paramount Studios,
11 September 1929. [1],15,21,15,13,10,14,2,[blank] leaves. Narrow quarto, legal format.
Mimeographed typescript, printed on rectos only. Production number and studio filing stamps
on title leaf, along with release title in pencil, a few minor creases, otherwise an unusually
nice copy.
Denoted a “Final White Script” for this film adaptation of Conrad’s novel, released 13 February
1930 under the title Dangerous Paradise. The film was directed by William A. Wellman,
and starred Nancy Carroll, Richard Arlen, Warner Oland, et al. This was the first talking
English language adaptation of the novel, preceded by a 1919 silent version. It is interesting
to note that independent French and Polish adaptations also appeared in 1930, and
independent German, Italian and Swedish adaptations followed in 1931. An uncommon script.
                                                                                        $1750.

91. [Conrad, Joseph]: Balderston, John L. [screenwriter]: VICTORY RELEASE DIALOGUE
SCRIPT.... [Los Angeles]: Paramount Pictures, 9 October 1940. [1],13,14,12,11,14,13,12,11
leaves. Narrow quarto, legal format. Mimeographed typescript, printed on rectos only, stapled
at left margin. Title-leaf dusty at edges, with chips at lower forecorner and around staples,
pencil filing notes, otherwise very good.
A release dialogue script of the third, and most faithful, English language film adaptation
of Conrad’s novel, directed by John Cromwell, and starring Frederic March, Betty Field,
Cedric Hardwicke, at al. The film was released on 21 December. Previous English language
versions appeared in 1919 (silent) and 1930.                                         $350.
                                    Presentation Copy
92. Cooper, James F.: PRÉCAUTION, OU LE CHOIX D’UN MARI.... Paris: Librairie de
Charles Gosselin / Mame et Delaunay-Vallée, Libraires, 1825. Four volumes bound in two.
[4],4,xi,[1],249,[1];[4],227;[2],256;[4],263pp. Contemporary mottled French calf, spines gilt
extra, gilt crimson labels, gilt decorated borders to boards. Corners quite worn, spine ends
chipped, but sound; scattered foxing, binder’s free endsheet in second volume imperfect,
and first half-title in that volume excised; still, a sound set, enclosed in a half morocco
case and cloth wrapper.
First edition in French of the author’s first novel, translated by A.-J.-B. Defauconpret, and
with a long prefatory essay about Cooper and his works by the publisher. A copy of particular
significance, inscribed on the title-page of the first volume: “J. Fenimore Cooper makes
his niece Georgianna Pomeroy a present of this translation wishing for her own sake and
that of the translator that it was better done.” Cooper’s dissatisfaction with the translation,
and with Gosselin’s cavalier attitude about payment, is recorded in the Cooper correspondence.
Cooper resided in Paris from 1826 to 1829, where he had been greeted on his arrival by
a considerable reputation due to the popularity of his tales. He found himself the center
of literary and fashionable circles, and Gosselin undertook the continued publication of
almost all of Cooper’s fiction. The recipient of this presentation copy, Georgianna Cooper
Pomeroy Keese (1806-1865) was the eldest daughter of Cooper’s sister, Ann (1784 - 1870).
While Cooper manuscript material and family associative items are not uncommon, actual
inscribed presentation copies of one of his own books from Cooper to another party, whether
family or not, are rare indeed in the marketplace.
SPILLER & BLACKBURN, p.19.                                                             $9,500.

93. [Cooper, James F.]: LIONEL LINCOLN; OR, THE LEAGUE OF BOSTON.... New York:
Published by Charles Wiley, 1825 [II: 1824]. Two volumes. xii,263;270pp. Octavo. Original
boards, paper spine labels, untrimmed. Scattered foxing early and late, some occasional
spotting, lower boards detached, with some chipping to spine extremities, rear blank and
free endsheet from second volume absent, still a relatively agreeable set of a book that
has of late become uncommon in boards. Bookplates. Gilt cloth wrappers.
First edition of Cooper’s fifth novel. The half-titles bear the series title, “Legends of the
Thirteen Republics,” of which this was to be the first installment. However, its reception
was tepid, and he turned in another direction, with The Last of the Mohicans published
the following year. In this set, the signature mark ‘11’ is intact in volume two.
BAL 3832. WRIGHT I:631. SPILLER & BLACKBURN 6.                                         $450.

94. Cooper, James F. Autograph Manuscript Leaf from THE HEADSMAN, OR THE ABBAYE
DES VIGNERONS. [Np]. [published 1833]. Two pages, on recto and verso of folio sheet
(36.7 x 34 cm). Very closely written in brown ink, with corrections and deletions throughout.
Left margin a bit ragged, with surplus of conjugate remaining, folded across middle, but
very good or better.
A fine and highly characteristic Cooper manuscript leaf, corresponding to a very rough
preliminary draft of the episode in Chapter VII of The Headsman..., when the Winkelried
is struck by a gale, and Maso’s dog, Nettuno, is in jeopardy (and much more). The text
totals in excess of two thousand words, and frequently differs substantially from the published
text.                                                                                   $3000.

95. Coover, Robert: THE UNIVERSAL BASEBALL ASSOCIATION, INC. J. HENRY WAUGH,
PROP. New York: Random House, [1968]. Cloth and boards. First edition of the author’s
second novel. Fine in neatly price-clipped dust jacket.                        $225.

96. Coover, Robert, and Kent Dixon [eds]: THE STONE WALL BOOK OF SHORT FICTIONS.
Iowa City: Stone Wall Press, 1973. Large octavo. Navy blue cloth, printed label. Cloth a
bit sunned at spine and edges, but a very good copy.
First edition. One of 325 copies printed on Rives paper. Merwin, Brautigan, Borges, Oates,
Godwin, Barthelme, Edson, Benedikt, et al.                                          $125.

97. Corman, Cid: OF VOLUME THREE. [Kyoto]: Origin Press, 1998. 791pp. plus index.
Cloth backed stiff pictorial wrappers, after a painting by Sam Francis. Wrappers a trace
rubbed, but very good in cloth-covered slipcase.

First edition of this massive collection, supplementing the first two volumes published in
1990 and following the same format. One of 200 ordinary copies, of 235. This copy bears
the author’s presentation inscription, signed with his first name only, with two pictograph
chops.                                                                                $150.

98. Courtin, Pierre: [PARENTS DU CÔTÉ GAUCHE] Original Etching. [N.p: The Artist,
2 October 1971]. Original etching “au burin sur cuivre” on paper. Plate size 12 x 15cm,
with full margins (27.5 x 21.5 cm). Tiny spot of pulp inherent in paper, far removed from
image, otherwise fine.




Copy #25 of 75, each numbered and signed by the artist in the lower margin. In the catalogue
raisonné of Courtin’s engraved work, this print is described as “tirage en cours,” and the
size of the edition was not as yet established. A charming and somewhat fanciful work
by this master of technique. He executed a similar (though less complex) design under
the same title as a color lithograph.
Rivière, PIERRE COURTIN L’OEUVRE GRAVÉ 1944 - 1972, 383.                        $275.
                Poetry that will “give you a heartburn in your arse.”
99. Cousins, James H.: THE BELL-BRANCH. Dublin: Maunsel & Co., 1908. Linen and printed
boards. Light foxing at edges, crown of spine a trifle worn, but a very good copy.
First edition of this collection by the prolific Theosophist poet/dramatist. This particular
volume deserves an additional sidenote, as it is generally believed to be the volume alluded
to by Joyce in “Gas From a Burner,” as a “tablebook of Cousins” which would “give you
a heartburn in your arse.”
COLBECK I:163.                                                                        $125.

100. Cowper, William: THE TASK A POEM. London: James Nisbet and Co., 1855. [16],263pp.
Octavo. Full medium red morocco, elaborately gilt extra, a.e.g., gilt inner dentelles, by
J. Ross of Edinburgh. First edition in this format, amply illustrated with engraved vignettes
and pictorial frames by Edmund Evans after designs by Birket Foster. A fine copy in unusually
fine dress of an otherwise common book.                                                $250.

101. Craig, Edward Gordon: NOTHING OR THE BOOKPLATE ... WITH A HANDLIST BY
E. CARRISK. London: Chatto & Windus, 1924. Quarto. Gilt decorated polished buckram.
Spine a bit sunned, with a few faint spots to lower board, otherwise a very good, bright
copy.
First edition, limited issue. One of 280 numbered copies, specially printed and bound.
Illustrated with fifty-one tipped-in facsimiles of bookplates designed by Craig, as well as
an original woodcut, signed by him in the margin. The trade issue appeared in 1925, and
contained a much smaller selection of facsimiles.
FLETCHER & ROOD A29a.                                                                $500.

102. Creeley, Robert: POEMS 1950-1965. London: Calder & Boyars, [1966]. Gilt parchment
backed boards, t.e.g. First edition, limited issue. One of 100 numbered copies (hors commerce),
specially printed on handmade paper, and signed by the author. Fine in faintly rubbed slipcase.
                                                                                         $200.

103. [Crichton, Michael]: Gidding, Nelson [screenwriter]: THE ANDROMEDA STRAIN
CINESCRIPT BY.... Universal City, CA: Universal City Studios, 5 September 1969. [2],189,[1],iv
leaves. Quarto. Mechanically reproduced typescript, printed on rectos only. Spiralbound
in studio wrappers. Illustrations. Very good, or better.
Denoted an “Estimating Draft” of this shooting script for the adaptation to the screen by
Gidding of Crichton’s breakthrough novel. Comparison with a later script associated with
production shows significant revisions took place subsequent to this draft. The “cinescript”
format is unusual, and is explained in a Preface by producer/director, Robert Wise, wherein
it is described as “an amplified screenplay which uses the written page in a cinematic form
to convey the total ‘look’ of a film. The method, incorporating illustrations, diagrams, ‘schema’
technique, computerized animations, multi-screen effects, and printouts, was suggested
by the unique style of Mr. Crichton’s novel, and retains it in translation to the screen. In
a complex film the advantage of a cinescript over the established screenplay format is a
closer approximation for the reader of what will be seen on the screen.” Released in 1971,
The Andromeda Strain demonstrated some cinematic prescience in regard to issues of
considerable concern over thirty years later.                                               $300.

104. [Cruikshank, George]: Brough, Robert B.: THE LIFE OF SIR JOHN FALSTAFF ...
WITH A BIOGRAPHY OF THE KNIGHT FROM AUTHENTIC SOURCES. London: Longman,
Brown [et al], 1858. xx,196pp. Small quarto. Original gilt pictorial crimson cloth. Frontis
and 19 plates. Gilt leather bookplate, inner hinges cracking slightly, otherwise an unusually
bright, near fine copy. Half morocco slipcase (spine a bit rubbed).
First edition in book form, preceded by the serial issue in ten parts beginning in 1857.
“The plan of this work [is] ...to illustrate the life of Sir John Falstaff exclusively from the
most striking passages in his career, as invented by Shakespeare”... Preface. An uncommonly
fine copy of a relatively common and popular book, most often seen rebound (or bound
up from parts) or repaired.
COHN 96.                                                                                  $500.

105. [Cullen, Countee]: Blum, David L. [ed]: SOME RECENT NEW YORK UNIVERSITY VERSE
... WITH AN INTRODUCTION BY JAMES B. MUNN. New York: NYU Press, 1926. Large
octavo. Gilt cloth. A very good copy.
First edition. Includes four poems by Cullen (three reprinted from Color). Charles Norman
also contributes, and has signed this copy at one poem, and ‘x’ed through another and
initialed the deletion, as he evidently did not like it in retrospect.                $50.

106. [Cummington Press]: McCorkle, Capt. [Samuel]: INCIDENT ON THE BARK COLUMBIA
BEING LETTERS RECEIVED & SENT BY CAPTAIN McCORKLE AND THE CREW OF HIS
WHALER, 1860 - 1862. Cummington, MA: The Cummington Press, [1941]. Small octavo.
Cloth. Top edge of upper board shows slight darkening, but a very nice copy.
One of three hundred numbered copies printed in Polyphilus & Blado types on Georgian
paper by Harry Duncan, Katharine Frazer and Jane Ward. A very early production by the
press.                                                                         $150.

107. [Dada]: Steegemann, Paul [publisher]: DER MARSTALL ZEIT- UND STREIT SCHRIFT
DES VERLAGES. Hannover, etc: Paul Steegemann Verlag, [1920]. 58,[4]pp. Heft 1/2. Printed
self wrappers. Uniform tanning of text and wrappers, modest internally mended tears to
upper wrapper at staples; nonetheless, a near very good copy of a fragile item.
First edition. A special number of this journal greatly preoccupied with Dada, including
contributions by Schwitters, Huelsenbeck, et al. Georges Hugnet refers to this as functionally
“a Dada almanac” (Motherwell, p.162).
KARPEL 76 (not examined).                                                               $450.




108. Dali, Salvador: LA CONQUÊTE DE L’IRRATIONNEL. Paris: Éditions Surréalistes, [1935].
Small octavo. Stiff pictorial wrappers. Color frontis and thirty-five black & white plates. Short
splits to heads and toes of joints, text paper a bit tanned, small corner crease to title,
else a very good copy.
First (French language) edition, ordinary issue. One of 1200 copies in French, in addition
to thirty-five deluxe copies and one thousand copies in English. With the ownership signature
of Alan Pryce-Jones.                                                                   $400.

109. Dana, Richard Henry, [Sr.]: POEMS AND PROSE WRITINGS. New York: Baker and
Scribner, 1850. Two volumes. Original plum brown cloth. Somewhat heavily foxed, with
old tide mark in upper margin of first volume; spines somewhat dull and spotted, spill mark
on upper board of first volume; just a sound set.
First edition, BAL’s second printing, and second state of the binding. Inscribed to Dartmouth
Professor S.G. Brown “with the affectionate regards of The Author” in each volume, and
with several authorial revisions or corrections in ink in the text. Ownership signature of
the recipient, as well as bookplate of his heirs.
BAL 4430.                                                                               $175.

110. [Defoe, Daniel (occasional attribution)]: SOME QUERIES CONCERNING THE DIS-
BANDING OF THE ARMY: HUMBLY OFFERED TO PUBLICK CONSIDERATION. WHICH
MAY SERVE FOR AN ANSWER TO MR. A, B, C, D, E, F, G’S ARGUMENT. [London]:
Printed in the Year 1698. 12pp. Small quarto. Later plain sewn stiff wrappers. Old foliation
in upper fore-corner from having once been part of a nonce volume of pamphlets, otherwise
very good, with the lower edges partially untrimmed.
First edition. A contribution to a heated pamphlet controversy which is attributed to Defoe
by Moore, but disputed by Furbank and Owens. Moore attributes three other contemporary
pamphlets on the topic to Defoe as well. ESTC locates 12 copies in North America and
7 in the U.K.
MOORE 17a. ESTC R33845. WING D846a WING S4560.                                        $375.

111. [Defoe, Daniel]: THE LIFE AND ADVENTURES OF ROBINSON CRUSOE.... London:
Printed for John Stockdale, 1804. Two volumes. viii,405; v,[1],446pp. plus 17 engraved copper
plates (including frontispieces and titles). Small quarto (25 x 17 cm). Frontispiece and
engraved title-page in each volume. Contemporary gilt calf and boards. Some occasional
modest foxing, fore-tips rather worn, joints cracking slightly (but sound); generally a very
good, crisp copy.
A new printing of Stockdale’s celebrated illustrated edition, including engravings by Medland
after drawings made by Thomas Stothard for the original 1790 edition. The final sixty-three
pages consist of Chalmers’ Life of Defoe. Ray describes the 1790 printing as “the first well-
illustrated edition of Defoe’s classic story.”
Ray, ILLUSTRATOR AND THE BOOK IN ENGLAND, 19.                                           $900.

112. [Demby, William]: Van Vechten, Carl: Original Portrait Photograph of William Demby.
[New York]. 13 March 1956. Original borderless gelatin silver print, 25 x 17.5 cm (9 7/8
x 6 7/8 inches). Matted. Fine.
A striking and characteristic portrait by Van Vechten of African American novelist and translator
William Denby, taken in the decade following the publication of his first novel. With Van
Vechten’s studio stamp on the verso, and with his manuscript subject identification, negative
number and date in ink.
KELLNER G333.                                                                             $850.

113. [Design]: Mercer, F. A., and W. Gaunt [eds]: MODERN PUBLICITY: 1939 - 40. London
& New York: The Studio, [ca. 1940]. Quarto. Cloth. Profusely illustrated, including a section
in colour. Fine in lightly used Edward Bawden dust jacket (one small tear).
First edition of this annual of advertising art and product design, including the separate
insert, “Notices of Interest to Subscribers to this Volume.”                        $150.
114. [Design]: RYTHMES DESSINS DÉCORATIFS 74 MOTIFS EXEMPLAIRES DU STYLE
ACTUEL EN TISSUS D’ART ET PAPIERS PEINTS. Paris: Librairie des Arts Décoratifs,
[1951]. [4]pp. plus forty-six plates (74 images). Quarto. Loose sheets paid into cloth-backed
decorated board portfolio. Light foxing to endsheets of portfolio, two plates minutely nicked
in extreme margins, a few smudges of offsetting on versos of a few plates, otherwise very
good.
First edition. An intriguing assemblage of samples of work done by various artists for use
in wallpapers and decorative papers, including work by Fini, Henry Moore, Matisse, Bonfils,
Prassinos, Berard, Ackermann, et al. Six of the full-page plates are in color, via pochoir
or screen-printing.                                                                 $225.
                           First Book-Length U.S. Publication
115. [Dickens, Charles]: WATKINS TOTTLE, AND OTHER SKETCHES, ILLUSTRATIVE
OF EVERY-DAY LIFE AND EVERY-DAY PEOPLE. Philadelphia: Carey, Lea & Blanchard,
1836. Two volumes. [4],[13]-210;[4],[13]-221pp. Original cloth and pale green paper over
boards, printed spine labels. Boards and labels very lightly soiled and rubbed, free endsheet
of first volume has loss at top edge and in middle, and is partially adhered to pastedown
at bottom gutter, front inner hinge of 2nd volume cracked, with 2 x 5 cm. losses from inner
gutter of front free endsheet and title (with no loss of text), upper fore corner of rear pastedown
in second volume scraped away, fore-corners bruised; in spite of these detractions, an
uncommonly nice set of a rare book in any condition.
First American edition. Gimbel asserts that the edition consisted of 1250 copies. Contrary
to Wilkins’s suggestion that the first volume of Pickwick Papers preceded, this was Dickens’s
first book-length publication in America, reprinting the text of Sketches by Boz (First Series).
The superb McGuire collection contained only an odd volume one. American Imprints, most
likely working from rebound copies, describes the format as “2 v. in 1.”
GIMBEL A8. WILKINS, p.11. AMERICAN IMPRINTS 37129.                                      $3500.

116. [Dickens, Charles]: THE POSTHUMOUS PAPERS OF THE PICKWICK CLUB:
CONTAINING A FAITHFUL RECORD OF THE PERAMBULATIONS, PERILS, TRAVELS,
ADVENTURES AND SPORTING TRANSACTIONS OF THE CORRESPONDING MEMBERS.
EDITED BY “BOZ.” Philadelphia: Carey, Lea & Blanchard, 1837. Five volumes. Original
linen and boards, paper spine labels. Some modest spotting, edgewear and soiling to boards,
backstrips modestly soiled and sunned, two labels eroded, volume one lacks a rear endsheet,
some occasional foxing or staining, but all things considered, for this work, a good to very
good set.
Second American edition of the first volume, first American editions of volumes two through
five (with ads as per Gimbel), the second with the second state of the title-leaf (with ‘sporting’
not split at end of line). As with most extant sets, assembled by a previous owner, with
differing pencil ownership signatures in a couple volumes. The first edition (i.e. printing)
of the first volume is quite scarce, having been issued in a printing of only 1500 copies.
As the following volumes were published serially, the first and second volumes were reprinted,
and one often finds mixed sets. As these volumes were set up and printed as the parts
were received from London (the text of four parts per volume), a very sound case has been
made, most recently by Richard Loomis in his admirable catalogue of the McGuire collection,
that “it is...quite certain that four of the five Philadelphia volumes preceded the issuance
of” the first British edition in book form.
GIMBEL A19. WILKINS, pp. 7-9.                                                             $2850.

117. [Dickens, Charles]: THE TUGGS’S AT RAMSGATE, AND OTHER SKETCHES
ILLUSTRATIVE OF EVERY-DAY LIFE AND EVERY-DAY PEOPLE BY BOZ...TO WHICH
IS ADDED THE PANTOMIME OF LIFE.... Philadelphia: Carey, Lea & Blanchard, 1837.
viii,[9]-204pp. Original cloth and boards, printed spine label. Boards a bit edgeworn, label
slightly eroded but quite legible, two early ink ownership signatures on preliminary advert
leaf, moderate foxing, but a very good copy of a scarce book.
First U.S. edition thus, reprinting the second series of Sketches (published in February
in the U.S.), the title piece from its previous anthology appearance, and adding the last
from its periodical appearance in the UK. Gimbel asserts that one thousand copies were
printed in June.
GIMBEL A10. WILKINS, p.11. AMERICAN IMPRINTS 44050.                               $1850.

118. Dickens, Charles: BLEAK HOUSE. New York: Harper & Bros., 1853. Two volumes.
xvi,480;[1],481-936,[4]pp. Publisher’s blue cloth, decorated in blind, spines lettered in gilt.
Portrait, and thirty-seven plates by H. K. Browne. A bit shaken and edgeworn, scattered
foxing, small stain on lower board of first volume, otherwise a good set.
First U.S. edition, clothbound issue, to all appearances bound up from the Harper serial
issue of 20 numbers in 19 parts, with the plates as yet present in the positions they are
in the parts issue, rather than placed according to the table of plates.
GIMBEL A133.                                                                       $400.

119. [Dickens, Charles]: Slater, Michael [ed]: THE CATALOGUE OF THE SUZANNET
CHARLES DICKENS COLLECTION. London: Sotheby Parke Bernet, [1975]. Gilt cloth. Frontis,
illustrations. First edition. Fine in price-clipped dust jacket.                $50.

120. [Dickensana]: [Wood, Henry]: CHANGE FOR THE AMERICAN NOTES: IN LETTERS
FROM LONDON TO NEW-YORK. BY AN AMERICAN LADY. New York: Harper & Brothers,
1843. 88pp Large octavo. Original printed wrappers, edges untrimmed. Light foxing, crown
and toe of spine a bit chipped, but a very good copy.
First American edition. A criticism of the hasty observations rendered in print by English
travelers to America, most notably those of Dickens recorded in his American Notes.
Uncommon with the wrappers intact — exceedingly common without them.                $175.

121. [Didymus Press]: Breidehnbach, Tom: THE DOUBLE WHAMMY. New York: Didymus
Press, 2000. Quarto. Linen, printed spine label. Illustrated with five original color woodcuts
by Donald Baechler, printed from the block. As new, with prospectus laid in.
First edition of the poet’s first book. One of 330 numbered copies (of 360) printed after
a design by Thomas Whitridge by Michael and Winifred Bixler, signed by the author and
artist.                                                                            $300.

122. DIRECTION. SPECIAL ISSUE. AMERICAN STUFF.... Darien, Ct. [1938]. I:3. Decorated
wrappers. Plates. Wrappers show usual tanning, spine a bit rolled, some use at corners,
but a good copy
Edited by Harold Rosenberg. A fine special issue, in book format, devoted to the FWP
and FAP, including early work by Rexroth, Kees, Larsson, Rothermell, et al.      $55.

123. Dobell, Bertram: ROSEMARY AND PANSIES. London: Published by the Author, 1904.
Polished tan buckram, lettered in gilt. Spine and edges darkened, otherwise a very good
copy.
Second edition, vastly expanded, of the bookseller/editor/bibliographer’s first verse collection.
With an eight-line verse “Fragment” written out on the free endsheet, signed with his initials.
                                                                                            $65.

124. [Dodgson, C.L.]: SYLVIE AND BRUNO [with:] SYLVIE AND BRUNO CONCLUDED.
By “Lewis Carroll” [pseud]. London: Macmillan, 1889 & 1893. Two volumes. Gilt red cloth,
a.e.g. Frontis and illustrations in each volume by Harry Furniss. Spine of first volume a
trace sunned, a few minor marks and bubbles to cloth, but a very good, bright set.
First editions, the latter with the error in the table of contents re: chapter 8 beginning on
p.110, as usual. Each volume bears the author’s presentation inscription on the half-title:
“E.F. Sampson with sincere regards from the Author. Dec. 14. 1889,” and “E.F. Sampson,
from his old friend & colleague, the Author. Dec. 27, 1893.” The Rev. E.F. Sampson was
one of Dodgson’s Oxford colleagues, and the subject of one of his photographs. $3250.

125. Dos Passos, John: 1919. New York: Harcourt, Brace and Co., [1932]. Orange cloth,
stamped in silver. Bookplate and pencil inscription on pastedown (“Sent to me by R. Stewart
Mitchell December, 1932 Davis L. James, Jr”), three small tape shadows on pastedown
from previously affixed a.l.s. (see below), edges a bit darkened, faint ringmark on lower
board, otherwise a very good copy in good dust jacket (spine a bit darkened and soiled,
with shallow chipping at head and toe of spine and one corner).
First edition. Inscribed and signed by the author on the front free endsheet: “Sincerely yours
John Dos Passos December 1932.” Laid in is a closely written, one page a.l.s. from R.
Stewart Mitchell, 14 September 1932, anticipating the gift, explaining that Dos Passos
left for Mexico before the book would appear earlier that spring, but that he signed the
sheet on which the letter is written to send to him (“John Dos Passos Sept 14 - 32 Lancaster
Mass”), and that a signed copy of the book would follow. Mitchell, a historian and regular
Dial columnist in the 1920s, and Dos Passos’s good Harvard friend, was one of the original
8 Harvard Poets whose collective anthology appeared in 1917.
HANNA 1025. POTTER 13.                                                                  $550.

126. Doucet, Jérôme: DANSES. Paris: Sociéte d’Éditions Litteraires & Artistiques / Paul
Ollendorff, 1901. Octavo. Contemporary full black morocco, stamped in gilt, a.e.g., original
stiff card wrappers bound in. Spine extremities a bit rubbed, a few small smudges, a few
spots of foxing to wrappers, otherwise a very good copy.
First edition in this format, printed on tinted card, and decorated throughout with elaborate
art nouveau illustrations and borders in gilt and white by Leon Fuchs. When bound, each
bifolium was mounted on a stub to facilitate opening of the double-spread designs. Doucet
(1865 - 1957) was well-known for his fantastic and children’s tales, published under his
given name and the pseudonym, “Montfrileux.” His devotion to the book arts resulted in
his participation in a number of collaborations between author and artist in this mode. There
are also one hundred copies on Japon.                                                   $550.

127. Douglas, Norman: TOGETHER. London: Chapman & Hall, 1923. Royal octavo. Polished
buckram, t.e.g. First edition, limited issue. One of two hundred and seventy-five numbered
copies, specially printed and bound, and signed by the author. A fine copy, without dust
jacket, in a half morocco slipcase and chemise (a bit rubbed at corners)
WOOLF A22b.                                                                          $200.
128. Douglas, Norman: NERINDA (1901). Florence: G. Orioli, 1929. Large octavo. Printed
paper boards. Toe of spine lightly bumped, else near fine in chipped glassine.
First edition of this revised text of a story from Unprofessional Tales. One of 475 numbered
copies, signed by the author. Laid in is a one page t.l.s. from Douglas, Florence, 21 March
1925, responding to a query about the book, forwarding a specimen page (not here present),
indicating copies should ship in a week, and requesting payment. With a somewhat ragged
envelope, addressed in Douglas’s hand.
WOOLF A28a.                                                                            $225.

129. Douglas, Norman: ONE DAY. Chapelle-Reanville: Hours Press, 1929. Quarto. Red
roan over boards, photographic endsheets. Portrait. Spine extremities and top edge a trifle
rubbed, otherwise, for this book, a very good copy, significantly better than the norm.

First edition. One of two hundred numbered copies printed on velin de rives and signed
by the author, from a total edition of 500. Perhaps the most ill-considered binding of many
such executed by Ms. Cunard.                                                          $300.

130. [Doves Press]: Ruskin, John: UNTO THIS LAST FOUR ESSAYS ON THE FIRST
PRINCIPLES OF POLITICAL ECONOMY. Hammersmith: The Doves Press, 1907. Small
quarto. Limp vellum, lettered in gilt, by the Doves Bindery. Four spots of old offsetting from
protective wrapper at corners of endsheets, a few light finger smudges to rear endsheets,
but a very good copy.
One of three hundred copies printed on handmade paper by T.J. Cobden-Sanderson and
Emery Walker. There were also fifteen copies printed on vellum.
RANSOM (Doves Press) 11.                                                     $450.

131. [Doves Press]: Winship, George P.: WILLIAM CAXTON A PAPER READ AT A MEETING
OF THE CLUB OF ODD VOLUMES IN BOSTON.... [Hammersmith: The Doves Press], 1909.
Small quarto. Vellum backed boards. Slight darkening at edges of binding, crown of spine
slightly rubbed, otherwise near fine.
One of three hundred copies printed in black and red on handmade paper by T. J. Cobden-
Sanderson. There were also fifteen copies on vellum.
RANSOM (Doves Press) 19.                                                          $400.

132. [Doves Press]: Wordsworth, William: THE PRELUDE AN AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL POEM
... 1799 - 1805. [Hammersmith: The Doves Press], 1915. 301,[1]pp. Small quarto. Full limp
vellum by the Doves Bindery. Slight flecking to the vellum along the spine panel, mild pencil
erasures from endsheet, otherwise about fine.
One of 155 copies printed under the direction of T.J. Cobden-Sanderson on handmade paper,
with side-notes in red. There were also ten copies on vellum.
RANSOM (DOVES PRESS) 47. TOMKINSON (DOVES PRESS) 47.                              $1250.
                   First Sherlock Holmes Talkie — One Treatment
133. [Doyle, Arthur Conan]: Garrett, Oliver H. P. [screenwriter]: THE RETURN OF SHERLOCK
HOLMES [caption title]. [Hollywood: Paramount Pictures], 29 March 1929. 79 leaves. Quarto.
Original typescript, on rectos only of onion-skin stock. Bradbound on typed wrappers bearing
early annotations and a stamp noting this as a “Master File” copy. Pencil inscription and
annotations on upper wrapper, light use at edges, very good.
An original typescript of a preliminary treatment for the 1929 film adaptation, directed by
Basil Dean and starring Clive Brook as Holmes, H. Reeves-Smith as Watson, Donald Crisp
as Col. Moran, and Harry T. Morey as Moriarty, in a loose adaptation based on “The Dying
Detective” and “His Last Bow.” There are a few scattered neat revisions and insertions
in ink in the text in a contemporary hand. The credits for the final script go to director
Dean and Garrett Fort, and it would appear that Oliver Garrett’s involvement may have ceased
after this early treatment, which predates the release by seven months. In fact, a subsequent
treatment was written in late May, by F. Hugh Herbert. Garrett’s career as a prolific screenwriter
included such later full credits as Moby Dick (1930), A Farewell to Arms (1932), The
Story of Temple Drake (1933) and Duel in the Sun (1946). While the finished film has
been the object of some criticism by Holmes film critics, this was the first Holmes sound
film, and a comparison of the film with this early treatment by a talented writer might help
track where it went wrong. Well over one hundred and fifty adaptations of Sherlock Holmes
to the screen are known, beginning with Sherlock Holmes Baffled (1903). Any script material
relating to the pre-1950 adaptations is quite uncommon, and this particular text may very
well be a unique survival. The upper wrapper bears an interesting early pencil inscription:
“Get The Return of Sherlock Holmes for Col. Sebastian Moran.”
DE WAAL 5133.                                                                             $2250.

                 First Sherlock Holmes Talkie — Another Treatment
134. [Doyle, Arthur Conan]: Herbert, F. Hugh: [screenwriter]: THE RETURN OF SHERLOCK
HOLMES OUTLINE TREATMENT [caption title]. [Hollywood: Paramount Pictures], 21 May
1929. 52 leaves. Legal format. Mixed original and carbon typescript, on rectos only of yellow
stock. Stapled at left margin. Pencil inscription and annotations on top leaf (“1st Rough
Draft”), “Master File” stamp, light use at edges, top leaf chipped at lower staple, else very
good.
An original typescript of a preliminary treatment for the 1929 film adaptation, directed by
Basil Dean and starring Clive Brook as Holmes, H. Reeves-Smith as Watson, Donald Crisp
as Col. Moran, and Harry T. Morey as Moriarty. There was an earlier treatment, written
by Oliver H. P. Garrett, and the credits for the final script went to director Dean and Garrett
Fort. It would appear that Oliver Garrett’s involvement may have ceased after the earlier
treatment, and the project may have then been reassigned to Herbert, then in the early
years of his long career, which included over eighty-five films and presidency of the Screen
Writers Guild (1953-4). While the finished film has been the object of some criticism by
Holmes film critics, this was the first Holmes sound film, and a comparison of final film
with this early treatment might help track where it went wrong. Like the item above, this
particular text may very well be a unique survival.
DE WAAL 5133.                                                                          $2000.

135. [Doyle, Arthur Conan]: Lowe, Edward T.: [screenwriter]: IDEAS FOR “SHERLOCK
HOLMES #2” BY [wrapper title. Released as: SHERLOCK HOLMES AND THE SECRET
WEAPON]. [Los Angeles: Universal Pictures], 4 March 1942. [1],12 leaves. Quarto. Original
carbon typescript on rectos only of onion skin stock denoted “Contract File Copy” in red.
Bradbound in typed wrappers. Production number stamped on upper wrapper, wrappers
a bit tanned and nicked, typescript fine.
A fascinating and very early pre-production text relating to this loose adaptation to the
screen of “The Dancing Man” for Universal’s distinguished series of Sherlock Holmes vehicles.
Lowe was one of the principal writers for the film, and here discusses characterization,
plotting and other issues, most notably the questions about presenting credible but advanced
technology in the film: cyclotrons, cosmic rays, ultra-sonic waves, etc. The film, directed
by Roy William Neill, and starring Basil Rathbone and Nigel Bruce, was released on 12
February 1943. Script material relating to any of the pre-1950 Holmes films is uncommon,
particularly material from such an early stage of development. Although well over one hundred
and fifty adaptations of Sherlock Holmes to the screen are known, beginning with Sherlock
Holmes Baffled (1903), the Rathbone-Bruce portrayals have become almost canonical,
beginning with The Hound of the Baskervilles (March 1939), and concluding with the
twelfth in sequence, Dressed to Kill (1946).
DE WAAL 5149.                                                                           $600.
136. [Doyle, Arthur Conan]: Darling, Scott, Edward T. Lowe, and Edmund L. Hartmann
[screenwriters]: DIALOGUE CONTINUITY TRAILER BASIL RATHBONE AND NIGEL BRUCE
IN “SHERLOCK HOLMES AND THE SECRET WEAPON”.... [Los Angeles: Universal Pictures],
3 September 1942. [1],4 plus two blank leaves. Quarto. Mimeographed typescript, printed
on rectos only and stapled at top margin. Staples a trace rusty, a bit dusty at edges, else
very good.
A continuity script for the trailer for this adaptation to the screen for Universal’s distinguished
series of Sherlock Holmes adaptations, costarring Lionel Atwill, and directed by Roy William
Neill. Trailer continuity scripts are uncommon.
DE WAAL 5149.                                                                                $350.

137. [Doyle, Arthur Conan]: Darling, Scott, and Edward T. Lowe [screenwriters]: “SHERLOCK
HOLMES FIGHTS BACK” SCREENPLAY BY...BASED ON A FREE ADAPTATION OF “THE
DANCING MAN” BY SIR ARTHUR CONAN DOYLE [released as: SHERLOCK HOLMES
AND THE SECRET WEAPON]. [Los Angeles: Universal Pictures], 22 April 1942. [1],110
leaves. Quarto. Original carbon typescript (title leaf in original typescript), on rectos only
of onion skin stock. Bradbound in typed wrappers. Production number and pencil note on
upper wrapper, crease and short chipped tear to upper wrapper at lower corner, pencil typist’s
notes, but very good, internally about fine.
A very early pre-production script, denoted the “third draft” of this adaptation to the screen
for Universal’s distinguished series of Sherlock Holmes vehicles. This particular copy is
the “Copy from which we Mimeod Pink script 5/4/42,” according to the notations on the
upper wrapper, and the internal typist’s annotations bear that out. The film, directed by
Roy William Neill, and starring Basil Rathbone and Nigel Bruce, was released on 12 February
1943, and subsequent to this draft, a third writer, E.L. Hartmann, was called in to revise/
collaborate, and comparison with a later draft indicates his revisions were substantive. Script
material relating to any of the pre-1950 Holmes films is uncommon, particularly material
from such an early stage of development.
DE WAAL 5149.                                                                          $1850.

138. [Doyle, Arthur Conan]: Darling, Scott, Edward T. Lowe, and Edmund L. Hartmann
[screenwriters]: “SHERLOCK HOLMES FIGHTS BACK” SCREENPLAY BY...BASED ON
A FREE ADAPTATION OF “THE DANCING MAN” BY SIR ARTHUR CONAN DOYLE [released
as: SHERLOCK HOLMES AND THE SECRET WEAPON]. [Los Angeles: Universal Pictures],
22 May - 17 June 1942. [1],110 leaves plus numerous numbered or lettered revised inserts
or appended leaves. Quarto. Original carbon typescript (title leaf in original typescript),
on rectos only of onion skin stock denoted “Contract File Copy” in red. Bradbound in typed
wrappers (neatly detached). Production number stamped on upper wrapper, upper wrapper
heavily creased, with resulting cracks in brittle stock and small chips, but the typescript
itself is fine.
A very early revised pre-production script, in highly privileged format, of this adaptation
to the screen for Universal’s distinguished series of Sherlock Holmes adaptations. This
particular copy includes the revisions and “additional changes” by Edmund L. Hartmann
that were made over the time span subsequent to the third draft of Darling and Lowe’s script,
and they are substantial. The film, directed by Roy William Neill, and starring Basil Rathbone
and Nigel Bruce, was released on 12 February 1943, and it is probable that even more
alterations were made prior to the final shooting script.
DE WAAL 5149.                                                                          $2000.
                      Original Typescript Treatment and Critique
139. [Doyle, Arthur Conan]: Millhauser, Bertram [screenwriter]: SHERLOCK HOLMES NO.
3 [wrapper title. Released as SHERLOCK HOLMES IN WASHINGTON]. [Los Angeles:
Universal Pictures], 1 and 8 April 1942. [1],34 and [5] leaves. Quarto. Original typescript,
on rectos only, the former partially on canary yellow stock, bradbound in typed wrappers
(a bit chipped and detached), the latter stapled. Very good.
Two very early typescripts relating to this contribution to the Holmes screen canon, consisting
of the original “Plot Structure” (i.e. treatment) for the film (accompanied by a detailed typed
memo, signed, from the screenwriter to the producer dealing with issues in conception
of the film), and a closely typed summary of the proposed sequences in the film. In the
memo, Millhauser enters into a detailed analysis of what he finds wrong with the property:
“Detective stories should have an element of mystery; and there is no mystery of any kind
in this one ... I am convinced we need to introduce an element of mystery to maintain suspense
and keep our story from wearing thin. The lack of such mystery is the basic fault of the
story.” He arrives at that final conclusion via analysis of previous films/scripts in the sequence,
and the specific plot-line of this property. His memo is signed in ink at the conclusion.
Released in April of 1943, Sherlock Holmes in Washington was directed by Roy William
Neill, and starred Basil Rathbone and Nigel Bruce. Millhauser ultimately shared screen
credit for the script of this film with Lynn Riggs. His career as a screenwriter began in
1911 and includes over sixty credits, including Sherlock Holmes Faces Death (1943) and
Sherlock Holmes and The Spider Woman (1944).
DE WAAL 5150.                                                                               $2500.
                                Typescript of the Treatment
140. [Doyle, Arthur Conan]: Andrews, Robert B. [screenwriter]: “SHERLOCK HOLMES VS.
LORD HAW-HAW” STORY OUTLINE BY... [wrapper title. Released as: SHERLOCK HOLMES
AND THE VOICE OF TERROR]. [Los Angeles: Universal Pictures], [14 February 1942].
[2],51 leaves. Quarto. Original typescript, typed on rectos only of canary yellow onion skin
stock. Bradbound in typescript wrappers. Old vertical fold down middle, a few corner creases,
otherwise very good or better.
Perhaps the earliest available draft for this 1942 contribution to the Holmes film canon,
based in part on His Last Bow, updated to a setting in the years immediately preceding
WWII. This is an original typescript of Andrews’s outline/treatment for the film, here under
the working title, which was later changed to The Voice of Terror. Although this typescript
is undated, we have handled a carbon of it which is explicitly dated as above. The film
was directed by John Rawlins, and starred Basil Rathbone and Nigel Bruce. Robert H. Andrews,
John Bright and Lynn Riggs shared final screen credit for the shooting script, and in the
final version, the particular reference to Lord Haw-Haw was altered, and the mysterious
broadcaster referred to as “The Voice of Terror.” Both the wrapper and the first leaf denote
this typescript is “For: Mr. Howard Benedict” - the film’s producer.
DE WAAL 5148.                                                                        $2250.
                        Unproduced Universal Sherlock Holmes
141. [Doyle, Arthur Conan]: Gangelin, Paul, and Brenda Weisberg [screenwriters]: SHERLOCK
HOLMES #6 [wrapper title, then recaptioned in manuscript:] SHERLOCK HOLMES & THE
WOMAN SMUGGLER. [Los Angeles: Universal Pictures], 12 June 1943. 18;28 leaves. Quarto.
Original carbon typescript, typed on rectos only of onion skin stock, captioned in red “Contract
File Copy.” Punched for bradbinding, but unbound, accompanied by typed upper wrapper,
the latter a bit chipped and with production number stamped in upper corner. First leaf
of typescript a bit rumpled and chipped at right margin, otherwise very good.
An intriguing item, being a detailed treatment for an unproduced film in the distinguished
Universal Holmes/Watson sequence starring Basil Rathbone and Nigel Bruce, followed by
28 leaves of a preliminary draft of a start on the shooting script. Gangelin and Weisberg
were cowriters of the screenplay for The Scarlet Claw (1944, a.k.a. Sherlock Holmes
in Canada – see below), but the property in hand bears no relationship to that film, either
in setting or subsidiary characters. It is presumably unproduced, and this may well be an
instance of unique survival of this text in the present copy.                       $1500.

142. [Doyle, Arthur Conan]: [Hartmann, Edmund L., Roy William Neill, and Brenda Weisberg
(screenwriters)]: SHERLOCK HOLMES IN CANADA [caption title. Released as: THE SCARLET
CLAW]. [Los Angeles: Universal Pictures, 1943]. 100 leaves. Quarto. Original carbon
typescript, typed on rectos only of onion-skin stock with denotation in red: “Contract File
Copy.” Bradbound in plain stiff wrappers with production number stamped on upper wrapper.
Very good.
A very early pre-production draft (under the working title) of the screenplay for this addition
to the Universal Holmes/Watson film canon, in a format indicative of highly privileged
circulation. While the authorship is not evident on this draft, the writers identified above
— which include the film’s director — received final screen credit. Comparison with another
draft, dated in December 1943, indicates substantial revision took place subsequent to
this draft. The film, directed by Roy William Neel, starred Basil Rathbone and Nigel Bruce,
and was released on in May 1944. The contemporary setting served as a tribute to Canada’s
contribution to the war effort.
DE WAAL 5153.                                                                          $2250.

143. [Doyle, Arthur Conan]: [Hartmann, Edmund L., Roy William Neill, and Brenda Weisberg
(screenwriters)]: SHERLOCK HOLMES IN CANADA [released as: THE SCARLET CLAW].
[Los Angeles: Universal Pictures], 15 December 1943. [1],115 leaves. Quarto. Mimeographed
typescript, printed on rectos only of rose colored stock. Punched, and held by single brad.
Title leaf a bit creased, production number stamp and pencil name on title leaf, otherwise
very good.
An unspecified, but pre-production draft (under the working title) of the screenplay for this
addition to the Universal Holmes/Watson film canon. While the authorship is not evident
on this draft, the writers identified above — which include the film’s director — received
final screen credit. The film directed by Roy William Neel, starred Basil Rathbone and Nigel
Bruce, and was released on in May 1944. The contemporary setting served as a tribute
to Canada’s contribution to the war effort.
DE WAAL 5153.                                                                        $1750.

144. [Doyle, Arthur Conan]: Millhauser, Bertram [screenwriter]: TRAILER BASIL RATHBONE
AND NIGEL BRUCE IN “SHERLOCK HOLMES FACES DEATH”.... [Los Angeles: Universal
Pictures], 29 July 1943. [1],4 plus two blank leaves. Quarto. Mimeographed typescript,
printed on rectos only and stapled at top margin. Staples a trace rusty, a few corner creases,
else very good.
A continuity script for the trailer for this adaptation to the screen for Universal’s distinguished
series of Sherlock Holmes adaptations, directed by Roy William Neill. Trailer continuity
scripts are uncommon.
DE WAAL 5151.                                                                                $350.

145. [Doyle, Arthur Conan]: Millhauser, Bertram [screenwriter]: CONTINUITY & DIALOGUE
TRAILER ON BASIL RATHBONE AND NIGEL BRUCE IN THE PEARL OF DEATH.... [Los
Angeles: Universal Pictures], 18 August 1944. [1],4 plus two blank leaves. Quarto.
Mimeographed typescript, printed on rectos only and stapled at top margin. Staples a trace
rusty, production number stamped on title leaf, else very good.
A continuity script for the trailer for this adaptation to the screen for Universal’s distinguished
series of Sherlock Holmes adaptations, directed by Roy William Neill. Trailer continuity
scripts are uncommon.
DE WAAL 5154.                                                                                $350.

146. [Doyle, Arthur Conan]: Chanslor, Roy [screenwriter]: “THE MURDER CLUB” SCREEN-
PLAY BY ... SUGGESTED BY “THE FIVE ORANGE PIPS” BY A. CONAN DOYLE [with:]
“THE HOUSE OF FEAR”.... [Los Angeles: Universal Pictures], 8 and 21 April, and 18 August
1944. Three items, [2],112 leaves plus lettered insert; [2],109 leaves; and [1],4 leaves.
Quarto. The first item original carbon typescript, on rectos only, of onionskin stock denoted
in red “Contract File copy,” bradbound with typed wrappers (the latter neatly detached at
brads, with chips to corners of lower wrapper); the second item mimeographed typescript,
on rectos only of pink stock, pencil name and production and filing numbers, otherwise
very good; the third item, mimeographed typescript, on rectos only of white stock, stapled
at top, with production number and pencil note on top leaf, very good.
Three significant items associated with the production of Chanslor’s adaptation to the screen
of Doyle’s Holmes story, released on 16 March 1945 under the title, The House of Fear.
The film was directed by Roy William Neil, and starred Basil Rathbone and Nigel Bruce.
Present here are the highly privileged “Contract File Copy” draft of the script in carbon
typescript, in which format distribution is usually made in only a handful of copies, for the
principals and for the studio archive. The second item is an unspecified but revised
preproduction draft, exhibiting some substantial changes in the dialogue in comparison
to the earlier draft; and finally, a scarce continuity script for the film’s trailer.
DE WAAL 5155.                                                                         $2750.

147. [Doyle, Arthur Conan]: Lee, Leonard [screenwriter]: “THE FUGITIVE” SCREENPLAY
BY ... [released as PURSUIT TO ALGIERS]. [Los Angeles: Universal Pictures], 25 April
1945. 109 leaves Quarto. Carbon typescript, typed on rectos only of onionskin marked in
red: “Contract Copy.” Punched for bradbinding in typescript wrappers (brads not present).
Some creasing and small tears to some margins, small chip to upper wrapper at top edge,
otherwise very good.
An early pre-production draft of this adaptation of the Holmes/Watson characters to the
screen, here present in an unusual, privileged form. The index on the upper wrapper indicates
that seven copies were prepared (this being #7) and distributed to the producer, director,
writer, and other principals. Comparison of this early draft with another, dating from July/
August, indicates the script underwent significant later revision. The film, directed by Roy
William Neill, starring Basil Rathbone and Nigel Bruce, involves their protection of the heir
of Rovenia after the King of that nation was assassinated. The Rathbone-Bruce portrayals
of Holmes and Watson have become almost canonical, beginning with The Hound of the
Baskervilles (March 1939), and concluding with the twelfth in sequence, Dressed to Kill
(1946), for which Lee also served as writer.
DE WAAL 5157.                                                                        $2250.

148. [Doyle, Arthur Conan]: Lee, Leonard [screenwriter]: “THE FUGITIVE” SCREENPLAY
BY ... [released as PURSUIT TO ALGIERS]. [Los Angeles: Universal Pictures], 28 July
- 4 August 1945. [1],113 leaves (modified somewhat by revised inserts). Quarto. Mimeographed
typescript, printed on rectos only of white and blue stock. Bradbound in mimeographed
wrappers. A few small chips and tears at wrapper edges, lower wrapper recycled from another
contemporary script (at the time, due to wartime paper conservation), pencil signature on
wrapper and first leaf, otherwise very good, internally fine.
An unspecified, but revised pre-production draft of this adaptation of the Holmes/Watson
characters to the screen. Inserted revises on blue paper span the period above. The film,
directed by Roy William Neill, starring Basil Rathbone and Nigel Bruce, involves their protection
of the heir of Rovenia after the King of that nation was assassinated.
DE WAAL 5157.                                                                            $1750.

149. [Doyle, Arthur Conan]: Lee, Leonard [screenwriter]: CONTINUITY & DIALOGUE ...
PURSUIT TO ALGIERS. [Los Angeles: Universal Pictures], 8 October 1945. 107 leaves,
paginated by reel. Quarto. Mimeographed typescript, printed on rectos only. Punched at
top and bradbound. Occasional slight creases or marginal fraying; very good.
A post-production continuity script of this adaptation of the Holmes/Watson characters
to the screen. The film, directed by Roy William Neill, starring Basil Rathbone and Nigel
Bruce, involves their protection of the heir of Rovenia after the King of that nation was
assassinated.
DE WAAL 5157.                                                                       $450.
                        Unproduced Universal Sherlock Holmes
150. [Doyle, Arthur Conan]: Neill, Roy William [screenwriter]: MURDER WILL OUT BASED
ON THE ADVENTURE OF THE SECOND STAIN AND THE ADVENTURE OF THE SPECKLED
BIRD.... [Los Angeles: Universal Pictures], 4 May 1945. 49 leaves. Quarto. Original carbon
typescript, typed on rectos only of onion skin stock. Punched for bradbinding, but unbound,
accompanied by typed wrappers, the latter a bit chipped and with production number stamped
on upper wrapper. Last two leaves of typescript a bit rumpled at right margin, otherwise
very good.
An interesting find, being a detailed treatment for an unproduced film in the distinguished
Universal Holmes/Watson sequence starring Basil Rathbone and Nigel Bruce. Neill was
the director of over ten of the films in the series, but contributed as writer to only one other,
The Scarlet Claw. He directed over one hundred films and his other Universal credits include
Frankenstein Meets the Wolfman, and his last film, released the year of his sudden death,
was an adaptation of Cornell Woolrich’s Black Angel.                                     $1250.

151. [Doyle, Arthur Conan]: Gruber, Frank [screenwriter]: CONTINUITY & DIALOGUE ...
“TERROR BY NIGHT.” [Los Angeles: Universal Pictures], 14 January 1946. [1],18,20,15,
16,17,20 leaves, paginated by reel. Quarto. Mimeographed typescript, printed on rectos
only. Punched at top and bradbound. Occasional slight creases or marginal fraying, title
leaf chipped around brads, and with creased tear in right margin; generally very good.
A post-production continuity script of this important adaptation of the Holmes/Watson characters
to the screen. The screenplay was written by novelist Frank Gruber, and was his sixth
credited screenplay. The film, directed by Roy William Neill, starred Basil Rathbone and
Nigel Bruce, and was the penultimate film in the sequence of twelve Universal films in which
the due set high marks for their portrayal of Holmes and Watson.
DE WAAL 5158.                                                                             $650.

           “Let it be said he found us very close together in the light”
152. [Doyle, Arthur Conan]: Goldman, James [screenwriter]: COMBINED CONTINUITY ON
“THEY MIGHT BE GIANTS.” [Los Angeles: Universal Pictures], 5 April 1971. [1],122 leaves.
Quarto. Mimeographed typescript, printed on rectos only, punched and bradbound at top
edge. About fine.
A combined continuity script for Goldman’s adaptation to the screen of his first play. George
C. Scott played the lead, Justin Playfair, in the 1971 film, directed by Anthony Harvey,
and co-starring Joanne Woodward as Dr. Watson. Scott was a standout in the role of a
slightly delusional, but ultimately exceedingly sensible man operating under the conviction
that he is Sherlock Holmes, and his psychiatrist the fictional Dr. Watson, in their pursuit
of Moriarity through the night-time streets of Manhattan. The film is occasionally screened
under the far less satisfying alternate title, The Return of the World’s Greatest Detective.
“One of the most refreshing and entertaining Holmes films ever made, with an actor whose
performance equals those of Gillette and Rathbone” - De Waal.
DE WAAL 5165.                                                                           $150.

153. [Doyle, Arthur Conan]: Wilder, Gene [screenwriter]: THE ADVENTURE OF SHERLOCK
HOLMES’ SMARTER BROTHER .... BASED ON THE PLAY “SHERLOCK HOLMES” BY
WILLIAM GILLETTE. [Los Angeles]: Twentieth Century-Fox, 1 February - 20 March 1975.
[1],129 leaves plus lettered inserts. Quarto. Mechanically reproduced typescript, printed
on rectos only of white and blue stock. Bradbound in printed studio wrappers. Very good
or better, with only faint use to the canary yellow wrappers.
An unspecified pre-production draft, including a multitude of revises on blue paper extending
into March. In addition to writing the script for this Holmes pastiche, Wilder both directed
and starred in it, in company with Madeline Kahn, Marty Feldman, et al. The film saw
release in mid-December.                                                               $175.
154. [Doyle, Arthur Conan]: Sapinsley, Alvin [screenwriter]: “SHERLOCK HOLMES IN NEW
YORK” BEING AN ACCOUNT OF THE PENULTIMATE STRUGGLE OF WITS AND WILLS
BETWEEN MISTER SHERLOCK HOLMES AND PROFESSOR JAMES MORIARTY IN NEW
YORK CITY DURING THREE DAYS AT THE END OF MARCH AND THE BEGINNING OF
APRIL IN THE YEAR 1901, AS RECONSTRUCTED FROM UNFINISHED NOTES OF DR.
JOHN H. WATSON. [Los Angeles]: Twentieth Century-Fox Television, 25 July 1975. [1],112
leaves. Quarto. Mimeographed typescript, printed on rectos only. Bradbound in printed studio
wrappers. Faint dust-soiling to wrappers, but very good or better.
An unspecified, but pre-production draft of this original television Sherlock Holmes pastiche.
The October 1976 release starred Roger Moore as Holmes, John Huston as Moriarty, Patrick
Macnee as Watson, and Charlotte Rampling as Irene Adler, under the direction of Boris
Sagal. While a novelization was published as a paperback original in 1976, the original
teleplay was not published at the time. It was nominated for an Edgar Allen Poe Award,
and if only by virtue of the stand-out cast, this addition to the Holmes adaptation canon
deserves scrutiny. Denoted copy #24 of this script on the title-leaf.                  $250.

155. Dreiser, Theodore: EPITAPH A POEM. New York: Heron Press, [1929]. Quarto. Black
raw silk over boards, lettered in silver. Frontis and decorations by Robert Fawcett. Fine
in bumped and worn, good slipcase.
First edition. One of 1100 numbered copies, printed on handmade Keijyo Kami paper, and
signed by Dreiser and Fawcett.                                                  $225.

156. [Dreiser, Theodore]: Goetz, Ruth and Augustus [screenwriters]: WILLIAM WYLER’S
PRODUCTION OF “SISTER CARRIE”...SCREENPLAY BY.... [Los Angeles]: Paramount
Pictures, 20 July - 17 August 1950. [3],137 leaves (with small variations due to inserted
lettered revises). Quarto. Mimeographed typescript, printed on rectos only. Punched and
bradbound at left. Three studio filing stamps and a couple colored pencil notes on first
leaf, title leaf slightly torn and creased around top brad, but very good or better.
A preproduction draft, denoted “Final White,” but with revises on blue and goldenrod papers
dated as late as 17 August 1950. Adapted for the screen from Dreiser’s first novel by Ruth
and Augustus Goetz, the film was finally released in 1952, under Wyler’s direction, and
starred Laurence Olivier as George Hurstwood and Jennifer Jones as Carrie Meeber. The
title was abbreviated to Carrie prior to release. We have recently handled a slightly earlier
draft, dated 1 December 1949, but with revises through 22 May 1950, that was 33 leaves
longer, suggesting that a considerable amount of revision/cutting took place during the
months separating the two drafts. Accompanied by: Carrie Release Dialogue Script
(revised). [Los Angeles]: Paramount Pictures, 4 January 1952. Narrow quarto. Mimeographed
typescript, printed on rectos only, stapled in left margin. Foliated in reel sequence,
corresponding to the thirteen reels of the film at a stage close to the end of final production.
Even cursory comparison between the present draft of the script and the Release Script
makes it evident that between 17 August 1950 and release, major portions of the script
underwent significant reconception/revision.                                              $750.

157. Dryden, John: AN EVENING’S LOVE, OR THE MOCK ASTROLOGER. AS IT IS ACTED
BY THEIR MAJESTIES SERVANTS. London: Printed for Henry Herringman, and are to be
sold by Richard Bentley, 1691. [16],63,[1]pp. Quarto. Three-quarter early 20th century straight-
grain morocco and cloth. Moderate foxing, small rust hole in title affecting one letter in
the imprint, fore-corners slightly bumped, otherwise a good copy.
Fourth edition, published two decades after the first and second editions. Based on Molière’s
Le Dépit Amoureux and Les Precieuses Ridicules, and Corneille’s Le Feint Astrologue.
ESTC R15472. MACDONALD 75d. WING D2276.                                               $250.
158. [Duchamp, Marcel]: Carrouges, Michel: LES MACHINES CÉLIBATAIRES. Paris: Arcanes,
[1954]. Pictorial wrappers. Wrappers faintly tanned at spine and lightly foxed, lower forecorner
of upper wrapper a bit frayed, otherwise a very good or better copy, largely unopened.
First edition. One of 1980 copies on Alfa Prioux, published as the second volume in Collection
“Chiffres.” The frontis and wrapper reproduce a drawing from Duchamp’s “La mariée mise
à nu par ses célibataires, même.” Controversial essays on Duchamp, Kafka, Roussel, Jarry,
Villiers, et el.                                                                        $275.
                          One of Four With Original Drawing
159. Duncan, Robert: MY MOTHER WOULD BE A FALCONRESS [caption title]. [Berkeley]:
Oyez, 1968. Large folio broadside (71 x 51 cm). Hinged at top verso to sheet of stiff board;
about fine.




First edition. Copy “B” of only four lettered copies, signed in full by Duncan, dated “Feb
7, 1968,” and embellished with an original multi-color drawing of a falcon over the body
of the text and into the lower left margin, signed again with his monogram. The entire edition
consisted of 179 copies printed by Graham Mackintosh, with one hundred unsigned copies
(hors commerce), seventy-five numbered copies, signed (for sale), and the four special lettered
copies, with the drawing, not for sale. A significant poem, and in this lettered and illustrated
issue, a Duncan rarity.
BERTHOLF A28c.                                                                           $2250.
160. Duncan, Robert: THE SENTINELS [caption title]. [San Francisco]: Square Zero Editions,
1979. Four examples. Folio broadside (48.3 x 31.9 cm). Illustration by the author. Very
good to fine.
Four different press proofs on variant papers of the second edition. The edition consisted
of 126 copies designed and printed by the Black Stone Press. These proofs are on four
different types of paper, show issues with inking, and one features the illustration printed
in black ink.
BERTHOLF A52b.                                                                        $350.

161. Duncan, Robert: A PARIS VISIT ... DRAWINGS & AFTERWORD BY R.B. KITAJ.
[New York]: The Grenfell Press, [1985]. Small folio. Full deep orange-red morocco, lettered
and ruled in blind. Portrait and illustrations. Fine slightly edge-darkened clamshell box with
blindstamped morocco label.
First edition. One of fifteen copies, numbered in Roman, printed on handmade DeWint paper,
specially bound and cased by Claudia Cohen, and signed by the author and artist, from
a total edition of 130.                                                           $2000.

162. [Eisenstein, Sergei]: Seton, Marie: SERGEI M. EISENSTEIN A BIOGRAPHY. [London]:
The Bodley Head, [1952]. Gilt cloth. Frontis. Plates and illustrations. First edition of the
first full-length English language biography of the Russian film genius. Light rubbing at edges,
otherwise a very good or better copy in slightly darkened dust jacket with crease and closed
tear at lower edge of the rear panel.                                                       $55.

163. Eliot, T.S.: A SONG FOR SIMEON ... DRAWING BY E. McKNIGHT KAUFFER. London:
Faber & Gwyer, 1928. Gray boards, lettered in gilt. Color frontis. Faint dust-toning to edges
of boards, otherwise a fine copy. Custom cloth slipcase and chemise.
First edition, limited issue, of Ariel Poem number 16. One of five hundred numbered copies,
printed on large handmade paper, and signed by the author.
GALLUP A11b.                                                                         $650.

164. Eliot, T.S.: ASH-WEDNESDAY. New York & London: Fountain Press/ Faber & Faber,
1930. Blue cloth, decorated and lettered in gilt, t.e.g. Usual slight offset to endsheets,
else a fine copy in slightly chipped glassine, in slightly soiled slipcase with short cracks
at two joints. The whole enclosed in custom cloth slipcase and chemise.
First edition, limited issue. One of six hundred numbered copies, printed on handmade
paper at the Curwen Press and signed by the author.
GALLUP A15. MODERN MOVEMENT 65.                                                 $2250.

165. Eliot, T.S.: [FOUR QUARTETS] EAST COKER [with:] BURNT NORTON [with:] THE
DRY SALVAGES [with:] LITTLE GIDDING. London: Faber and Faber, [1940 through 1942].
Four volumes. Sewn and stapled stiff printed wrappers. Some sunning at edges, light foxing
to first and third title, old clipping offset to rear endsheets of first volume, a couple of staples
rusty, but a very good set.
First Faber printing of the first title, first separate edition of the second title, and first editions
of the latter two titles. The fourth title is in the preferred binding (sewn rather than stapled).
East Coker first appeared in two forms associated with its publication in The New English
Weekly.
GALLUP A36c, A37, A39 and A42. MODERN MOVEMENT 92.                                              $1750.

166. Eliot, T.S.: RELIGIOUS DRAMA: MEDIAEVAL AND MODERN. New York: House of
Books, 1954. Cloth. Small, tasteful bookplate in corner of front pastedown, otherwise fine
in original glassine (large chip from front panel). Custom cloth slipcase and chemise (bearing
another tasteful bookplate).
First edition One of three hundred numbered copies, in addition to twenty-six lettered copies
for presentation, all signed by the author.
GALLUP A65.                                                                            $850.

167. Ellison, Ralph: INVISIBLE MAN. New York: Random House, [1952]. Cloth. White spine
stamping modestly flaked, as often, otherwise a very good copy in frayed shelfworn dust
jacket that has been laminated by the former owner.
First edition of the author’s first novel, winner of the National Book Award for its year, and
a key work of 20th century U.S. literature. Inscribed by the author in the year of publication:
“For Al and Jean Wolfe, Sincerely, Ralph Ellison. April 1952.” The recipient, the brother
of novelist and Trotsky bodyguard Bernard Wolfe and one-time political activist, may have
met Ellison during their years in the Merchant Marine. The inscription is dated within a
few weeks of publication.
BLOCKSON 86.                                                                           $8500.
                              With Engravings after Eisen
                                   Large Paper Copy
168. Erasmus: L’ELOGE DE LA FOLIE, TRADUIT DU LATIN ... NOUVELLE EDITION REVÛE
ET CORRIGÉE SUR LE TEXTE DE L’EDITION DE BASLE. ORNÉE DE NOUVELLES
FIGURES. AVEC DES NOTES. [Paris]. 1751. [6],xxiv,222,[2]pp. Quarto. Full deep plum
straight-grain morocco, elaborately stamped in blind, lettered and ruled in gilt, gilt inner
dentelles, gilt borders on endsheets, a.e.g. Title in red and black. Frontis and fourteen
engraved plates, engraved head- and tail-pieces. Extremities a bit worn, narrow scrapes
at fore-tips of lower board, armorial bookplate on pastedown, slight offset from plates to
facing pages; a very good copy.




First edition of this translation, accompanied by notes by Meunier de Querlon. The frontis,
plates, title-vignette and head- and tail-pieces are engraved by various hands after designs
by Charles Eisen. This is a large-paper copy (23.8 x 17.4 cm), with the fourteen plates
inlaid into larger sheets, and with the frontis framed and etched by P.F. Martenasie under
the direction of “Mr. Le Bas.”
SALOMONS, pp.98-9. COHEN-DE RICCI (VI), pp.348-9.                                    $2000.

169. [Essex House Press]: Wordsworth, William: WORDSWORTH’S ODE ON THE
INTIMATIONS OF IMMORTALITY... [caption title]. [Campden, Gloucestershire: Essex House
Press, 1903]. Octavo. Publisher’s vellum over boards, upper board decorated in blind, spine
lettered in gilt. Frontis. Manuscript initials in gold, blue and red. Binding a bit dust darkened,
front pastedown lifting a bit, otherwise a very good or better copy.
One of 150 numbered copies printed in Caslon type on real vellum. With a woodcut frontis
by Walter Crane, and the pictorial colophon device, both hand colored. The 9th of Ashbee’s
“Great Poems” series. Ransom attributes the handpainted and gilded initials to “Miss Power.”
TOMKINSON (ESSEX) 35. RANSOM (ESSEX) 35.                                             $1250.

170. Everson, William: BLAME IT ON THE JET STREAM! ODE: THE FIRST COMMENCE-
MENT, JUNE 17, 1973 KRESGE COLLEGE, THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA SANTA
CRUZ. [Santa Cruz]: The Lime Kiln Press, 1978. Oblong folio. Half morocco and cloth.
Pastedowns and gutters darkened due to binding glue interaction (which seems now to
be common with many copies) otherwise about fine.
First edition. One of 150 numbered copies, printed under Everson’s direction in Goudy
Modern on Hayle handmade paper, signed by Everson. Woodcut by Dennis Marks. Bound
by The Schuberth Bookbindery. Unjustly overshadowed by two more ambitious productions
of the press, this handsome work is the only book-length publication by the press of Everson’s
own poetry, in this case one of his best poems of those years.                          $150.

171. Faulkner, William: SOLDIERS’ PAY ... WITH A PREFACE BY RICHARD HUGHES.
London: Chatto & Windus, 1930. Green cloth, lettered in gilt. Binding a bit sunned at edges,
slight bubbling along fore-edge of rear pastedown, but about very good in dust-darkened
dust jacket with three closed tears at toe of spine.
First British edition of Faulkner’s first novel. Hughes, along with Arnold Bennett’s enthusiastic
review of The Sound and the Fury, were instrumental in getting Chatto & Windus to take
on Faulkner. The disclaimer, “Not a ‘War Book’,” is emblazoned on the upper wrapper panel.
A 4pp. leaflet of publisher’s adverts is laid in front.
PETERSON A2i. MASSEY 310.                                                                $1500.

172. [Faulkner, William]: CONTINUITY & DIALOGUE ... “THE TARNISHED ANGELS.” [Los
Angeles]: Universal, 4 October 1957. [125] leaves, foliated in reel format. Quarto. Mimeographed
typescript, printed on recto only. Punched and bradbound at top edge. A few corner creases,
ink note (“Editorial Office”) on title leaf, top edge of title leaf and terminal blank slightly
chipped and torn, else very good.
A continuity and dialogue script of Douglas Sirk’s film adaptation of Faulkner’s Pylon, based
on a screenplay by George Zuckerman, and starring Rock Hudson, Robert Stack and Dorothy
Malone. Under the direction of Sirk, this trio of actors turned in some of their best performances.
                                                                                             $225.

173. Faulkner, William: MOSQUITOES A NOVEL ... WITH AN INTRODUCTION BY RICHARD
HUGHES. London: Chatto & Windus, 1964. Gilt cloth boards. First British edition. Fine
in bright dust jacket with minor wear at tips.
PETERSON A4M. MASSEY 165.                                                      $150.

174. Faulkner, William: FATHER ABRAHAM. [New York]: Red Ozier Press, 1983. Cloth
and decorated boards. Small bookplate of the Rosenbach Foundation, otherwise about fine.
First edition. Edited by James Meriwether. Illustrated with wood engravings by John DePol.
One of 210 press numbered copies.                                                   $500.

175. Feiffer, Jules: LITTLE MURDERS A COMEDY. New York: Alexander H. Cohen/Shubert
Theatre, [nd. but ca. 1966]. [3],36,25,24 leaves. Quarto. Mimeographed typescript, printed
on rectos only. Bolt bound in gilt stamped flexible stiff wrappers. Wrappers a bit edgeworn
and creased, otherwise very good.
An early script for Feiffer’s breakthrough black comedy. The play opened in New Haven
in 1966, then moved to New York in 1967. We have compared this draft to another early
(but also not explicitly dated) script for this play, and find very substantial variations, both
structural and textual, between the two, demonstrating a significant evolution of the text.
From the papers of Colleen Dewhurst.                                                      $225.

176. Felton, Major [illustrator]: FLOWERS OF EVIL. By Charles Baudelaire. New York:
Ives Washburn, 1931. Quarto. Cloth and boards. with art deco lettering and decoration in
black and silver. Frontis and plates. Lower edges shelf-rubbed, otherwise a near fine copy,
without dust jacket.
First edition thus, featuring Felton’s unusual monochrome art deco plates, accompanying
translations by Lewis Piaget Shanks.                                             $150.


                                     Association Copy
177. [Finney, Charles G.]: Beaumont, Charles, and [Ben Hecht] [screenwriters]: THE
STRANGE CIRCUS OF DR. LAO A GEORGE PAL PRODUCTION. [Culver City]: Metro-
Goldwyn-Mayer, 13-14 May 1963. [4],117 leaves. Quarto. Mimeographed typescript, printed
on rectos only. Bradbound, in studio wrapper (upper wrapper only). Small chips around
brad-hole of terminal leaf, some annotations and sketches relevant to the production, else
a very nice copy.
Copy #2 of an unspecified, but early draft of this adaptation of Finney’s classic fantasy.
Beaumont, the accomplished screen, television and fiction writer, was a felicitous choice
for this project, and was given credit on this draft, as well as final screen credit, but some
sources indicate that Ben Hecht was also involved, though uncredited. This copy is signed
on the upper wrapper by visual effects master Gene Warren, and bears his presentation
inscription on the title leaf, along with inscriptions from Wah Chang and Jim Danforth, who
worked on special effects for the film. While Warren is not generally credited with having
worked on this film, he was closely associated with Pal (including The Time Machine,
1960, which garnered an Academy Award for its special effects), and that he might have
reviewed an early draft of the script seems likely. A number of leaves bear annotations,
including a few small sketches on blank versos, related specifically to demanding special
effect sequences (including considerable annotation, a small laid-in color snapshot of the
model, and a stage set-up diagram for the Serpent sequence). The resulting film was vintage
George Pal, and starred Tony Randall in the role of each of the Seven Faces of Dr. Lao,
the title under which it was released in 1964.                                          $1250.

178. Fischer, Hans R.: SCHWARZKÜNSTLERISCHE ETÜDEN. [Np]: Verlag Heinz Engel
Olten, [1964]. Oblong small quarto. Pictorial wrapper over stiff wrapper. Illustrated with
23 original woodcuts by Hanns Studer. First edition, limited issue. One of 150 numbered
copies, signed by the author and artist, from a total edition of fifteen hundred copies. Fine
in lightly dust soiled glassine with small snag at lower edge.                           $75.

179. [Fitzgerald, F. Scott]: [Epstein, Philip G. and Julius J., and Richard Brooks (screen-
writers)]: THE LAST TIME I SAW PARIS BASED ON A STORY BY F. SCOTT FITZGERALD
[wrapper title]. Culver City: Loew’s Incorporated / MGM. 22 February through 14 April 1954.
[1],126,[1] leaves. Quarto. Mimeographed typescript, bradbound with mimeographed studio
upper wrapper, with printed label. Some light creasing and minor use, no lower wrapper
present, but very good.
An unspecified, but pre-production, draft of this screenplay based on Fitzgerald’s story,
“Babylon Revisited,” adapted by Philip and Julius Epstein, and Richard Brooks, who also
directed the film. This draft is stamped “Complete” and incorporates revisions dated within
the span noted above, with the characteristic summary sheets, and a table on the verso
of the front wrapper checking and initialing this copy for revises made on 3/31 and 4/14.
Fitzgerald’s own efforts to adapt his story to film, undertaken in the final months of his
life, were never realized on the screen. This adaptation, uncredited at this stage except
as “Based on a story by...” Fitzgerald, updated the scenario to post-liberation Paris, and
starred Elizabeth Taylor, Van Johnson, Walter Pidgeon, Roger Moore, Odetta, et al.
BRUCCOLI 7.9.                                                                       $850.

180. [Fitzgerald, F. Scott]: Moffat, Ivan [screenwriter]: F. SCOTT FITZGERALD’S TENDER
IS THE NIGHT SCREENPLAY BY.... [Los Angeles: 20th Century-Fox], 31 January - 6
November 1961. [2],180,[4] leaves, plus lettered inserts. Quarto. Mimeographed typescript,
printed on rectos only of white, yellow, blue and pink paper stocks. Bradbound in studio
wrappers. Wrapper a bit used at overlap edges, original printed title and date on wrappers
crossed through, then relettered in ink, series of relevant pencil notes on title-leaf, otherwise
very good or better.
Denoted a “Final” draft of this adaptation to the screen of Fitzgerald’s novel, but shot through
with dated revises and retakes on colored paper spanning the ten month period above. The
February 1962 release, directed by Henry King, starring Jennifer Jones, Jason Robards,
Joan Fontaine, et al, had a running time of 142 minutes, suggesting that some material
present in this draft was lost to later revision or left on the cutting room floor. Although
a 20th Century-Fox film, it has been suggested that David O. Selznick, who was Fontaine’s
husband, had a considerable hand in the planning of the production. The pencil annotations
on the title leaf list mattes necessary for backgrounds for several scenes in the film. An
uncommon script.
BRUCCOLI 7.10.                                                                            $600.

181. Flagg, James Montgomery: TOMFOOLERY. New York: Life Publishing Company, 1904.
Small octavo. Pictorial boards, printed in red and black. Illustrations by the author. First
edition. A relatively early collection of Flagg’s cartoon work, accompanied by humorous
verse. Crown of spine very slightly worn, otherwise near fine, without dust jacket, in later
glassine wrapper.                                                                    $125.

182. [Ford, John]: Wead, Frank [screenwriter]: THEY WERE EXPENDABLE. Culver City:
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, 18-22 September 1944. [4],155 leaves plus numerous lettered inserts
and duplicate numbered leaves with variant text. Quarto. Mimeographed typescript, printed
on rectos only. Bradbound in pale blue studio upper wrapper, with studio label and
rubberstamps, and darker blue, probably later lower wrapper. Upper wrapper faintly sunned,
with a couple of minor smudges, title neatly lettered on spine, internally about fine.
A “Temporary Complete Composite Script,” including revised and unrevised leaves dated
over the five day span, a character list, and two variant forms of the film’s Foreword/Dedication.
The script was adapted by Wead from William L. White’s book, and the film, starring Robert
Montgomery, John Wayne, Donna Reed, Ward Bond, et al, was directed by John Ford.
Regarded by many as one of Ford’s chief triumphs, They Were Expendable was released
20 December 1945, just a little over four months after V. J. Day. The narrative is based
on the exploits of John D. Bulkeley, a motor torpedo boat squadron commander and Medal
of Honor recipient, and Robert Kelly, a skipper, during the World War II Japanese invasion
of the Philippines in 1941–1942, and the film is acknowledged as one of the most realistic
among the many contributions by Hollywood to the war and immediate post-war effort. The
admonition on the upper wrapper to “Save Film! Help Win the War!, “ as well as the prefatory
note about the economic rationale for the composite nature of the script, underscore the
circumstances of war-time film production.
Bogdanovich, JOHN FORD (Revised edition, 1978), pp. 82-4, 137.                            $3000.

183. [Ford, John]: Nugent, Frank S. [screenwriter]: WAR PARTY SCREEN PLAY BY ...
SUGGESTED BY THE STORY “MASSACRE” BY JAMES WARNER BELLAH [wrapper title].
[Culver City]. 10 July 1947. [1], 190 leaves. Quarto. Mimeographed typescript, printed on
rectos only. Bradbound in printed studio wrappers. Release title (Fort Apache) written
in ink on upper wrapper, a couple minor smudges, small pinhole and one corner crease
to upper wrapper, otherwise a very good or better copy.
A “revised” draft of Frank Nugent’s screenplay, based on a story by James Warner Bellah,
of the film eventually released in March 1948 under the title Fort Apache, directed by John
Ford, and starring John Wayne, Henry Fonda, Shirley Temple, et al. Fort Apache, among
John Ford’s most popular and commercially successful films, was one of the long line of
his films scripted by Frank Nugent — eventually Ford’s son-in-law — over a fifteen year
period that included She Wore a Yellow Ribbon (1949), The Quiet Man (1952), Mister
Roberts (1956), The Last Hurrah (1958), etc. The substantial length of the present draft
approximates the length of one of the author’s own working drafts we handled a few years
ago, but still suggests, in comparison with the release running time of 125 minutes, that
considerable revision and editing were still to be done before the script neared production
status
Bogdanovich, JOHN FORD (Revised ed. 1978), pp. 86-7, 138.                            $2250.

184. [Ford, John]: Kyne, Peter B. [screenwriter]: THE THREE GODFATHERS [with:]
DIALOGUE CUTTING CONTINUITY ON “3 GODFATHERS.” [Los Angeles]: Argosy Pictures
Corp., 19 January and 16 August 1948. Two volumes. [1],53 and [78] leaves. Quarto.
Mimeographed typescript, printed on rectos only. Bradbound in stencil-printed studio wrappers.
Crimson wrappers of first item dampmarked, with resulting red patches of discoloration
to text block early and late (not affecting legibility or integrity); upper wrapper of second
item creased and showing an old spillmark, with consequent faint discoloration to first leaf
and modest rippling to first several leaves; in spite of these cosmetic flaws, intact and
perfectly serviceable copies.
Two items associated with the production of John Ford’s 1948 western, one pre-production,
one post-production. The first is a complete draft of Kyne’s original story, first utilized by
Ford as the basis for his 1919 silent feature, Marked Men. For this remake, Kyne’s story
was adapted by Frank Nugent and Laurence Stallings for the actual screenplay. The Dialogue
Cutting Continuity is an explicit record of the film as shot. John Wayne, Pedro Armendáriz,
Harry Carey, Jr., Ward Bond and Mae Marsh starred.
Bogdanovich, JOHN FORD (Revised ed. 1978), pp. 120 & 138.                                $450.

185. [Ford, John]: Fenton, Frank [screenwriter]: THE WINGS OF EAGLES. Culver City:
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, 21 July - 4 October 1955 and 20 February - 11 July [rerun 27 July]
1956. Two volumes. 116 leaves, plus duplicate leaf 116 printing variant text; and [1],123
leaves, plus lettered inserts. Quarto. The first comprised of carbon typescript on yellow
paper (with each leaf marked ‘Permanent Script File’ in red), and mimeographed typescript,
text on rectos only. Bradbound in studio wrappers, with studio labels and stamps. A few
fore-edges in first script extended and slightly frayed; faint discoloration to fore-edge at
toe of second script, otherwise very good or better, the first stamped “Vault Copy.”
Two widely differing drafts of the script for John Ford’s 1957 film about the development
of Naval aviation, and semi-biographical tribute to his friend, Navy flier turned screenwriter
Frank W. “Spig” Wead. John Wayne was cast as Wead, and Dan Daily, Maureen O’Hara
and Ward Bond co-starred. Fenton shared final screen credit with William W. Haines for
the script, but at this point in the creative process, Fenton is the sole identified screenwriter.
A table inside the front wrapper of the second draft records in manuscript some of the dated
revisions over the span noted above.
Bogdanovich, JOHN FORD (Revised ed. 1978), pp. 95-6 ,143.                                 $2650.

186. [Ford, John]: Webb, James R. [screenwriter]: “THE LONG FLIGHT” SCREENPLAY
BY ... BASED ON “CHEYENNE AUTUMN” BY MARI SANDOZ. Burbank: John Ford
Productions / Bernard Smith Productions, 1 August - 19 September 1963. [7],153 leaves.
Quarto. Mimeographed typescript, printed on rectos only of pale green and medium blue
stock. Bradbound in printed production company wrappers. Final title handlettered on upper
wrapper and spine, Warner Bros. Story Dept. stamp on upper wrapper, a few small nicks
in overlap edges, otherwise about fine.
Denoted a “Final” draft of this adaptation to the screen of Sandoz’s book Cheyenne Autumn,
but including dated revises on blue paper spanning the dates above and still presented
under its working title. The October 1964 release was directed by John Ford, and starred
Richard Widmark, Carroll Baker, Karl Malden, Sal Mineo, Ricardo Montalban, Gilbert Roland,
et al. One of Ford’s most significant late career undertakings, marking an important transition
in the film-maker’s cinematic p.o.v. toward the subject of military/Native American relations.
For the first time, Ford undertook a project that was fundamentally sympathetic to the plight
of the Native Americans as they were being pursued by cavalry from their home lands to
the reserved lands, a paradigm in almost direct opposition to that at the core of earlier
films, such as Fort Apache. The studio required substantial cuts in the film, and as a
consequence, this script preserves material that did not make it to the screen.
Bogdanovich, JOHN FORD (Revised ed. 1978), pp. 104-6, 147.                             $2250.

187. [Ford, John]: Nichols, Dudley [screenwriter]: STAGECOACH. [Los Angeles]: Twentieth
Century-Fox Film Corporation, 10 December 1964. [2],95 leaves. Quarto. Mechanically
reproduced typescript, printed on rectos only. Bradbound in printed studio wrappers. Wrapper
spine discolored, small nicks and tears to overlap wrapper edges, block lettered name (“Richard
Zanuck”) on upper wrapper, otherwise very good.
A later studio reprinting of a production script for John Ford’s 1939 masterwork, prepared
by 20th Century-Fox as a reference preliminary to their own 1966 remake. The remake
was adapted from Nichols’s original screenplay by Joseph Landon, and was directed by
Gordon Douglas, starring Ann-Margret, Red Buttons, Van Heflin, Slim Pickens, Robert
Cummings, Bing Crosby, et al. Certain identification of Zanuck’s connection with this project
has proven elusive.
Bogdanovich, JOHN FORD (Revised ed. 1978), pp. 134.                                    $150.

188. [Ford, John]: Green, Janet, and John McCormick [screenwriters]: CHINESE FINALE
A SCREENPLAY BY ... BASED ON A STORY BY NORAH LOFTS. [Np]: A John Ford-Bernard
Smith Production, [nd but probably ca. 1965]. [2], 158 leaves. Quarto. Original typescript,
on rectos only. Bradbound in later plain wrappers with manuscript caption. Near fine.
An unspecified, but presumably early draft typescript, under the original working title, of
the screenplay for John Ford’s last film, released in March 1966 under the title 7 Women.
The typescript is contiguous, but was clearly typed on at least two different typewriters,
suggesting it dates from early enough in the process that it had not yet been turned over
to studio pool typists for preparation for mimeographing. The film starred Anne Bancroft,
Sue Lyon, Woody Strode, Margaret Leighton, et al, in an account of the plight of missionaries
in China in the 1930s under threat from a warlord, and again, in a late career turn around
much like that evidenced in Cheyenne Autumn, Ford elected to focus on a class of characters
(women) who had been largely slighted in his earlier films.                            $850.

189. Forneret, Xavier: [WORKS] SANS TITRE. ENCORE UN AN DE SANS TITRE, PAR
UN HOMME NOIR, BLANC DE VISAGE... [Paris]: Arcanes, 1952. 247,[3]pp. Small, thick
octavo. Printed wrappers. Light use to wrapper edges, otherwise a very good, unopened
copy.
First modern collective edition of the works of this 19th century writer, here resurrected
with a prefatory essay by André Breton and a bibliography by Willy-Paul Romain. Issued
in the collection “Humour Noir,” in an edition of one thousand numbered copies. $75.

190. Forrest, Michael de: THE GAY YEAR. New York: The Woodford Press, 1949. Cloth
boards. Somewhat dusty at edges, but a very good copy in shelfworn dust jacket with some
darkening to the white portions of the rear panel and a scratch to the front panel.
First edition of a “novel with a strange theme,” the fictional treatment of “one year in the
life of a young man who entered the world of New York’s third sex.” Young cites it with
an ‘*’ for particular relevance, but bases the entry on the relatively recent remainder reprint
and ascribes to it the date of the original.
YOUNG 805.                                                                               $125.

191. Forsyth, Frederick: THE DOGS OF WAR. London: Hutchinson, [1974]. Cloth. Light
offsetting to endsheets from jacket flaps, top edge dusty, else very good or better in dust
jacket (a few small nicks).
First edition. Inscribed and signed by the author on the half-title: “For my very good friend
John Mallinson with warmest best wishes Freddie Forsyth.” The source novel for the 1981
film adaptation, starring Christopher Walken and Tom Berenger.                         $175.

192. [Fowles, John]: Mann, Stanley, and John Kohn [screenwriters]: THE COLLECTOR
… SCREENPLAY BY... [Np]: The Collector Company/Columbia Pictures, 30 April 1964.
[1],144 leaves. Quarto. Mimeographed typescript, printed on rectos only, bradbound in stiff
wrappers with handprinted printed caption. Wrappers a bit tanned at edges, with a couple
small spots, else very good, internally fine.
A “revised final draft” of the script of the first screen adaptation of a Fowles work, and in
the minds of many, the most successful. The film was directed by William Wyler, and starred
Terence Stamp and Samantha Eggar. The finished product was released in 1965. This draft
is 4pp. longer than the “final” draft dated 16 March.                                  $600.

193. France, Anatole: LE PROCURATOR DE JUDEÉ. Paris: Societé des Amis Livres, 1902.
84,[1]pp. Small octavo. Full emerald green crushed levant, t.e.g., others untrimmed, by
Samblanx. Spine and edges a bit sun faded, otherwise a fine copy.
First separate edition (according to Talvart & Place preceding the Pelletan edition). One
of a total edition of 130 numbered copies on vélin de Hollande. The text is printed from
plates burin engraved by Frédéric Pimpe, and the fifteen illustrative vignettes are etchings
by Louis Muller after drawings by Aug.-Francois Gorguet. Monod queries the precedence
of this jewel-like little edition over the Pelletan edition.
TALVART & PLACE (FRANCE) 50a. MONOD 4937.                                              $600.

194. [Fraser, Claud Lovat]: A GREAT STEP FORWARD AN AMAZING MACHINE, WHICH
WILL AFFECT EVERY BUSINESS HOUSE FROM THIS DAY ... [caption title]. [London:
H.E. Robbins Ltd., February 1921]. 16pp. Sewn pictorial self wrappers. Small ink ownership
inscription of book historian Thomas Boynton, otherwise about fine.
First edition of this attractive brochure for the Robbins “Comptometer,” featuring ten colored
illustrations by Fraser, printed at the Curwen Press.
MILLARD 709.                                                                             $75.

195. Frost, Robert: COLLECTED POEMS. New York: Henry Holt and Company, 1939. Thick
octavo. Gilt decorated cloth. Portrait frontis by Doris Ulmann. A fine copy in dust jacket.
First edition. Signed by Frost on the first blank, preceding the frontis. One of 3750 copies
printed. An expended selection, adding the section “A Further Range” to the contents of
the 1930 edition, as well as the important introductory essay, “The Figure A Poem Makes.”
A handsome copy of an attractive book.
CRANE A23.                                                                           $1250.
196. Frost, Robert: A WITNESS TREE. New York: Holt, 1942. Cloth and pastepaper boards.
Portrait. Modest rubbing to board fore-edges, otherwise a very good or better copy in bit
rubbed slipcase with a couple short corner cracks.
First edition, limited issue. One of 735 numbered copies, signed by the author. $600.

197. Frost, Robert: HARD NOT TO BE KING. New York: House of Books, 1951 Small octavo.
Gilt blue cloth. Spine and extremities sunned, as often, but a very good copy without the
glassine wrapper.
First edition. One of three hundred numbered copies (of 326), signed by the author. Published
as the 11th of the Crown Octavo series.                                                $550.

198. Frost, Robert: DOES NO ONE BUT ME AT ALL EVER FEEL THIS WAY AT LEAST.
[New York: Printed at the Spiral Press], Christmas 1952. 12mo. Decorated wrapper over
stiff wrappers. Drawings by Howard Cook. First separate edition, this being one of 475 bearing
Frost’s own imprint. Fine.
CRANE B24.                                                                               $35.

199. Frost, Robert: FROM A MILKWEED POD. [New York: The Spiral Press, 1954]. Small
octavo. Pictorial wrappers. Wood engraving by Thomas W. Nason. Near fine.
First edition. One of 598 copies imprinted for Robert Frost, from a total edition of 5076
copies. This copy is signed by Frost, and includes ‘to’ in his hand, but the recipient’s name
is in another hand.
CRANE B26.                                                                              $300.

200. Fugard, Athol: THE BLOOD KNOT. New York: Sidney Bernstein, [nd. but early 1960s].
[1],70,65 leaves. Quarto. Mimeographed typescript, printed on rectos only. Bolt bound in
Hart Steno Bureau binder, with title stamped in silver. Lower fore-corner bumped, else about
fine.
A playscript for Fugard’s most widely known work, very likely associated with one of its
earliest U.S. productions. The play saw its first New York production in 1962, and was
first published in the U.S. in book form in 1964. This script exhibits old-style postal codes
for both the producer and the steno service. From the papers of Colleen Dewhurst and George
C. Scott.                                                                               $225.

201. [Futurism]: Joly, Auguste: LE FUTURISME ET LA PHILOSOPHIE / IL FUTURISMO E LA
FILOSOFIA. [Milan: Direction du Mouvement Futuriste, ca. 1912]. [4]pp. Quarto (29 x 23 cm).
Printed in double columns, parallel French and Italian texts. Cheap paper tanned and a bit frayed
along foremargin and lower fore-corner, neat split to spine fold, a few faint spots; an intact copy
of an excessively fragile production.
A separate printing of this article from the July 1912 number of La Belgique Artistique
et Littéraire.                                                                     $75.

202. Gallaudet, T. H.: THE CHILD’S BOOK ON THE SOUL. Hartford: Published by Cooke
and Co., 1831. x,[11]-127,[1]pp. Small octavo. Publisher’s quarter roan and pictorial boards.
Illustrations and title vignette. Early gift inscription and small bookplate on endsheet, scattered
modest foxing, several plates exhibit early hand-coloring, tips a bit worn, but a good copy.
First edition of the first part of this highly popular work by the founder of the American
Institute for the Instruction of the Deaf in Hartford. Subsequent “parts” appeared shortly
after this edition appeared, and it was widely reprinted at home and in the U.K. In this
first edition, the wood engravings are by John Warner Barber; for the second edition the
majority were recut by A. J. Mason.
HAMILTON 363a.                                                                      $225.
203. Gill, Eric: SCULPTURE AN ESSAY ON STONE-CUTTING, WITH A PREFACE ABOUT
GOD. Ditchling, Sussex: Saint Dominic’s Press, [1923]. Pictorial linen. First collective
edition of these two essays, with revisions. Printed in Caslon Old Face type on Batchelor
handmade paper. Binding slightly bowed and smudged, otherwise a very good copy.
GILL 10.                                                                           $350.

204. Godwin, William: THINGS AS THEY ARE; OR, THE ADVENTURES OF CALEB
WILLIAMS. London: Printed for G.G. and J. Robinson, 1796. Three volumes. 12mo. 19th
century three quarter pebbled morocco, stamped in gilt, marbled boards. A few smudges
and scattered foxmarks, binding extremities rubbed, but quite sound, otherwise a good
set, with the half-titles bound in.
The second London edition, “corrected,” of the author’s best known novel, originally published
in 1794, shortly after the appearance of his Enquiry Concerning Political Justice. Irish
and North American editions followed soon after. Godwin virtually rewrote the text for this
edition, and included the preface which had been suppressed in the first edition. It is a
distinguished fictional polemic on behalf of some of his ethical views, and with the former
work, is regarded by many as his most considerable achievement.
NCBEL II:1249. ESTC T73517.                                                             $650.

205. Goffin, Robert: SUR LES TRACES D’ARTHUR RIMBAUD. Paris: Editions du Sagittaire,
[1934]. Printed wrappers. Tipped-in frontis by Valentine Hugo. Photographs. Very slight
tanning, else near fine.
First edition of this relatively early work by the critic and jazz historian. In addition to 225
copies on fine papers, this is one of an unknown number of copies specified as hors commerce.
                                                                                            $85.

206. [Golden Cockerel Press]: Swift, Jonathan: SELECTED ESSAYS OF ... VOLUME ONE.
[Waltham St. Lawrence]: Golden Cockerel Press, 1925. Quarto. Quarter parchment and
boards. Parchment slightly darkened, foretips bruised, internally fine and unopened.
One of an edition intended to consist of 450 numbered copies, illustrated with wood engravings
by John Farleigh. The text was edited by R. Ellis Roberts. “It was originally intended to
issue these essays in two volumes, but owing to an accident in which more than half the
edition of the first volume was destroyed, it was decided not to proceed with Volume 2.
The 190 surviving copies, being complete in themselves, were therefore issued to subscribers
according to priority of application” - Chanticleer.
CHANTICLEER 27.                                                                         $300.

207. [Golden Cockerel Press]: Lucian: THE TRUE HISTORIE OF LVCIAN THE SAMOS-
THENIAN.... [Waltham St. Lawrence]: Golden Cockerel Press, 1927. Folio. Quarter niger
morocco and cloth by Sangorski & Sutcliffe. Illustrated. Spine a bit darkened, very faint
foxing to endleaves, otherwise about fine.
Copy #3 of two hundred and seventy-five numbered copies printed on handmade paper,
imaginatively decorated with wood engravings by Robert Gibbings. Hickes’s translation into
English is printed in company with the original Greek text.                         $500.

208. [Golden Cockerel Press]: Smith, Aaron: THE ATROCITIES OF THE PIRATES; BEING
A FAITHFUL NARRATIVE OF THE UNPARALLELED SUFFERINGS ENDURED BY THE
AUTHOR DURING HIS CAPTIVITY AMONG THE PIRATES OF THE ISLAND OF CUBA....
[Waltham St. Lawrence]: The Golden Cockerel Press, 1929. Cloth and boards, t.e.g. Frontis
and illustrations from engravings by Eric Ravilious. Boards somewhat rubbed, small bookseller’s
ticket, otherwise about very good.
First printing in this format, the text derived from the edition of 1824. One of five hundred
numbered copies printed by Robert Gibbings and A.C. Cooper.                             $250.

209. Gooden, Stephen: Proof Engraving for THE FABLES OF LA FONTAINE: “THE TWO
FRIENDS.” [London: For William Heinemann, 1930]. Quarto. Plate size 15.7 x 8.8 cm,
on 31.5 x 23.5 cm sheet of handmade paper. Three minor spots of foxing in margins, otherwise
fine.
A strong proof of this engraving, in its penultimate state, before letters, signed and dated
by Gooden in the lower margin. The illustration appears at p.75 of the second volume of
Heinemann’s edition of Marsh’s translation, published in a limited edition of 525 copies
in 1931.
CAMPBELL DODGSON 77.                                                                  $250.

210. Gooden, Stephen: Title Page Proof for PERONNIK THE FOOL. By George Moore.
London: For George G. Harrap, 1933. Large quarto. Plate size 20 x 14.5cm on 32 x 25.5
cm sheet of handmade paper. Tipped to mat, but fine (mat somewhat used and split at
fold).
One of a small number of artist’s proofs of this superbly engraved title-page design, signed
by the artist in pencil in the lower margin, and dated ‘1933.’ The design incorporates a
highly polished silver goblet, in which a reflection of the artist at work at his engraving
table is visible.
CAMPBELL DODGSON 95.                                                                  $275.

211. Gosse, Philip Henry: THE AQUARIUM: AN UNVEILING OF THE WONDERS OF THE
DEEP SEA. London: John Van Voorst, 1856. xvi,[1],304,[6],15,[1]pp. Small octavo. Original
straight-grain medium green cloth, decorated in blind, spine lettered in gilt, a.e.g. Color
lithographed frontis and five plates, 8 “lignigraph” plates. Spine a shade darkened and modestly
rubbed, minor adhesion at gutter between frontis and free endsheet, otherwise a very good
copy.
Second, and best, edition of the first book about the Aquarium, and the origin of the term
(as an alternative to “aquatic vivarium”). Roger Senhouse’s copy, with his 1924 pencil ownership
signature. The first edition appeared in 1854, and a new preface to this edition outlines
the additions and extensive revisions appearing here — the chapter of instructions for
maintaining an aquarium having been substantially improved. The color lithographs are
fine views of marine specimens. ‘Gosse’s second study of the sea-shore is full of infectious
enthusiasm. It is as much about observations of marine animals in the wild, particularly
those at the bottom of the tide and below, as it is about the servicing of a marine aquarium
and was an important influence behind the mid-Victorian craze for keeping aquariums’ -
Freeman. The inserted terminal catalogue is dated Dec. 1858.
FREEMAN 60.                                                                                sold

212. Graves, Robert: THE SHOUT. London: Elkin Mathews & Marrot, 1929. Decorated boards.
About fine in dust jacket with short snag-tear at crown of spine.
First edition. One of 530 numbered copies (500 for sale) signed by the author. The source
novella for the 1978 screen adaptation, starring Alan Bates, Susannah York, John Hurt,
Tim Curry, et al, directed by Jerzy Skolimowski.                                    $250.

213. Green, Paul: LONESOME ROAD SIX PLAYS FOR THE NEGRO THEATRE. New York:
McBride, 1926. Cloth and decorated boards, paper labels. Trace of offsetting to front endsheets
from jacket flaps, minor rubbing at lower edges, otherwise a fine copy in faintly sunned
pictorial dust jacket.
First edition of this collection of plays in dialect by the pre-eminent figure in early regional
American theatre, signed and dated by him in the year of publication.                     $200.

214. [Greene, Graham]: MINISTRY OF FEAR. [Np]: Paramount Pictures, 1944. Original
three color, unused pictorial window card (55x 35 cm). Corners bumped, two short closed
tears into blank portion of left edge, modest tanning, otherwise a very good copy.




A beautiful and uncommon window card for Fritz Lang’s excellent drama of war-time London,
based on Seton I. Miller’s screenplay from Greene’s novel, featuring highly dramatic and
atmospheric noir imagery. The film starred Ray Milland and Marjorie Reynolds, who are
prominent in the image.                                                             $350.

215. Greene, Graham: LOSER TAKES ALL. London: Heinemann, [1955]. Small octavo.
Printed wrappers. Uncorrected page proofs of the first edition. Small partial ring mark on
upper wrapper, light mark on fore-edge, otherwise very good.                        $350.
216. Greene, Graham: A BURNT-OUT CASE. London: Heinemann, [1961]. The first English
language edition, preceded by the actual first edition, in Swedish, published the previous
year. A group of three copies in out of the ordinary formats:
a) Pale blue printed wrappers. Uncorrected proofs. Light use, very good or better.
b) Sewn, rough trimmed sheets, bound in plain wrappers. Advance reading copy, for privileged
review, with literary agent’s label on title leaf. Some messy typography evident in the proofs
has been remedied in this state, so it clearly follows.
c) A copy of the published printing, in one of the publisher’s bindings for presentation copies,
three quarter green morocco, gilt, t.e.g., by Bayntun-Riviere. Fine. The three items:
                                                                                          $750.

217. [Greene, Graham]: Wheeler, Hugh, and Jay Allen [screenwriters]: TRAVELS WITH
MY AUNT. [N.p.]: Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, 25 February [-3 March] 1972. 104 numbered leaves
in sequence, plus many inserted lettered leaves, with revises on blue paper dated “3-3-
72.” Quarto. Mimeographed typescript, text on rectos only. Bradbound in studio wrappers
with mimeographed captioning. Upper corner of front wrapper clipped, else a very good
to near fine copy.
A “Final shooting script” for Hugh Wheeler and Jay Allen’s adaptation to the screen of Greene’s
novel. Even at this late stage, there are significant revisions represented by the inserts.
The film was directed by George Cukor, and starred Maggie Smith in the lead role, for which
she received an Oscar nomination.                                                        $300.

218. [Griffin, Vivian C.]: FIVE NIGHTS. By “Victoria Cross” [pseud]. London: John Long,
[1908]. Red cloth, stamped in gilt and black. Offsetting to endsheets, cloth a bit marked,
but a good, tight, bright copy.
First edition of this novel involving travels in Mexico, San Francisco and elsewhere.
WOLFF 2788.                                                                         $75.

219. [Gromaire, Marcel]: Hertz, Henri: VERS UN MONDE VOLAGE. Paris: Editions Marcel
Seheur, 1926. Quarto. Original printed wrappers. Wrappers a trifle dust soiled and faintly
marked, fore-tips and spine extremities a bit frayed, but a very good copy, internally near
fine.
First illustrated edition. One of 225 numbered copies on vélin d’Arches, from a total edition
of 270 copies. Illustrated with ten beautiful original etchings by Marcel Gromaire.
MONOD 6001.                                                                         $1500.

220. Gunn, Thom: BALLY POWER PLAY. [Toronto: Open Door Broadsheet, 1979]. [4] leaves.
Small folio. Printed coarse-textured handmade coverboard wrappers. Lower edge very slightly
curled, upper outer corner of front wrapper slightly darkened, else about fine.
First edition. One of twenty lettered copies, signed by the author, printed on handmade
paper and specially cased, from a total edition of ninety copies printed by hand by David
Brooks at the Massey Press. Title-page illustration by Mary Harman. Published to benefit
the “Body Politic Defence Fund.”                                                    $250.
                                    With T.L.S. of Note
221. Hall, Radclyffe: THE WELL OF LONELINESS ... WITH A COMMENTARY BY HAVELOCK
ELLIS. Paris: The Pegasus Press, [1928]. Large octavo. Gilt cloth. Slight crimp in spine
incurred in binding, some offsetting to endsheets, otherwise a very good copy in moderately
used and frayed dust jacket.
First continental edition, issued two months after the suppressed Jonathan Cape edition,
and to all appearances, printed photo-offset from that edition. Michael Ernest Sadler’s copy,
with his book label, and a relevant pencil inscription on the free endsheet about the book’s
acquisition. Affixed to the front pastedown is a t.l.s. from the Director of Public Prosecutions,
London, 22nd December 1928, to Sir Michael Sadler, Master’s Lodge University College,
Oxford, stating in part: “I ... was interested in reading your views with which perhaps I may
venture to say I do not entirely agree - that, however, is a question which obviously need
not be discussed. I quite agree to your retaining the copy for the present, but I am afraid
it must be in the understanding that the book is on loan to you ... The order of the Court
is unfortunately imperative. I should hardly suppose that much more will be heard of ‘The
Well of Loneliness’.” Although the British suppression of the book continued on for some
years, it sold widely in continental editions, and appeared in the U.S. more or less unscathed.
So much for prescience on the part of the Director of Public Prosecutions.                 $225.

222. Halsman, Philippe: Original Portrait Photograph of Oscar and Dorothy Hammerstein.
[New York?]: Philippe Halsman [nd. but ca. 1950s]. Original b&w silver print, oblong 24.3
x 30.5 cm (9.5 x 12 inches) with extended right and bottom borders. faint crease in one
border, else about fine.
A fine portrait of the songwriter and dramatist and his wife, possibly taken concurrent with
any one of the several sequences of photographs Halsman took of Hammerstein and Richard
Rogers. Halsman’s credit/copyright stamp appears on the verso.                       $500.

223. Halsman, Philippe: Original Portrait Photograph of Josh Logan. [Location: New
Orleans]: Philippe Halsman [nd. but ca. 1953]. Original b&w silver print, oblong 27.5 x 32
cm (10.75 x 12.5 inches) with extended right border. Old coffee ring mark in blank right
border, a few minor creases, but very good.
A fine portrait of the Broadway director, from a sequence of photographs Halsman took
for Life during the pre- Broadway tryout in New Orleans for Kind Sir by Norman Krasna.
Halsman’s credit/copyright stamp appears on the verso, along with pencil identification
of the subject and the play.                                                     $350.

224. [Hammett, Dashiell]: A Collection of Twenty-Eight Original Publicity Stills for
THE GLASS KEY. [Np]: Paramount Pictures, [1935]. Twenty-eight original 8 x 10 black
& white glossy publicity stills. Each still has the usual cutline text in one margin, along
with the image registration number. Unusually fine.
An unusually large selection of original publicity stills for the 1935 film adaptation by Kathryn
Scola, Kubec Glasmon and Harry Ruskin of Hammett’s 1931 novel. The film was directed
by Frank Tuttle, and starred slick Hollywood heavy George Raft as Ed Beaumont, along
with Edward Arnold, Claire Dodd, Charles Richman, et al. Raft, who was then perhaps
the most popular Hollywood personification of underworld characters in film, figures prominently
in many of the stills, of course, and several of them are quite striking character studies
of him alone. Paramount remade The Glass Key in 1942, starring Alan Ladd as Beaumont,
and each adaptation has its proponents.                                                   $1250.

225. Harte, Bret: Document, Signed. Glasgow. 3 March 1883. 2pp. Octavo and quarto.
One printed sheet, on blue paper, with attached manuscript inventory. Old folds, a few nicks,
otherwise very good.
A document signed by Harte while Consul of the United States at Glasgow, approving the
shipment of “5 quarters, 20 octaves” of Red Star and Superior Old Pembroke Jamaica Rum
by J.B. Sherriff & Co., aboard the S.S. Illinois, departing Liverpool, to Alexander Whitten
& Co. of Philadelphia. The manuscript attachment is executed in various hands, and includes
an inventory and manuscript replications, in color, of the labels. Harte served as Consul
in Glasgow 1880 - 1885.                                                              $150.

226. Harte, Bret: Document, Signed. Glasgow. 10 June 1885. 4 pp. on two conjugate
leaves. Quarto. Printed leaflet, on blue paper. Old folds, a few nicks and pinholes, otherwise
very good.
A document signed by Harte while Consul of the United States at Glasgow, approving the
shipment of steel boiler plates aboard the steam ship Waldensian, consigned by Downing
& Co., for shipment to David Colville & Sons, Philadelphia. The invoice portion of the form
is executed in manuscript, and bears various countersigns and stamps. Harte served as
Consul in Glasgow 1880 - 1885.                                                       $150.

227. Hassell, John: TOUR OF THE ISLE OF WIGHT. THE DRAWINGS TAKEN AND
ENGRAVED BY.... London: Printed by John Jarvis for Thomas Hookham, 1790. Two volumes
bound in one. xxiv,224;viii,248pp. Large, thick octavo. Very handsomely bound in full
contemporary apple-green morocco, spine elaborately gilt extra, a.e.g. Engraved extra title
with vignette for each volume, plus thirty fine oval aquatints finished with various colored
washes. Subscribers list. Small private ownership stamp on verso of marbled front free
endsheet, engraved titles a bit foxed, discolorations at gutters of a few leaves due to the
ribbon marker, otherwise a near fine copy.
First edition. Hassell “was one of the earliest [engravers] to apply colour to aquatints, and
in [this work]...he has experimented by washing a single tint of a blue, green, or reddish
color by hand over the finished aquatint. This is the method employed by Gilpin, except
that Hassell varies his colours” - Hardie.
ABBEY SCENERY 342. Hardie, ENGLISH COLOURED BOOKS, p. 121.                             $850.

228. [Hazlitt, William]: LIBER AMORIS: OR, THE NEW PYGMALION. London: Printed for
John Hunt, 1823. Engraved title, [4],192pp. 12mo. Full tan calf, gilt extra, t.e.g. Joints
rubbed (upper joint cracking toward crown), prelims and first few text leaves foxed, bound
without first fly-title, otherwise a very good copy, with the Frank Hogan bookplate, and
another.
First edition. Due to the rebinding, the status of D 1 and G 8 is unclear. The engraved title
is on text-paper. The somewhat embarrassing record of Hazlitt’s infatuation with, and jilting
by, the daughter of his landlord, supplemented by his letters about the episode to P. G.
Patmore and James S. Knowles.
KEYNES 67.                                                                            $350.
229. Hazlitt, William: LIBER AMORIS OR THE NEW PYGMALION ... WITH ADDITIONAL
MATTER NOW PRINTED FOR THE FIRST TIME FROM THE ORIGINAL MANUSCRIPTS.
[London]: Privately Printed, 1894. Large octavo. Polished buckram, untrimmed. Portrait.
Facsimiles. Faint ringmark on upper board, binding a bit sunned, a few small smudges,
otherwise a very good copy, with the bookplate of a noted collector.
First edition thus, including ancillary documents, correspondence and material first published
from the manuscript. Introduction by Richard Le Gallienne. One of five hundred copies.
KEYNES 70. LINGEL 80 (citing a much later edition only).                                $150.
                                   First Book Appearance
230. [Hearn, Lafcadio]: “Chahta-Ima” [pseud. of Adrien Emmanuel Rouquette]: LA NOUVLLE
ATALA OU LA FILLE DE L’ESPRIT LÉGENDE INDIENNE. Nouvelle-Orléans: Imprimerie
du Propagatetr [sic] Catholique, 1879. vii,[1],138,[2]pp. Printed rose wrappers. Spine backed
with binder’s tape with title hand-lettered on spine, a few finger smudges to wrappers, properly
deaccessioned institutional discard, with bookplate inside front wrapper and no other markings,
otherwise a very good copy of a very fragile book in half morocco folding case.
First edition thus, including Lafcadio Hearn’s first appearance in a book. His notice of this
work from the New Orleans Daily City Item, entitled “A Louisiana Idyl,” appears in both
English and French on pp. 126-33. The French translation was prepared for publication
in the Propagateur Catholique.
BAL 7910. PERKINS, p.1.                                                              $2000.

231. Hejinian, Lyn: WRITING IS AN AID TO MEMORY. [Berkeley]: The Figures, [1978].
Pictorial wrappers. First edition, trade issue. One of 474 copies, from an edition of five
hundred. Inscribed and signed by the author in 1981. Upper wrapper slightly dust marked
along spine, but very good or better.                                                $60.

232. [Hellman, Lillian]: Original Studio Promotional Campaign Pressbook for ANOTHER
PART OF THE FOREST. [Los Angeles]: Universal-International, [1948]. 12pp. Small folio.
Pictorial self-wrappers. Heavily illustrated. Horizontal fold across middle, as issued, light
creasing and use, small split to fore-edges ar crease, otherwise very good.
An original studio publicity campaign pressbook for this adaptation of Hellman’s 1946 play,
based on a screenplay by Vladimir Pozner, directed by Michael Gordon, and starring Frederic
March, Ann Blyth, Dan Duryea, at al. In addition to recording all the visually striking promotional
material for the film, the text includes tie-ins to Hellman and her play, and well as discussion
of the interrelations between this work and The Little Foxes.                                 $85.

233. [Hellman, Lillian]: Original Studio Promotional Campaign Pressbook for THE
SEARCHING WIND. [Los Angeles]: Paramount Pictures, [1946]. 26pp. plus single-sheet
broadside insert. Small folio. Pictorial wrappers. Heavily illustrated. Minor faint old adhesion
mark along blank portion of spine, otherwise very good or better.
An original studio publicity campaign pressbook for Hall Wallis’s film production of Hellman’s
1944 play, based on her own screenplay, directed by William Dieterle, and starring Robert
Young, Sylvia Sidney and Ann Richards. In addition to recording all the visually striking
promotional material for the film, this substantial pressbook includes, as would be expected,
significant text tie-ins to Hellman and her play. Uncommon.                              $250.
                                  George C. Scott’s Copy
234. Hellman, Lillian: THE LITTLE FOXES. New York: Saint-Subber, [nd. but ca. 1967].
[3],35,37,40 leaves. Quarto. Mimeographed typescript, printed on rectos only. Bolt bound
in gilt-stamped Studio Duplicating Service binder. Binder quite edgeworn, but sound, otherwise
very good.
George C. Scott played the role of Benjamin Hubbard in this 1967 Lincoln Center revival
of Hellman’s play, and this copy (designated copy #8) bears his annotations, chiefly marking
his lines, but including one instance of revision of his dialogue. Accompanied by four original
prints of photographs of Scott in his role ( two 11x14"; two trimmed down from 11x14").
The photographs are rather creased, edgeworn and edgetorn, and one has rubber cement
residue on the verso.                                                                   $375.

235. Herbert, George: THE POETICAL WORKS OF .... London: James Nisbet and Co.,
1851. [4],256pp. Octavo. Full olive green morocco, elaborately gilt extra, a.e.g., gilt inner
dentelles, by J. Ross of Edinburgh. First edition in this format, amply illustrated with engraved
vignettes and pictorial frames by Edmund Evans, the Dalziel Bros., and H.N. Woods, after
designs by Birket Foster, John Clayton and H.N. Humphrey. A bit of light scattered foxing,
tips lightly rubbed, otherwise a fine copy in unusually fine dress of an otherwise common
book.                                                                                       $250.

236. Hewitt, Graily: THE PEN AND TYPE-DESIGN...THE TREYFORD TYPE, ITALICS. London:
The First Editions Club, 1928. Small quarto. Full deep red morocco, upper and lower board
stamped with symmetrical ‘V’s and border rules, t.e.g. Slight offsetting from binding to
endsheet edges, else near fine.

First edition. One of two hundred and fifty copies printed in the Treyford types on Barcham
Green handmade paper by John Johnston, issued as the fourteenth of the Club’s publications.
                                                                                      $300.

237. Heyen, William: WITH ME FAR AWAY A MEMOIR. Roslyn, NY: Stone House Press,
1994. Small quarto. Half morocco and linen over boards. Wood engraved illustrations. Fine
in slipcase, accompanied by separate suite in folding cloth chemise.
First edition, the edition de tete. One of twenty-five deluxe copies (only twenty for sale),
signed by the poet, by John De Pol (who contributed the woodcuts), and by Morris A. Gelfand,
the printer/publisher. These deluxe copies are accompanied by a duplicate suite of impressions
of the wood-engravings, each signed by the artist.                                      $650.

238. Heyward, Du Bose: ANGEL. New York: George H. Doran, [1926]. Cloth backed batik
boards, paper spine label. Two small corner chips to spine label (not touching text), cloth
slightly dust soiled, lower fore-tips worn, otherwise about very good.
First edition, limited issue. One of an unspecified number of numbered copies, specially
bound and signed by the author, denoted the “Carolina Edition.” “Story of a daughter’s
rebellion against her father’s religious intolerance, set in the North Carolina hill country”
- Hanna.
HANNA 1712. POWELL, NORTH CAROLINA, 261.                                               $125.

239. Heyward, DuBose, and Hervey Allen [founders]: YEAR BOOK OF THE POETRY SOCIETY
OF SOUTH CAROLINA 1921 [through 1933]. Charleston, SC: Poetry Society of South
Carolina, 1921 - 1933. Twelve volumes. One quarto, the remainder octavo. Original printed
wrappers (those for the quarto issue chipped and detached). Occasional plates and illustrations.
Modest occasional tanning and a few spine chips to octavo issues, four numbers bear small
blindstamps, but generally a very good lot.
A good, long run of the earliest years. Founded in 1921 by DuBose Heyward and Hervey
Allen, the society declared its raison d’etre in the foreword to the first Yearbook: “Because
we believe that culture in the South is not merely an antebellum tradition, but an instant,
vital force, awaiting opportunity and recognition to burst into artistic expression — because
we believe that of all mediums of artistic expression, poetry is the inevitable avenue through
which the mass of people, untrained in the other arts, can find most ready and spontaneous
expression - and finally, because we [are] utterly weary of the reiterated announcements
from commercial publishing centers in the North and West....” Contributors include Heyward,
Allen Tate, Ransom, Davidson, Percy, Ford, Wylie, Sandburg, Monroe, Robinson, F.M.
Ford, et al.                                                                          $350.

240. Heyward, DuBose, and Dorothy: MAMBA’S DAUGHTERS A PLAY ... DRAMATIZED
FROM THE NOVEL .... New York: Farrar & Rinehart, [1939]. Cloth. Endsheets tanned,
otherwise a very good copy in attractive, lightly sunned dust jacket.
First edition of this dramatization of the 1929 novel, which proved a major dramatic vehicle
for Ethel Waters. Somewhat less common than the novel itself.                         $150.

241. Higinbotham, John U.: THREE WEEKS IN EUROPE THE VACATION OF A BUSY
MAN. Chicago: Herbert S. Stone & Company, 1904. Medium brown cloth, with pictorial
stamping in white, blue-gray and black, t.e.g., others untrimmed. Light flaking to spine
stamping, otherwise a very good copy.
First edition. Inscribed by the author in the year of publication: “Hamlet’s doubt ne’er puzzled
me. The first book out belongs ‘To B - ‘ Who furnished the best part of This book and inspired
whatever is good in the remainder - Oct 24, 1904 - Jack.” The book was deposited for copyright
on 27 October.
KRAMER 308.                                                                               $250.

242. Himes, Chester: PINKTOES. Paris: Traveller’s Companion Series / Olympia Press,
[1961]. Printed wrappers. First edition. Spine slightly creased, corners a trifle rubbed, but
a nice, crisp copy.                                                                    $175.

243. [Hitchcock, Alfred]: Reville, Alma, and Whitfield Cook [screenwriters] STAGE FRIGHT
A TREATMENT. [London(?): The Authors], 23 March 1949. [1],A-E,98 leaves. Quarto.
Mimeographed typescript, printed on rectos only. Bradbound in typed wrappers. Wrappers
a bit sunned and frayed at overlap edges, otherwise very good, internally fine.
An extremely detailed and substantial treatment for this adaptation to film of two short
stories by Selwyn Jepson. The film was released in April of 1950, under Alfred Hitchcock’s
direction, and starred Jane Wyman and Marlene Dietrich. Although Cook was credited
with the final screenplay, it is likely that Reville continued to have input beyond this very
early stage - as Hitchcock’s wife and an experienced director/filmmaker in her own right,
she frequently served as his sounding board and second set of eyes during production.
Treatments of this length and detail are not the rule.                                $1750.

244. Hockney, David [illus]: SIX FAIRY TALES FROM THE BROTHERS GRIMM. [London]:
Petersburg Press, [1970]. 12mo. 10.8 x 7.8cm. Publisher’s semi-leather, stamped in silver.
Illustrated with reproductions from original etchings by Hockney (who also chose the tales
to illustrate). Near fine. A redaction for the commoner, and a means to promote the sales,
of the grander issue with the original etchings.                                     $75.

245. Holbein, John: THE DANCES OF DEATH, THROUGH THE VARIOUS STAGES OF
HUMAN LIFE: WHEREIN THE CAPRICIOUSNESS OF THAT TYRANT IS EXHIBITED ....
London: Printed by W. Smith ... for John Scott..., 1803. [4],47pp. plus engraved frontis
and extra-title, portrait and forty-six copperplate engravings. Small quarto. 19th century
three-quarter morocco and marbled boards, rather rubbed at extremities, with surface scrape
to one fore-tip, modest tanning, occasional light foxing and marginal smudges, a few small
marginal spots, early mend to short marginal tear in terminal plate, otherwise very good.
First English edition in this format, with the plates engraved after Holbein’s wood blocks
by the Scottish engraver, David Deuchar, and with text explanations of each plate in English
and French. The main plates generally measure 7 x 5.5 cm, and the terminal plate 8.5
x 12cm.                                                                               $400.
246. Hook, Sidney: THE METAPHYSICS OF PRAGMATISM. Chicago: Open Court, 1927.
Gilt cloth. Frontis. Extremities a bit rubbed, foxing offset from frontis to title,
First edition of the philosopher and political theorist’s first book, his dissertation written under
the direction of John Dewey, who contributes an introduction.                                  $250.
                                     Forrest Reid’s Copy
247. Houghton, Arthur Boyd [illustrator]: ADVENTURES OF DON QUIXOTE DE LA MANCHA.
Translated from the Spanish of Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra, by Charles Jarvis. London:
Frederick Warne and Co., 1866. xii,710,[2]pp. Large, thick octavo. Publisher’s forest green
cloth, heavily decorated in gilt, a.e.g. Binding extremities worn and frayed, inner hinges
cracking, prelims foxed; a used but sound copy.
First edition with these illustrations by Arthur B. Houghton, engraved by the Brothers Dalziel.
Forrest Reid’s copy, with his ownership signature on the front free endsheet. “Taken as
a specimen of book making it is unattractive ... [but its scarcity] places it among the more
expensive on the [Houghton] collector’s list” - Reid.
REID, p. 196. Ray, THE ILLUSTRATOR AND THE BOOK IN ENGLAND, 201.                        $175.

248. Houghton, Claude: Original Portrait Photograph, Inscribed. London. nd. but ca.
1930s. Original silver print borderless photograph (20 x 14.5 cm). A few very faint signs
of creasing on verso, but very good.
An attractive and characteristic publicity portrait, by Pearl Freeman, 4 Berkeley Street,
London, with credit stamp on verso re: royalties for republication in anything but the Daily
and Sunday Press. Houghton has inscribed the photo on its recto to one of his most avid
U.S. bookseller promoters: “Gratefully to Ben Abramson Claude Houghton 1933.” On the
verso he has penciled through the credit rubberstamp, and noted in ink: “Copyright has
been purchased by Heinemann - Claude Houghton’s publishers. So this photograph is now
‘free’.” He has also signed the verso, identifying himself as author of “Julian Grant Loses
His Way” etc. etc. The references to himself in the third person on the verso would easily
be understood through his use of the print for self-promotion; however, the dissonant dates
(Julian Grant was published in 1935 and he inscribed the photo to Abramson in 1933)
might take some work.                                                                 $125.

249. Howe, M. A. De Wolfe: SHADOWS. Boston: Copeland and Day, 1897. Small octavo.
Gilt lettered decorated cloth. Head and toe of spine lightly rubbed, otherwise an unusually
nice copy.
First edition of this first book (a collection of poems) by the future Pulitzer-winning biographer
and man of letters.
KRAUS 80.                                                                                     $85.

250. Hudson, W. H.: A LITTLE BOY LOST. London: Duckworth, 1905. Beige pictorial cloth,
t.e.g. Frontis, plates and illustrations by A.D. M’Cormick. Cloth a trace darkened at spine
and edges, two lower fore-corners creased, otherwise a very good copy.
First edition of this children’s book little favored by its author. He did not agree to its
republication until the New York edition of 1918.
PAYNE A25a.                                                                         $125.
              “One of the Most Horrible Ideal Cultures Ever Imagined”
251. Hudson, W. H.: A CRYSTAL AGE. London: T. Fisher Unwin, 1906. Elaborately decorated
pictorial cloth. Slight foxing early and late, cloth a bit rubbed, spine somewhat dull, but
otherwise a very good copy.
Second edition, significantly revised, with a new preface, and bearing Hudson’s name for
the first time. The first edition appeared anonymously in 1887. “One of the arts-and-crafts,
anti-mechanistic utopias of the late Victorian age; the primary analogy is to a beehive,
with egalitarianism that amounts to oppression, except for a tiny elite who are, in turn,
constrained in other ways...I find it beautifully written, but one of the most horrible ideal
cultures ever imagined” - Bleiler.
PAYNE A2b. BLEILER, SCIENCE FICTION THE EARLY YEARS, pp.376-7.                         $250.

252. Hudson, W. H.: W.H. HUDSON’S LETTERS TO R.B. CUNNINGHAME GRAHAM WITH
A FEW TO CUNNINGHAME GRAHAM’S MOTHER MRS BONTINE.... [London]: Golden
Cockerel Press, 1941. Quarter morocco, t.e.g., by Sangorski & Sutcliffe. Frontis and portrait
by Rothenstein. A couple stray marks to cloth, otherwise a very good or better copy.
First edition. Edited by Richard Curle. One of 250 numbered copies printed on Arnould’s
mould made paper.
PAYNE A57a.                                                                      $125.

253. Huelsenbeck, Richard: DER TRAUM VOM GROSSEN GLÜCK. Berlin: S. Fischer Verlag,
[1933]. 305,[1]pp. Printed wrappers. Wrappers lightly worn and soiled, but internally about
fine and partially unopened.

First edition (Erste bis dritte Auflage) of this more or less mainstream novel by one of the
principals of the Berlin manifestation of Dada. Uncommon - OCLC locates only 9 copies
as of this writing - quite possibly because Huelsenbeck came under scrutiny by the Nazis
in 1933, and remained so until he left Germany in 1936.                               $275.

254. [Hughes, Langston]: INTER-RACIAL STUDY GROUP LANGSTON HUGHES POET-
PLAYWRIGHT DIRECTS A SURVEY NATIONAL MINORITIES IN EUROPE AND THE SOVIET
UNION THEIR PRESENT STATUS AND LATEST DEVELOPMENTS IN ART AND LITERA-
TURE... [wrapper title]. New York: Edutravel Inc., 1937. Quarto sheet folded to six panels,
printed in red and brown, with photograph on upper panel. About fine.
A fascinating artifact, being a prospectus for this projected 60 day tour of Europe and the
Soviet Union under Langston Hughes’s direction, printing a detailed, day-by-day itinerary
(3 July - 31 August), as well as details for application to participate ($499 including 3rd
class passage on the Cunard Line). However, in spite of considerable planning, the tour
fell through.                                                                          $55.

255. [Hughes, Langston]: CLOSING TESTIMONY OF LANGSTON HUGHES, POET AND
AUTHOR, BEFORE THE SENATE COMMITTEE ON PERMANENT INVESTIGATIONS...WITH
SENATORS McCARTHY AND McCLELLAN, AS TAKEN FROM A RADIO BROADCAST
[caption title]. [Np]. [ca.] 26 March [1953]. Two leaves. Legal format. Mimeographed single-
spaced typescript, printed on rectos only. Folded for mailing, staple removed from upper
left corner, else very good.
A partial transcript of Hughes’s testimony before the HUAC, including exchanges with McCarthy,
McClellan, and Roy Cohn. Hughes’s testimony was essentially friendly and cooperative,
and records his disaffiliation with many of his earlier commitments and writings. In one
instance a correction was made, in pencil (just possibly in Hughes’s hand), identifying
the speaker as Cohn rather than Hughes. Provenance: duplicate from the Hughes papers.
                                                                                         $75.

256. Hughes, Langston: PORT TOWN AN OPERA IN ONE ACT LIBRETTO BY ... SCORE
BY JAN MEYEROWITZ. [Np: The Authors, ca. 1960]. [4],21 leaves; and [6],24,[2]pp. Quarto.
Mechanically reproduced typescript, the first printed on rectos only, the second with main
text printed rectos and versos. Stapled at upper corners. Very good or better.
Two variant printings of this libretto by Hughes, the first typed in a serifed type, the second
in a sans-serif type, with differences in collation as noted, but with no readily visible differences
in text. The opera, based on Hughes’s 1926 poem, premiered at Tanglewood in August,
1960, under the direction of Boris Goldovsky. Both the critics and the author were dissatisfied
with the end result, leading shortly thereafter to Hughes’s rejection of any further plans
for writing libretti (see Rampersad, II, pp.320-1). Provenance: duplicates from the Hughes
papers.                                                                                 $450.
                                    Early Acting Script
257. Hughes, Richard: THE SISTER’S TRAGEDY [wrapper title]. 9, Longwall, Oxford. [dated
at end 7 October 1921]. [1],20 leaves. Quarto. Mechanically duplicated typescript, printed
on rectos only, cord bound in typed wrappers. Wrappers rather spotted and chipped, internally
very good.
An early acting script of the author’s first published play, with the above address on the
upper wrapper and title leaf in ink, in his hand, and with at least one correction and one
revision in ink in the text. The play was first performed privately at John Masefield’s house
on 24 January 1922, with the first public performance following in May. Comparison with
the published text (Blackwell, 1922, following the public performance) reveals forthcoming
tinkerings with stage mechanics, and the addition of at least one line of dialogue, at the
end.                                                                                  $1000.

258. Hughes, Richard: GIPSY-NIGHT AND OTHER POEMS. Waltham St. Lawrence: Golden
Cockerel Press, [1922]. Small octavo. Cloth and boards. Lithographed portrait by Pamela
Bianco. Tipped-in errata slip. Faint paperclip dent at top edge of free endsheet, otherwise
fine in very good, slightly spine-tanned dust jacket with small nicks at crown and toe of
spine.
First edition of the author’s first substantial book, and the eighth book from the press. One
of a total edition of 750 copies. This copy is from the American issue, with the price on
the spine in $, U.S. adverts on the back panel, and a notice of U.S. distribution by Charles
H. Daniels on the page opposite the title.                                              $250.

259. Hughes, Richard: GIPSY-NIGHT AND OTHER POEMS. Chicago: Will Ransom, 1922.
Large octavo. Cloth and boards, paper spine label. Portrait frontispiece by Pamela Bianco.
Bookplate on front free endsheet, very slight darkening at pastedown gutters, otherwise
about fine in unprinted dust jacket with shallow piece missing from top edge. Later slipcase.
First U.S. edition of the author’s first original book, printed in an edition limited to only
sixty-three copies on handmade paper, with the lithographed frontis signed by the artist,
signed by the author, and signed by Ransom on the colophon. By virtue of the limitation,
a significantly more uncommon book than the British edition, and physically a much more
substantial book.
RANSOM 9.                                                                               $450.

                                Scarce Early Publication
260. [Hughes, Richard]: LINES WRITTEN UPON FIRST OBSERVING AN ELEPHANT
DEVOURED BY A ROC...... [Waltham St. Lawrence: Golden Cockerel Press, nd. but 1922].
Unprinted sewn forest-green wrappers. A trace of sunning to wrappers, otherwise fine.
First edition. One of an unspecified, but small, edition printed on handmade paper at the
Golden Cockerel Press in the same year as the author’s first and second book publications.
Scarce: OCLC/Worldcat locates only seven copies. Not in NCBEL.                      $750.
                     Page Proofs with High Association Interest

261. Hughes, Richard: THE SISTER’S TRAGEDY. Oxford. 1922. Unbound rough-trimmed
folded page proofs. Lightly used, but very good. Enclosed in half morocco slipcase and
chemise.
Page proofs of the first edition of the author’s first published play, and second (or third)
separate publication. The proofs bear at least three corrections in Hughes’s hand, and are
inscribed by him on the half-title: “To The Bianco Family, M.B., F.B., P.B., C.B., from Diccon,
with love, June 1922 And for the Lord’s sake Come Back to England SOON....” Among
the collective recipients of the inscription is Pamela Bianco (1906-94), the artist who contributed
the portrait of Hughes that appeared as a frontis in his first book, A Gipsy-Night. A child
prodigy, she moved with her family to the U.S. after the success of her first exhibition there,
arranged by Mitchell Kennerley at Anderson Galleries.                                      $1250.

                                         One of Fifty
262. Hughes, Richard: MEDITATIVE ODE ON VISION. [London]: Privately Printed at the
Curwen Press, 1923. Sewn wrappers, stamped in gilt. Very slight creases, otherwise a
near fine copy.
First and only separate edition. Copy #4 of fifty numbered copies printed on Zanders handmade
paper for presentation by the author. This copy bears his presentation inscription: “To Walter
de la Mare With the warmest good wishes of R. H.” A highly appealing association copy
of one of Hughes’s scarce private printings.
RIDLER, p.60.                                                                             sold

                                           One of 75
263. Hughes, Richard: ECSTATIC ODE ON VISION. [London]: Privately Printed at the Curwen
Press, 1925. Sewn wrappers, stamped in gilt. Slightly rumpled, with a few faint spots to
wrappers, else very good.
First and only separate edition. Copy #17 of seventy-five numbered copies printed on ‘Nettuna’
paper for presentation by the author. This copy bears his presentation inscription: “To Walter
de la Mare With best wishes from R. H.” A highly appealing association copy of one of
Hughes’s scarce private printings.
RIDLER, p.61.                                                                           $850.

264. Hughes, Richard: A HIGH WIND IN JAMAICA. London: Chatto & Windus, 1929. Cloth
and boards, t.e.g., others untrimmed. Narrow wrinkle in cloth at toe of spine incurred in
the binding process, otherwise a very good to near fine copy in darkened and lightly chipped
glassine wrapper.
First British edition, deluxe issue, of the author’s most popular work. One of 150 numbered
copies, specially printed and bound, and signed by the author. The source novel for the
1965 film adaptation.                                                                 $500.

265. Hughes, Richard: THE SPIDER’S PALACE AND OTHER STORIES. London: Chatto
& Windus, 1931. Large octavo. Cloth and decorated boards. Color frontis, plates, and b&w
illustrations by George Charlton. Spine a shade sunned, minor rubbing at tips, some foxing,
particularly to endsheets, otherwise a very good copy.
First edition, limited issue. Copy #106 of 110 numbered copies (100 for sale), specially
printed and bound, and signed by the author.                                      $185.

266. Hughes, Richard: IN HAZARD A SEA STORY. London: Chatto & Windus, 1938. Plain
wrappers, printed label. Uncorrected “1st proof” of the first edition. The spine is chipped
and the wrappers nearly detached, otherwise a good copy of this early format, direct from
the typesetter, T. and A. Constable. The title is described as “Tentative.”           $125.

267. Hughes, Richard: THE HUMAN PREDICAMENT VOLUME ONE THE FOX IN THE
ATTIC. London: Chatto & Windus, 1961. Printed wrappers. Uncorrected page proofs of the
first edition. Wrappers faintly tanned at edges, otherwise fine.                 $75.
268. [Hughes, Richard]: Johnson, Nunnally [screenwriter]: “A HIGH WIND IN JAMAICA”
SCREENPLAY BY.... [Beverly Hills]: Twentieth Century-Fox, 5 June 1963. [1],159 leaves.
Quarto. Mechanically reproduced typescript, printed on rectos only, bradbound in printed
studio wrappers. Large overlap edges of wrappers a bit frayed and torn, internally fine.
Denoted a “first draft” of Johnson’s adaptation to the screen of Hughes’s classic novel of
the corruptibility of “innocent” children extracted by events from their normal environment.
This would appear to be an exceptionally early form — and perhaps even a form never utilized
— of the script for the 1965 film. Johnson, the accomplished writer/director whose long
career included an Oscar for his adaptation of Grapes of Wrath a quarter century earlier,
did not receive screen credit for the film. The final script is credited to Stanley Mann, Ronald
Harwood and Denis Cannan.                                                                  $400.

269. Hugo, Richard: SEA LANES OUT. [Story, WY]: Dooryard Press, 1983. Small quarto.
Cloth and boards. A fine copy.
First edition. One of 100 copies bound thus, from a total edition of 400 copies designed
and printed by Barbara and Tom Rea. The author prepared the text just prior to his death.
                                                                                   $175.

270. [Inge, William]: Taradash, Daniel [screenwriter]: PICNIC ... REVISED FINAL DRAFT
... [wrapper title]. [Np]: Columbia Pictures, 5-13 May 1955. [3],159,22,[11]leaves. Quarto.
Mimeographed typescript, printed on rectos only of white, blue and pale green stock. Title
lettered on spine, a couple of corner bumps, else about fine.
A revised final draft of this adaptation to the screen of Inge’s 1953 play. This is an interesting
copy, as it also includes a detailed 22 page shooting schedule, several leaves of production
memos and notes, and an appended lot of leaves of text in an earlier state, prior to the
form represented by the colored revises inserted in the main text. In what is likely the most
significant film adaptation of Inge’s most widely known play, Joshua Logan directed William
Holden, Kim Novak, Nick Adams, Susan Strasberg, Cliff Robertson, et al. The film won
two Academy Awards, and received a number of nominations and bows from other bodies.
                                                                                            $400.

271. Ireland, Samuel: PICTURESQUE VIEWS ON THE RIVER THAMES, FROM ITS SOURCE
IN GLOUCESTERSHIRE TO THE NORE; WITH OBSERVATIONS ON THE PUBLIC BUILD-
INGS AND OTHER WORKS OF ART IN ITS VICINITY. London: Printed by C. Clarke ...
Published by T. Egerton, 1801-2. Two volumes. xvi,209;viii,258pp. plus fifty-two sepia aquatint
plates, an aquatint title in the first volume, and an engraved map in each volume. Small
quarto. Contemporary diced Russia, spines gilt extra, marbled edges. Numerous woodcuts
in text and as tailpieces. Bound without half-titles, two adjacent text gatherings in second
volume show moderate foxing, usual offset from aquatints to facing text leaves, otherwise
a bright attractive set.




Second edition. First published, in folio, in 1782 (see Abbey 430).                       $1000.
272. Jacobs, W. W.: THE SKIPPER’S WOOING AND THE BROWN MAN’S SERVANT.
New York: Stokes, [1897]. Pictorial cloth. Somewhat darkened and soiled, spine ends frayed,
but a sound copy.
First U.S. edition. Inscribed by the author: “To Charles Rock from W.W. Jacobs Feb/98.”
The recipient collaborated with Jacobs on at least two plays, The Grey Parrot and The
Ghost of Jerry Bundler (both 1908). This copy has numerous pencil annotations in the
text, probably in Rock’s hand, which conform to use in preparing a dramatization of The
Skipper’s Wooing.
NCBEL IV:620.                                                                    $250.
                 Inscribed to the “Instructor to the British Empire.”
273. Jacobs, W. W.: ODD CRAFT. London: George Newnes, [1903]. Pictorial cloth. Frontis
and plates by Will Owen. Spine darkened and a bit creased, cloth modestly soiled, cheap
paper tanned and occasionally foxed, but a sound copy.
First edition, and an early copy, with the leaders on the table of contents page sharp and
distinct. A fine association copy, inscribed by the author: “To H.G. Wells Instructor to the
British Empire from its humblest citizen W.W. Jacobs Nov. 1903.”
NCBEL III:621. MUIR (POINTS, 2ND SERIES), p. 118.                                   $1500.

274. Jacobs, W. W.: ODD CRAFT. New York: Scribner, 1903. Pictorial cloth. Illustrations
by Will Owen. Cloth lightly soiled, spine very slightly darkened, else very good.
First U.S. edition. Inscribed by the author on the free endsheet: “To Mrs. Arthur Morrison
With my sincere regards. W.W. Jacobs Feb. 1904.” There is a pencil note on p.80 pointing
out a textual variation between this edition and the British edition.
NCBEL IV:621.                                                                       $350.

275. Jacobs, W. W.: NIGHT WATCHES. London, etc: Hodder and Stoughton, [1914]. Pictorial
cloth, spine lettered in gilt. Frontis and plates by Stanley Davis. Edges foxed, front endsheet
a bit tanned, otherwise a very good copy in the uncommon pictorial dust jacket, the latter
lightly dust-soiled, with tiny chips at corners and a small chip from the spine panel.
First edition, first binding. Inscribed by the author on the front free endsheet: “The ‘Homeless
Sailors’ & Soldiers’ Fund’ will benefit by the sale of this copy. W.W. Jacobs. Dec. 1916.”
NCBEL IV:621. BLEILER, p.108 BLEILER (SUPERNATURAL) 898.                                   $450.
                                     Association Copy
276. Jacobs, W. W.: NIGHT WATCHES. London, etc: Hodder and Stoughton, [1914]. Pictorial
cloth, spine lettered in gilt. Frontis and plates by Stanley Davis. Top edge dusty and cloth
lightly soiled, minor edge rubbing, otherwise a very good copy, without dust jacket.

First edition, first binding. A fine association copy, inscribed by the author on the front
free endsheet: “To my old neighbour Arthur Morrison, with sincere regards. W.W. Jacobs
Oct. 1914.” The recipient, the novelist and Japanese print collector, is best remembered
for his sequence of novels featuring detective Martin Hewitt.
NCBEL IV:621. BLEILER, p.108 BLEILER (SUPERNATUAL) 898.                              $650.

277. James, C. L. R.: THE BLACK JACOBINS TOUSSAINT LOUVERTURE AND THE SAN
DOMINGO REVOLUTION. New York: The Dial Press, [1938]. Green cloth. Portrait, plates
and folding map. Lower forecorners slightly bumped, otherwise a very good copy in faintly
worn dust jacket which was laminated by the former owner.
First edition, U.S. issue, comprised of sheets printed in the U.K. The Afro-Trinidadian political
theorist and historian’s masterwork. Inscribed by the author: “For A. H. Wolfe with revolutionary
greetings from C. L. R. James.” James came to the U.S. on a tour under the auspices
of the Socialist Workers Party in late 1938, and stayed for almost two decades. The recipient
of the inscription, Albert Wolfe (brother of novelist and one-time Trotsky bodyguard Bernard
Wolfe), most likely connected with James as a consequence of his own political activism
at the time.
BLOCKSON 75.                                                                         $2500.

278. [James, Henry]: Goetz, Ruth and Augustus [screenwriters]: “THE HEIRESS” [caption
title]. [Np: Paramount Pictures Inc., 2 July 1948]. [1],174 leaves. Quarto. Mimeographed
typescript, printed on rectos only of white stock, with revises on blue paper. Bradbound.
Light use and minor fraying, preliminary cast list has players identified in a contemporary
hand (with one change), otherwise a good copy.
A pre-production script (draft unspecified) for this very significant film adaptation of James’s
Washington Square. Under the direction of William Wyler, Olivia de Havilland turned in
an Oscar-winning performance, in tandem with Montgomery Clift and Ralph Richardson.
Aaron Copland composed the score. This was the second major adaptation of James to
the screen, preceded by The Lost Moment (1947), which was based on The Aspern Papers.
Uncommon.                                                                                  $400.

279. Jenkins, Ron: WILDLIFE ART OF RON JENKINS. Missoula, MT: Produced for Jon
E. Cates, [1976]. Small quarto. Gilt pictorial cloth. Photographs, illustrations and plates.
Fine in slipcase.
First edition, limited issue. One of two hundred numbered copies, signed by the artist and
publisher. With a full-page presentation inscription from the artist, along with a full-page,
highly finished ink drawing of a family of gray wolves.                                 $200.

280. Jerrold, Douglas: MRS. CAUDLE’S CURTAIN LECTURES. London: Bradbury, Evans
& Co., 1866. xx,190,[10]pp. Small quarto. Original publisher’s plum cloth, elaborately stamped
in gilt and blind, a.e.g. Color chromolithographed frontis and copious text illustrations by
Charles Keene. Title printed in red and black. Binding rather rubbed, with some shallow
fraying at spine ends, some occasional light foxing and marginal soiling, but a good, sound
copy, with a decent association interest (see below).
First illustrated edition, printed on blue tinted paper. Forrest Reid’s copy, with his ownership
signature. In his monograph on the Illustrators of the Eighteen Sixties, Reid describes
this work as “Keene’s masterpiece in book illustration...the illustrations show Keene at
his best...Yet Ruskin found this artist ‘coarse’, and Mrs. Meynell, even more sensitive,
found him ‘obscene’.”
REID, p.131.                                                                              $200.

281. Johnson, Lionel: POEMS. London & Boston: Elkin Mathews / Copeland & Day, 1895.
Pale blue boards. Pictorial title. First trade edition, preceded by the limited edition of twenty-
five deluxe copies. One of 750 copies. Endsheets tanned, modest wear at tips, otherwise
a near fine copy of this fragile book.
HAYWARD 304.                                                                                 $500.

282. [Johnson, Philip C.]: RESIDENCE FOR MR. & MRS. RICHARD HODGSON NEW CANAAN
- CONNECTICUT SPECIFICATIONS. New York: Philip C. Johnson - Designer / Landis
Gores - Associated, 14 June 1950. [5],9,4,5,6,3,2,3,2,5,3,2,2,23,[1],1,1,5,5,4 leaves. Quarto.
Mechanically reproduced typescript, on rectos only, punched and bound in stiff binder,
with typed label. Some pencil annotations, corrections and revisions in an unknown hand,
a few marginal highlights, occasional dust-soiling, with some old smudges on verso of one
leaf, otherwise very good.
A detailed set of construction specifications for contractor bid submissions for one of Johnson’s
best known residential undertakings, located across the road from Johnson’s Glass House.
The Hodgson house was completed in 1951, and tear sheets from a feature about it in the
March 1953 issue of Architectural Record are laid in.                            $350.

283. Johnson, Samuel: THE PRAYERS OF DOCTOR SAMUEL JOHNSON. New York:
McClure, Phillips and Co., 1902. Boards, fore and bottom edges untrimmed. Portrait. Boards
lightly smudged, tipped-in bookplate, minute nick at top of one joint, otherwise a very good
to near fine copy.
First edition in this format, edited by W.A. Bradley. Decorations by William Jordan. One
of two hundred numbered copies on Kelmscott handmade paper, from a total edition of
750 copies.                                                                          $95.

284. [Johnson, Samuel]: Adam, R.B.: THE R.B. ADAM LIBRARY RELATING TO SAMUEL
JOHNSON AND HIS ERA. Buffalo: Printed for the Author, and New York and London: Oxford
University Press, 1929. Three volumes. Quarto. Gilt navy blue cloth, t.e.g., others untrimmed.
Portraits, plates and facsimiles. Spines very slightly darkened, very light wear at edges,
short crack to one inner hinge, otherwise a very good set of a work most often seen worn
and shaken.
First edition. One of five hundred sets printed at the Volksfreund Press. A fourth, supplemental,
volume was published in 1930 in an edition of only 225 copies. The monumental catalogue
of Adams’s collection, consisting of: Volume I: Letters of Samuel Johnson, James Boswell,
Edmund Burke, Joshua Reynolds, and David Garrick; Volume II: Catalogue of Books; and
Volume III: Miscellaneous Autograph Letters.                                               $750.

285. Jones, David [illustrator]: THE CHESTER PLAY OF THE DELUGE.... Waltham St.
Lawrence, Berks.: Golden Cockerel Press, 1927. Quarto. Polished red buckram. Illustrated
with ten large wood-engravings by David Jones. Spillmark affecting top edge and running
down side panels, and affecting two leaves (not the woodcuts). A dull but sound copy, from
the library of printer/typographer C.P. Rollins, with his bookplate.

Edited by J. Isaacs. One of 275 numbered copies, printed on hand-made paper. A modest
copy, with some association interest, of one of the masterworks of Jones’s career as a
book illustrator.                                                               $750.

286. Jones, Shirley: NOCTURNE FOR WALES [I-5 series title]. [Np: Red Hen Press], 1981.
Five volumes. Stiff pictorial wrappers. Fine in typically edgeworn marbled board sleeve with
printed label.
First edition, regular issue. One of 200 sets, with each volume signed by the author/artist/
printer. The wrappers are decorated with one of the five etchings produced by Jones to
accompany the stories in the deluxe issue of twenty portfolio sets. This set is warmly inscribed
by Jones in the first volume.                                                             $275.

287. Jouffroy, Alain: TIRE A L’ARC. Milan: Galerie Schwarz, [1962]. Quarto. Printed wrappers.
Fine in slightly chipped glassine wrapper.
First edition, ordinary issue (after 125 deluxe copies). Illustrated with six plates reproducing
etchings by Victor Brauner.
MONOD 6441.                                                                                $350.

288. Kanin, Garson: CAST OF CHARACTERS STORIES OF BROADWAY AND HOLLY-
WOOD. New York: Atheneum, 1969. Large octavo. Cloth. Fine copy in very good or better
dust jacket with a trace of sunning to the spine and a small nick at the crown..
First edition. With the author’s remarkable humorous full-page presentation inscription in
multi-colors of ink and pencil, within an elaborate border and incorporating drawings of flowers
and a pierced heart: “G.K. Loves L. L. XMAS 1969 - and doesn’t give a pink fuck who knows
it ....” From the library of New York newspaper columnist Leonard Lyons. While, of course,
Kanin inscriptions are not at all uncommon, they seldom rise to this level of decorative
intensity.                                                                          $200.
                                    Forrest Reid’s Copy
289. Keary, E[liza]: THE MAGIC VALLEY OR PATIENT ANTOINE. London: Macmillan and
Co., 1877. xii,176pp. plus frontis, twelve plates and a title-page decoration by Eleanor Vere
Boyle. Small octavo. Pictorial blue-green cloth, decorated in gilt and black. Foretips and
spine ends a bit worn, with small nicks at toe of spine, minor foxing, but a very good copy.
First edition. Forrest Reid’s copy, with his ink ownership signature on the half-title. A charming
fantasy, with equally charming illustrations by the associate and friend of Rossetti, et al.
“...Several of the designs for The Magic Valley (Macmillan, 1877) are really lovely things
in their own unpretentious fashion” - Reid.
REID, p.253.                                                                                 $200.

290. [Kelmscott Press]: Cavendish, George: THE LIFE OF THOMAS WOLSEY, CARDINAL
ARCHBISHOP OF YORK. [Hammersmith: The Kelmscott Press, 1893]. Small quarto. Original
limp vellum, ribbon ties (one broken). Vellum darkened, traces of erased ink 1895 gift
inscription from blank, endsheets a bit tanned at gutters, an about very good copy, internally
very good or better.
One of 250 copies printed in the Golden type on paper, in addition to six copies on vellum.
Edited from the original manuscript by F.S. Ellis.
PETERSON A14.                                                                      $1000.

291. [Kelmscott Press]: Tennyson, Alfred Lord: MAUD, A MONODRAMA. [Hammersmith:
Printed at the Kelmscott Press and published by Macmillan & Co, August 1893]. Publisher’s
stiff vellum, spine lettered in gilt, ribbon ties. Decorative title-page, borders and initials.
Collector’s bookplate (on pastedown) and ownership stamp (on free endsheet), the latter
attended by a 1934 gift inscription to the collector, a couple small spots of foxing to fore-
edge, otherwise about fine, the ribbons intact, in gilt board slipcase.
First Kelmscott edition. One of five hundred copies printed on paper, in addition to five
hors commerce copies on vellum. This copy has the corrected states of pp. 16, 19, 26
and 69, the result of cancellans Peterson notes “were perhaps inserted in at least a few
copies ....” The borders were specially designed for this edition, and reused by Morris in
the 1894 Kelmscott Keats.
PETERSON A17.                                                                     $1650.

292. Kent, Rockwell: WILDERNESS A JOURNAL OF QUIET ADVENTURE IN ALASKA.
New York & London: Putnam, 1920. Quarto. Grey linen, lettered in gilt, t.e.g. Frontis, plates
and decorations by the author. Modest darkening at binding extremities, a few small smudges
to lower board, otherwise a very good copy, without the dust jacket. Custom cloth clamshell
box.
First edition, first binding, of Kent’s first book as sole author. Inscribed by Kent on the
dedication page, following two bars from Wagner in ink: “Siegmund zu Sieglinda März 10,
1920...,” and then signed below the printed dedication. The nature of the inscription suggests
the possibility that the presentation was to Hildegarde Hirsch, Kent’s German model/mistress
of the period leading up to his Alaska sojourn of 1918 on which the book is based. A significant
portion of the edition appeared at a later date in a secondary binding of decorated tan boards.
                                                                                         $750.

293. [Kent, Rockwell]: [Pulitzer, Ralph]: DREAMS & DERISIONS. [New York: Privately
Printed by the Pynson Printers], 1927. Small quarto. Three quarter gilt calf and marbled
boards, decorated endsheets. Illustrated. Very light rubbing to tips, otherwise near fine.
First edition. One of two hundred numbered copies printed for “John Burke.” A collection
of poems by Ralph Pulitzer, published more anonymously than pseudonymously, extensively
illustrated with pictorial head and tail-pieces by Kent. According to Zigrosser, copies 1-
100 contain an additional poem and illustration. This is copy #95.
ZIGROSSER, p. 61.                                                                   $500.

294. Kent, Rockwell: THE BIRTHDAY BOOK. New York: Random House, 1931. Pictorial
cloth, silk endsheets. Plates. Some wear to tips, else a very good copy, without the plastic
wrapper. Enclosed in custom cloth clamshell box.
First edition. One of 1850 numbered copies, printed by the Pynson Printers, and signed
by Kent.                                                                         $350.

295. Kent, Rockwell [illustrator]: CITY CHILD POEMS BY SELMA ROBINSON WITH
DECORATIONS BY.... New York: The Colophon Ltd., 1931. Cloth and decorated paper over
boards, paper spine label. Fine, in matching slipcase, accompanied by the original prospectus
and three inserts, enclosed in the original wrapping tissue, in shipping box (remnant of
label to original subscriber).
First limited edition. One of three hundred numbered copies, printed on Shogun paper at
the Walpole Printing Office, signed by the author, and by Rockwell Kent with a variant of
a finger print. This limited edition includes a lithograph not included in the trade edition.
                                                                                      $350.
                             Deluxe Issue with Extra Suite
296. Kent, Rockwell [illus]: VENUS AND ADONIS. Rochester, NY: The Printing House of
Leo Hart, 1931. Quarto. Publisher’s full polished maroon calf, ruled in gilt, t.e.g., others
untrimmed. Spine extremities a bit worn, otherwise a fine copy. Slipcased.




First edition, deluxe issue. Illustrated with twenty-one engravings by Rockwell Kent, printed
in two colors. One of seventy-five numbered copies printed on handmade paper, specially
bound, and signed by Kent, from a total edition of 1250 copies printed at the Oxford University
Press after a design by Will Ransom. Accompanied by an extra suite of the engravings,
matted and enclosed in a matching cloth box.
STANLEY (GROLIER) 40.                                                                  $3000.
297. [Kent, Rockwell]: THE JEWEL A ROMANCE OF FAIRYLAND. [Portland, ME: The
Baxter Society, 1990]. Two volumes. Large octavo. Cloth and boards, and gilt lettered wrapper
over stiff wrapper. Illustrations, facsimiles and plates. Fine in slipcase.
First public edition of this private calligraphic “book” presented by Kent to Hildegarde Hirsch
in 1917. The accompanying volume of commentary includes a Preface by Sally Kent Gorton
and a detailed essay on the text and its history by Eliot Stanley. From a total edition of
five hundred copies printed at the Stinehour Press, this is one of one hundred Benefactor
copies signed by Gorton.                                                                 $300.

298. [Kent, Rockwell]: Stanley, Eliot H. [comp]: REDISCOVERING ROCKWELL KENT:
BOOKS, GRAPHICS AND DECORATIVE ARTS SELECTIONS FROM THE COLLECTION
OF ... AN EXHIBITION AT THE GROLIER CLUB. New York: The Grolier Club, 1997. Large
octavo. Quarter morocco and marbled boards. Color frontispiece. Fine.
First edition, limited issue. One of twenty-six lettered copies, specially bound by Gray
Parrot and signed by the compiler, from a total edition of twelve hundred copies printed
at the Ascensius Press. One hundred annotated entries, accompanied by an introductory
essay and references.                                                              $300.

299. [Kerouac, Jack]: Original Lobby Card for FURIA DE JUVENTUD (THE SUBTER-
RANEANS). Sinaloa, Mexico: Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, [ca. 1960]. Very colorful, highly pictorial
lobby card (12.5 x 16.75 inches), printed on recto only. Unused, and apart from some minor
curling at the tips, about fine.
An original lobby card for the Mexican release of the 1960 film adaptation of Kerouac’s
novel, based on a screenplay by Robert Thom, directed by Ranald MacDougall, starring
Leslie Caron, George Peppard, Janice Rule and Roddy McDowell. It features a great
soundtrack by Gerry Mulligan and cronies, and that, perhaps, is the best that can be said
for this movie, the first mainstream film adaptation of a work by Kerouac. This card is far
more atmospheric and attractive than any of the American series of lobby cards, and features
four inset images as well as text, including two steamy scenes (for the times) between
Peppard and Caron, and a suitably silly image of well-groomed “hipsters” smoking or flailing
about with great abandon to the accompaniment of a sax player.                        $150.

300. Kershaw, Alister: ADRIAN LAWLOR: A MEMOIR. Francestown: Typographeum, 1981.
Cloth and boards, paper spine label. Portrait of the subject by Anthony Pallisher. Trace
of hand soiling to binding, otherwise about fine.
First Edition. One of 85 numbered copies signed by Kershaw (the entire edition). An
affectionate memoir of the Melbourne modernist painter and writer.             $75.

301. Kesey, Ken: THE FURTHER INQUIRY. [New York]: Viking Press, [1990]. Small quarto.
Cloth. Photographs by Ron Bivart. First edition. Signed and dated by Kesey in 1992 in
gold ink on the front free endsheet. Fine in dust jacket.                      $125.

302. Killens, John Oliver: YOUNGBLOOD. New York: Dial Press, 1954. Cloth and boards.
First edition of the author’s first book. A very good copy in lightly nicked and creased dust
jacket with small chip in upper spine fold.                                            $150.

303. Kinsella, W.P.: SHOELESS JOE. Boston: Houghton, 1982. Cloth and boards. Fine
in like dust jacket. First (U.S.) edition of the author’s first novel, a HMCO Fellowship winner
and the source for the popular film, Field of Dreams.                                     $375.

304. Kipling, Rudyard: ‘CAPTAINS COURAGEOUS’ A STORY OF THE GRAND BANKS.
London: Macmillan & Co., 1897. Gilt decorated pictorial blue cloth, a.e.g. Illustrations by
I.W. Taber. Trace of faint foxing to tissue guard and frontis, otherwise a fine, bright copy
in a very good, unrestored example of the pictorial dust jacket (lightly dust soiled, with
shallow losses at crown and toe of spine and foretips, and some closed tears). Half morocco
folding case.
First British edition, preceded by serialization in Pearson’s Magazine and by the U.S.
edition. One of 10,000 copies printed. One of the enduring “Boys’ Books” of its generation,
and the source novel for the superb 1937 film adaptation directed by Victor Fleming, starring
Spencer Tracy, Freddie Bartholomew, Lionel Barrymore, Melvyn Douglas, et al.
RICHARDS A103. STEWART 163.                                                          $8500.

305. Kipling, Rudyard: THE SHIPPING INDUSTRY REPORT OF A SPEECH BY ... AT THE
ANNUAL DINNER OF THE CHAMBER OF SHIPPING OF THE UNITED KINGDOM.... Garden
City: Doubleday, 1925. Cream wrappers, printed in green. Light foxing to title leaf and
upper wrapper, small nick at top of upper wrapper, else very good or better.
First American edition. One of sixty-three copies printed for copyright purposes.
STEWART 557. RICHARDS A354.                                                       $175.

306. Kipling, Rudyard: POEMS 1886 - 1929. Garden City: Doubleday, Doran & Co., 1930.
Three volumes. Quarto. Parchment boards, gilt decorations, gilt labels, t.e.g., others
untrimmed. A fine set, in lightly dust-soiled printed dust jackets.
First U.S. edition, limited issue. One of 537 sets (525 for sale), specially printed and bound,
and numbered and signed by the author in the first volume.
STEWART 575. REILLY (WWI), p.189.                                                       $2000.

307. Kipling, Rudyard: THE FOX MEDITATES. Garden City: Doubleday, 1933. Cream
wrappers, printed in green. Lower edge of upper wrapper creased, else fine in somewhat
faded folding cloth slipcase.
First edition, printed for copyright purposes, and preceding the UK edition.
STEWART 616.                                                                               $175.

308. [Kipling, Rudyard]: Libott, Robert Yale [screenwriter]: “THE PHANTOM RICKSHA”...
FROM A STORY BY RUDYARD KIPLING. Hollywood: ZIV Television Programs, Inc., 13
November, 1952. [1],46 leaves. Quarto. Mimeographed typescript, printed on rectos only,
brad-bound in mimeographed wrappers. Very heavily annotated throughout and on wrappers
in pencil and colored pencils (see below). Moderate wear and soiling to wrappers, but a
good or better copy.
A “Final Master Script” of this adaptation of Kipling’s story, prepared as #3B of the My
Favorite Story series. This script was the property of script supervisor Larry Lund, and
is very heavily annotated throughout with camera angles, revisions in dialogue and stage
directions, etc. The versos of the majority of the leaves bear annotations pertaining to camera
p.o.v. and similar data keyed to the facing recto. An important copy.                     $225.

309. Klinefelter, Walter: MAPS IN MINIATURE NOTES CRITICAL AND HISTORICAL ON
THEIR USE ON POSTAGE STAMPS ... WITH A CHECK-LIST. Windham, CT: Hawthorn
House, [1936]. 12mo. Pictorial boards. Ecuadoran stamp inserted as frontis. Trace of foxing
to endsheet gutters, otherwise fine in dust jacket. Errata and printer’s slip laid in.
First edition of this essay on the use of cartographic images in philately, including spaces
for the acquisition and preservation of particularly relevant specific examples. A good association
copy, inscribed by the author/printer to Fred Athoensen on the occasion of publication.
                                                                                            $125.
310. Kober, Arthur: MY DEAR BELLA. New York: Random House, [1941]. Cloth. Plates
by Hoff. Endsheets a trace tanned, otherwise about fine, in good, lightly chipped and sunned
dust jacket with internally mended tear at base of one flap fold.
First edition. Inscribed by the author to playwright Marc Connelly: “To Marc, who brought
forth upon this continent an even greater Bella in Teddy Stern. With kindest regards, Arthur.”
Connelly wrote a foreword to Kober’s “Having a Wonderful Time” (1937).                   $95.

311. Kooser, Ted: TWENTY POEMS. [Crete, NB: Best Cellar Press, 1973]. Printed wrappers.
First edition, unsigned issue, of this rather early and uncommon chapbook by the recent
Poet Laureate. A few minor smudges to wrappers, else near fine.                  $225.

312. Kurtz, Rudolf: EXPRESSIONISMUS UND FILM. Berlin: Verlag der Lichtbildbühne,
1926. 135pp. Quarto. Cloth, with large color pictorial onlay on upper board (by Paul Leni).
Heavily illustrated, including five color plates. Cloth darkened, with some chipping to relaid
spine and one foretip, dedicatory bifolium loose from sewing, extreme lower edge of text
block damp wrinkled, with small chip from lower margin of frontis; still, a reasonably good
copy of a book prone to condition issues.




First edition of this important, beautifully illustrated study of Expressionism in art, literature,
music and architecture and its manifestation in film. Dedicated to Emil Jannings. With the
1927 ownership inscription of collector/dealer Julien Levy on the front free endsheet. $850.

313. Lardner, Ring, Jr. [screenwriter]: “BRITANNIA MEWS” SCREENPLAY BY.... [Beverly
Hills]: Twentieth Century-Fox, 30 August 1948. [2],132 leaves plus lettered inserts. Quarto.
Mimeographed typescript, printed on rectos only. Bradbound in printed studio wrappers.
Alternate U.S. title (“The Forbidden Street”) handlettered on upper wrapper and spine, checkout
slip clipped from prelim, but a very good or better copy.
Denoted a “Final Draft” of this adaptation to the screen by Lardner of Margery Sharp’s novel.
The film was released the following May, starring Dana Andrews, Maureen O’Hara and Sybil
Thorndike under the direction of Jean Negulesco. Lardner was likely at work on this script
in the months preceding his call, on 30 October 1947, to testify before the HUAC. He had
been discharged by 20th Century-Fox just days before his appearance, and like many of
the other uncooperative witnesses associated as the Hollywood Ten, he was sentenced
to a term in prison. Given his status as the most highly paid studio writer in Hollywood
prior to his dismissal, it seems clear that Fox had little desire to set aside their investment
in this film’s script as easily as they set aside the man, as it continued to bear his name.
                                                                                         $950.

314. Lardner, Ring, Jr. [screenwriter]: “MASH” SCREENPLAY BY ... FROM THE NOVEL
BY RICHARD HOOKER. [Beverly Hills]: Twentieth Century-Fox, 26 February 1969. [1],141
leaves. Quarto. Mimeographed typescript, bradbound in printed studio wrappers. Ink name
on upper wrapper, wrappers show a faint damp/spill discoloration in from the spine in the
lower quadrant, title leaf slightly rippled (but not stained) in same area, wrappers a bit creased
and snagged at overlap edges, a few marginal paper clip marks and a few passages neatly
underscored in red ink, otherwise very good.
Denoted a “Final” draft of the screenplay for Lardner’s adaptation of Hooker’s novel, one
of the seminal films of its era, and though set in Korea, one of the handful of contemporary
on-target critiques of the Vietnam war released by a Hollywood studio. A cursory examination
of the script indicates that significant changes were yet to be made between the version
represented by this draft and the film that saw release in January of 1970, under the direction
of Robert Altman, starring Donald Sutherland, Elliott Gould, Robert Duvall, Sally Kellerman,
Tom Skerritt, Gary Brughoff, et al. It was also one of Lardner’s post Black List triumphs,
for which he won an Academy Award. The ownership signature is of one “Bob Burkhart,”
and although he does not appear in the screen credits, the underlined passages relate
chiefly to scenes involving helicopters, and he may have been associated with that element
of the production.                                                                       $500.

315. Lardner, Ring, Jr., and Lester Koenig: A MAN’S TOWN AN ORIGINAL COMEDY FOR
THE SCREEN BY.... Hollywood: Rosalie Stewart Agency, [nd. but likely prior to 1953].
[1],71 leaves. Quarto. Mimeograph typescript, printed on rectos only. Bradbound in printed
agency binder. A few corner creases and a bit of minor coffee-drop spotting to a few margins,
otherwise a very good copy.
A substantial collaborative treatment for an evidently unproduced film, focusing on issues
surrounding a student “rebellion” in favor of concentrating on education in the face of university
officials’ corruption by an influx of investment — we suspect ‘comedy’ was used in an ironic
sense. The treatment bears two Screen Writers Guild registration stamps, but is undated.
As Lardner was blacklisted in late 1947, and Koenig himself gave up filmwork in 1953 in
favor of full time concentration on his legendary record company, Contemporary Records,
due to the persistence of the blacklist, it would seem likely that this treatment would not
have been written later than 1953, and probably even predates 1948.                        $375.

316. [Laurencin, Marie]: Dumas, Alexandre: CAMILLE. London: Printed for Members of
The Limited Editions Club at the Curwen Press, 1937. Quarto. White polished buckram,
lettered in gilt, t.e.g. Illustrated with twelve plates after watercolors by Marie Laurencin.
Spine a bit darkened, a few marginal finger smudges in prelims, otherwise very good or
better, in slipcase.
Copy #3 from an edition limited to 1500 copies designed and printed by Oliver Simon at
the Curwen Press, and signed by the artist. Translation and introduction by Edmund Gosse.
                                                                                   $450.
                        His Last Film Before Being Blacklisted
317. Lawson, John Howard “SMASH-UP” [released as: SMASH-UP: THE STORY OF A
WOMAN]. [Los Angeles: Universal Pictures], 4 May 1946. 118 leaves. Quarto. Mimeographed
typescript, printed on rectos only. Bradbound in stencil-printed wrappers. Production number
stamped on upper wrapper, pencil name and note (“Only Copy”) and ink number on upper
wrapper, wrappers slightly chipped along overlap edges, otherwise a very good copy, internally
about fine.
An early draft of this screenplay by dramatist / screenwriter / activist Lawson, based on
a story by Dorothy Parker and Frank Cavett (for which Parker and Cavett received Oscar
nominations). The film was directed by Stuart Heisler, and starred Susan Hayward, Lee
Bowman, Eddie Albert, et al. Hayward was nominated for an Oscar for her role. Lionel
Wiggan received screen credit for additional dialogue, but this draft is all Lawson’s and
predates the film’s release by eight months. In October 1947, Lawson was called before
the HUAC, and as an uncooperative witness, he became one of the most important members
of the so-called “Hollywood Ten.” As a consequence, this was his last credited studio
screenwriting assignment. After serving his sentence and being blacklisted, Lawson went
into self-imposed exile in Mexico, where he wrote, under a pseudonym, the screen adaptation
of Paton’s Cry, the Beloved Country (1951). His last screenplay, again pseudonymous,
was for the 1957 Careless Years. Accompanied by a continuity and dialogue script for
the trailer, [1],7 leaves, stapled mimeographed typescript, very good as well, except for
a long, creased tear to the title leaf.                                            $1750.

318. Lazarus, Emma: [UNPUBLISHED MANUSCRIPT] THE SPAGNOLETTO. [New York?].
1876. 56pp. Original printed tan wrappers. Spine and corners considerably chipped, lower
wrapper detached, wrappers a bit soiled with light stains, top fore-corner of last three leaves
chipped (touching or approaching the page numbers); still, an intact copy of a scarce book.
First edition of this tragic verse play in five acts, privately published by the author. This
copy features the manuscript insertion on the first page, in an unidentifiable hand in block
letters, of a one word first line of dialogue by Maria, “Father!,” which renders more sensible
the first printed line of dialogue, by Josef Ribera. An uncommon book: OCLC locates ten
copies only (spread between two entries, one based on the title-page, one on the wrapper
title), and the front wrapper of the Yale copy is illustrated in BAL. The text was reprinted
in 1882 in Songs of a Semite.
BAL 11487. RODEN, p.74.                                                               $1250.

319. Le Blanc, H.: THE ART OF TYING THE CRAVAT: DEMONSTRATED IN SIXTEEN
LESSONS, INCLUDING THIRTY-TWO DIFFERENT STYLES. FORMING A POCKET
MANUAL...PRECEDED BY A HISTORY OF THE CRAVAT.... London: Effingham Wilson,
1828. 72pp. 12mo. Late 19th century 3/4 calf, t.e.g. Frontis and four lithographed folding
plates. Crown of spine and label chipped, occasional minor foxmarks, but internally a very
good copy.
Third London edition, published in the same year as the first edition in English. A popular
work: editions appeared in Philadelphia (1828) and New York (1829), and a seventh edition
appeared in London in 1829 as well. Accompanied by a modern facsimile reprint of this
edition (published with only one of the plates) distributed by Countess Mara, Inc., with
a brief prefatory note overstating considerably the scarcity of the original editions.
HILER, p.532 (a later edition).                                                        sold

320. [Leaf Book]: Dearden, Robert R., Jr., and Douglas S. Watson: AN ORIGINAL LEAF
FROM THE BIBLE OF THE REVOLUTION AND AN ESSAY CONCERNING IT. San Francisco:
Printed by Edwin & Robert Grabhorn for John Howell.., 1930. 34pp. Large octavo. Quarter
calf and decorated boards. Frontis, portrait and facsimiles. Small chip from crown of lightly
rubbed spine, otherwise very good, in modestly sunned slipcase with some cracks at joints.
First edition. One of 515 numbered copies of the “Colonial Edition,” from a total edition
limited to 580 copies. Inserted into this copy is a leaf from II Chronicles. A note by Edwin
Grabhorn on typography of the period is appended. Aitken, a Philadelphia printer, produced
an edition of the New Testament in 1781 and of the Old Testament in 1782, and received
the endorsement of the Continental Congress in September 1782. His edition of the Bible
was the first English language edition produced after the monopoly enjoyed by the Royal
Printer ended, and is commonly referred to as “The Bible of the Revolution.”
GRABHORN BIBLIOGRAPHY 131.                                                             $350.

321. Levin, Ira: AN UNTITLED PLAY [GENERAL SEEGER]. New York: Ayers, Bowden &
Bullock, [nd. but ca. 1961]. [5],38,53 leaves. Quarto. Mimeographed typescript, printed
on rectos only. Boltbound in Hart Steno Bureau wrappers. One bolt absent, a couple short
tears at wrapper edges, relevant ink notes on title, otherwise very good.
An early draft of this play, as yet untitled (the eventual title, as well as a new agency stamp
and annotation appear on the title in ink). The play enjoyed a very short Broadway run of
two performances (28 Feb - 1 Mar 1962), in a production directed by George C. Scott.
                                                                                          $150.

322. Lewis, Wyndham: THE ART OF BEING RULED. London: Chatto & Windus, 1926. Gilt
cloth. First edition, first binding. A total of 1500 copies were printed. Light foxing at fore
edges, otherwise a very nice, bright, near fine copy. The dust jacket is quite tanned, as
usual, and has some short tears at the flap folds, but is otherwise a nice example.
MORROW & LAFOURCADE A6a.                                                               $300.

323. Lewis, Wyndham: THE DIABOLICAL PRINCIPLE AND THE DITHYRAMBIC SPECTA-
TOR. London: Chatto & Windus, 1931. Gilt cloth. First edition, first binding. Some very
minor foxing to endsheets, otherwise about fine and bright in faintly worn dust jacket with
small spot on upper panel and small chip at toe of lower joint.
MORROW & LAFOURCADE A14.                                                            $250.

324. Lewis, Wyndham: SNOOTY BARONET. London [etc]: Cassell and Company, [1932].
Gilt cloth. First edition, first binding. Top edge a trifle dusty, spine very slightly cocked,
otherwise a very good, bright copy, in spine-sunned dust jacket with a few very, very shallow
chips along the top edge. The entire edition consisted of 2791 copies, but it is uncommon
in dust jacket.
MORROW & LAFOURCADE A18.                                                                 $300.

325. Lewis, Wyndham: MRS. DUKES’ MILLION. [Toronto]: Coach House Press, [1977].
Cloth. First edition, clothbound issue, of Lewis’s first novel (in order of composition), preceded
by an issue in wrappers and a “line printer” edition for advance review. Fine in dust jacket.
Morrow & Lafourcade do not record copies in cloth.                                            $40.

326. Linderman, Frank B.: BLACKFEET INDIANS. [St. Paul, MN: Great Northern Railway,
11 May 1935]. Quarto. Cloth backed printed boards. Color portraits by Winold Reiss. Top
edge lightly dust marked, otherwise near fine in very good, slightly tanned dust jacket with
small chip and a shallow snag at the top edge of the front panel.
First edition of this popular example of art-deco typography and binding decoration, published
on the 25th Anniversary of Glacier National Park. The extreme realism of Reiss’s brilliantly
colored portraits are a sympathetic counterpoint to the design. This copy is accompanied
by an original undated pencil drawing, 19.8 x 23.5, signed “Fritz Winold Reiss” in a hand
much out of character with Reiss’s mature signature, of a knight in armor on horseback.
With a biographical sketch of Linderman by Grace Stone Coates, and of Reiss by Helen
Appleton Reid.                                                                          $450.
327. Linton, William J.: THE FLOWER AND THE STAR AND OTHER STORIES FOR
CHILDREN. Boston: Ticknor and Fields, 1868. 120pp. Small octavo. Folded, untrimmed
signatures. Elaborate engraved title and engraved illustrations and decorations by the author.
Outer leaves a bit dusty and rubbed, otherwise a very good copy.
Original folded and gathered signatures, never bound, of the first edition of this work by
the British radical poet/engraver, published shortly after his emigration to the U.S. The
London edition did not appear until 1892.
NCBEL III:533.                                                                      $100.

328. Linton, William J.: IN MEMORY OF JAMES WATSON [caption title]. London: Blakeman
& Jagger, Old-Style Printers, 1874 [though likely 1875]. Printed broadside, 26.5 x 21.2cm.
Text in double columns. Old folds, a bit dusty at edges, but very good.
A rare broadside printing of this poem by Linton, in memory of his close friend and publisher,
fellow radical James Watson. Written after Linton’s removal to the U.S., the text is dated
at the end “U.S. Dec, 20, 1874.” Linton’s early publication history in Britain was closely
connected with Watson, dating from the years of Linton’s first major endeavor, the radical
weekly, The Nation. In 1879 Linton published his own significant prose memoir of Watson
and their association. Not in Linton’s entry in NCBEL.                                 $175.

329. [Linton, William J.]: CATONINETALES A DOMESTIC EPIC BY HATTIE BROWN [pseud]
A YOUNG LADY OF COLOUR LATELY DECEASED AT THE AGE OF 14. London: Lawrence
and Bullen, 1891. Large octavo. Original publisher’s vellum over boards, lettered in red and
black. Head- and tail- pieces after engravings by Linton. Title-vignette. Attractive bookplate
(and remains of another) on front pastedown, vellum slightly bowed and smudged, but a
very good or better copy.
First British edition, limited issue. One of thirty-five numbered copies on Japon vellum,
specially bound, from a total edition of 330. Linton is credited on the half-title as editor
and illustrator, but he of course was the composer of the poems as well. Scarce in this
issue.
NCBEL III:533.                                                                        $600.
                                         One of Fifty
330. [Linton, William J.]: THE POOR-HOUSE FUGITIVE BEING THE LIFE AND ADVENTURE
OF BOB THIN 1840.... [Hamden, CT: The Appledore Press, nd. but ca. 1897]. 176pp. Octavo.
Folded, untrimmed sheets. Occasional decorations by the author. Near fine.
First edition thus, reprinting the text of the 1845 edition, supplemented by a generous selection
of poems from later years, including many on political and economic themes. Printed by
Linton on his own press in an edition of fifty copies only, but not bound and published due
to his death on New Year’s Day, 1898. Not in NCBEL or Ransom.                             $150.

331. [Logan Elm Press]: Chafetz, Sidney: THE STORY OF WU-KUT & PREN-TING A TRUE
ACCOUNT GATHERED FROM CONTEMPORARY SOURCES & ILLUSTRATED BY....
[Columbus]: Logan Elm Press at The Ohio State University, 1979. Small octavo. Accordion-
fold text bound in printed boards. Woodcuts. Fine in slipcase.
First edition, and the first title published under the imprint. One of seventy-five copies printed
in handset Caslon on Arches text and signed by the author/illustrator.                      $350.

332. [Logan Elm Press]: Strand, Mark: THE FAMOUS SCENE [caption title]. [Columbus,
OH: The Logan Elm Press, 1988]. Quarto. Sewn decorated wrappers with cutout title window.
Portrait. Fine.
First edition in this format. Four color woodcut portrait by Sidney Chafetz. One of one hundred
numbered copies printed by hand in Janson types on handmade paper, signed by the author
and the artist.                                                                           $150.
333. [Logan Elm Press]: Thurber, James: UNIVERSITY DAYS ... FROM MY LIFE AND HARD
TIMES. Columbus, OH: Privately Printed for The Ohio State University Office of University
Development, 1990. Quarto. Printed wrapper over boards. Portrait. Illustrations. Fine.
First printing in this format. Woodcut portrait by Sidney Chafetz. Illustrations by the author.
One of 175 copies, printed by hand in Gill’s Joanna on Twinrocker rag paper at the Logan
Elm Press and Papermill. The binding paper was handmade “using pulp beaten from OSU
black academic robes and white cotton athletic shorts.”                                  $200.

334. [Logan Elm Press]: Jasud, Lawrence: WORDS SOUNDS AND POWER AN EVOCATION
OF THE HEART AND MIND OF RASTAFARI THROUGH THE WORDS AND IMAGES OF
DR. BONGO U. AND THE BRETHREN OF ST. JAMES PARISH, MONTEGO BAY, JAMAICA,
W.I. [Columbus, OH]: Logan Elm Press, 1991. Quarto. Cloth and gilt cannabis-hemp paper
over upper board. Photographs. Color illustrations. Fine.
First edition. Printed in four colors. One of only sixty-five numbered copies printed on Mohawk
Superfine paper by Russ McKnight in Kennerley Forum and Goudy Bold types set by the
author, with the collotypes printed by hand. Signed by the author. The text is based on
an afternoon the author spent with Dr. Bongo U, a Jamaican herb doctor and Rastafarian
religious leader, and is largely an edited transcription of the words of Bongo U and his
associates.                                                                               $300.

335. [Logan Elm Press]: Wallace, David Rains: CHESTNUT RIDGE. [Columbus, OH]: Logan
Elm Press Ohio State University, 1993. Small quarto. Printed decorated wrapper over boards.
Illustrations. Fine.
First separate edition. Illustrated by the author. Afterword by Edward F. Hutchins. One
of 275 numbered copies, printed in Van Dijck and Caslon types on Johannot paper, signed
by the author. An elegant presentation of this work selected from Idle Weeds (Sierra Club,
1981).                                                                              $150.

336. [Logan Elm Press]: Matthews, Jack: AN INTERVIEW WITH THE SPHINX. [Columbus,
OH]: Logan Elm Press and Papermill at The Ohio State University, 1993. Oblong small
quarto. Cloth and boards. Illustrations. Fine.
First deluxe edition. Illustrated (including a pop-up) by Eric May. One of three hundred
numbered copies, printed in Joanna and Gill Sans types, and signed by the author and
artist.                                                                            $100.

337. London, Jack: MOON-FACE AND OTHER STORIES. New York: Macmillan, 1906. Dark
blue cloth, stamped in gilt, pale green and off-white. First published edition, preceded by
a copyright printing. Two small bubbles to cloth on lower board, otherwise a very good,
or better, copy, with only minor rubbing to three of the letters on the upper board.
BAL 11895. SMITH L-452.                                                               $250.

338. London, Jack: HEARTS OF THREE. New York: Macmillan, 1920. Gilt red cloth. Front
inner hinge slightly weak, corners rubbed, a couple of faint splashmarks on lower board,
but a good copy of a less than common title.
First U.S. edition of this posthumously published novelization based on a collaborative film
project with Charles William Goddard. “...as foolish a compilation of fictional nonsense
as ever an important writer wrote”- Bleiler.
BAL 11982. BLEILER (SF) 1362.                                                         $250.

339. [London, Jack]: Simmons, Michael L., and [Lester Koenig] [screenwriters]: POWER
TO BURN SCREEN PLAY BY... [released as ROMANCE OF THE REDWOODS]. [Hollywood]:
Columbia Picture Corp, 10 - 20 December 1938. [1],116 leaves, plus many interleaves and
lettered inserts. Quarto. Largely mimeographed typescript, but with instances of original
typescript and autograph manuscript. Bradbound in printed studio wrappers (upper wrapper
chipped and detached, with long tear). Some occasional coffee-stains to fore-margins of
a few leaves, occasional creases and frays, but generally good to very good.
A working copy of this preproduction script for the adaptation to the screen of London’s
early story, “The White Silence,” eventually released in 1939 under the title, Romance
of the Redwoods. This was the working copy of Lester Koenig, who contributed late to
the project with some additional scenes (present in typescript), is signed by him on the
upper wrapper, and has some loose leaves of manuscript notes laid in or inserted. The
film was directed by Charles Vidor, and seems to have left no considerable impression
on film history.                                                                   $225.

340. Loos, Anita: Autograph Letter, Signed. 109 East 55th St., NY. [ny but likely 1920s
- 1930s]. Two pages, on two sheets of octavo blue letterhead with deckle edges. Folded
for mailing, with tiny breaks at edges of folds, ink slightly oxidized against the blue paper,
otherwise very good.
To a Mr. Digges (just perhaps Dudley Digges, theatrical and film director and actor), in
response to some flowers: “It is the hardest thing in the world to thank some one for good
wishes about a play that goes wrong - and that is my only excuse for being a perfect
barbarian....” Signed in full. Ca. 100 words.                                        $150.

                             Formerly by F. Scott Fitzgerald
341. Loos, Anita [screenwriter]: “THE RED-HEADED WOMAN” BY KATHERINE BRUSH....
Culver City: Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, 25 January and 11 February 1932. Two volumes. 96
leaves and 117 leaves. Quarto. Mimeographed typescript, printed on rectos only. Bradbound
in stencil-printed wrappers, with studio labels and stamps. Typical chipping and short tears
along wrapper overlap edges, internally about fine.
Two different drafts of Anita Loos’s screen adaptation of Katharine Brush’s novel, both denoted
“vault copies,” the first incomplete and likely representative of Loos’s work until that date,
the second complete. While the opening leaves of the two scripts are similar (though typed
at different times), a collation of the two around the endpoint of the incomplete draft show
they differ considerably. Jean Harlow played the lead in this scandalous pre-Code film involving
inter-office seduction, divorce, adultery, attempted murder and ambition, directed by Jack
Conway. The film was of particular importance as F. Scott Fitzgerald’s first assignment
during his second stay in Hollywood, in November-December 1931. He was offered $1,200
a week to rewrite an already extant script, in collaboration with Marcel de Sano, but after
five week’s work, their script was rejected as “too somber.” It is unclear, unfortunately,
from the present scripts if any of Fitzgerald’s work remains, or if Loos started from scratch.
Given the nature of the process, it is quite possible that Loos took over some of Fitzgerald
and de Sano’s script and then undertook her own revisions, but only comparison to a copy
of the rejected Fitzgerald/de Sano script would be sufficient to determine what, if any, material
carried over.
BRUCCOLI 6.4.                                                                            $2250.

342. [Loos, Anita]: Lederer, Charles [screenwriter]: “GENTLEMEN PREFER BLONDES”
SCREENPLAY BY.... [Los Angeles: 20th Century-Fox], 19 August 1952. [1],140 leaves.
Quarto. Mimeographed typescript, printed on rectos only of yellow stock. Bradbound in
stenciled wrappers. Production stamps on upper wrapper, wrappers a bit used at overlap
edges, with snag-tear to spine, internally about fine.
Denoted a “Writer’s Working Script.” An unspecified but pre-production script of Lederer’s
adaptation to the screen of the 1949 Broadway musical adaptation (by Joseph Fields) of
Anita Loos’s novel. The film was directed by Howard Hawks, and starred Marilyn Monroe
and Jane Russell. It was released in July of 1953, and Lederer’s script was nominated for
an award from the WGA. Of special note as one of Monroe’s most important early roles,
and of added significance because the 1928 adaptation by John Emerson is, as of current
references, a lost film.                                                        $1250.

343. Loos, Anita, and John Emerson [screenwriters]: “EADIE WAS A LADY” [a.k.a. GIRL
FROM MISSOURI] [wrapper title]. Culver City: Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, 20 March 1934. 121
leaves. Quarto. Mimeographed typescript, on rectos only. Bradbound in mimeographed wrapper
with studio label and stamps. A few soft creases and smudges to wrapper, otherwise a
very good or better copy.
An unspecified, but evidently close to production draft of this original screenplay by Loos
and Emerson, denoted by stamps on the upper wrapper as an MGM File/Vault Copy. The
upper wrapper notes in type the “Script okayed by Mr. Hyman” (Bernard Hyman, the producer),
and in pencil “Complete with all changes.” The working title is amended to the release title
on the upper wrapper in a slightly later hand. The 1934 film was directed by Jack Conway,
and starred Jean Harlow, Lionel Barrymore and Franchot Tone. The released film had a
running time of 75 minutes (later cut to 70 minutes); the length of the present draft (121
leaves) suggests some of the material in this draft did not make it to the screen. $950.

344. Loos, Anita, and John Emerson [screenwriters]: KISS IN THE SUN. [Los Angeles?].
19 January 1938. [1],159 leaves. Quarto. Carbon typescript, on onionskin, bradbound in
stiff wrappers with typed caption. Near fine.
An unspecified, but quite early and interesting draft of this screenplay by Loos and her
troublesome husband — by this point in their deteriorating relationship, his name appeared
as collaborator on a number of projects that were chiefly her work. Although not noted on
the draft, this is an adaptation of a story by Leo McCarey and Frank R. Adams, and was
ultimately filmed under the title The Cowboy and the Lady, and released in November
1938. However, it is very interesting to note that not only was the final screenplay credited
entirely to S.N. Behrman and Sonya Levien, but that an unusually large number of other
writers served, like Loos, as uncredited contributing writers, including Gene Flower, Lillian
Hellman, Dorothy Parker, Alan Campbell, et al. Whether they composed independent drafts
such as the one in hand, or served as script doctors, is not clear, but it is evident that
the Samuel Goldwyn Company had a tough time getting a script together. The film, directed
by H.C. Potter, starred Gary Cooper, Marie Oberon, Walter Brennan, et al. The film earned
an Academy Award for best sound, and two nominations for music. Unpublished and
unproduced in this form.                                                              $1250.

345. Lowell, James R.: Autograph Letter, Signed. Elmwood [Cambridge, MA]. 20 July
1871. One page, on folded quarto lettersheet. Old mounting residue at top edge of verso
of blank conjugate, clean split at toe of fold, otherwise very good.
To an unidentified “My Dear Sir,” noting “it is one of the unhappy incidents of a professorship
that the incumbent must sit every year for his photograph, & I waited in hope that this
year’s unlikeness might be less than that of its predecessors. But the sun has a spite
against florid men....” Signed in full. Ca. 65 words.                                    $400.

346. Lowell, Robert: LORD WEARY’S CASTLE. New York: Harcourt, [1946]. Cloth. First
edition of the poet’s second book. A very good or better copy in lightly edgeworn dust jacket
with faint dust marking to white edges and a couple of creased, closed edge tears. $200.

347. Lowell, Robert: PROMETHEUS BOUND ... DERIVED FROM AESCHYLUS. London:
Faber, [1970]. Gilt cloth. About fine in near fine dust jacket with a trace of soiling to lower
panel
First British edition. Inscribed by the author: “For Elizabeth Jennings with affection from
Robert Lowell.” Accompanied by a copy of the programme for the production at the Mermaid
Theatre, June 1971.                                                                   $375.
348. [Machine Art]: Hultén, K. G. Pontus: THE MACHINE AS SEEN AT THE END OF THE
MECHANICAL AGE. New York: MOMA, [1968]. Small quarto. Publisher’s embossed metal
binding, printed in colors. Illustrations and photographs throughout. Unprinted back panel
a bit rubbed and scratched, spine a bit flecked, upper panel bright and fresh, internally
about fine.
First edition. The heavily annotated catalogue for this exceptional exhibition, notable as
well for the out-of-the-ordinary binding.                                             $85.

349. MacKay, Charles [ed]: THE HOME AFFECTIONS PORTRAYED BY THE POETS. London:
George Routledge, 1858. xv,[1],391,[1]pp. Small quarto. Full dark brown morocco, elaborately
gilt extra, a.e.g., by Hayday. Frontis and illustrations. Tips a bit rubbed and slightly bumped,
rear endsheet shows a faint discoloration, otherwise a very good copy.
First edition. A highly characteristic anthology, featuring engravings by the Brothers Dalziel
after the work of a number of artists, including themselves, Tenniel, Millais, Pasquier, et
al. The texts are selected from the works of poets on both sides of the Atlantic. This work
“contains two of Millais’s masterpieces, ‘There’s Nae Luck about the House’ and ‘The Border
Widow’; and the fact that the latter was by some oversight omitted from his Collected
Illustrations makes the book particularly desirable” - Reid (p.67).
REID, pp. 67 & 275.                                                                     $225.

350. MacLane, Mary: MY FRIEND ANNABEL LEE. Chicago: Herbert S. Stone and Co. 1903.
Maroon cloth, stamped in white, t.e.g., others untrimmed. Portrait. Small surface snag
at top edge of lower board, otherwise a fine copy.
First edition. The not quite so successful follow-up to the Montana-born author’s 1902 succès
de scandale, The Story of Mary MacLane.
KRAMER 301. SMITH M-293.                                                                 $75.

351. [Mailer, Norman]: Van Vechten, Carl: Original Portrait Photograph of Norman Mailer.
[New York]. [13 September 1948]. Original borderless gelatin silver print, 25.3 x 17 cm
(9 7/8 x 6 2/4 inches). Matted. Old mat mounting tape on verso, else near fine.
A striking and characteristic portrait by Van Vechten of the American novelist, seated,
left-profile, dating from the year of his breakthrough success with The Naked and the
Dead. With Van Vechten’s studio stamp on the verso, his blindstamp in the corner, and
with his assistant’s manuscript subject identification, negative number and date in ink.
The date is carelessly written as ‘1940.’ None of Van Vechten’s portraits of Mailer are
included in Portraits (1978), but a different image from the same sitting is present in the
LC Van Vechten Portrait archive.
KELLNER G827.                                                                      $1350.

352. Mailer, Norman: OF A SMALL AND MODEST MALIGNANCY, WICKED AND BRIST-
LING WITH DOTS. Northridge: Lord John Press, 1980. Publisher’s gilt leatherette. First
edition, deluxe issue. One of one hundred numbered copies (of 400) specially bound and
signed by the author. Fine in rubbed and dust-marked publisher’s cloth slipcase. $175.

353. Mailer, Norman: ANCIENT EVENINGS. Boston: Little, Brown and Company, [1983].
Large octavo. Tan buckram, stamped in gilt, patterned endpapers, silk ribbon marker. First
edition, limited issue. One of three hundred fifty numbered copies, specially bound, and
signed by the author. Fine in publisher’s slipcase.                                 $250.

354. Mailer, Norman: TOUGH GUYS DON’T DANCE. New York: Random House, [1984].
Gilt cloth. Fine in slipcase with some irregular sunning to one panel.
First trade edition, limited issue. One of three hundred and fifty numbered copies specially
bound, and signed by the author. Mailer wrote the script for, as well as directed, the 1987
film adaptation.                                                                      $125.

355. Mamet, David [screenwriter] WE’RE NO ANGELS. Los Angeles: Paramount Pictures
Corp., November, 1988. [2],119 leaves. Quarto. Mechanically reproduced typescript, on
rectos only of goldenrod stock. Bradbound in plain stiff wrappers. Abbreviated casting list
in ink on title-leaf, otherwise very good or better.
Denoted a copy of the first draft of December 1987, but clearly later, incorporating dated
revises as late as 9 November 1988. Mamet’s own adaptation of Albert Husson’s play, itself
the basis for a previous adaptation in 1955. The December 1989 release, directed by Neil
Jordan, starred Robert DeNiro, Sean Penn, Demi Moore, Hoyt Axton, et al.             $250.

356. [March, William]: Kobritz, Richard [screenwriter]: THE BAD SEED ... BASED ON:
THE PLAY BY MAXWELL ANDERSON THE SCREENPLAY BY JOHN LEE MAHIN THE
NOVEL BY WILLIAM MAXWELL. Burbank: Warner Bros. Television, 1982. [1],120 leaves.
Quarto. Mimeographed typescript, printed on rectos only. Bradbound in decorated studio
wrappers. Title lettered across lower edge, a few stray marks and corner creases to wrappers,
very good.
A final shooting script for an evidently unproduced television adaptation of March’s classic
horror drama, via the intermediary adaptations by Anderson and Mahin. A later, 1985 adaptation
did appear on television, but it was scripted by George Eckstein. Kobritz had earlier adapted
King’s Salem’s Lot to the small screen.                                                 $150.

357. [Martin, Frank]: Balston, Thomas [ed]: THE HOUSEKEEPING BOOK OF SUSANNA
WHATMAN 1776 - 1800. London: Geoffrey Bles, [1956]. Ivory boards, stamped in gilt and
blue. Portraits. Illustrated with wood engravings by Frank Martin. Slight darkening at edges,
otherwise about fine in glassine jacket.
First trade edition, preceded by a 1952 printing as a Cambridge Christmas Book. This copy
is signed by the editor, and laid in are separate impressions of the six woodcuts (11.4
x 14.5 cm) by Frank Martin, each signed and titled by the artist in the margin. $200.

358. Masefield, John: BALLADS. London: Elkin Mathews, 1903. 12mo. Printed wrappers.
First edition of the poet’s second book. One of 762 copies printed. Typical sunning and
light use to wrappers, scattered foxing, but a very good copy.
SIMMONS 2.                                                                         $75.

359. Matheson, Richard [screenwriter]: TIME KILLER. [Np]: ABC Circle Entertainment,
24 May 1972. [1],99 leaves. Quarto. Mechanically reproduced typescript, printed on rectos
only, bradbound in printed studio wrappers. Dated receipt stamp on upper wrapper, ink
name and relevant annotations (see below), 3.5 x 5 cm piece clipped from fore-edge of
upper wrapper, else very good or better.
Denoted a “first draft” of this original screen/teleplay by Matheson, intended as an ABC
“Movie of the Week.” It was finally released in 1973 under the title, The Night Strangler,
as the sequel to the 1972 film, The Night Stalker, also scripted by Matheson. Both served
as the springboard for the less effective, but still highly popular series, The Night Stalker,
wherein Darren McGavin reprised his role that debuted in the two films: Carl Kolchak. This
copy of this script was used for casting purposes, and has relevant annotations in the text,
and some notes, and a few squiggles, on the title leaf. Matheson’s talents as fiction, screen
and television writer have earned him considerable respect from his contemporaries and
succeeding generations of writers, and his original scripts are uncommon.               $450.
360. [Maugham, W. Somerset]: Set of Nine Pictorial Lobby Cards for ‘JACK STRAW.’
[Los Angeles]: Famous Players - Lasky Corp. / Paramount Artcraft, 1920. Nine original
11 x 14 sepia-toned pictorial lobby cards. Some modest soiling and discoloration to a few
extreme edges of margins, thumb-tack holes in margins from original use, but an unusually
nice lot.




A very uncommon set of lobby cards, including the title card, for this adaptation to the
screen of Maugham’s 1908 play (published 1911/12). The adaptation/scenario was written
by Olga Printzlau and Elmer Harris, and the film directed by William DeMille. It starred
Robert Warwick, Carroll McComas and Charles Ogle, and was, it would appear, the fifth
known adaptation of a Maugham property to the screen. While it would be difficult to assert
with any certainty that this film is “lost” in the proper use of the term, it is quite likely
inaccessible, making pictorial records such as that present here of significant import. $750.

361. [Maugham, W. Somerset]: Meehan, John; Salka Viertel, and Edith Fitzgerald
[screenwriters]: THE PAINTED VEIL...DIALOGUE CONTINUITY... [(sic) wrapper title]. Culver
City: Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios, 8 November 1933. 127 leaves. Quarto. Mimeographed
typescript, printed on rectos only. Bradbound in mimeographed studio wrappers, with paper
label. A few short, creased tears at edge of upper wrapper near brads, corner from filing
label torn away, otherwise an unusually nice copy.
Labeled a “Dialogue Continuity” script (denoted a “Complete” “Vault Copy” via rubberstamps
on upper wrapper), but in fact, an actual shooting script of this adaptation of Maugham’s
1925 novel. The 1934 release, directed by Richard Boleslawski, starred Greta Garbo, Jean
Hersholt, Herbert Marshall, et al. Although Viertel and Fitzgerald were given collaborative
screen credit for the adaptation, this script acknowledges only Meehan, and the date above
is assigned in the denotation that the script had been okayed by Hunt Stomberg, the producer,
on that date.                                                                          $600.

362. [Maugham, W. Somerset]: Hogan, Michael [screenwriter]: THE HOUR BEFORE DAWN.
[Los Angeles]: Paramount Pictures, 29 April - 21 June 1943. [125] leaves, numbered in
various sequences. Quarto. Bradbound mimeographed typescript, printed on rectos only
of an array of different colored papers marking revisions. Title leaf detached from brads,
cast notes in later hand on title leaf, studio “file copy” stamp on title, else very good.
A very heavily revised working draft of this adaptation to the screen of Maugham’s 1942
wartime espionage thriller. Dated color revises spanning the period above make up the majority
of the text. The 1944 film starred Franchot Tone and Veronica Lake, directed by Frank
Tuttle. Lesser Samuels is given co-credit for the adaptation in IMDB, but this draft is identified
as Hogan’s work alone.                                                                     $375.
363. [Mayfield, Julian]: Van Vechten, Carl: Original Portrait Photograph of Julian Mayfield.
[New York]. [6 March 1959]. Original borderless gelatin silver print, 25.3 x 19 cm (10 x
7.5 inches). Matted. Old mat mounting tape on verso, minor creases to a couple corners,
else near fine.
A striking and characteristic portrait by Van Vechten of African American writer, dramatist
and activist Julian Mayfield (1928-1985), seated, full face, dating from the years immediately
following his first literary and dramatic successes. With Van Vechten’s studio stamp on
the verso, his blindstamp in the corner, and with his manuscript subject identification, negative
number and date in ink. A print of this image is in the Library of Congress Van Vechten
Portrait Collection.
KELLNER G866.                                                                              $750.

364. McClure, Michael: LION FIGHT. New York: Pierrepont Press, 1969. Small deck of
poetry cards with two words printed on each card, enclosed in small cloth pouch and the
publisher’s fragile plastic case with pictorial label, all unusually fine.
First edition of this shuffle-poem. One of four hors commerce copies, in addition to 326
numbered or lettered copies, all signed by the author.                              $75.

365. [McCoy, Horace]: Duff, Warren [screenwriter]: THIS IS DYNAMITE. [Los Angeles]:
Paramount Studios, 21 August 1951. [2],142 leaves. Quarto. Bradbound mimeographed
typescript, printed on rectos only. First and second title leaves a bit dust spotted at edges,
and creased and chipped at the brads, internally very good.
Denoted a “Final White Script” of this adaption by Duff from a story (i.e. treatment) by
Horace McCoy. The finished film was released in November 1952, titled The Turning
Point, starring William Holden, Edmond O’Brien and Amanda Smith, under the direction
of William Dieterle. It is of particular note that McCoy’s treatment was eventually published,
four years after his death, as the 1959 paperback original, Corruption City.            $500.

366. McMurtry, Larry: “HORSEMAN, PASS BY,” contained in THE RICE MILL. Houston:
Published by the Students of the Rice Institute, 1958. I:1. Quarto. Pictorial wrappers.
Illustrations. Upper wrapper a bit foxed at edges, but very good.
An appearance by McMurtry early in his career as a graduate student, substantial excerpts
from his “recently completed novel which Mr. McMurtry is now in the process of revising.”$75.

367. McMurtry, Larry: “NOTES ON VASSAR MILLER” and ‘THE BEAT ACADEMY,” in
JANUS. Houston: Published by the Students of the Rice Institute, March 1960. Quarto.
Pictorial wrappers. Illustrations. A few patches of rubbing to upper wrapper, but a very good
copy.
Two appearances by McMurtry late in his career as a graduate student, in the distinguished
company of Grover Lewis, Vassar Miller and William Corrington, et al.                 $60.

368. McMurtry, Larry: THE LAST PICTURE SHOW. New York: Dial Press, 1966. Cloth.
First edition of the author’s third novel, source for the multiple award-winning and nominated
1971 film adaptation, based on McMurtry’s collaborative screenplay with director Bogdanovich.
Fine in dust jacket with trivial use at tips. No longer common in this condition. $750.

369. McMurtry, Larry, et al [contributors]: THE RED NECK REVIEW NO. 1. Houston: The
Bookman, Spring 1968. Printed wrappers. Pencil ownership signature, otherwise fine.
Edited by Max Crawford and Michael Evans. With contributions from McMurtry (a long excerpt
from Moving On, then under its working title The Country of the Horn), Greg Curtis, Grover
Lewis, the editors, et al.                                                            $75.
370. McMurtry, Larry: IT’S ALWAYS WE RAMBLED AN ESSAY ON RODEO. New York:
Frank Hallman, 1974. Printed boards. First edition. One of three hundred numbered copies,
signed by the author. Shallow old bruise at lower edge of upper board, hence a very good
copy, otherwise fine.                                                              $550.

371. McMurtry, Larry: LONESOME DOVE. New York: Simon & Schuster, [1985]. Large
thick octavo. Cloth and boards. First edition, first printing, with ‘none’ for ‘done’ at 621:16.
The Pulitzer Prize-winning novel of its year. Top edge faintly dusty, read carefully once
(perhaps), otherwise about fine in dust jacket.                                           $400.

372. Mebane, Mary: MARY. New York: Viking Press, [1981]. Cloth and boards. Light signs
of having been read more than once, otherwise a very good or better copy in dust jacket.
First edition of the African American author’s first book, an autobiographical account of
life in North Carolina in the pre-WWII years. Inscribed and signed by her on the occasion
of publication. Laid in are two a.ls.s. from an academic colleague of the author to the recipient
of the inscription, commenting on the book after having borrowed it, giving an account of
his providing a copy for one of the dedicatees to read shortly before his death, and summarizing
the dedicatee’s response.                                                                   $55.

373. [Melville, Herman]: Coxe, Louis O., and Robert Chapman: BILLY BUDD A PLAY IN
THREE ACTS BASED ON THE NOVEL BY HERMAN MELVILLE. Princeton: Princeton
University Press, 1951. Original pictorial wrappers, bound up in contemporary gilt cloth.
Foreword by Brooks Atkinson. Early ink ownership signature on binder’s endsheet, slight
tanning, but a very good copy.
First edition in book form of this adaptation, here present as a round-robin including the
signature of Robert Chapman, along-side twenty-five others, the large majority of whom
are readily identifiable as opening cast members in the Broadway production (10 Feb. -
12 May 1951) at the Biltmore Theatre, New York. Among those signing are Lee Marvin
(cast as Hallam) and Charles Nolte (cast as Billy Budd).                            $400.
                                        Second Book
374. [Mérimée, Prosper]: LA GUZLA, OU CHOIX DE POÉSIES ILLYRIQUES, RECUEILLIES
DANS LA DALMATIE, LA BOSNIE, LA CROATIE ET L’HERZÉGOWINE. Paris: Chez F.G.
Levrault...; et...à Strasbourg, 1827. xii,257pp. Small octavo. Original printed publisher’s
pale blue boards. Lithographed frontis portrait of Hyacinthe Maglanovitch. Boards faintly
soiled, small chip at crown of spine, inner hinges cracking, but sound, scattered foxing,
but a very good copy in original state.
First edition of Mérimée’s anonymously published second original book, presented as being
translations from the Illyrian of non-existent poet, Hyacinthe Maglanovich. The conceit
is said to have taken in Sir John Bowring, as well as Pushkin. A scarce book in this original
condition.
CARTERET II:136. VICAIRE V:705. TALVART & PLACE (MÉRIMÉE) 3. ASSELINEAU,
pp.21-2.                                                                              $950.
                                       Balzac Imprint
375. [Mérimée, Prosper]: LA JAQUERIE, SCÈNES FÉODALES, SUIVIES DE LA FAMILLE
DE CARVAJAL, DRAME. Par L’Auteur du Théatre de Clara Gazul. Paris: [Imprimerie de
H. Balzac for] Brissot-Thivars, Libraire, 1828. [8],422,[1]pp. Octavo. 20th century three-
quarter fawn calf and marbled boards, raised bands, lettered in gilt, t.e.g., ribbon marker.
Early ink authorship attribution on title, light foxing, binding a bit rubbed, but a very good
copy.
First edition of Mérimée’s third original book, notable as well for being one of the principal
works of literary substance printed by H. Balzac’s firm. Unsold sheets from the first edition
also appeared later with a cancel title, and the imprint of Alexandre Mesnier, represented
as the “Deuxiéme édition.”
CARTERET II: 137-8. TALVART & PLACE (MÉRIMÉE) 4a. VICAIRE V:705-6.                     $850.

376. Merrill, James [foreword to]: LE SORELLE BRONTË OPERA IN QUATTRI ATTI. By
Bernard de Zogheb. New York: Tibor de Nagy Editions, 1963. Oblong octavo. Printed wrappers.
Frontispiece. Wrappers a bit sunned and smudged, internally fine.
First edition. One of three hundred copies (the entire edition). This copy only has one
ink correction in the text; presentation copies from Merrill we have handled have had an
average of six. In the tribute to Bernard de Zogheb printed in Al-Ahram Weekly (#44, Aug/
Sept 1999), Hala Halim notes: “...beyond his work as an artist, it is arguably Bernard’s
comic operettas that are his most outstanding achievement. Set to popular tunes, the libretti
are written in Bernard’s ‘kitchen Italian,’ with much tongue-in-cheek ventriloquism of the
mannerisms and verbal macaronics typical of Mediterranean cities, particularly Alexandria
... Originally written for the consumption of his circle of friends, Bernard’s operettas caught
the attention of the late American poet James Merrill. It was thanks to Merrill that the Little
Players, a puppet theatre company in New York, had two of them performed in the late
’60s and early ’70s.” One of the less common of the Tibor de Nagy imprints.               $450.

377. Merrill, James: YANNINA. New York: Phoenix Book Shop, 1973. Decorated wrapper
over stiff wrappers, paper label. First edition. One of 26 lettered copies, from a total edition
of 126 copies signed by the author. Fine. #17 of the Oblong Octavo series.                $350.

378. Merrill, James: YANNINA. New York: Phoenix Book Shop, 1973. Decorated wrapper
over stiff wrappers, paper label. First edition. One of one hundred numbered copies, from
a total edition of 126 copies signed by the author. Fine. #17 of the Oblong Octavo series.
                                                                                   $275.

379. Merrill, James: THE IMAGE MAKER A PLAY IN ONE ACT. [New York]: Sea Cliff
Press, [1986]. Cloth, pictorial onlay on upper board. First edition. One of two hundred and
twenty numbered copies, signed by the author. Fine, without printed dust jacket, as issued.
                                                                                      $200.

380. [Merrill, James]: HELLEN’S BOOK. New York: [Privately Printed], 1991. Cloth and
boards. Portrait and photographs. Fine, without dust jacket, as issued.
First edition. A privately printed tribute to Hellen Merrill, edited by Mark Magowan, Robin
Magowan and Doris Merrill Magowan. Includes James Merrill’s poem, “Upon a Second
Marriage.”                                                                            $200.

381. [Merrill, James]: Magowan, Robin, and Mark Magowan: [ed]: JM A REMEMBRANCE.
New York: Academy of American Poets, [1996]. Cloth and boards. Portrait and photographs.
Portion of one paragraph printed a trifle faintly, else about fine, without dust jacket, as
issued.
First edition of this memorial festschrift, issued in an edition of one thousand copies on
the occasion of what would have been the poet’s 70th birthday. With contributions by family,
friends and colleagues.                                                                $75.

382. Merrill, James, and David Jackson: DAVID JACKSON: SCENES FROM HIS LIFE.
[New York]: Nadja, 1994. Small folio. Folded sheets, laid into cloth portfolio and pictorial
label and printed internal folder. Plates. A couple smudges to folder lining paper, small
rub mark to upper panel of portfolio, otherwise fine.
First edition. One of one hundred copies printed on Arches, for private distribution in
commemoration of Jackson’s 72nd birthday. With the printed gift card laid in, personalized
in manuscript by Jackson.                                                          $1000.

383. Middleton, Christopher, and Leticia Garza-Falcón [trans]: ANDALUSIAN POEMS
TRANSLATED ... FROM SPANISH VERSIONS OF THE ORIGINAL ARABIC. Austin: W.
Thomas Taylor, [1992]. Narrow small quarto. Open sewn handmade paper wrappers, with
Japanese handmade paper endsheets. A fine copy.
First edition, preceding the trade edition published by David Godine. One of one hundred
copies designed and printed by Neil Furqueron and Tom Taylor on Arches, in Poliphilus
and Blado types.                                                                    $95.

384. Millard, Christopher: FIVE LETTERS AND A CATALOGUE. London: Victim Press,
[1983]. Small quarto. Tape-backed printed wrappers. Facsimiles. Three small spots in corner
of upper wrapper, otherwise a very good or better copy.
First edition. Introduction by Timothy d’Arch Smith. Five letters from prison by the Wilde
bibliographer / bookseller, as well as the relevant pages of his catalogue 14 offering Corvo’s
notorious letters from Venice. One of 158 numbered copies.                               $35.

385. Miller, Arthur: A MEMORY OF TWO MONDAYS. New York: Kermit Bloomgarden, [ca.
1955]. [3],71 leaves, expanded considerably by lettered, revised inserts, pasteovers, canceled
leaves and similar variations. Quarto. Mimeographed, original and carbon typescript, clamp-
bound into stiff binder lettered in manuscript. Binder worn at edges, overall use associated
with purpose, but generally very good.
The assistant stage-manager’s copy of a heavily revised working script associated with
the Broadway premiere performance of Miller’s one-act play at the Coronet Theatre, on
a double bill with the one-act version of A View from the Bridge. This copy bears Miller’s
signed presentation inscription: “For Bob Carrington - Thanks - Arthur Miller Sept. 29,
1955 - 6:45 p.m.” (the date corresponds to the opening performance). This script is heavily
worked over with revisions, insertions, pasteovers, deletions, stage directions and annotations
of a similar nature, and clearly presents a form of the play which was the result of much
on-going revision up to the final hours. A leaf inserted in front directs that someone should
“disregard all words and lines in colored pencils when typing,” suggesting that this copy
was utilized for production of a subsequent draft of the script. This production was directed
by Martin Ritt, and the cast included Van Heflin, J. Carrol Nash, Jack Warden, Eileen Heckart
and Richard Davalos.                                                                   $2500.
386. [Miller, Arthur]: Jacobs, Alexander [screenwriter]: HENRIK IBSEN’S AN ENEMY OF
THE PEOPLE A SCREENPLAY BY ... FROM THE STAGE ADAPTATION BY ARTHUR
MILLER .... Los Angeles: Solar Productions, July and August 1976. Two volumes. [3],117
leaves and [1],116 leaves. Quarto. Mimeographed typescript, printed on rectos only. Bradbound
in gilt lettered wrappers. Ink name on upper wrapper of second volume, with a few scattered
relevant annotations; very good.
Two drafts of this adaptation of Miller’s 1951 play to the screen, the first denoted a “rehearsal
draft” (and incorporating a significant number of dated revises on colored stock), the second
denoted the “final” draft. Both drafts substantially predate the 17 March 1978 release,
which was directed by George Schaefer and starred Steve McQueen, Bibi Anderson, Charles
Durning, et al. According to IMDB: “This was a personal project for McQueen, as he made
it to prove to many people that he could act. But Warner Bros. could not figure out how
to distribute it and decided not to release it domestically. It had a very brief theatrical release
in New York a few years after it was made. It was hard for McQueen once he found the
book to convince his partners at First Artists to make the film, he agreed to take a union
scale fee and promised to keep the budget under 3 million.”                                  $450.

387. Miller, Henry: MONEY AND HOW IT GETS THAT WAY. Paris: Booster Publications,
[1938]. Printed wrappers. Inevitable slight tanning toward edges of text-block, otherwise
an uncharacteristically near fine copy.
First edition. One of ca. 495 copies printed. Though this is among the very best preserved
of the many copies of this fragile book we’ve had over the years, it is nonetheless one
of the handful we recall handling without a presentation inscription and/or the characteristic
copyright statement in Miller’s hand.                                                  $400.

388. Miller, Joaquin: Autograph Manuscript Poem, Signed. N.p. 27 July 1881. One page,
on quarto lettersheet, in ink. Old creases from being mailed, otherwise about fine.
Seventeen lines from “The Sea King’s Bride,” in variant order from the published version
reprinted in The Danites (1878), with one correction. Signed in full, and dated as above.
                                                                                   $400.

389. [Miniature Book]: Merriam, Robert L.: LUCY TERRY PRINCE Conway, MA: [Privately
Printed], 1983. Miniature book (7.5 x 5.5 cm). Cloth, paper label. Silhouette portrait and
illustrations. Fine.
First edition. Illustrations by Melinda Merriam. One of 350 numbered copies, signed by
the binder, Linda Lembke. Prince was an important spokesperson for African Americans
in 18th century Deerfield, best known for her poem on the Deerfield Indian Massacre of
1746, which is reprinted in the context of this essay on her life.                $65.

390. [Miniature Book]: Yarnell, Jim: SPECIMENS FROM RAGS TO RUSHES...12 HAND-
MADE PAPERS AND HOW THEY CAME TO BE. Wichita, KS: The Oak Park Press, 1983.
Miniature (6.7 x 4.8 cm). Full gilt publisher’s leatherette. Color illustrations. One of two
hundred numbered copies printed on various papers handmade at the Press’s mill, and
signed by the author/printer/binder. Fine.                                              $75.

391. [Monograms]: Koch, Alexander [pub]: 600 MONOGRAMME UND ZEICHEN VORBILDER
FÜR KÜNSTLER, KUNSTGEWERBLER UND KUNSTFREUNDE FÜR INDUSTRIE UND
HANDEL. Darmstadt: Verlagsanstalt Alexander Koch, [1920]. [8]pp. plus 48 plates (the
last printed recto and verso). Small folio. Cream cloth, stamped in orange. Small old mended
nick at lower edge of one leaf, a few minor marks to cloth, otherwise a very good copy.
First edition. A handsome catalogue of monogram designs made for a variety of purposes,
with the majority of the artists for the designs identified.                     $125.
392. Moore, George: CELIBATES. London: Walter Scott, 1895. Red cloth stamped in gilt,
t.e.g. Small red splashmark near toe of spine, else very good.
First edition. With Moore’s post-publication presentation inscription on the title-page: “To
Evelyn Marshall Field with hope that she will tell her baby about her friend George Moore
April 6th 1923.”
GILCHER A21a.                                                                         $175.

393. Moore, Marianne: POEMS. London: The Egoist Press, 1921. Decorated paper over
stiff wrappers, printed paper label. Bookplate, neat ownership inscription on front endsheet,
hairline split in paper wrapper spine, but otherwise a very good copy.
First edition of the poet’s first collection, brought together and sent to the press by Bryher,
H.D., and Robert McAlmon from the poems’ earlier appearances in The Egoist, The Dial,
Others and Contact.
ABBOTT A1.                                                                               $600.

394. Moore, Marianne: THE PANGOLIN AND OTHER VERSE. [London]: The Brendin Publishing
Company, 1936. Decorated boards, paper label. Trace of darkening and light foxing to boards,
tiny bump at upper edge and nicks to corners, but a very good, internally fine copy.
First edition. Illustrated with drawings by George Plank. One of only 120 copies printed
at the Curwen Press (the entire edition). By virtue of the limitation, an uncommon book.
ABBOTT A5.                                                                         $900.

395. [Moore, Marianne]: Van Vechten, Carl: Original Portrait Photograph of Marianne
Moore. [New York]. [1 November 1948]. Original borderless gelatin silver print, 17.5 x 12
cm (7 x 4.75 inches). Matted. Pencil note for reproduction on verso, else near fine.
A charming portrait by Van Vechten of the American poet, three-quarter length, standing
against a wall of books, in characteristic dress, with hands clasped. With Van Vechten’s
studio stamp on the verso, his blindstamp in the corner, and manuscript subject identification,
negative number and date in ink in his hand on the verso. This image was included in Portraits
(1978), and is the sole image of Moore in the Library of Congress Van Vechten Portrait
archive.
KELLNER G914.                                                                          $1500.

396. [Moore, Marianne]: Kauffer, E. McKnight: DRAWINGS FOR THE BALLET AND THE
ORIGINAL ILLUSTRATIONS FOR EDGAR ALLEN POE ... [wrapper title]. New York: American
British Art Gallery, 18 October to 12 November 1949. [4]pp. folded leaflet. First edition.
Includes a three paragraph note on Kauffer by Moore. Old fold across middle, else very
good. The date on the upper panel appears to have been corrected in type from ‘1948’ to
‘1949’.
ABBOTT Cb281.                                                                       $50.

397. Moore, Marianne: OCCASIONEM COGNOSCE A POEM [wrapper title]. [Cambridge:
Laurence Scott / Lowell House Separatum, May 1963]. Folded folio sheet. About fine.
First edition. Copy #9 of eighteen “proof” copies (so designated in ms. on the colophon),
in addition to 175 numbered copies in wrappers.
ABBOTT A21.                                                                        $150.

398. [Moore, Marianne]: OMAGGIO A MARIANNE MOORE. Milan: All’Insegna del Pesce
d’Oro, [1964]. 12mo. Pictorial wrapper over stiff wrappers. Portrait. About fine.
First edition. One of one thousand numbered copies, printed at the Stamperia Valdonega.
Prints translations, by Mary de Rachewiltz, of poems and a letter to Pound by Moore, and
a poem by E.E. Cummings.                                                            $60.
399. Morand, Paul: MAGIE NOIRE. Paris: Bernard Grasset, 1928. Small, thick quarto. Double
printed wrappers. About fine in original glassine and publisher’s chemise and slipcase (the
latter a bit worn, with short splits at forecorners of two joints).
First edition, issue in quarto format. Published in the series “Les Cahiers Verts.” One of
35 numbered copies (of 43) printed on Annam de Rives, from a total issue in quarto format
of 312 copies, in addition to the various issues in octavo and 16mo. The novelist/diplomat’s
journals of his observations on the lives and culture of Blacks in the U.S., Africa and the
Antilles.                                                                              $450.

400. Morell, Jean Pit: DIE WOLKE DER MIßVERSTÄNDNISSE [series title]. [Braunschweig:
Galerie Schmucking, 1971]. [1] plus six plates. Folio (51 x 34 cm; plate size: 32 x 25
cm). Light offset from case to verso of last sheet, otherwise internally fine, enclosed in
defective board case.
A sequence of six original monochrome etchings by Morell, the edition limited to one hundred
numbered sets, and ten sets reserved for the artist. Each etching is signed and numbered
in pencil by Morell (1939 - ). The imagery is strong and occasionally erotic and fanciful.
Morell has been the subject of a number of one-artist shows, and recipient of numerous
grants and awards.                                                                     $450.

401. Morgan, Charles: THE GUNROOM. London: A. & C. Black, Ltd., 1919. Thick octavo.
Gilt blue pastepaper cloth. Spine sunned, a few short tears along top of front endsheet
due to adhesion at the time of binding, with the small bookplate of Herbert Boyce Satcher.
Very good and tight.
First edition of the author’s first novel, in the preferred binding (500 copies), though the
publisher denied any precedence. A candid account of conditions among midshipmen in
the Navy. It “was not officially suppressed, but was mysteriously withdrawn soon after
publication” - Kunitz & Haycraft.                                                     $150.

402. Nathan, Robert: PORTRAIT OF JENNIE. New York: Knopf, [1940]. Cloth. Spine very
slightly darkened, otherwise near fine in very good, spine-sunned dust jacket with some
dust marking at exposed flap edges and a small scrape to spine panel.
First edition, presentation issue, with the special imprint on the first blank indicating it
is a gift from Redbook Magazine, wherein the novel had been serialized in the Fall of
1939. The copyright statement has been amended in ink, as usual. Filmed in 1948, based
on a script by Leonardo Bercovici.                                                   $125.

403. Neilson, William: [Text in Greek]. GREEK IDIOMS, EXHIBITED IN SELECT PASSAGES,
FROM THE BEST AUTHORS; WITH ENGLISH NOTES AND A PARSING INDEX. TO WHICH
ARE ADDED, OBSERVATIONS ON SOME IDIOMS OF THE GREEK LANGUAGE. Dublin:
Graisberry and Campbell, 1810. [4],iv,90,[80],28pp. plus curious folding plate. Large octavo
(signed in 4s). Extracted from bound pamphlet volume, faint old stamps and blind stamp
of a defunct mercantile library, otherwise a very good, fresh, untrimmed copy.
First edition of this uncommon work by the distinguished scholar of Greek and Irish, author
of An Introduction to the Irish language (Dublin, 1808, Achill Island, 1843), and the Greek
Exercises in Syntax...[&c] (Dundalk, 1804, widely reprinted through an 8th edition in 1846).
The curious allegorical folding plate was engraved by his brother, J.A. Neilson. OCLC locates
four copies, to which NSTC adds another five.                                           $250.

404. Nesbit, Wilbur D.: LITTLE HENRY’S SLATE. Evanston: William S. Lord, 1903. Small
octavo. Pictorial stiff wrappers, open sewn at spine. Light soiling to wrappers, small chips
and tears at two spine corners, first two leaves neatly detached from thread, otherwise
a very good copy of a fragile book, in imperfect but largely complete pictorial box.
First edition of this very early work by the poet/journalist, inscribed and signed by him
in 1904. Accompanying this copy is a one page a.l.s. of presentation, 1226 Benson Ave,
no city, 7 March 1904, forwarding this copy to “Mr. [George W.] Cable,” apologizing for
the delay in sending it, and noting that “although the book doesn’t amount to anything...Please
accept it with my apologies and regards Sincerely W.D. Nesbit.” A collection of the author’s
pieces from his “Linotype or Two” column in the Chicago Tribune, presented in the form
of scrawls on a blackboard. A decent association copy. The box is presumably rather
uncommon.                                                                                $225.

405. [Nonesuch Press]: Rousseau, Jean Jacques: THE CONFESSIONS OF.... London:
The Nonesuch Press, 1938. Two volumes. Large octavo. Full natural tan morocco, t.e.g.,
gilt labels. Some normal darkening to spine and edges, otherwise about fine. Lacks slipcase.
One of eight hundred numbered sets printed on mouldmade paper, decorated with ornamental
head-pieces engraved by Reynolds Stone. Introduction by Havelock Ellis. Text revised by
A.S.B. Glover from the translation of 1783-90.
McKITTERICK, et al, 113.                                                          $350.

406. [Nordhoff, Charles, and James Norman Hall]: Jennings, Talbot, and Jules Furthman
[screenwriters]: MUTINY ON THE BOUNTY.... [Culver City]: Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, 12 October
1934. 209 leaves. Quarto. Mimeographed typescript, printed on rectos only, bradbound
in mimeographed wrappers. Denoted “Temporary Complete,” “Vault Copy,” and “File Copy”
on upper wrapper. Portion of MGM file label torn away, wrappers lightly smudged and sunned,
upper wrapper has corner creases and a short tear, but a very good copy.
An unspecified but clearly substantially pre-production draft of Jennings and Talbot’s adaptation,
the basis for the Oscar-winning 1935 Frank Lloyd film starring Charles Laughton, Clark
Gable, and a host of others. Upon its release, Carey Wilson was added to the scriptwriters’
credits but is not yet credited in this draft. Adding to that the substantial length of this
script, which would imply a running time far greater than the film’s release length of 132
minutes, and the implication is that this draft is still a good distance from the finished
film. It was an early credit for Jennings (whose later films include The Good Earth and
Northwest Passage) and a substantial addition to Furthman’s career, which began in 1915,
and included such major films as The Big Sleep, To Have and Have Not, Nightmare
Alley, and The Way of All Flesh.                                                          $1850.

407. Norman, Haskell F.: ONE HUNDRED BOOKS FAMOUS IN MEDICINE. New York: The
Grolier Club, 1995. xlii,390,[3]pp. plus plates (some in color). Quarto. Cloth, leather label.
As new, in cloth and paperboard slipcase. Prospectus laid in.
First edition. One of 1500 copies printed at the Stinehour Press. Design by Jerry Kelly.
The descriptive catalogue recording the Grolier Club exhibition of great medical books curated
by Haskell Norman, based in part on his own collection. A fine and substantial addition
to the tradition of the other influential Grolier One Hundred bibliographical works, including
those relating to science, and English and American literature.                         $250.

408. North, Sterling: PLOWING ON SUNDAY. New York: Macmillan, 1934. Gathered, rough
trimmed signatures, bound in the dust jacket panels of the published book. Slightly dusty,
with a few soft creases and heavier creasing at extreme upper outer corner of rear panel.
Uncommon in this format.
Advance reading copy of the first edition of the writer’s first solo book. The jacket features
a front panel illustration by Grant Wood.
HANNA 2667.                                                                             $125.

409. O’Connor, John: A PATTERN OF PEOPLE WRITTEN AND ENGRAVED BY .... London:
Hutchinson, [1959]. Quarto. Cloth. Illustrated with thirty-eight engravings by the author (18
full-page, with color). First edition. Near fine, with the ownership signature of book historian
Thomas Balston, in very good dust jacket with creasing along top edge.                     $75.

410. [O’Neill, Eugene]: Steichen, Edward: Formal Portrait Photograph of Eugene O’Neill.
[Np: The Photographer, ca. 1931 - 1934]. Original toned borderless gelatin silver print, on
heavy stock, 7 3/8 x 9 3/8". Matted. About fine.
A striking formal portrait, one of several Steichen took of the American playwright, captioned
on the verso by Carlotta O’Neill: “Steichen took this in 1931 on our return from France.”
The portrait photograph was published in the April 1934 issue of Vanity Fair. $4000.

411. [Officina Bodoni]: Publius Virgilius Maro: THE GEORGICS TRANSLATED INTO ENGLISH
VERSE BY JOHN DRYDEN. Verona: Printed for the Members of the Limited Editions Club
at the Officina Bodoni, 1952. Folio. Cloth and decorated boards. Fine in near fine slipcase.
One of 1500 numbered copies, illustrated with wood engravings by Bruno Bramanti, and
signed by him, and by Giovanni Mardersteig.                                   $150.

412. Osborne, John [screenwriter]: THE CHARGE OF THE LIGHT BRIGADE SCREENPLAY
BY.... London: Woodfall Films, 14 October 1965. [1],149,[1] leaves. Quarto. Mechanically
reproduced typescript, printed on rectos only, bradbound in script service binder with die-
cut window in upper wrapper. Title leaf a bit smudged and offset from upper wrapper, a
couple of ink notes on title, a couple of paperclip marks, light use, else very good.
An unspecified draft of this unproduced and evidently unpublished original screenplay by
the dramatist/screenwriter, from the papers of Colleen Dewhurst and George C. Scott (a
couple of pencil queries in the text appear to be in Scott’s hand). In addition to his adaptations
of his own plays (Look Back in Anger, Luther, and The Entertainer) to the screen, Osborne
was responsible for the screenplay for Tom Jones (1963). The 1968 film about the Light
Brigade was written by another hand.                                                        $600.

413. Otero, Blas de: TWENTY POEMS. [Madison]: The Sixties Press, 1964. Cloth. Portrait.
First edition, clothbound issue. Selected and translated by Hardie St. Martin. Near fine
in lightly edgeworn dust jacket.                                                   $50.

414. [Overbrook Press]: [Evans, Margaret B.]: THE PIED PRINTER’S PRIMROSE PATH
A TYPOGRAPHICAL NONSENSE BOOK. Stamford: The Overbrook Press, 1940. Gilt cloth.
Typographically illustrated in various colors. Slightly dusty at edges, else near fine in dust
jacket.
First edition. One of two hundred and fifty copies printed in handset Centaur and Lutetia
types on papier de chine. One of the AIGA Fifty for its year.
CAHOON, p.24.                                                                      $150.

415. [Pennsylvania Sporting Verse]: Everhart, James Bowen: THE FOX CHASE. Philadelphia:
Porter & Coates, 1874. Forest green cloth, with gilt pictorial vignette of a fox. Frontis and
plates. A very nice, bright copy.
First edition. Inscribed by the author: “Mr. Justice Sharswood with Mr. Everhart’s compliments,”
and with the bookplate and 1874 ownership signature of the recipient “Geo. Sharswood
April 1874.” George Sharswood was Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania
and the author served in the Pennsylvania State Senate beginning two years after this
publication.                                                                              $175.

416. Pepys, Samuel: MEMOIRS OF SAMUEL PEPYS, ESQ. F.R.S. SECRETARY TO THE
ADMIRALTY IN THE REIGN OF CHARLES II. AND JAMES II. COMPRISING HIS DIARY
FROM 1659 TO 1669.... London: Henry Colburn, 1825. Two volumes. xlii,498,xlix;311pp.
Large quarto. Handsome 19th century three-quarter dyed tan and green morocco, gilt raised
bands, gilt crimson labels, t.e.g. Frontispieces, portraits, folding map, facsimile, plates.
Some foxing to prelims, plates (and their neighbors) and two gatherings in the index, usual
offset from frontispieces to facing titles, a bit of rubbing to lower edges, neat early mend
to marginal tear in I:3B 2, otherwise a quite attractive set, bound with the half-titles.
First edition. Edited for publication by Richard, Lord Braybrooke, based on the famous
transcriptions from Pepys’s shorthand by Rev. John Smith, and including a selection from
Pepys’s correspondence. “It is a document of extraordinary interest, on account both of
the light that its sincere narrative throws on the author’s own lovable character, and of the
vivid picture that it gives of contemporary everyday life, of the administration of the navy,
and of the ways of the court” - OCEL.
NCBEL II:1583. GROLIER ENGLISH HUNDRED 75.                                            $4500.

417. Peterkin, Julia: GREEN THURSDAY. New York: Knopf, 1924. Cloth and batik paper
over boards, printed spine label. Mild shallow damp tidemark along top edges of endsheets,
slight darkening at top edges of side panels, otherwise a very good copy in somewhat faded
dust jacket with several chips at edges, slight damp discoloration along extreme edges
of rear panel, and chips at crown and toe of spine panel (as well as two small chips to
the interior of the spine panel).
First edition of the author’s first book, limited to 2000 numbered copies (1950 for sale —
an error on the back panel of the jacket indicates ‘1150’’ were for sale). The debut of Peterkin’s
sympathetic fictional chronicles of the lives of African Americans on South Carolina plantations.
Uncommon in dust jacket.
HANNA 2848.                                                                                $450.

418. Peterkin, Julia: SCARLET SISTER MARY. Indianapolis: Bobbs Merrill, [1928 (sic)].
Flexible black cloth, stamped in gilt. Pictorial endsheets. A nice, if not fine copy, in somewhat
chipped original plain wrapper.
The so-called “Airplane Edition,” printed on India paper, with a numbered leaf signed by
the author bound in. The author’s Pulitzer Prize-winning novel, repackaged in a novel fashion.
Although no limitation is indicated, we’ve not had/seen a copy numbered higher than 1000.
                                                                                        $300.

419. Peterkin, Julia: BRIGHT SKIN. Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill, [1932]. Large octavo. Gilt
red cloth, t.e.g. Crown of spine rubbed, small spot on upper board, otherwise a good copy
without slipcase.
First edition, limited issue. One of 250 numbered copies specially printed and bound, and
signed by the author. The thematic successor to the author’s Pulitzer Prize-winning Scarlet
Sister Mary.
HANNA 2847.                                                                          $300.

420. Peterkin, Julia: BRIGHT SKIN. Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill, [1932]. Black cloth, stamped
in gilt and red. Spine gilding dull, otherwise a very good copy, without dust jacket.
First edition, trade issue. Inscribed by the author on the front free endsheet: “For Betty
J. Curtis with a deep hope she will not forget me, Julia Peterkin Aug. 15, 1932.”
HANNA 2847.                                                                         $175.

421. Peterkin, Julia: BRIGHT SKIN. Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill, [1932]. Black cloth, stamped
in gilt and red. First edition, trade issue. Smudge to front free endsheet, a few stray marks
to cloth, otherwise a very good copy in lightly chipped and edgeworn dust jacket.
HANNA 2847.                                                                             $125.
422. Peterkin, Julia: ROLL, JORDAN, ROLL ... THE PHOTOGRAPHIC STUDIES BY DORIS
ULMANN. New York: Robert O. Ballou, [1933]. Large octavo. Blue cloth, lettered in gilt.
Frontis and plates reproduced in offset gravure after photographs. Trace of sunning along
extreme top and bottom edges, otherwise a fine, bright copy, with the vulnerable spine
stamping bright and fresh, in very good dust jacket with a few thin streaks of rubbing, a
small chip at the lower tip of the upper joint, and an old, externally mended creased tear
at the top corner of the rear panel.
First edition, first U.S. issue of the trade issue. Sheets from this printing were also exported
to Jonathan Cape for the British issue, and in later years (ca. 1935), additional sets of
sheets were bound up by Bobbs-Merrill with a cancel title-leaf and different binding. Ms.
Peterkin’s prose sketches of southern African Americans, accompanied by Ulmann’s
photographic portraits, add up to a memorable collaboration in documentation that has become
somewhat uncommon in this condition.                                                     $2750.
                                 Two Family Presentations
423. Petry, Ann: THE NARROWS. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1953. Cloth. Binding a trifle
handsoiled and rubbed at the edges, offsetting to endsheets, else very good in edgeworn,
modestly soiled dust jacket with some close tears and creases.
First edition of the African American author’s third novel, inscribed by her on the front endsheet:
“for Uncle Frank and Aunt Lou with all my love - Ann Petry Old Saybrook, Conn. August
- 14 - 1953.” A couple of related clippings are laid in. One of the recipients, “Uncle Frank,”
was later the dedicatee of Petry’s Tituba of Salem Village (1964).                           $450.

424. Petry, Ann: TITUBA OF SALEM VILLAGE. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell, [1964].
Cloth. Endsheets and edges a bit foxed, contemporary reviews (docketed in the author’s
hand) tipped to front endsheets, but a very good copy in edgeworn dust jacket with short
closed tear and edge-tanning.
First edition. Inscribed by the author: “For Aunt Louise with love from the author: Ann Petry
Oct. 18 - 1964.” The dedication of this title (to the husband of the inscription’s recipient)
reads: “To my uncle Frank B. Chisholm,” and in this copy Petry has corrected the middle
initial to read (we believe) ‘P’.                                                      $450.

425. Phillips, Jayne Anne: HOW MICKEY MADE IT. St. Paul, MN: Bookslinger, 1981. Large
octavo. Cloth and decorative paper over boards. Illustrated by Gaylord Schanilac. Fine.
First edition, deluxe issue. One of twenty-six lettered copies, specially bound, with an
additional paragraph omitted from the printed text written out in pencil and signed by the
author. There were also 150 ordinary signed copies, and one thousand copies in wrappers.
                                                                                    $375.

426. [Pickering, William]: Kelly, Jerry [comp]: A CHECKLIST OF BOOKS PUBLISHED
BY WILLIAM PICKERING 1820 – 1853 ... WITH ESSAYS BY JOSEPH BLUMENTHAL AND
ARTHUR WARREN. Pomona, NY: Kelly-Winterton Press, 2003. Gilt cloth and boards. Portrait.
Facsimiles and tipped-in leaves. New copy.
First edition. From an edition of three hundred copies, this is one of 180 copies specially
bound, with four original leaves from Pickering imprints tipped in. An excellent reference,
supplanting Keynes’s checklist (1924/69), augmented with Jerry Kelly’s own essay on “The
Earliest Revivals of Caslon Old-Face Types,” Warren’s “The Collaboration Between Charles
Whittingham & William Pickering,” and Blumenthal’s “William Pickering, Publisher: An
Appreciation.” Includes reproductions of sample title-pages and texts.                $125.

427. [Piper, John]: Betjeman, John, and Geoffrey Taylor [eds]: ENGLISH SCOTTISH &
WELSH LANDSCAPE 1700 - c.1860. London: Frederick Muller, [1944]. Pictorial cloth boards.
Illustrated with twelve original three-color lithographs by John Piper. First edition. Fine in
very good dust jacket with a few small nicks and shallow loss around crown of spine panel.
Issued in the series “New Excursions into English Poetry.”                              $150.

428. Plath, Sylvia: WINTER TREES. London: Faber and Faber, [1971]. Cloth. First edition
of this posthumously published collection, including the radio play, “Three Women,” an
a prefatory note by Ted Hughes, Top edge faintly dusty, otherwise about fine in dust jacket
with a couple faint rubs to front panel.                                             $125.

429. [Poe, Edgar A. (contributor)]: THE AMERICAN REVIEW: A WHIG JOURNAL OF
POLITICS, LITERATURE, ART, AND SCIENCE. VOL. I:1-6 [with: VOL. II:1-6]. [New York:
Wiley & Putnam], Jan. through December 1845. Two volumes. Large octavo. Contemporary
calf, gilt label. Two engraved portraits in each volume, indices for each volume bound in,
and issue titles/tables bound at front. Scattered foxing and occasional browning, faint old
tide-mark at lower fore-quadrant of text blocks, otherwise a good set, the bindings lightly
rubbed but well-preserved.
The first twelve numbers of Colton’s distinguished periodical, notable for the inclusion in
the second number of one of the two earliest publications of “The Raven,” along with three
other pieces by Poe (one a first appearance) in the April number of the first volume, and
four contributions to the second volume, all first appearances, including “The Facts of M.
Valdemar’s Case.” Though this was the first setting of “The Raven” in type, an authorized
reprinting in The Evening Mirror of 29 January is often said to have preceded the arrival
of this issue on the stands. However, that is not definite, as the custom of distributing
the issue for a designated month some days in anticipation of the arrival of that month
would increase the likelihood of the February issue having actually appeared prior to 29
January. Walt Whitman also appears in the final issue, with his “The Death of Wind-Foot.”
Though by no means rare, this is one of the more eagerly sought of 19th century American
public periodicals.
HEARTMAN AND CANNY, p.145-6.                                                        $3500.

430. Poe, Edgar Allan: THE RAVEN THE PIT AND THE PENDULUM. London: Leonard
Smithers & Co., 1899. Quarto. Crimson cloth, lettered in gilt, pictorial vignette stamped
in black. Portrait and six plates printed in Paris by Lemerciergravure. Endsheets foxed,
usual slight offset from plates, light flecking to binding sizing, otherwise a very good copy.
First edition with the illustrations by William Thomas Horton, the extraordinarily curious
one-time friend of Yeats and others in his circle. With a prefatory essay on Poe by Vincent
O’Sullivan. A 2pp. catalogue of Smithers’s wares is inserted in the rear. Uncommon. $400.

431. Porter, Katherine Anne: HACIENDA. [New York]: Harrison of Paris, [1934]. Russet
cloth, stamped in gilt, t.e.g. Bookseller’s label on rear free endsheet, else fine in lightly
worn and sunned publisher’s board slipcase.
First edition, the uncommon first state, with leaf 51/52 integral and uncorrected, and with
the errata slip laid in. One of eight hundred and ninety-five numbered copies. $450.

432. Porter, Katherine Anne: FLOWERING JUDAS AND OTHER STORIES. New York:
Harcourt, [1935]. Cloth. Endsheets a trifle tanned, as usual else about fine, in near very
good, modestly frayed and tanned dust jacket with a few short edge-tears.
First collective edition of the author’s short fiction to date, expanded from the text collected
in the limited edition of 1930.                                                           $125.

433. Porter, Katherine Anne: SHIP OF FOOLS. Boston: Atlantic-Little, Brown, [1962]. Cloth.
About fine in dust jacket with a few trivial incidents of rubbing at the edges.
First edition of the author’s most popular work. Laid in are two a.pc.s. from Porter to,
presumably, a former owner, both from Venice, 4 June 1963, remarking about the views
of Venice on the verso in relation to where she lives there and the city’s beauty. $150.

434. Porter, Katherine Anne: Original Inscribed Photograph. [Np]. [1964]. Original black
& white print, 8 x 10" (landscape). Some old creases and strip of offsetting to lower edge
of verso, ferrotyping a bit speckled, else very good.
An informal photograph of Porter, standing in front of a nine-member Mariachi band. Porter
has inscribed the verso of the photograph at great length in pencil, signed with initials,
describing the occasion of the photo (“1st December 1964 Guadalajara at Samuel and Mary
Sewall’s reception...”), her extreme illness at the time, travels thereafter, etc, ca. 100 words.
                                                                                           $250.

435. Pound, Ezra: CANZONI OF .... London: Elkin Mathews, 1911. Grey cloth, stamped
in gilt. First edition, first binding. One of less than five hundred copies bound thus, of a
total edition of one thousand copies. Bookplate residue on pastedown, a couple spots to
lower board, else very good.
GALLUP A7a.                                                                          $550.

436. [Pound, Ezra (ed)]: DES IMAGISTES AN ANTHOLOGY. New York: Albert & Charles
Boni, 1914. Blue cloth, stamped in gilt. Cloth very faintly sunned at edges, spine tips slightly
frayed, front hinge cracking, but sound, else a very good, clean copy.
First edition, the U.S. issue in book form, published the month after the periodical issue.
Sets of sheets, all from the same printing, were also issued bound in wrappers as an issue
of The Glebe, in boards in Britain by the Poetry Bookshop in April, and in two remainder
issues, ca. 1917 and 1920, by Frank Shay. An essential anthology, and now somewhat
uncommon. Includes works by Pound, Williams, Aldington, H.D., Joyce, Lowell, Flint, Hueffer,
et al.
GALLUP B7 & C125, etc.                                                               $300.

437. Powell, Anthony: JOHN AUBREY AND HIS FRIENDS. London: Heinemann, [1963].
Large octavo. Cloth. Portrait, plates, folding tables. Some mild discoloration to sizing at
extreme edges of boards and toe of spine, otherwise a very good copy in lightly chipped
and frayed dust jacket.
“New and revised edition.” Signed by the author on the title page, and with his friendly
inscription to two American friends, Congressman John Monagan and his wife, “from Tony
at Haligan’s Restaurant (Monagans at Haligan’s) ... May 1984.”
LILLEY A7b.                                                                       $500.

438. Powell, Anthony: TEMPORARY KINGS. London: Heinemann, [1973]. Gilt cloth. Light
rubbing at edges, else near fine and bright, in largely complete but torn dust jacket (partial
splits to two folds and a few small chips).
First edition of the 11th volume of the author’s sequence A Dance to the Music of Time.
Signed by the author on the title, and inscribed again to an American friend, former
Congressman “John Monagan from Anthony Powell September, 1978 After a long walk.”
LILLEY A21a.                                                                      $750.

439. Powell, Anthony: HEARING SECRET HARMONIES. London: Heinemann, [1975]. Gilt
cloth. Cloth sizing along lower edges speckled, else a very good copy in like dust jacket
with minor nicks at tips.
First edition of the twelfth volume in the sequence A Dance to the Music of Time. Signed
by the author on the title page, and inscribed on the front endsheet to an American friend,
former Congressman “John Monagan at the Chantry September 1975 Anthony Powell.” The
inscription is dated within the month of publication.
LILLEY A22a.                                                                 $750.

440. [Powell, Anthony]: IRON ASPIDISTRA. By “Mark Members” [pseud. of Roy Fuller].
[Oxford]: Sycamore Press, [21 December 1985]. Sewn printed wrappers. Fine.
First edition of this jeu d’esprit published to mark Anthony Powell’s 80th birthday and to
honor his literary creation. From a total edition of four hundred copies, this is one of eighty
copies designated for the use of Anthony Powell, who has inscribed it to his American
friends, former Congressman John Monagan and his wife, and on the title, identified the
pseudonym as “in this case Roy Fuller.” “Members” is assigned a proper biographical sketch,
and his manuscript is reproduced. His sudden death occurred when he collapsed at Auden’s
memorial service in Westminster Abbey. Copies inscribed by Powell are not too terribly
common.
LILLEY F14.                                                                              $375.

441. [Powell, Lawrence Clark]: Dickinson, Donald C., et al [eds]: VOICES FROM THE
SOUTHWEST A GATHERING IN HONOR OF LAWRENCE CLARK POWELL. Flagstaff:
Northland Press, 1976. Large octavo. Publisher’s half calf and cloth. Portrait. Plate and
photograph. Fine in slipcase.
First edition, limited issue, of this festschrift, concluding with a bibliography of Powell’s
keepsakes. One of seventy-five numbered copies, specially bound, and with a leaf signed
by the contributors bound in. Signers include Ansel Adams, William Everson, Frank Waters,
Jose Cisneros, Paul Horgan, Ward Ritchie, Jake Zeitlin, et al.                         $400.

442. Prassinos, Gisèle: QUAND LE BRUIT TRAVAILLE. [Paris]: Editions G.L.M., 1936.
Small octavo. Typographically decorated wrappers. Mounted black & white photograph as
frontis (after a drawing by Hans Bellmer). A fine copy.
First edition of the precocious author’s third book. One of 170 numbered copies on vélin,
from a total edition of 205 (plus h.c. copies). Prassinos (born in Turkey in 1920) was quickly
adopted by the surrealists as a creator of automatic writing par excellence. Her first book,
La Sauterelle Arthritique was published in 1935, accompanied by a preface by Paul Éluard
and a photograph by Man Ray.                                                            $750.

443. [Prokosch Imprints]: Barker, Nicholas: THE BUTTERFLY BOOKS AN ENQUIRY INTO
THE NATURE OF CERTAIN TWENTIETH CENTURY PAMPHLETS. London: Bertram Rota,
1987. Cloth and boards. Plates and facsimiles. Prologue by Arthur Freeman. First edition
of this documentation of the exposure of Prokosch’s deceptively dated printings, as well
as a discussion of those with claim to legitimacy. Fine, without dust jacket, as issued.
                                                                                   $100.

444. Proulx, E. Annie: HEART SONGS AND OTHER STORIES. New York: Scribner, [1988].
Cloth and boards. First edition of the author’s first collection of short fiction. Top edge
dusty, else about fine in near fine dust jacket with small nick and slight wear along the
top edge.                                                                             $300.

445. [Puffin Picture Book]: Badmin, S. R.: TREES IN BRITAIN. [West Drayton, Middlesex:
Penguin Books, 1943]. [32]pp. Oblong octavo. Lithographed pictorial color wrappers. Illustrated
throughout (including color). Very close to fine.
First edition, published as #31 of the innovative Puffin Picture Books edited by Noel
Carrington. The lithographed illustrations were drawn on the plate by the author and printed
by W.S. Cowell, Ltd.                                                                   $45.
446. Rackham, Arthur: Original Pen and Ink Drawing for LITTLEDOM CASTLE AND
OTHER TALES. [Np]. 1901. Quarto. 10.5 x 8.5 inches scant (26.8 x 21.3 cm) on white
stock. Some foxing and smudging to margins, pencil production annotations on recto and
verso, otherwise very good. Matted.




An original ink drawing, signed in full and dated “1901,” executed as an illustration for Mrs.
M.H. Spielmann’s Littledom Castle and Other Tales. This charming image depicts a
jaunty knight of medium stature, in armor, with a crowd of humanoids and fantastic creatures
surrounding him and fading into the background.                                        $3000.

447. Rackham, Arthur: Original Pen and Ink Drawing for MISADVENTURES AT MARGATE.
[Np]. 1907. Quarto. 10.5 x 8.5 inches scant (27 x 21.3 cm) on white stock. Some light
foxing to margins, otherwise very good. Matted.




An original ink drawing, signed with initials and dated “07,” executed as an illustration for
Barham’s The Ingoldsby Legends (1907). An ink note “3 inches high” appears at the lower
edge, in ink, in Rackham’s hand, and the extreme upper right corner includes some small
ink doodles. The verso bears a very rough pencil drawing, presenting a variant on the same
image, perhaps executed as a very rough study for the finished drawing. The image depicts
two old salts in ragged nautical garb, with the ocean and a cloud-filled sky in the background.
                                                                                        $2500.

448. [Rand, Ayn]: Daves, Delmer, and Robert Pirosh [screenwriters]: THE NIGHT OF
JANUARY 16TH RELEASE DIALOGUE SCRIPT.... [Los Angeles]: Paramount Pictures,
29 May 1941. [1],14,13,11,14, 15,14,17,14,[blank] leaves, foliated in reel format. Narrow
quarto. Mimeographed typescript, printed on rectos only. Partially stapled at left margin
(bulk of text block was inadequate for the original staples, it would appear). Dated ink studio
filing stamp on title leaf, along with ink name and later direction to prepare a file photocopy,
otherwise a very good copy.
A release dialogue script for Daves’s and Pirosh’s adaptation to the screen of Rand’s 1933/
36 play, directed by William Clemens and starring Robert Preston, Ellen Drew and Bjorn
Faulkner. Though evidently optioned at least once much earlier, this production was the
first English language adaptation of a Rand property to be released (on 28 November 1941).
                                                                                     $375.
                               Early Will Ransom Imprint
449. [Ransom, The Private Press of Will]: Landor, Walter Savage: A VISION AND THE
DREAM OF PETRARCA. Chicago: Will H. Ransom, 1903. Small octavo. Gathered and sewn
signatures. Handcolored title decorations and opening initials. Faint dust smudging to outer
blanks, otherwise about fine.
First edition in this format, and the third imprint by Will Ransom. With a note by Thomas
Wood Stevens. Ransom’s earlier productions appeared under the imprint of the Handcraft
Shop from Snohomish, Washington, and this work appeared shortly after his move from
the Northwest to Chicago. The edition was to be limited to 165 copies, but according to
Ransom only ten copies were completed and distributed. This copy is unnumbered, but
complete and colored. Kreisman and Mason discuss the book, but report that it appeared
under the Handcraft Shop imprint. It wasn’t until 1921 that Ransom undertook the printing
of another book.
RANSOM 3. Kreisman & Mason, THE ARTS AND CRAFTS MOVEMENT IN THE PACIFIC
NORTHWEST, p.342.                                                                    $300.

450. Rich, Adrienne: THE FANTASY POETS ADRIENNE CECILE RICH [wrapper title].
[Swinford, Oxford: The Fantasy Press, 1952]. Stapled printed wrappers. Staples a trace
rusty, otherwise near fine.
First edition. Two of the poems appear here for the first time in book(let) form. One of
ca. three hundred copies, issued as #12 in the series.                             $500.

451. [Ricketts, Charles]: Moore, T. Sturge [intro]: CHARLES RICKETTS R.A. SIXTY-FIVE
ILLUSTRATIONS. London: Cassell & Company, [1933]. Small quarto. Cloth. Color frontis
and plates. Decorated endsheets. First edition. Boards very slightly bowed, slightly dusty
at edges, otherwise about fine in dust jacket.                                        $45.

452. Ridge, John Rollin: A TRUMPET OF OUR OWN YELLOW BIRD’S ESSAYS ON THE
NORTH AMERICAN INDIAN ... SELECTIONS FROM THE WRITINGS OF THE NOTED
CHEROKEE AUTHOR JOHN ROLLIN RIDGE. San Francisco, CA: The Book Club of California,
1981. Cloth and patterned paper over boards. Portrait and plates. Fine in fine plain dust
jacket.
First edition. Edited by David Farmer and Renard Strickland. One of 650 copies printed
by Peter Koch at the Black Stone Press. Ridge, an accomplished poet whose Cherokee
name was Cheesquatalawny, published the legendary rarity, The Life and Adventures
of Joaquin Murieta (1854), considered the first novel written in California and the first
novel published by a Native American. A preliminary checklist of Ridge’s publications is
appended.                                                                          $50.

453. Riggs, Lynn: LISTEN, MIND. [Np]: Privately Printed, 1933. Octavo. Printed self wrappers,
sewn. An unusually fine copy, in terms of condition the best of the several we have handled
over the years.
First edition. One of only fifty copies printed for the author by Ward Ritchie on handmade
paper. Laid into this copy is a printed slip presenting this copy as a birthday gift from Ritchie
to Mrs. Doheny on 2 August 1934. This poem in six parts first appeared in the New York
Herald Tribune in 1931. The Oklahoma born, (tiny) part-Cherokee dramatist and poet’s
scarcest work, and an early Ward Ritchie imprint as well.                                  $350.

454. Ritchie, Ward: THE POET AND THE PRINTERS. [Los Angeles: Laguna Verde Imprenta,
1980]. Quarto. Quarter morocco and marbled boards. Decorated three color title-page.
Illustrated. Minor nick at toe of spine, otherwise fine, with several pieces of relevant ephemera
laid in.
First edition. One of “nearly fifty” copies designed and printed by hand by the author. A
fine essay on the interrelations of Robinson Jeffers with his trade publishers and the several
small presses that ventured editions of his works, both during his life-time, and posthumously.
                                                                                         $600.

455. Rittenhouse, Jessie [ed]: THE LOVER’S RUBÁIYÁT. Boston: Small, Maynard &
Company, 1904. Small octavo. Cloth, upper board elaborately decorated in gilt, t.e.g. Minuscule
nick at top of lower joint, gilt coated endsheets a bit spotted (as inevitable), otherwise a
very good or better copy.
First edition. With a decorative border and endpiece by A. Eleanor Hobson. The gilt cover
design is the work of Bertram Grosvenor Goodhue.
FINLAY, p. 90.                                                                     $150.

456. Roberts, Charles G.D.: THE BOOK OF THE NATIVE. Boston, New York & London
/ Toronto: Lamson, Wolffe and Company / Copp, Clark Company, 1896. Small octavo. Gilt
forest green cloth, t.e.g., others untrimmed. First (U.S.) edition. Inscribed and signed, with
a snippet of verse, by the author. A fine, bright copy.
WATTERS, p.122.                                                                         $150.

457. Roditi, Edouard: NEW OLD & NEW TESTAMENTS. [New York]: Red Ozier Press,
1983. Linen and paper boards, stamped in blind. Trace of sunning at edges, corners faintly
bumped, else a near fine copy, with prospectuses laid in.
First edition. One of 110 numbered copies, printed in Gills Sans on Ingres paper. A double
presentation copy, inscribed by the author at the end of the acknowledgements: “Affectionately,
for Ned Rorem, as ever, Edouard Roditi,” and inscribed again on the first blank leaf: “For
Anne and James Laughlin very affectionately Edouard Roditi.” Either inscription renders
this a very decent association.                                                         $225.

458. [Rogers, Bruce]: Kelly, Jerry: THE FIRST FLOWERING BRUCE ROGERS AT THE
RIVERSIDE PRESS 1896 - 1912 WITH A CHECKLIST OF THE RIVERSIDE PRESS
EDITIONS. Boston: Thomas G. Boss, 2008. Cloth and gilt decorated boards. Decorated
title-page. Facsimiles. Fine, without dust jacket, as issued.
First edition. One of five hundred copies, printed after a design by the author, of which
this is one of 323 copies for public distribution.                                   $75.
459. Rolfe, Frederick, “Baron Corvo”: LETTERS TO LEONARD MOORE.... London: Nicholas
Vane, 1960. Large octavo. Gilt cloth, t.e.g. About fine, in lightly worn glassine.
First edition, ordinary limited issue. Edited, with an Introduction, by Cecil Woolf and Rabbi
B.W. Korn, with an Epilogue by Leonard Moore. One of 260 numbered copies (of 306),
published as the second volume of the Centenary Edition of the Letters. Warmly inscribed
and signed by Woolf in 1960.
WOOLF A19a.                                                                             $300.

460. [Rolfe, Frederick, “Baron Corvo”]: Woolf, Cecil, and Brocard Sewell [eds]: CORVO,
1860 - 1960 A COLLECTION OF ESSAYS BY VARIOUS HANDS TO COMMEMORATE THE
CENTENARY OF THE BIRTH OF FR. ROLFE, BARON CORVO.... Aylesford: Saint Albert’s
Press, 1961. Large octavo. Gilt buckram, t.e.g. About fine in lightly worn glassine.
First edition of this festschrift, with an introduction by Pamela Hansford Johnson. One of
three hundred numbered copies (of 314), signed by the editors. This copy is warmly inscribed
by Woolf on the occasion of publication.                                              $275.

                         And Here’s To You, Mrs. Robinson....
461. Rowlandson, Thomas [illustrator]: POETICAL SKETCHES OF SCARBOROUGH:
ILLUSTRATED BY TWENTY-ONE ENGRAVINGS OF HUMOUROUS SUBJECTS.... London:
Printed for R. Ackerman, 1813. [4],xv,[1],215pp. plus handcolored frontis and twenty plates.
Large octavo. Full tan polished calf, raised bands, spine gilt extra, a.e.g., by Tout. Bookplate,
occasional light foxing, tiny marginal mend to one plate, otherwise a near fine, tall copy.




First edition. The anonymous poetical contributions are by John Buonartti Papwroth, William
Combe, Francis Wrangham, et al. The twenty-one beautiful colored aquatint plates were
engraved by Rowlandson from “sketches made as souvenirs of the place during a visit to
Scarborough in the season of 1812” by J. Green. “They were not intended for publication,
but being found to interest many persons of taste, several of whom expressed a desire
to possess engravings of them, and some gentlemen having offered to add metrical illustrations
to each, the present form of publication has been adopted” - Advertisement. A second edition
was soon called for, adding a dedication, table of contents, and the identities of the
contributors (via initials). “Plate 8 The Warm Bath is said to contain the portrait of Mrs.
Robinson, George IV’s mistress” - Tooley.
TOOLEY 422. ABBEY SCENERY 297.                                                        $1250.

462. [Samurai Press]: Ficke, Arthur Davison: THE EARTH PASSION, BOUNDARY, & OTHER
POEMS. [Cranleigh, Surrey: The Samurai Press, 1908]. Small quarto. Cloth backed printed
boards, paper spine label, t.e.g.. Spine very slightly spotted, light rubbing at edges, otherwise
a very good copy.
First edition. Although nowhere so indicated, approximately three hundred copies were printed.
Because the press could not afford to buy sufficient type to print this work by hand, it
was commercially printed.
WOOLMER XXII.                                                                            $75.

463. Santee, Ross: APACHE LAND. New York: Scribner, 1947. Small quarto. Cloth.
Illustrations by the author. Binding a trace foxed around joints, pastedowns a bit tanned
toward gutters, but a very good copy in slightly tanned and frayed pictorial dust jacket.
First edition. Inscribed by the author in 1952 (as “Ross”), with a characteristic landscape
drawing in ink and color pencil on the front free endsheet.
ADAMS HERD 2007. ADAMS SIX GUNS 1941.                                                 $500.

464. Sarton, May: THE PHOENIX AGAIN NEW POEMS. Concord, NH: William B. Ewart,
1987. Boards. Woodcut frontis, in color, by Mary Azarian. Fine, without dust jacket, as
issued.
First edition, deluxe issue. One of twenty-five specially bound copies, numbered below
the frontis, and signed by the author and the artist, from a total edition of one hundred
and fifty copies printed and bound by the Firefly Press.                            $250.

465. Sarton, May: COMING INTO EIGHTY NEW POEMS. Concord, NH: William B. Ewart,
1992. Boards. Fine, without dust jacket, as issued.
First edition, deluxe issue. One of twenty-six lettered copies, specially bound, and signed
by the author, from a total edition of one hundred and twenty-six copies printed and bound
by the Firefly Press.                                                                 $225.

466. Sassoon, Siegfried: MEMOIRS OF A FOX-HUNTING MAN ... WITH ILLUSTRATIONS
BY WILLIAM NICHOLSON. New York: Coward-McCann, [nd. but ca. 1929]. Large octavo.
Decorated cloth, fore and bottom edges untrimmed. Illustrations and plates. Spine faintly
darkened, a bit of foxing to fore-edges, otherwise a very good or better copy in edgeworn
slipcase.
First illustrated edition, U.S. issue, comprised of sheets from the Faber edition with a Coward-
McCann title leaf. Keynes indicates that fifteen hundred copies were issued thus.
KEYNES A30d(n).                                                                            $225.

467. [Sassoon, Siegfried]: MEMOIRS OF AN INFANTRY OFFICER. “By the Author of Memoirs
of a Fox-Hunting Man.” London: Faber & Faber, [1930]. Large octavo. Gilt blue polished
buckram, t.e.g. Spine a shade sunned (as usual), small bump at lower edge of one board,
but a very good copy, without printed dust jacket, as issued.
First edition, limited issue. One of seven hundred and fifty numbered copies, specially printed
and bound, and signed by the author.
KEYNES A33.                                                                              $650.

468. THE SAVOY AN ILLUSTRATED QUARTERLY [later:] MONTHLY. London: Leonard
Smithers, January through December 1896. Whole numbers one through eight (all published).
Three volumes. Quarto. Bound up in publisher’s deep blue cloth, with elaborate gilt pictorial
decorations based on Beardsley’s designs, without original wrappers or boards (as usual
for this format), untrimmed. Heavily illustrated. Beardsley Christmas card inserted. Occasional
to moderate foxing, light wear at tips, very slight cracking to inner hinges of first volume,
otherwise a very good set, with the bindings unusually bright.
Edited by Arthur Symons, with Aubrey Beardsley on board as primary illustrator (over 50%
of the artwork is Beardsley’s). Smithers’s highly appealing rival to Harland and Lane’s Yellow
Book, a staple of the periodical legacy of the 1890s. Contributors of significance include
Yeats, Macleod/Sharp, Crackenthorpe, Conrad, Wedmore, Dowson, Ellis, Shaw, Beerbohm,
Hueffer, et al, and most copiously, Symons himself. The expurgated text of Beardsley’s
“Under the Hill” is serialized as well, and the enigmatic William T. Horton is among the
illustrators, who also include Beerbohm, Rothenstein, Floriani and works by Blake
SULLIVAN (VEA), pp. 383-9. LASNER 103.                                                  $2750.

469. Schiller, Lawrence: Original Portrait Photograph of Barbara Streisand. [New York.
nd. but 1960s]. Original black & white silver print, oblong 24 x 35 cm (9.5 x 13.75 inches)
with extended upper and lower borders. About fine.
A superb portrait of the singer/actress, pensive, wearing a large fur hat, by the photographer
/ author/ film director. Among Schiller’s several significant accomplishments are his well-
known portraits of the icons of the 1960s - the Kennedys, Marilyn Monroe, Robert Redford,
Paul Newman, Timothy Leary, et al. With Schiller’s credit/agency stamp on the verso, along
with the stamp of Transworld Feature Syndicate.                                          $350.

470. [Sedgwick, Catharine Maria]: LETTERS FROM ABROAD TO KINDRED AT HOME.
“By the Author of “Hope Leslie.” New York: Harper & Bros., 1841. Two volumes. xii,[13]-
275,[1],29pp. inserted catalogue; 297,[3]pp. Publisher’s gilt decorated cloth. Minor wear
to extremities, with three small nicks, typical moderate foxing, faint early private ownership
stamp, but a good, reasonably bright set of a work often seen rebound or bedraggled.
First U.S. edition, BAL’s state ‘c’ of 276 and state ‘b’ of the terminal catalogue in the first
volume (no sequence determined), and printing 1 of the second volume. The novelist’s epistolary
account of her tour abroad 1839-40. The London edition in two volumes preceded.
BAL 17384.                                                                              $450.

471. Selvon, Samuel: THE LONELY LONDONERS. London: Allan Wingate, [1956]. Gilt
cloth boards. First edition. Ink name on free endsheet, endsheets a trifle foxed, otherwise
a very good copy, in good, chipped and frayed pictorial dust jacket.                  $100.

472. Shaffer, Peter: AMADEUS A PLAY. New York: McCann and Nugent, December 1980,
Revised February 1981. [10],I-59,II-58 leaves. Quarto. Mimeographed typescript, printed
on rectos only, bradbound in gilt-lettered flexible Studio Duplicating Service wrappers. Upper
wrapper creased, relevant ink annotations and corner-creases (see below); a very good
copy.
A working script for the original New York production of Shaffer’s play at the Broadhurst
Theatre 11 December through 16 October 1983. This copy belonged to actor Russell Gold,
with his signature and extensive annotations on the prelims, and scattered in the text.
Gold played Giuseppe Bono, Citizen of Vienna, and understudied three other parts for this
production.                                                                        $350.

473. Shahn, Ben: “I KNEW HER BY HER ROMAN SYMBOLS” [caption title]. [Np: The
Artist, ca. 1931]. Original ink brush drawing, 36 x 28cm (14.2 x 11 inches) on cream wove
paper. Mounted at top corners to larger sheet, and matted and framed under Plexi. With
the Shahn estate label on the verso of the frame.
A fine exploration of the theme of Levana, the Roman Goddess, a recurrent preoccupation
of Shahn’s, with his manuscript caption title as above, and signed by him in the lower right
corner. Shahn utilized this drawing as the cover image for the 1931 portfolio, Levana and
Our Lady of Sorrows, and returned again late in life to the same subject, in a somewhat
variant form, for the 1966 lithograph published by Gemini G.E.L.                    $1500.
474. Shaw, George B.: ...PYGMALION A ROMANCE IN FIVE ACTS [caption title]. New
York: Everybody’s Magazine, November 1914. Small quarto. Publisher’s mauve cloth,
lettered in gilt. Illustrated. Spine tips rubbed, irregular sunning of boards, otherwise very
good.
First separate American issue (unauthorized) and first separate issue in English, comprised
of sheets from the periodical publication, specially bound up and distributed by Putnam.
When advised by Shaw’s agent that they had acquired serial rights only, distribution in
this format was halted. Some copies were also bound in limp leather. Formal book publication
in English finally took place in 1916.
LAURENCE A124d.                                                                       $750.

475. [Shelley, Mary]: LODORE. By the Author of “Frankenstein.” Brussels: A.D. Wahlen,
Printer to the Court, 1835. [4],[5]-396pp. Octavo. Contemporary gilt cloth and marbled boards,
half-title bound in. Boards modestly rubbed, minuscule nick in top margin of first few leaves,
trace of minor foxing early and late, but a very good copy.
First Belgian edition (in English), one of two Continental English language editions published
in the same year as the London triple-decker. One of Shelley’s most popular works, after
Frankenstein, and a romance clearly imbued with autobiographical parallels. The other
Continental edition in English appeared in Paris under Galignani’s imprint.
SUMMERS (GOTHIC BIB), p.390.                                                           $1250.

476. [Simms, William Gilmore]: THE YEMASSEE. A ROMANCE OF CAROLINA .... New
York: Published by Harper & Bros., 1835. Two volumes. [viii],[9]-222; 242,13,[3]pp. Original
publisher’s green cloth, printed spine labels (obviously a married set, with the first volume
in S cloth and volume two in P cloth). Cloth a trifle rubbed, small chips to spine labels,
some foxing, faint ink name on endsheet of second volume; still, an above average set,
enclosed in a somewhat musty-smelling half-morocco slipcase, gilt extra, and chemise.
First edition, first printing, of each volume, the second with BAL’s state A of the copyright.
The work regarded by many as Simms’s most substantial achievement.
BAL 18051. WRIGHT I:2438.                                                              $750.
477. Simon, Neil: “LAST OF THE RED HOT LOVERS” SCREENPLAY BY.... [Np: The
Author], 3 May 1971. [1],155 leaves. Quarto. Mechanically reproduced typescript, printed
on rectos only of pale green stock. Brad bound in stiff wrappers, with typed label. Title
lettered on spine, receipt stamp (see below) on title leaf, wrappers faintly sunned and marked
at edges, otherwise very good.
A “first draft” of Simon’s own adaptation to the screen of his 1969 play. This copy bears
the dated receipt stamp (“May 4 1971”) of Paramount V.P. Ralph Kamon. The film, directed
by Gene Saks and starring Alan Arkin, Sally Kellerman and Paula Prentiss, was released
in August 1972.                                                                     $275.

478. Simon, Neil: THE PRISONER OF SECOND AVENUE WRITTEN BY.... Burbank: Warner
Bros., Inc., 30 August - 4 September 1973. [2],128 leaves plus lettered inserts. Quarto.
Photographically duplicated typescript, printed on rectos only of white and colored stock
(marking revises). Bradbound in printed wrappers. Title lettered on spine, studio stamps
on upper wrapper, very good.
“Final” draft of Simon’s own adaptation to the screen of his play, but including many revised
leaves on pink and blue paper pushing development even further. The film, directed by Melvin
Frank, appeared in 1975, and starred Jack Lemmon and Anne Bancroft. A revised cast
and credits leaf, dated 24 Feb. 1975, has been inserted after the title-leaf in this copy.
                                                                                       $275.
                                   Presentation Copies
479. Simon, Neil: MURDER BY DEATH SCREENPLAY BY.... [Burbank]: Rastar Films,
7 July - 15 September 1975. [1],134 leaves. Quarto. Mechanically reproduced typescript
on rectos only of blue and white stock. Bradbound in stenciled production company wrappers.
Faint ripple to lower wrapper and last few leaves, otherwise a very good or better copy.
Inscribed on the title-leaf: “To Mel, Neil Simon.” The recipient was, in all probability, Mel
Traxel, who served as still photographer on this and many other films based on Simon’s
scripts. Denoted the “Second Draft” of this original screenplay by Simon, but with nearly
half that draft replaced with variously dated revises on blue paper extending over the next
two months. The 1976 film was directed by Robert Moore, and starred Truman Capote,
Eileen Brennan, James Coco, Peter Falk, Alec Guinness, Elsa Lanchester, David Niven,
Peter Sellers, Maggie Smith, et al, in a highly successful spoof of the master-detective
genre. A novelization by Henry Keating appeared as a Warner paperback original in 1976,
but there was no contemporary published form of Simon’s own work. OCLC locates only
two copies of some form of this script.                                                $950.

480. Simon, Neil: THE SUNSHINE BOYS. [Culver City]: Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, Inc., February
1975. 139 leaves (adjusted with inserted revises). Quarto. Mechanically reproduced typescript,
printed on rectos only of white, blue and slate paper. Bradbound in printed studio wrappers.
A few light smudges to wrappers, upper wrapper snagged at brads, but very good..
Inscribed on the first leaf: “To Mel, Neil Simon.” The recipient was, in all probability, Mel
Traxel, who served as still photographer on this and many other films based on Simon’s
scripts. An unspecified draft, but with revises on colored paper dated variously in late January
and early February, of Simon’s own adaptation to the screen of his 1972 play (published
1974). The 1975 release was directed by Herbert Ross, and starred Walter Matthau and
George Burns. Simon’s script was nominated for awards from the Academy, the Golden
Globes and BAFTA.                                                                          $950.

481. Simon, Neil: THE CHEAP DETECTIVE ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY BY.... Burbank: Rastar
Productions, 28 February 1977. [1],136 leaves. Quarto. Mimeographed typescript, printed
on rectos only. Bradbound in mimeographed production company wrappers. A thin, small
ink stroke and a few tiny spots on upper wrapper, otherwise about fine.
Inscribed on the title-leaf: “To Mel, If we keep on going like this we’ll be able to play ‘The
Sunshine Boys’ Neil Simon.” The recipient was, in all probability, Mel Traxel, who served
as still photographer for this production, as well as three earlier films based on Simon’s
scripts (including The Sunshine Boys). Denoted a “final draft” of this original screenplay
for Simon’s detective parody, directed by Robert Moore, starring Peter Falk and Ann Margaret,
and released in 1977. A novelization by Robert Grossbach was published in 1978 as a
Warner paperback original, but there was no contemporary publication of Simon’s own original
work. OCLC locates only one copy of this script (a revised final draft at Michigan State).
$950.

482. Simon, Neil: THE GOODBYE GIRL. [Culver City]: Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, Inc., December
1976 - 11 January 1977. 125 leaves plus lettered inserts. Quarto. Mechanically reproduced
typescript, printed on rectos only of white, blue and slate paper. Bradbound in printed studio
wrappers. A few light smudges to wrappers, small nick at top edge of upper wrapper, but
very good or better.
Inscribed on the first leaf: “To Mel, Neil Simon.” The recipient was, in all probability, Mel
Traxel, who served as still photographer on this and many other films based on Simon’s
scripts. Denoted the “third draft” of this original screenplay by Simon, but shot through
with colored revises dated over the span above. The 1977 release, directed by Herbert Ross,
starred Marsha Mason and Richard Dreyfuss, and was nominated for many awards. Simon
won a Golden Globe for this script, and Dreyfuss won an Oscar for Best Actor. $950.

                                  Special Signed Issue
483. Simon, Neil: CHAPTER TWO SCREENPLAY BY .... [Burbank: Rastar Films], 11 January
1980. [1],131 leaves plus colophon. Quarto. Photographically duplicated typescript, printed
on rectos only of white stock. Bradbound in gilt lettered wrappers. Some shelf-soiling to
lower edge at foretip, otherwise near fine.
A specially produced printing of a revised form of the third draft of Simon’s own adaptation
to the screen of his 1979 play, based on the draft of April 1979, but with dated revises
as late as 11 August 1979. This specially bound printing was produced for promotional
purposes, and is signed by Simon on the upper wrapper. Laid in is an 11 January 1980
t.l.s. from a Vice President at Rastar films, forwarding the copy, describing its special
promotional status “We are sending these screenplays out as a limited mailing to key
entertainment press...It is a collector’s item right now and will be even more so in years
to come....” The film, directed by Robert Moore, was released in December 1979, and starred
James Caan and Marsha Mason.                                                          $450.

484. Simon, Neil: “I OUGHT TO BE IN PICTURES” ... SCREENPLAY BY.... [Np]: Twentieth
Century-Fox., October 1980. [1],139 leaves. Quarto. Mechanically duplicated typescript,
printed on rectos only of cream stock. Bradbound in printed studio wrappers. Lower fore-
corner bumped, otherwise very good or better.
Denoted the “first draft” of Simon’s own adaptation to the screen of his 1981 play. The
film, directed by Herbert Ross, appeared in 1982, and starred Walter Matthau and Ann-
Margret, et al.                                                                  $385.

485. Simon, Neil: SEEMS LIKE OLD TIMES ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY BY.... Burbank:
Rastar Films, April 1980. [1],150 leaves, plus lettered inserts. Quarto. Photographically
reproduced typescript, printed on rectos only. Bradbound in production company wrappers.
Ink name on upper wrapper (see below), otherwise very good.
Denoted a “revised final draft” of this original screenplay by Simon. The master from which
this script was reproduced appears to have been assembled from a number of drafts, as
evidenced by the variations in copying. Laid in is an original two page shooting call for
the first day of shooting, 7 April. The last name ink signature ‘Traxel’ is likely that of Mel
Traxel, who served as still photographer for many of Simon’s films. He appears on the call-
sheet. The film, directed by Jay Sandrich and starring Goldie Hawn and Chevy Chase, was
released in December 1980.                                                          $200.

486. Simon, Neil: BILOXI BLUES ... SCREENPLAY BY.... Universal City: Universal City
Studios, Inc., 26 February - 14 April 1987. [1],130 leaves, plus 61 leaves (including some
contiguous sequences) of fresh revises inserted at end, along with a 6 leaf “One liner.”
Quarto. Photographically duplicated typescript, printed on rectos only of pale green, darker
green and pink stock. Bradbound in plain stiff wrappers. Title lettered on spine, otherwise
very good or better.
Denoted the “Third Draft” of Simon’s own adaptation to the screen of his 1986 Tony Award-
winning play, but with considerable subsequent revisions spanning the period above. The
film, directed by Mike Nichols, appeared in 1988, and starred Matthew Broderick, Christopher
Walken, et al. Of special note in this copy is the presence of both the unrevised and revised
texts of those sixty-one leaves inserted at the end.                                   $225.
                                    One of Four Copies
487. Sims, George: TERMINAL STATUS. [Np: Privately Printed by the Author, nd. but ca.
1986]. [8],176 leaves. Quarto. Photographically reproduced typescript, printed on rectos
only. Title-page and two sectional-titles printed at The Tragara Press. Black cloth, lettered
in gilt. Fine.
One of four copies, privately printed, of George Sims’s otherwise unpublished novel, Terminal
Status, a political dystopia set in the year 2055, in a world devastated by nuclear and biological
warfare. Inscribed, signed and dated on a preliminary leaf by the author to Alan Anderson
of The Tragara Press : “Number two of four copies. For Alan from his friends George and
Beryl 10.x.86,” and with Anderson’s booklabel. There are a few scattered original manuscript
corrections in the text. Sims inscribed another copy (#3): “The germinal idea for this book
came to me on a coach trip from Alpbach to Munich (in 1975)...Unpublished and probably
unpublishable (because of the unforeseen collapse of Communism). I sent a typescript
of the book to Graham Greene who liked the book but thought I made the ‘Glossary’ too
long and too complicated. Plenty of action and some excitement, with an attractive heroine
and a very nasty villain.”
HALLIWELL, p.138.                                                                          $750.

488. [Sinclair, Upton]: Nugent, Elliott, and Edgar Selwyn [screenwriters]: THE MONEY KING
TREATMENT BY.... Culver City: Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, 3 November 1932. 63 leaves. Quarto.
Original carbon typescript, bradbound in typed wrappers with studio label. Typescript about
fine; wrapper chipped at overlap edges, spine and lower spine corner.
A treatment for an unproduced film which might have either been an adaptation of a Sinclair
property, or just possibly, an original collaboration between Sinclair and Selwyn. The nature
of the project is slightly ambiguous: the typed wrapper title describes “The Money King”
as a work co-authored by Sinclair and Selwyn, and the film treatment the work of Nugent.
However, penciled in an early hand is an indication that the treatment too is a collaborative
work, by Nugent and Selwyn. Whatever the case, the film appears not to have come to
fruition, and the narrative, which spans the first three decades of the century, is not readily
identifiable as derived from any single fictional work by Sinclair. Selwyn was, at the time,
on staff as writer-director at MGM, and had crossed paths with Sinclair at various times.
They co-wrote at least one property, under the title The Gold Spangled Banner (Mss
in the Sinclair Archive, Lilly Library), and Arch Selwyn (Edgar’s brother) produced the 1914
film adaptation of The Jungle. Nugent, the actor/director/writer who would later collaborate
with James Thurber on The Male Animal, began in the early 1930s to concentrate more
on writing and less on acting, and presumably this project had a place in that transition.
                                                                                         $850.
489. Sitwell, Edith: THE COLLECTED POEMS OF EDITH SITWELL. London & Boston:
Duckworth/Houghton Mifflin, 1930. Large octavo. Pale yellow cloth. Portrait by Pavel
Tchelitchew. Errata slip. Fine, in lightly chipped glassine wrapper and slipcase with two
corner bumps.
First edition, limited issue. One of 320 numbered copies, specially printed and bound, and
signed by the author.
MODERN MOVEMENT 67.                                                                 $450.




                            One of Twenty, with Two Suites
490. Soupault, Philippe: CORPS PERDU. Paris: Au Sans Pareil, 1926. Thick octavo. Printed
green wrappers. Illustrated with two original drypoints, as well as text illustrations, by Jean
Lurçat. As usual, the fugitive green wrappers have faded somewhat, but otherwise about
fine.
First edition. The edition de tête, being one of twenty numbered copies on vélin de cuve,
with two extra suites of the drypoints and illustrations, one on Japon, bound in back, each
copy designated with the name of one of the friends of the press. The entire edition consisted
of 990 copies, plus copies reserved hors commerce. Published in the year of Soupault’s
breach with the surrealists over politics, Corps Perdu is not as widely known as the work
it is most often compared to, Breton’s Nadja, which it anticipated by a year.
MONOD 10380.                                                                           $1250.

491. [Southcott, Joanna]: A CONTINUATION OF THE CONTROVERSY WITH THE WORLDLY
WISE [caption title]. London: Printed by Galabin & Marchant, [1811]. 52pp. Octavo. Extracted
from bound pamphlet volume, bound up in modern boards. Light foxing early and late, otherwise
a very good copy.
First edition of the second of two responses by Southcott (via Ann Underwood) to alleged
inaccuracies and accusations leveled against her in a rare little book by R. Hann, The
Remarkable Life, Entertaining History and Surprising Adventures of Joanna Southcott
the Prophetess... [1810].
WRIGHT (SOUTHCOTT) 55.                                                            $225.

492. Southcott, Joanna: THE CONTROVERSY OF THE SPIRIT WITH THE WORLDLY WISE,
AS GIVEN THROUGH.... London: Printed by Galabin & Marchant, 1811. 52pp. Octavo.
Extracted from bound pamphlet volume. Light foxing early and late, otherwise a very good
copy.
First edition of the first of two responses by Southcott (via Ann Underwood) to alleged
inaccuracies and accusations leveled against her in a rare little book by R. Hann, The
Remarkable Life, Entertaining History and Surprising Adventures of Joanna Southcott
the Prophetess... [1810].
WRIGHT (SOUTHCOTT) 54.                                                       $225.

493. Southcott, Joanna: COPIES OF LETTERS SENT TO THE CLERGY OF EXETER, FROM
1796 TO 1800, WITH COMMUNICATIONS AND PROPHECIES PUT IN THE NEWSPAPERS
IN 1813. London: Printed by Marchant & Galabin, 1813. 64pp. Octavo. Extracted from bound
pamphlet volume. Light foxing and a few smudges, otherwise a very good copy.
First edition of this interesting compilation of public press notices (including prophecies
and pronouncements) Southcott had either had published, or endeavored to have published,
along with copies of letters she had sent to (largely hostile) members of the clergy.
WRIGHT (SOUTHCOTT) 59.                                                                $150.

494. Southern, Terry, and Christopher Isherwood [screenwriters]: THE LOVED ONE. Culver
City: Filmways / Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer / Martin Ransohoff Production, 21-22 July 1964.
[1],154 leaves, plus lettered revises. Quarto. Mimeographed typescript, printed on rectos
only of white stock, with the first five leaves revised on pale blue paper. Bradbound in plain
wrappers. Floridly written ink name and telephone number in margin of title leaf, otherwise
very good or better.
An unspecified but preproduction draft of Southern and Isherwood’s brilliant creative adaptation
to the screen of Evelyn Waugh’s novel. The film, released on 11 October 1965, had a running
time of 122 minutes, and the early date of this draft - Southern moved to Los Angeles to
work on the script full-time in August - suggests the probability of considerable difference
between this draft and the final film. Tony Richardson directed an ensemble cast including
Robert Morse, Jonathan Winters, Dana Andrews, John Gielgud, James Coburn, Robert Morley
and many others, resulting in one of the highpoints of black comedic film of its decade.
Original scripts for Southern’s significant early films have long been elusive.          $3500.

495. [Spanish Republic]: BUENOS MALOS [wrapper title]. [Madrid?]: La Sección “Artes
Plasticas” de Altavoz del Frente, [nd. but ca. 1937]. [16]pp. Quarto. Color pictorial self
wrappers. Illustrated in color. A bit dusty at edges, but an unusually nice copy, crown of
spine a bit frayed and curled, printed on friable pulp paper.
A visually striking children’s book, published by Altavoz del Frente under the auspices
of the Ministerio de Instrucción Pública y Bellas Artes. The text is printed in facsimile of
simplified handwriting, and neither author nor illustrator are identified. No copies were located
in OCLC/Worldcat at the time of cataloguing.                                                $150.

496. [Spanish Republic]: CUENTO INFANTIL PEPIN, LA VACA PEPA Y AZULIMA [wrapper
title]. [Madrid?]: La Sección “Artes Plasticas” de Altavoz del Frente, [nd. but ca. 1937].
[16]pp. Quarto. Color pictorial self wrappers. Illustrated in color. A bit dusty at edges, but
an unusually nice copy, printed on friable pulp paper.
A visually striking children’s book, published by Altavoz del Frente under the auspices
of the Ministerio de Instrucción Pública y Bellas Artes. The text is printed in facsimile of
simplified handwriting, and neither author nor illustrator are identified. OCLC locates one
copy, at UC Berkeley, in the Veterans of the Abraham Lincoln Brigade Bay Area Post
Collection.                                                                           $150.

497. SPEKTRUM VIERTELJAHRESSCHRIFT FÜR ORIGINALGRAPHIK UND DICHTUNG.
Zurich. March 1959 through September 1975. Whole numbers 2, 8, 13, 14, 15, 30, 36, 39,
41, 42, 44, 46, 47, 66 and 68. Fifteen issues. Folio. Loose sheets laid into original pictorial
wrappers. Profusely illustrated with original woodcuts, linocuts, lithographs, etc. Three wrappers
lightly foxed, otherwise very good to fine.
Edited and published by Sven Knebel and Felix Rellstab. A fine representative sampling
of issues of this handsome periodical devoted to original graphic arts and literature in translation.
Of the above numbers, all but issues 2, 8, 15 and 30 are the special deluxe issue (usually
one of 100 or 120 numbered copies), with many of the original graphics signed by the artist,
and with a supplemental graphic, hors-texte, also usually signed by the artist. These separates
include works by Carlo Duss (#s13 & 36); Erich Schönig (#14); Pierre Baltensperger (#39);
Rolf Nägeli (#41); Georges Lemoine (#42); Jürgen Zumbrunnen (#44); Walter Worn (#46,
in this case unsigned, and printed with six poems by Rainer Brambach); Emanuel Jacob
(#47, unsigned); Secondo Püschel (#66, signed and numbered, with the errata slip outlining
the inclusion of this rather than the item called for on the back wrapper); and Hans Gantert
(#68). The lot is accompanied by a duplicate of the deluxe issue of #41, and two deluxe
copies of #15, lacking the separate print. Literary contributors include Frost, Sachs, Alberti,
Char, Corso, Brecht, MacLeish, W.C. Williams, Quasimodo, et al.                               $750.

498. Spender, Stephen: POEMS. New York: Random House, [1934]. Gilt cloth. First U.S.
edition of the author’s first trade book. Fine in unusually nice dust jacket with small, very
faint spot of discoloration at top spine corner of lower panel.
KULKARNI A3d.                                                                          $200.

499. Spingarn, J[oel] E[lias]: A HISTORY OF LITERARY CRITICISM IN THE RENAISSANCE
WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO THE INFLUENCE OF ITALY IN THE FORMATION AND
DEVELOPMENT OF MODERN CLASSICISM. New York: Published for Columbia University
Press by The Macmillan Co., 1899. Gilt decorated cloth. A very nice, bright, largely unopened
copy.
First edition of the first published book by the future founding officer of the NAACP, and
co-founder of Harcourt, Brace and Co. This was Spingarn’s dissertation, and was of sufficient
stature as to see its translation into Italian undertaken by Croce.                   $150.

500. Spivak, John L.: SHRINE OF THE SILVER DOLLAR. New York: Modern Age, 1940.
Cloth. First edition of this exposé of Father Coughlin. Fine in bright dust jacket with a few
small nicks.                                                                             $30.
                                           First Book
501. Stacton, David: AN UNFAMILIAR COUNTRY 25 POEMS. [Swinford, Oxford]: The
Fantasy Press, [ca. 1953]. Printed wrappers. Rust stains to staples, small smudge, otherwise
near fine.
First edition of the author’s first book, preceded by a handful of scholarly offprints. This
copy bears the publisher’s characteristic “file copy” stamp on the front wrapper. $350.

502. Stallings, Laurence [screenwriter]: BIG EXECUTIVE BY ALICE DUER MILLER SCREEN
PLAY BY... [with:] BIG EXECUTIVE RELEASE DIALOGUE SCRIPT.... [Los Angeles:
Paramount Pictures], 13 May and 8 August 1933. Two volumes. [3],25,17,25,20,16,12,[blank]
leaves, and [1],11,11,11,11,9,8,[blank] leaves. Narrow quarto, legal format. Mimeographed
typescript, printed on rectos only. Stapled in left margins. Studio filing stamps on title
leaf of second item (along with record of a xerox having been prepared at some point),
title leaf of first item rumpled at lower edge, with tears and piece torn from upper corner
- still present, with filing stamp on it), otherwise very good.
Preproduction and post production scripts of this screenplay by the dramatist/screenwriter,
based on a story by novelist/poet/screenwriter Miller, the former denoted a “First Script,”
printed on pink paper. The film, released on 19 October 1933, was directed by Erle Kenton,
and starred Ricardo Cortez, Richard Bennett and Elizabeth Young in a timely drama about
competition, bankruptcy and romance.                                                $500.
503. Stein, Gertrude: MORCEAUX CHOISIS DE LA FABRICATION DES AMERICAINS.
HISTOIRE DU PROGRÈS D’UNE FAMILLE. Paris: Éditions de la Montagne, [1929]. Quarto.
Printed wrapper over stiff wrappers. Portrait frontis. Small chip at top edge of rear outer
wrapper, else about fine in lightly frayed glassine.
First edition in French of portions of The Making of Americans, introduced and translated
by Georges Hugnet. From a total edition of 302 copies, this is one of eighty-five numbered
copies on vergé bouffant, with the extra portrait of Stein by Christian Berard, and signed
by the author and artist.
WILSON D5d.                                                                         $2000.

504. [Stein, Gertrude]: FOUR SAINTS IN THREE ACTS [wrapper title]. Hartford. 1934. Quarto.
Pink stiff wrappers, printed in black and gilt. Photographs. Wrappers very faintly sunned
at edges, else about fine.
The first printing of the deluxe program for the premiere performance, including text by
Stein (“Portrait of Virgil Thomson), illustrations by Berard, et al, and photographs of the
principals and actors. A substantially more common program for the New York run followed.
WILSON G7.                                                                           $150.

505. [Steinbeck, John]: Archive of One Hundred and Fifty Original Production and
Publicity Stills for OF MICE AND MEN. Los Angeles: United Artists, 1939. One hundred
and fifty 7.5 x 9.5 inch (a few smaller) borderless black & white stills. Generally very good
to near fine (a few corner creases, one or two with signs of oxidation).




An unusually comprehensive archive, with trivial duplication, of the production and publicity
stills for the 1939 film adaptation of Steinbeck’s novel, directed by Lewis Milestone, starring
Burgess Meredith, Lon Chaney Jr., et al. The still photographer for the film has generally
been identified as Tom Evans. The collection offers unusually strong representation of the
X, P, and H sequences, in many instances representing contiguous runs of images within
the negative sequences. A considerable number of the stills bear the studio’s mimeographed
cut-lines affixed to the back, and a few bear rubber-stamped designations as “proof” prints.
It would be difficult indeed to recreate such a near comprehensive collection of the stills
associated with this film.                                                             $4500.
506. Steinbeck, John: A LETTER WRITTEN IN REPLY TO A REQUEST FOR A STATEMENT
ABOUT HIS ANCESTRY.... Stamford: The Overbrook Press, 1940. Paper over boards, printed
label. Tiny nicks at two fore-tips, small, faint spot on upper board, otherwise near fine.
First boardbound edition, preceded by a four page leaflet printing. One of three hundred
and fifty copies printed. Steinbeck’s reply to issues pertaining to The Grapes of Wrath
and accusations of it being “Jewish propaganda.” Uncommon.
GOLDSTONE & PAYNE A13b. CAHOON, p.27.                                              $750.

507. [Steinbeck, John]: SOUVENIR PROGRAM DARRYL F. ZANUCK’S PRODUCTION
OF THE GRAPES OF WRATH BY JOHN STEINBECK A 20TH CENTURY-FOX PICTURE
DIRECTED BY JOHN FORD [wrapper title]. [Np]: 20th Century-Fox, [1940]. [16]pp. Oblong
octavo (18 x 25.5 cm). Plates. Printed self-wrappers, deckled fore-edges. Very faint tanning,
otherwise fine.
The very uncommon Souvenir Program offered for sale in select theatres during the first
run of the 1940 film adaptation of Steinbeck’s novel. It is enhanced by the presence of
six high-quality tipped-in reproductions of Thomas Hart Benton’s artwork that was used
to promote the film, including character portraits of the principals and a fine view of the
Joads and their truck against a landscape. There is also a cast list, as well as a page
of commentary on the production.                                                     $950.

508. Steinbeck, John, et al A MEDAL FOR BENNY CENSORSHIP DIALOGUE SCRIPT
[with:] A MEDAL FOR BENNY RELEASE DIALOGUE SCRIPT. [Los Angeles]: Paramount
Pictures, 1 November and 7 December 1944. Two volumes, each foliated in reel/page format
as: [1],10,9,7,10,11,10,10,8 leaves. Quarto. Mimeographed typescript, printed on rectos
only. Second item stapled at left margin, first formerly stapled. Some corner creases, “Master
File Copy” and production number stamps on title leaf of first item, pencil annotations,
name and ink file number on title leaf of second. Very good.
Two late production states of the script for the 1945 film, based on a story idea by Jack
Wagner, co-written with John Steinbeck, and adapted as a screenplay by Frank Butler.
The release dialogue script records a print totaling 51 more feet than the censorship script.
Irving Pichel directed, and Dorothy Lamour, J. Carrol Naish and Arturo de Cordova led the
cast. Obviously, little apart from Steinbeck’s treatment for the film (the Valentine collection
included a carbon typescript) may be easily identified as purely Steinbeck’s work; however,
nothing relating to the script saw lifetime publication so even continuity scripts such as
these take on some significance for Steinbeck scholars.                                 $850.
              With Signed Proofs and Publisher’s Lithographed Poster
509. [Steinlen, Theophile-Alexandre]: Morel, Émile: LES GUEULES NOIRES. Paris: E. Sansot
& Cie, 1907. 207,[4]pp. Small quarto. Original pictorial stiff wrappers (by Steinlen). With
original lithographed frontispiece and fourteen other lithographs hors-texte, and forty text
illustrations and vignettes, by Steinlen. Modest rubbing to joints, light foxing to edges,
otherwise very good.
First edition, ordinary issue (there were twenty-five copies on Japon, and five on Chine).
Preface by Paul Adam. Accompanied by proofs of eleven of the full-page lithographs, on
25.5 x 21.5 cm sheets, with register marks, each signed in pencil in the lower margin by
the artist (occasional light isolated foxing at margins, otherwise very nice; hinged and matted).
Two of the proofs, for the illustrations facing pages 139 (Crauzat 281) and 171 (Crauzat
279), are for the illustrations as they were redrawn for a portion of the 5th edition. Accompanied
by the publisher’s original lithographed promotional poster for the book (Crauzat 515), matted
and framed (printed and lithographed area 43 x 55 cm) featuring the powerful image used
for the wrapper. The poster, which was lithographed by Eugène Verneau, is, to all appearances
near fine, but has not been examined outside the frame.
CRAUZAT 639, 269ff & 515.                                                                   $2500.
510. Sterne, Laurence: VOYAGE SENTIMENTAL, PAR M. STERNE, SOUS LE NOM
D’YORICK. Neuchatel: De l’Imprimerie de Samuel Fauche, 1776. viii,207,[1],205pp. Two
parts bound in one volume. 12mo. Full contemporary red morocco, elaborately gilt extra,
a.e.g., initials “N.S.” in gilt on upper board, painted armorial crests on each pastedown.
Spine darkened, inner hinges cracking slightly, joints a bit rubbed, bookplate on verso of
front free endsheet, internally very good or better.
An attractively bound copy of this edition of Frénais’s translation into French, first published
in Amsterdam in 1769. The distinctive and elaborate painted coats of arms on the pastedowns
are in four or more colors, and include a crowned eagle ascendant over a crocodile, and
a blind-folded man in profile against a shield.                                           $500.

511. [Stevenson, Robert Louis]: Baxter, Charles: Autograph Letter, Signed, To Publishers
Stone & Kimball. 11 So. Charlotte Street, Edinburgh. 25 September 1896. One-half page,
plus salutation, on quarto sheet of Stevenson Estate letterhead. Folded, and with filing
pinhole. Short break at right edge of one fold, not affecting text, otherwise very good.
A brief letter from Stevenson’s old and trusted friend, then acting as his literary executor,
to his primary U.S. publishers: “Dear Sirs - I am being pressed in regard to the American
Book rights of St. Ives, and I shall now be glad, therefore, to hear from you in reply to
my offer of 14th August....” The letter coincides with a period of transition, as Stone &
Kimball’s option on Stevenson’s U.S. book publications soon passed to Scribner, who did
published St. Ives in 1897, preceding the UK edition.
KRAMER, pp. 62.                                                                        $200.

512. Stone, Reynolds: THE OLD RECTORY SEVENTEEN ENGRAVINGS BY .... [London]:
Warren Editions, 1976. Seventeen wood-engravings (sizes vary), each mounted and matted
(25 x 20 cm), with engraved title and colophon, accompanied by separate booklet, in decorated
wrappers, the whole enclosed in publisher’s gilt folding cloth box. Trace of sunning to
box spine panel, otherwise fine.




First edition. One of 150 sets of proofs of the engravings, each hand printed by the artist
and numbered and signed by him in the lower margin. The accompanying booklet, entitled
Litton Cheney 1877, prints a poem by F.T. Colby, with an accompanying Latin translation
by E. D. Stone, and an introduction by Reynolds Stone. It is one of 150 numbered copies,
signed by Stone, reserved to accompany this portfolio, from a total edition of five hundred
copies. A beautiful evocation of the artist’s house, garden and the wooded environs. $2450.
513. STONY BROOK. Stony Brook, NY: Stony Brook Poetics Foundation, Post-Fall 1968
and 1969. Two double numbers, 1/2 and 3/4 (all published). Large, thick octavo. Printed
and pictorial wrappers. Plates and occasional illustrations. Spines a bit sunned and wrappers
slightly dust marked, but very good copies.
Edited by George Quasha. Projected as a semiannual devoted to poetry, poetics and
translation, with a significant group of contributing and advisory editors, this book-length
periodical accomplished much in its regrettably brief life, printing work by Pound, Duncan,
Levertov, Olson, Snyder, Simic, Harrison, Milosz, Williams, Antin, Paz, Ginsberg, Rothenberg,
Laughlin, J. Tate, Oppen, Niedecker, Creeley, Reznikoff, Wakoski, Bukowski, and many,
many others.                                                                            $85.
                              Poetic Execution Broadside
514. [Strang, Jesse]: Anonymous: EXECUTION, CONFESSION AAD[sic] DIEING WORDS
OF JESSE STRANG, FOR THE MURDER OF JOHN WHIPPLE, AT ALBANY, AUGUST
27TH, 1827 [caption title]. [New York?: no imprint, ca. 1827]. Broadside, 26 x 22.5cm with
irregular margins. Crudely printed on recto only, within mourning border, with woodcut coffin
below caption title. Old folds, with a couple small breaks at folds not affecting text, some
scattered foxing and spotting, ample margins somewhat creased and occasionally chipped
or slightly torn at extreme edges, else very good.
A very scarce broadside printing of a poem occasioned by the sensational Strang case.
Strang, using an alias after the abandonment of his wife, lived in Albany on the Van Rensselear
estate, working for Whipple. Strang and Mrs. Whipple had an affair and she convinced
Strang to kill her husband. “The murder of John Whipple was unusual in two respects;
one, the actual killing followed months of the most careful planning and preparation; two,
the guiding genius of the crime was his wife” - McDade. Popular interest in this case of
adultery and murder ran high, and McDade records no less than a dozen prose imprints
relating to it. This particular effort, presented in twenty-two quatrains, devotes two-thirds
of its length to a piety-laden account of the events, and the remainder to a verse adaptation
of his address from the gallows. Not in American Imprints.                               $550.
                             “...immediately destroyed....”
515. Sutherland, Howard V.: THE LEGEND OF LOVE A TALE ADAPTED TO THE
REQUIREMENTS OF CHILDREN AND OTHERS. San Francisco: Privately Printed, 1893.
Sewn printed wrappers. Wrappers creased and somewhat stained at edges, thread broken,
internally very good.
First edition of this early work, inscribed by the author in 1902. At the conclusion of the
text of the 1911 New York edition, the author wrote: “... One hundred copies were originally
printed in San Francisco in 1893 for private distribution. Of this edition eighty-five were
immediately destroyed.”
WRIGHT III:5326.                                                                      $125.

516. [Tarkington, Booth]: Conselman, William, and Gene Towne [screenwriters]: “BUSINESS
AND PLEASURE” FROM THE COMEDY THE PLUTOCRAT BY ARTHUR GOODRICH BASED
UPON THE NOVEL OF THE SAME NAME BY BOOTH TARKINGTON. Hollywood: Fox Film
Corp., 22 May 1931. [2],103 leaves. Quarto. Mimeographed typescript, printed on rectos
only. Bradbound in studio wrappers. Wrappers frayed at overlap edges and with some tears
along spine, but a very good copy.
A “Final Shooting Script” of this adaptation to the screen of Goodrich’s 1930 dramatic
adaptation of Tarkington’s 1927 novel. The film was directed by David Butler, and starred
Will Rogers, Jetta Goudal and Joel McCrea. It was released in October 1932, and is
representative of the fertile period (1929 - 1935) of Rogers’s association with Fox, where
he starred in over twenty films
RUSSO & SULLIVAN, p.82.                                                              $450.
                                    Joanna Gill’s Copy
517. Taylor, Jeremy: THE MYSTERIOUSNESS OF MARRIAGE. Capel-Y-Ffin, Abergavenny:
Francis Walterson, 1928. Cloth and boards. Illustrations by Denis Tegetmeier. Boards
faded and a bit marked, a few minor smudges, a bit of foxing to endsheets, otherwise a
good copy.
First edition in this format, limited to three hundred numbered copies, printed by Walter
Lewis at the Cambridge University Press. This is copy #13, and bears an additional note
designating it a “Presentation Copy.” With the bookplate of Joanna Brigid Mary [Gill], designed
by her father, and with a presentation inscription to her: “J.B.M.G. from D.A. [Donald Attwater?]
Easter 1928” on the free endsheet.
SKELTON P206.                                                                              $225.

518. Tennyson, Alfred: POEMS. London: Edward Moxon, 1857. xiii,[3],375,[1]pp. Small
quarto. Portrait and 54 woodcut vignettes. Original publisher’s medium green cloth, elaborately
decorated in blind, spine gilt extra, ornate gilt urn device on side panels. Bookplate and
small French bookseller’s ticket on pastedown, inner hinges cracking very slightly, usual
foxing early and late and sporadically in text, spine a trace sunned, but nonetheless, an
unusually nice copy in original state of a book now seldom encountered in the original cloth.
First edition thus. The now celebrated illustrated edition published by Moxon to some
controversy and only marginal economic success, commingling work by traditional illustrators
with work by members of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood, including Millais, Rossetti, Hunt
and Stanfield, engraved by the Dalziel Bros., William Linton, and others.
RAY (ILLUSTRATOR AND THE BOOK IN ENGLAND), 148. TINKER 2076. ASHLEY VII:114.
FREDEMAN 90.3.                                                                      $2000.

519. [Terry, John Orville]: THE POEMS OF J.O.T. CONSISTING OF SONGS, SATIRE,
AND PASTORAL DESCRIPTIONS CHIEFLY DEPICTING THE SCENERY AND ILLUSTRATING
THE MANNERS AND CUSTOMS AND THE ANCIENT AND PRESENT INHABITANTS OF
LONG ISLAND. New York: George F. Nesbitt, 1850. 292pp. Original cloth. Bookplate,
pencil note on front endpaper recording acquisition from “Dodd, Mead & Cos. Catalogue
of Rare Books Relating to America Nov. 1901.” Cloth a bit sunned, rubbed and lightly soiled,
but a very good copy.
First edition of the author’s first — and it would appear only — collection of verse. While
amply represented institutionally in OCLC/Worldcat, it is uncommon in trade these days.
                                                                                      $100.

520. Thomas, Dylan: THE WORLD I BREATHE. Norfolk: New Directions, [1939]. Cloth.
One fore-tip rubbed, else a near fine copy in very good dust jacket with very shallow loss
at crown at spine and a few short, closed tears at tips and edges.
First edition, first binding, with single stars on either side of the author’s name on the spine.
One of seven hundred copies (the entire edition). There was no analogous British edition.
                                                                                           $650.

521. [Thomas, Edward]: Jefferies, Richard: THE HILLS AND THE VALE ... WITH AN
INTRODUCTION BY EDWARD THOMAS. London: Duckworth, 1909. Gilt cloth, top edges
plain. Binding slightly bowed, otherwise a very good, bright copy.
First edition of this selection of Jefferies’s periodical contributions, supplemented by three
hitherto unpublished essays, and Thomas’s 20+ page introduction. Publisher’s presentation
copy, with perforated stamp in title. Whether indicative of early (as implied by the stamp)
or late status, the top edges on this copy are not gilt.
ECKERT, p.267.                                                                          $125.
522. Thomas, Edward: THE COUNTRY. London: Batsford, [1913]. Gilt decorated cloth, t.e.g.,
ribbon marker. A near fine, bright copy.
First edition, advance state. Stamped on the title-page: “Rough Proof Copy Only / Not to
be Sold.” The most obvious difference between this copy and the published issue is a
dedication to W.H. Davies on the last page that did not appear in the published book.
ECKERT, pp. 228-9.                                                                $150.

523. Thomson, James: THE SEASONS ... WITH ENGRAVED ILLUSTRATIONS FROM
DESIGNS DRAWN ON WOOD ... AND WITH THE LIFE OF THE AUTHOR BY PATRICK
MURDOCH .... London: Longman, Brown, Green, and Longmans, 1842. xlviii,320pp. Large
octavo. Full crimson morocco, gilt extra, raised bands, gilt inner dentelles, by Hayday.
Tips faintly worn, endsheets foxed, early ink name, a few marginal smudges, otherwise
very good.
First this edition, edited by Bolton Corney, and illustrated with wood engravings by Vizetelly
after Bell, Cope, Creswick, Horsley, Knight, Redgrave, Stone, Stonhouse, Tayler, Townsend
and Webster. The elaborate pictorial extra-title leaf is by Bell.                       $350.

524. [Thornwillow Press]: Auchincloss, Louis: CIVIL WARS THREE TALES OF OLD NEW
YORK ... ILLUSTRATIONS BY ELLIOTT BANFIELD. [New York, West Stockbridge & Prague]:
Thornwillow Press, 1999. Large octavo. Publisher’s three quarter green morocco, lettered
in gilt, and pastepaper over boards, t.e.g. Frontis and illustrations. A fine copy in publisher’s
clamshell case.
First edition. One of 175 numbered copies, printed by Michael and Winifred Bixler on Cardinal
Mill handmade paper after a design by Luke Pontifell. Signed by the author, the artist and
the designer.                                                                          $850.

525. Trevor, William: FOOLS OF FORTUNE. London: The Bodley Head, [1983]. Half morocco
and marbled boards, a.e.g. Handsome bookplate of a noted printer/designer/bookseller,
else fine in lightly edgeworn slipcase.
First edition sheets, specially bound for Kenny Galway Fine Binding Ltd. One of fifty numbered
copies thus, signed by the author.                                                       $450.

526. Trumbo, Dalton: “TO OWN THE WORLD” [caption title]. [Los Angeles]: RKO Radio
Pictures, Inc. September 1939. [2],19 leaves. One leaf octavo, remainder quarto. Mimeographed
typescript, printed on rectos only. Some corner creasing and mild occasional marginal nicks
and chips, terminal leaf detached from staple, but very good.
An interesting artifact, being a mimeo of Trumbo’s story, accompanied by a reader’s abstract
and recommendation for consideration memo (by William Koenig). The story was accepted
for production, and Trumbo went on to write the screenplay. The 1940 release appeared
as We Who Are Young, directed by Harold Bucquet, starring Lana Turner, John Shelton
and Gene Lockhart.                                                                    $175.

527. Turner, Tom: A LITTLE SHEAF OF VERSE [with:] MORE VERSE [with:] SOME
TRANSLATIONS AND OTHER VERSE. Bradford & London: Privately Printed by Percy Lund,
Humphries & Co., Ltd., Xmas 1903, 1904, and 1906. Three volumes. Sewn printed wrappers.
A few small chips at overlap edges, otherwise very good, enclosed in a folding cloth clamshell
box.

First editions of these small collections of verse, each bearing the author’s signed presentation
inscription to fellow poet, Gordon Bottomley. Turner, though not without interest as a minor
poet, left a considerable mark in the world of book-collecting. On a postman’s salary,
he built a collection of some ten thousand volumes that found a home at the University
of Illinois, through the good offices of Gordon Ray. His private publications are scarce,
and these are good association copies; each bears the label of the Bottomley Bequest.
                                                                                   $200.

528. [Tyler, Anne]: Kasdan, Lawrence [screenwriter]: THE ACCIDENTAL TOURIST
SCREENPLAY BY ... BASED ON THE NOVEL BY ANNE TYLER. Burbank: Kasdan Company
/ Warner Bros., 30 October - 14 December 1987. [1],141,[1] leaves. Quarto. Mechanically
reproduced typescript, printed on rectos only of blue and rose paper. Bradbound in production
company wrappers. 1 x 3" piece clipped from blank top margin of title-leaf, title lettered
across bottom edge, faint tide-mark at upper edges of wrappers (only), otherwise very good.
Denoted a “Final Revised” script of this adaptation of Tyler’s novel, but proceeding from
that draft with revises on blue paper from December. Kasdan, who also directed the 1988
film, shared screen credit for the script with Frank Galati upon final release. The film was
nominated for a broad range of awards, including an Oscar nomination for the script, and
Gena Davis won an Oscar as Best Supporting Actress. William Hurt, Kathleen Turner, Bill
Pullman and Ed Begley, Jr., also starred. While copies of the final script, distributed for
Academy consideration, turn up with some frequency, preproduction scripts such as this
are less common.                                                                       $200.

529. Vail, Laurence: TWO POEMS. [New York]: Modern Editions Press, [nd. but ca. 1934].
Sewn pictorial wrappers, with a decorative cut by Max Axe. Fine.
First edition of the expatriate artist and author’s second book, issued as No. 6 of the press’s
Poetry Series in an unspecified, but small edition.                                      $150.

530. [Vale Press]: Marlowe, Christopher, and George Chapman: HERO AND LEANDER.
[London: Sold by Elkin Mathews and John Lane..., 1894]. Large octavo. Full publisher’s
vellum, decorated in gilt, edges untrimmed. Illustrations and decorative initials. Vellum bowed
and a bit darkened and handsoiled, a few scattered leaves show some typical light foxing,
but about very good.
One of 220 copies printed at the Ballantyne Press. Illustrated with woodcuts and devices
by Charles Ricketts and C.H. Shannon. One of the handful of early works by Ricketts and
Shannon singled out by Ransom as foreshadowing the founding of the Vale Press in 1896.
RANSOM (VALE) c. FRANKLIN (PRIVATE PRESSES), p.81.                                $1250.

531. [Vale Press]: Suckling, Sir John: THE POEMS OF.... [London: Hacon & Ricketts,
1896]. Large octavo. Paper boards, decorated side panels, paper spine label. Extremities
shelf-rubbed, tasteful bookplate on pastedown, but a very good copy.
One of 310 copies printed at the Ballantyne Press under the direction of Charles Ricketts,
who also made the decorated initials. Text edited by John Gray.
RANSOM (VALE) 3. TOMKINSON (VALE) 3.                                                $275.

532. [Vale Press]: THE PARABLES FROM THE GOSPELS. [London: Hacon & Ricketts,
1903.]. Full limp vellum. Illustrated with ten original woodcuts. Binding and endsheets a
bit dusty, internally about fine (though some of the tissue guards are creased).
One of 310 copies on paper printed at the Ballantyne Press under the direction of Charles
Ricketts, who also made the woodcuts. There were also ten copies on real vellum.
RANSOM (VALE) 40.                                                                  $850.

533. Valente, Alfredo: Original Photograph from JUDGMENT DAY. [New York]. [ca. 1934].
Original borderless sepia silver print, 24 x 19 cm (9 3/8 x 7 3/8 inches). Faint oxidation
along left and upper edges, otherwise very good or better.
A superb image, in Valente’s distinctive style, identified on the verso in a later hand as
from a production of Elmer Rice’s play, “Judgement Day” [sic] (corrected from “We, the
People”), and with the photographer’s stamp “Proof Property of Alfred Valente.” Rice’s play
was a political work, mirroring the Reichstag Trial, and played at the Belasco Theatre Sept.
Dec. 1934. The image is of an unidentified prisoner, in manacles, seated on the floor, awash
in shadow and light. Valente (1899 - 1973), rose to considerable prominence in the 1930s
as the photographer for the Group Theatre, and by the end of the decade was one of the
leading theatrical photographers for the New York Times and other major periodicals. His
stint as a Hollywood still photographer included such major and visually rich productions
as Lost Horizon.                                                                       $350.

534. Van Vechten, Carl: Original Photograph “GIPSY DANCERS.” [Location: Granada,
Spain, printed New York]. 25 May 1935. Original sepia-tone borderless silver print. 25 x
16.5 cm (9.75 x 6.5 inches). Fine.
A well-executed photograph by Van Vechten of a subject close to his heart and in one
of his areas of greatest expertise: Spanish dancing. The print bears his blindstamp, and
on the verso his credit stamp. It is captioned in ink on the verso, in his hand: “Gipsy Dancers,
in front of the Gipsy Caves El Albaicin - The Sacromonte” and is dated and bears his negative
number. Beginning with The Music of Spain (1918), Van Vechten did much to introduce
the subject, particularly Spanish dance, to readers in the U.S. and U.K. He photographed
and promoted some of its practitioners when they toured in the U.S., but this photograph
taken in situ is particularly choice.                                                    $1000.




535. Van Vechten, Carl: Original Portrait Photograph of Lillian Gish. New York. 12
April 1937. Original borderless gelatin silver print, 35.5 x 23 cm (14 x 9 inches). Slight
discoloration on verso, otherwise near fine.
A fine portrait of the actress, dating from the late days of her performance as Ophelia in
the Broadway revival of Hamlet, opposite John Gielgud. This large format print bears Van
Vechten’s ink studio stamp on the verso. The subject, date and negative number are also
written on the verso in ink, in Van Vechten’s hand. There are no portraits of Lillian Gish
indexed in the Library of Congress Van Vechten collection. A print from another negative
taken during the same session is included in Extravagant Crown Carl Van Vechten’s
Portraits of Women (Yale, Beinecke Library, 2003). This sitting is not recorded in Kellner,
and the image printed in Portraits (1978) is from her 1947 sitting.                 $1250.

536. Van Vechten, Carl: Original Portrait Photograph of Edward Lueders. [New York].
21 November 1951. Original borderless gelatin silver print, 24 x 19 cm (9.5 x 7.5 inches).
Fine.
A striking left-profile portrait by Van Vechten of the youthful Lueders who, in 1955, published
the very important study, Carl Van Vechten and the Twenties, and in later years came
into his own as a poet and nature writer (The Clam Lake Papers). With Van Vechten’s
blindstamp, his studio stamp on the verso, and with his manuscript subject identification,
negative number and date in ink. Not in Kellner’s index of Van Vechten’s photographs,
and not indexed in the Library of Congress Van Vechten photo archive.                    $550.

537. Van Vechten, Carl: Original Portrait Photograph of Eartha Kitt. New York. 19 October
1952.. Original borderless gelatin silver print, 25.5 x 17 cm (9 7/8 x 6 3/4 inches). Fine.

A beautiful vintage portrait of the 25 year old singer, dating from the year of her Broadway
appearance in New Faces. This print bears Van Vechten’s ink studio stamp on the verso.
The subject, date and negative number are also written on the verso in ink, in Van Vechten’s
hand. There are prints of three other negatives from the same session in the Library of
Congress Van Vechten photo archive, and two other prints from the session were exhibited
in Extravagant Crowd Carl Van Vechten’s Portraits of Women (Yale, Beinecke Library,
2003).
KELLNER G701.                                                                         $1000.
                                Portrait of St. Settlement
538. Van Vechten, Carl: Original Portrait Photograph of Martha Flowers. New York.
17 February 1953. Original borderless gelatin silver print, 23.5 x 18 cm (9.25 x 7.25 inches).
Fine.
A vintage portrait of the young singer, then in the ascendance of her career, less than a
year after her role as St. Settlement in the Broadway revival of Four Saints in Three Acts.
This print bears Van Vechten’s blindstamp, and on the verso his ink studio stamp. The
subject, date and negative number are also written on the verso in ink, in Van Vechten’s
hand. There is a print of another negative from the same sitting, albeit dated in the catalogue
entry a week earlier - an impossibility as it is separated from this photograph by only one
other exposure and the set and dress are identical - in the Library of Congress Van Vechten
photo archive.
KELLNER G434.                                                                             $750.

539. Van Vechten, Carl: Original Portrait Photograph of Charlotte Holloman. New York.
6 December 1957. Original borderless gelatin silver print, 25.5 x 19 cm (9.85 x 7.5 inches).
Small stray ink mark in upper left corner of image (see below), otherwise fine.
A vintage portrait of the singer, from the decade of her Broadway ascendance. This print
bears Van Vechten’s blindstamp, and on the verso his ink studio stamp. The subject, date
and negative number are also written on the verso in ink, in Van Vechten’s hand. A stray
pen mark, in the same ink as Van Vechten’s annotations, appears in the upper left corner
of the image. There is a print of another negative from the same sitting in the Library of
Congress Van Vechten photo archive.
KELLNER G582.                                                                       $750.
540. Van Vechten, Carl: Original Portrait Photograph of Althea Gibson. New York. 20
November 1958. Original borderless gelatin silver print, 25 x 15.3 cm (9 7/8 x 6 inches).
About fine.
A vintage portrait of the ground-breaking African American tennis star, showing her in left
profile, in tennis dress, with racquet, looking pensively toward the ground. This print bears
Van Vechten’s blindstamp, and on the verso his ink studio stamp. The subject and negative
number are also written on the verso in ink, in Van Vechten’s hand. There are prints of
ten other negatives from the same sitting in the Library of Congress Van Vechten photo
archive, but not this image; two prints of different images from the sitting were included
in Extravagant Crowd Carl Van Vechten’s Portraits of Women (Yale, Beinecke Library,
2003).
KELLNER G470.                                                                           $850.

541. Van Vliet, Claire [illustrator]: THE TRAGEDIE OF KING LEAR. By William Shake-
speare. Bangor, ME: Theodore Press, 1986. Large quarto. Quarter open-laced alum-tawed
pigskin and hand-painted birch boards. Illustrated with woodcuts by Claire Van Vliet. Fine
in cloth slipcase and chemise.
One of one hundred and sixty numbered copies, printed on handmade paper by Michael
Alpert. Claire Van Vliet printed her woodcut illustrations at the Janus Press, designed the
binding, and signed each copy. An ambitious and imposing presentation of a slightly modified
form of the First Folio text.                                                        $2250.

542. [Vonnegut, Kurt]: Geller, Stephen [screenwriter]: SLAUGHTERHOUSE-FIVE FINAL
DRAFT SCREENPLAY ... BASED ON THE NOVEL BY KURT VONNEGUT, JR. Universal
City: Universal Studios, 21 December 1970 - 6 January 1971. [2],134 leaves. Quarto.
Mechanically reproduced typescript, printed on rectos only of pale green and pink stock.
Bradbound in printed studio wrappers. Wrappers faintly used, some very minor offset from
wrappers to fore-edges of a couple prelims, otherwise a very good or better copy.
Denoted a “final draft” (but with later dated revises) of Geller’s screen adaptation of what
many regard as Vonnegut’s key novel, his fictionalized mining of his experiences as a POW
and witness to the firebombing of Dresden. Vonnegut’s novel was inherently a particularly
difficult adaptation, unless one were to treat the narrative on the most literal level, and
this film, whatever its flaws, remains a heroic effort. The 1972 release was directed by
George Roy Hill, and starred Michael Sacks, Valerie Perrine, Ron Liebman, Holly Near,
et al.                                                                                $650.

543. Wade, Allan: A BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE WRITINGS OF W. B. YEATS.... [London]:
Rupert Hart-Davis, [1958]. Gilt polished buckram. Frontis portrait. Second edition, revised.
Published in the Soho Bibliographies series. Small pencil ownership inscription on pastedown,
a few light pencil notes, but a very good, bright copy in lightly smudged and frayed dust
jacket. Laid in is a prospectus for the Irish Univ. Press Cuala reprint series.         $150.

544. Wakoski, Diane: GREED PARTS ONE AND TWO. Los Angeles: Black Sparrow Press,
1968. Decorated boards. Fine in faintly dustsoiled unprinted jacket.
First edition of the first element in the author’s magnum opus. One of fifty numbered copies,
specially bound, from an edition of 300 numbered copies signed by the author. $175.

545. Wall, Bernhardt: BITS FROM WALL’S ETCHED BOOKS. [Lime Rock, CT: Bernhardt
Wall, ca. 1929]. Small octavo (15.3 x 10.5 cm). Cloth backed boards, with engraved imprint
on upper board. Thirteen original etchings (including title and colophon). Some minor creases
to boards, otherwise very good, internally fine.
A random sampling of etchings from Wall’s work from 1920-1929, five of them (including
the title) signed by him in pencil. Weber suggests the edition may have consisted of about
fifty copies; the copy he describes included a total of fourteen etchings, but in our experience,
both the number and the etchings vary between copies.
WEBER,p.37.                                                                               $375.




546. Ward, Lynd: Original Woodcut, Signed. [New York]. 1932. Original woodcut on paper,
15.5 x 9.5 cm plus margins, matted, and handsomely glazed and framed. Small brown spot
largely obscured by image, but very good. Not examined out of frame.
One of twenty numbered impressions, signed and dated by the artist in the lower margin.
A striking image of a couple embracing against a background of stars, a planet, and the
sun, published in the Equinox Press edition of Powys’s Now That The Gods Are Dead.
                                                                                 $600.

547. [Weidman, Jerome]: Polonsky, Abraham [screenwriter]: “I CAN GET IT FOR YOU
WHOLESALE” SCREENPLAY BY.... [Los Angeles]: Twentieth Century-Fox, 4 August 1950.
[2],168 leaves. Quarto. Mimeographed typescript, printed on rectos only. Bradbound in printed
studio wrappers. Light use at overlap wrapper edges, check-out coupon clipped, otherwise
about fine.
Denoted a “Revised First Draft Continuity” script, but in fact, an early pre-production script,
and not a continuity script in the regular sense. A screenplay by Polonsky, via an adaptation
by Vera Caspery, of Weidman’s novel (and later, musical play), released in April 1951,
directed by Michael Gordon, starring Susan Hayward, Dan Dailey and Sam Jaffe. As
screenwriter for Body and Soul (1947) and writer/director of Force of Evil (1948), Polonsky
was well on his way toward a distinguished career in film when he was blacklisted and
fired by Fox for refusing to cooperate with HUAC in 1951. He continued to work during the
Blacklist, either uncredited or pseudonymously, and in 1996 the Writers Guild restored
his real name and credits. The degree of Caspary’s involvement in this adaptation is unclear
— this draft is credited solely to Polonsky, and Caspary may have either done an earlier
treatment, or had some involvement after this draft. Accompanied by a separately bound
script breakdown, [6],82 leaves, dated 2 October 1950, bearing a few pencil annotations.
                                                                                       $1500.
                                     Presentation Copy
548. Wells, H.G.: AFTER DEMOCRACY ADDRESSES AND PAPERS ON THE PRESENT
WORLD SITUATION. London: Watts & Co., [1932]. Gilt plum cloth. Covers a bit bowed,
otherwise a nice, bright copy in slightly chipped and nicked dust jacket.
First edition. With Wells’s presentation inscription to fellow novelist Frank Swinnerton: “Swinny
from H.G.”                                                                                  $450.

549. Wells, H.G.: “DETRIMENTAL WRAPPERS AND BLURBS AND ADVERTISEMENTS”
[caption title]. London: Society of Authors, ca. 1934]. Three long folded letterpress galleys.
Relevant pencil annotations, otherwise about fine.
Three copies of the letterpress galley for this article by Wells, ca. 400 words, on the problems
associated with sensationalized blurbs and advertisements for books mischaracterizing
their actual content, singling out his own The Science of Life, as well as Richard Calder’s
Birth of the Future, as examples of books ill-served by their publisher’s attempts to promote
them. In the case of the former, “our publisher intimates quite plainly that our book is a
compilation of scientific smut, spook-nonsense and general ‘extraordinariness” for curious
minds. This is not selling a book; it is killing a book.” The pencil notes (not in Wells’s
hand) add a postscript: “Mr. Wells, whose article reached me in April, asks me to say
that the wrapper in question has now been withdrawn and a more appropriate one substituted
- Ed. The Author.” A relatively early note, in ink, on an envelope containing the galleys,
indicates the article was scheduled for publication in the Summer 1934 issue of The Author,
but withdrawn at Wells’s request.                                                          $350.

550. Wells, H.G.: THE COUNTRY OF THE BLIND. [London]: Golden Cockerel Press, 1939.
Quarto. Quarter dyed vellum, lettered in gilt. Illustrated with engravings by Clifford Webb.
About fine.
First edition thus. One of two hundred and fifty numbered copies (of 280), printed on handmade
paper. This edition collects both the 1904 and the 1939 versions of the story, along with
an explanatory Introduction by Wells.                                                     $575.

551. Wells, H.G.: Autograph Letter, Signed. 13 Hanover Terrace, Regent’s Park. 15 February
1945. One page, on small octavo letter sheet. Folded for mailing, otherwise about fine.
To Kelham Roberts. “Just to remind you that I am expecting you here to a drink & to meet
my Son ... Sidgwick he [sic] can take you to the Savile & accumulate signatures in the
Candidates book & so on... Yours H.G.” Wells had originally signed the letter in full ‘H.G.
Wells’ but then crossed that out and wrote simply ‘H.G.’                             $500.

552. Welty, Eudora: PLACE IN FICTION. [Np]: Reprinted from The South Atlantic Quarterly,
January, 1956. Stapled printed wrappers. Upper wrapper a bit darkened and spotted, with
a couple ink squiggles, otherwise a very good copy.
First separate issue, reported as being one of about fifty copies specially gotten up for
distribution by the author and publisher. The pagination remains the same as in the periodical
appearance. This copy is inscribed by Welty on the front wrapper to one of her former editors
at Harcourt, Lambert Davis, and his wife, as a New Year’s greeting.
POLK C20 (ref).                                                                       $1500.

553. Welty, Eudora: PLACE IN FICTION. New York: House of Books, 1957. Gilt cloth.
Very slight darkening to endsheets, else fine in glassine wrapper (possibly original).
First edition in book form, numbered issue. One of three hundred numbered copies, from
a total edition of 326 copies signed by the author. This copy bears the author’s later signed
inscription on the free endsheet. Published as Crown Octavo 13, and among the more difficult
titles in the series, due to a portion of the edition being damaged by damp and destroyed.
Preceded by publication as an author’s offprint.
POLK A12:1.                                                                         $750.

554. Welty, Eudora: ONE TIME, ONE PLACE MISSISSIPPI IN THE DEPRESSION / A
SNAPSHOT ALBUM. New York: Random House, [1971]. Oblong small quarto. Cloth.
Photographs by the author. Fine in very near fine slipcase.
First edition, limited issue. One of three hundred numbered copies, specially bound and
signed by the author/photographer. A superb collection of Welty’s photographs associated
with her work with the WPA.
POLK A18:1.                                                                       $500.

                                        One of 26
                                  Inscribed, with Letter
555. Welty, Eudora: A PAGEANT OF BIRDS. New York: Albondocani Press, 1974. Small
octavo. Pictorial wrapper over stiff wrappers, paper label. Photographs by the author. Near
fine.
First edition in book form. One of twenty-six lettered copies, reserved for the author and
publisher, in addition to three hundred numbered copies, all signed by the author. This
copy also bears the author’s presentation inscription, “...with New Year’s Day wishes and
love, from Eudora....” Laid in is a two page a.l.s., recto and verso of an octavo sheet, in
ink, from Welty to the recipient, forwarding the book and commenting on it, and thanking
the recipient at great lengths for his help in the preliminary work that would result in the
selection of texts that would eventually appear as The Eye of the Story (1978).
POLK A20:1b.                                                                        $1500.

556. Welty, Eudora: “ACROBATS IN A PARK” [caption title]. [Montpellier]: Delta, Novembre
1977. Stapled printed wrappers. Fine.
First separate issue, as an author’s separate from Delta No. 5.
POLK B51.                                                                               $400.

557. Welty, Eudora: IDA M’TOY. Urbana: Univ. of Illinois Press, [1979]. Small quarto. Gilt
red cloth. Photograph and facsimiles. Fine.
First edition. One of 350 numbered copies, signed by the author. Inscribed and signed
by the author on the front free endsheet. Polk assigns “first state” status to the red binding.
POLK A23:1.                                                                              $400.

558. Welty, Eudora: ACROBATS IN A PARK. Northridge: Lord John Press, 1980. Small
quarto. Decorated cloth. Fine, without dust jacket, as issued.
First clothbound printing, preceded by publication as an author’s offprint. One of one hundred
numbered copies (of four hundred), differently bound, and signed by the author. This copy
is additionally inscribed and signed by Welty on the first blank.
POLK A26:1b.                                                                             $350.

559. Welty, Eudora: THE COLLECTED STORIES OF EUDORA WELTY. New York: Harcourt,
[1980]. Cloth. As new in slipcase with printed label.
First Harcourt edition, limited issue (reported to have been preceded by a Franklin Library
printing). One of five hundred numbered copies, specially bound and signed by the author.
POLK A27:2C.                                                                         $500.
560. [Welty, Eudora]: Macdonald, Ross: SELF-PORTRAIT: CEASELESSLY INTO THE PAST.
Santa Barbara: Capra Press, 1981. Publisher’s full black leather. Fine in marbled paper
over boards slipcase.
First edition, limited issue. Edited, with an afterword, by Ralph B. Sipper, and with a foreword
by Eudora Welty. One of twenty-six lettered copies (of 226) specially bound and signed
by MacDonald and Welty, with a small photograph of them together inserted in a pocket
affixed to the front pastedown.                                                            $750.

561. [Welty, Eudora]: Brooks, Cleanth, et al.: EUDORA WELTY: A TRIBUTE 13 APRIL
1984. [Winston-Salem]: Printed for Stuart Wright, 1984. Large octavo. Half Niger morocco
and marbled boards. Fine, without dust jacket, as issued.
First edition in book form, published in observance of Welty’s 75th birthday. A collective
reprinting of essays by Brooks, B. Malamud, W. Maxwell, R. Price, W. J. Smith, E. Spencer,
P. Taylor, Anne Tyler, R. P. Warren and R. Wilbur. One of seventy-five copies, signed by
each of the authors at the end of their respective contribution.                    $850.

562. Welty, Eudora: ONE WRITER’S BEGINNINGS. Cambridge: Harvard, 1984. Cloth. Portrait
and photographs. Fine in cloth slipcase.
First edition, limited issue. One of 350 numbered copies, specially bound and signed by
the author.
POLK A31:1b.                                                                      $600.

563. Welty, Eudora: PHOTOGRAPHS. Jackson: Univ. Press of Mississippi, [1989]. Oblong
small quarto. Cloth. Fine in slipcase.
 First edition, limited issue. One of 375 numbered copies, signed by Welty (of 401). Foreword
by Reynolds Price, and with an interview with Welty about photography. A breathtaking
testament to Welty’s large and embracing talent as a photographer, with particular emphasis
on her work from the 1930s.                                                             $750.

564. Welty, Eudora, et al.: MISS EUDORA WELTY MISS JEAN STAFFORD MR. ALFRED
KAZIN ... REQUEST THE PLEASURE OF YOUR COMPANY... [caption title]. [New York:
Farrar, Straus and Co.], 1949. [4]pp. French fold leaflet. Small octavo. A promotional for
Fritz Peters’ The World Next Door, printing blurbs by Welty, Stafford, Kazin, et al. Fine.
Signed by Welty on the upper panel.                                                 $150.

565. Wescott, Glenway: THE BITTERNS A BOOK OF TWELVE POEMS. Evanston: Monroe
Wheeler, [1920]. Small octavo. String-tied pictorial wrappers after a design by Frederik
Newquist. Tiny sliver chips at tips of three fore-corners, clean split at top of spine to first
string hole, else unusually fine.
First edition of the author’s first separate publication, signed by him on the first blank.
                                                                                     $650.

566. Wescott, Glenway: LIKE A LOVER. Villefranche-sur-Mer: Monroe Wheeler, 1926. Printed
wrappers. Fine in lightly rumpled glassine.
First edition. Copy #10 of only two hundred copies printed on Rives vellum, issued for
presentation only. Inscribed by Wescott: “For Hope, with all my heart, G.” Below the inscription
is a small, tipped-in photograph of a youthful Wescott. The presentation slip is not present,
but there is a correction of an error on page 15 in Wescott’s hand.                      $450.

567. Wescott, Glenway: THE DREAM OF AUDUBON SCENARIO OF A BALLET IN THREE
SCENES [caption title]. [Np, nd]. 13 leaves. Quarto. Mimeographed typescript, printed on
rectos only, stapled. Light use at edges, a bit of rust to the staple, but very good.
An unusual (to say the least) and fanciful work, placing considerable weight on the spurious
allegation of Audubon’s having been the son of Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette (the subject
of the third scene). Based on physical appearance, this production likely dates from the
1930s-1940s. Provenance: a small number of duplicate copies from the papers of Monroe
Wheeler and Glenway Wescott.                                                          $125.

568. [West, Nathanael]: Original Studio Publicity Campaign Pressbook for ADVICE
TO THE LOVELORN. [Hollywood]: 20th Century Pictures - United Artists, [1933]. [12]pp.
plus [4]pp. separate insert. Folio. Pictorial self wrappers. Heavily illustrated. Folded, as
issued, with remnants of paper seal across fore-edge, some pencil erasures from blank
portion of upper wrapper, some light external dust-soiling, short breaks at fold at fore-edge,
but a very good copy of a fragile item.
An original studio publicity campaign pressbook for the first attempt at translating West’s
Miss Lonelyhearts to the screen, based on a script by Leonard Praskins, directed by Alfred
Werker, starring Lee Tracy and Sally Blane, and produced by Darryl Zanuck. The fact that
the adaptation was far from faithful is a matter of record. Tracy was then at the height of
his popularity, and the studio went all out with a particularly wide array of publicity art
work, including completely different imagery for the one, three, six and twenty-four sheets,
and extensive text, as well as a synopsis. Nonetheless, publicity material for the film is
uncommon.                                                                             $400.

569. [West, Nathanael]: Six Pictorial Lobby Cards for IT COULD HAPPEN TO YOU.
[Hollywood]: Republic Pictures, 1937. Six original 11 x 14 color pictorial lobby cards. Very
light signs of use and faint tanning to stock, one card with neat thumb-tack holes from
original use, but an unusually nice lot, with colors bright and fresh.
Six highly pictorial lobby cards for this 1937 film, based on a script co-written by Nathanael
West and Samuel Ornitz. The film was directed by Phil Rosen, and starred Alan Baxter,
Andrea Leeds, Owen Davis Jr., et al. White, in his entry for this film, describes it as “Republic
Studio’s version of A Cool Million with Sinclair Lewis’s It Can’t Happen Here and ‘immigrant
sociology’.” While we obviously would prefer that it was, the record presented by these
lobby cards clearly evidences otherwise, and a brief synopsis of this film from another source
describes it as a family courtroom drama, albeit featuring two sons of immigrants, one
in legal jeopardy being defended by the other, an attorney. Publicity paper associated with
West’s film-writing career is uncommon.
WHITE D14.                                                                                 $450.

570. [West, Nathanael]: Two Pictorial Lobby Cards for BORN TO BE WILD. [Hollywood]:
Republic Pictures, 1938. Two original 11 x 14 color pictorial lobby cards. Blank margins
of one card a bit nicked and browned, upper corner of blank margin of second card smudged,
but very good.
Two highly pictorial lobby cards for this 1933 film distinguished largely by the fact that
it was the only Republic Picture actually produced during West’s tenure there that was
solely his own writing, as opposed to a collaboration or adaptation. It was, of course, in
every sense a ‘B’ action film, directed by Joseph Kane, starring Ralph Byrd, Doris Weston
and Ward Bond, and deals with the fight of a small town against a land baron who has
built a dam diverting their water supply, resulting in the attempt by two truckers to dynamite
the dam. Ample love interest was thrown in, as evidenced in the scene featured on one
of the cards, to lighten the load (the scene shows Bond tying up Byrd and Weston with
rope — in jest rather than malice — as they smile broad ‘B’ movie smiles and tightly embrace).
Some critics credit this film as the inspiration for Clouzot’s Wages of Fear and its own
worthy progeny, Sorcerer. Publicity paper associated with West’s film work is uncommon.
WHITE D13.                                                                               $250.
571. Whitman, Walt: THE BOOK OF HEAVENLY DEATH .... Portland, ME: Thomas B. Mosher,
1905. Large octavo. Printed parchment wrapper over boards. Portrait frontis. Facsimile.
Bookplate scar on verso of free endsheet, otherwise a near fine copy in slightly tanned
and nicked, very good printed dust jacket.
First edition of this authorized selection, edited by Horace Traubel. One of fifty numbered
copies on Japan vellum, in addition to five on vellum and five hundred on paper.
BISHOP B48. MYERSON C.19.1.b.                                                         $250.

572. [Wilde, Oscar]: THE BALLAD OF READING GAOL. By “C.3.3.” New York: Benj. R.
Tucker, Publisher, 1899. Tan wrappers, printed in red-brown. A few small nicks, wrapper
spine neatly split, a bit dusty, but otherwise very good.
A variant form of the uncommon first American edition, published by the noted American
anarchist theorist / publisher / bookseller / translator. Mason/Millard does not include this
(or any other American) edition in his list of either authorized or pirated editions of this
title. It is the first dated American edition cited in the NUC, and Tucker himself claimed
it was the first printed in the U.S. It occurs in at least two forms, the other being clothbound,
with the text printed on rectos only, untrimmed. This is a good association copy, bearing
Horace Traubel’s signed 1899 presentation inscription across the upper wrapper. $450.

573. [Wilde, Oscar]: Behmer, Marcus: Proof on Japan Vellum of Title Border Design
for SALOME. [Leipzig: Insel-Verlag, 1903]. Folio sheet (33.7 x 26.5 cm), with image size
17 x 13.2 cm. Somewhat crudely matted, otherwise about fine.
One of an unspecified but small number of proof impressions of the highly ornate floral
title-page border by Behmer for the 1903 edition of Wilde’s Salome, translated by Hedwig
Lachmann, and published in an edition of only fifty copies on Japan vellum. Captioned in
pencil beneath the image “Fuer Buchen Behmer 24.XII.03 M.B.” A pencil note in another
hand indicates “Titel-Rahmen.”                                                     $350.

574. [Wilde, Oscar]: Behmer, Marcus: Proof on Japan Vellum of Illustration for SALOME
[“CANDLE & MOON”]. [Leipzig: Insel-Verlag, 1903]. Folio sheet (33.9 x 26.5 cm), with image
size 17.4 x 12.5 cm. Somewhat crudely matted, otherwise about fine.
One of an unspecified but small number of proof impressions of this illustration by Behmer
for the 1903 edition of Wilde’s Salome , translated by Hedwig Lachmann, and published
in an edition of only fifty copies on Japan vellum. Captioned in pencil beneath the image
“Fuer Buchen M.” Although untitled here, the image depicts a lit candle with a heavily
stylized plume of smoke partially obscuring a black moon.                            $450.

575. [Wilde, Oscar]: Behmer, Marcus: Proof on Japan Vellum of Illustration for SALOME
[“HERODES”]. [Leipzig: Insel-Verlag, 1903]. Folio sheet (33.7 x 26.5 cm), with image size
17 x 12.5 cm. Somewhat crudely matted, otherwise about fine.
One of an unspecified but small number of proof impressions of this illustration by Behmer
for the 1903 edition of Wilde’s Salome, translated by Hedwig Lachmann, and published
in an edition of only fifty copies on Japan vellum. Captioned in pencil beneath the image
“Fuer Buchen M.” Although untitled here, it is referred to as “Herodes” in the secondary
literature, and shows a heavily robed figure, in large turban, left profile, on a flight of stairs.
                                                                                            $450.

576. [Wilde, Oscar]: Behmer, Marcus: Proof on Japan Vellum of Illustration for SALOME
[“HERODIAS”]. [Leipzig: Insel-Verlag, 1903]. Folio sheet (33.7 x 25.5 cm), with image size
17.5 x 12.6 cm. Somewhat crudely matted, otherwise about fine.
One of an unspecified but small number of proof impressions of this illustration by Behmer
for the 1903 edition of Wilde’s Salome, translated by Hedwig Lachmann, and published
in an edition of only fifty copies on Japan vellum. Captioned in pencil beneath the image
“Fuer Buchen M.” Although untitled here, it is the striking left profile of Herodias on his
throne.                                                                              $450.




577. [Wilde, Oscar]: Behmer, Marcus: Proof on Japan Vellum of Illustration for SALOME
[“JOCHANAAN”]. [Leipzig: Insel-Verlag, 1903]. Folio sheet (33.6 x 25.5 cm), with image
size 17.1 x 12.6 cm. Somewhat crudely matted, otherwise about fine.
One of an unspecified but small number of proof impressions of this illustration by Behmer
for the 1903 edition of Wilde’s Salome, translated by Hedwig Lachmann, and published
in an edition of only fifty copies on Japan vellum. Captioned in pencil beneath the image
“Fuer Buchen Marcus.” Although untitled here, it is referred to as “Jochanaan” in the secondary
literature.                                                                               $400.




578. [Wilde, Oscar]: Behmer, Marcus: Proof on Japan Vellum of Illustration for SALOME
[“NARRABOTH”]. [Leipzig: Insel-Verlag, 1903]. Folio sheet (33.7 x 26.7 cm), with image
size 17.4 x 12.5 cm. Somewhat crudely matted, otherwise about fine.
One of an unspecified but small number of proof impressions of this illustration by Behmer
for the 1903 edition of Wilde’s Salome, translated by Hedwig Lachmann, and published
in an edition of only fifty copies on Japan vellum. Captioned in pencil beneath the image
“Fuer Buchen M. B.” Although untitled here, the image depicts Narraboth, in right profile,
leaning on a pedestal or sword.                                                      $450.

579. [Wilde, Oscar]: Behmer, Marcus: Proof on Japan Vellum of Illustration for SALOME
[“SALOME”]. [Leipzig: Insel-Verlag, 1903]. Folio sheet (33.7 x 26.7 cm), with image size
17.5 x 12.7 cm. Somewhat crudely matted, otherwise about fine.




One of an unspecified but small number of proof impressions of this illustration by Behmer
for the 1903 edition of Wilde’s Salome, translated by Hedwig Lachmann, and published
in an edition of only fifty copies on Japan vellum. Captioned in pencil beneath the image
“Fuer Buchen M.” Although untitled here, the image depicts Salome in left profile, standing,
with a leashed bird attached to her left arm.                                         $450.

580. [Wilde, Oscar]: Behmer, Marcus: Proof on Japan Vellum of Illustration for SALOME
[“SALOME WITH HEAD OF JOCHANNAN”]. [Leipzig: Insel-Verlag, 1903]. Folio sheet (33.7
x 26.5 cm), with image size 17.2 x 12.4 cm. Somewhat crudely matted, otherwise about
fine.
One of an unspecified but small number of proof impressions of this illustration by Behmer
for the 1903 edition of Wilde’s Salome, translated by Hedwig Lachmann, and published
in an edition of only fifty copies on Japan vellum. Captioned in pencil beneath the image
“Fuer Buchen M.” Although untitled here, it is the striking scene of Salome kneeling, starring
into the eyes of the severed head of Jochannan.                                         $450.

581. [Wilde, Oscar]: Behmer, Marcus: Proof on Japan Vellum of Illustration for SALOME
[“THE PAGE OF HERODIAS”]. [Leipzig: Insel-Verlag, 1903]. Folio sheet (33.7 x 26.5 cm),
with image size 17 x 12.5 cm. Somewhat crudely matted, otherwise about fine.
One of an unspecified but small number of proof impressions of this illustration by Behmer
for the 1903 edition of Wilde’s Salome, translated by Hedwig Lachmann, and published
in an edition of only fifty copies on Japan vellum. Captioned in pencil beneath the image
“Fuer Buchen M.” Although untitled here, it is referred to as “The Page of Herodias” in
the secondary literature, and kneeling figure in black before a burning censer, with a barren
tree and a full moon dominating the foreground and background.                          $450.

                                  Three Different Drafts
582. [Wilde, Oscar]: Blum, Edwin [screenwriter]: THE CANTERVILLE GHOST. Culver City:
Loew’s Incorporated / Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Pictures, 7 April 1943. 105 leaves plus lettered
inserts. Quarto. Mimeographed typescript, printed on rectos only. Bradbound in stencil
printed wrappers, paper label. Some mild creasing, label chipped along lower edge, some
relevant pencil and colored pencil annotations and notes on wrappers, but a good copy,
internally very good.
An unspecified but early revised pre-production draft of this screenplay, loosely based on
Oscar Wilde’s 1887 story, with a portion of the narrative transposed to a contemporary
WWII setting. The film was directed by Jules Dassin, starred Charles Laughton, Robert
Young and Margaret O’Brien, and was released in July of 1944. The wrapper bears stamps
indicating this is a “Temporary Complete” draft, retained as a “File Copy,” as well as the
characteristic wartime conservation directives. The script went through further revisions
well into the third quarter of 1943, and likely beyond.                              $600.

583. [Wilde, Oscar]: Blum, Edwin [screenwriter]: THE CANTERVILLE GHOST. Culver City:
Loew’s Incorporated / Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Pictures, 23 July 1943. 135 leaves. Quarto.
Mimeographed typescript, printed on rectos only. Bradbound in stencil printed wrappers,
paper label. Some mild creasing, label chipped along lower edge, some relevant pencil
and colored pencil annotations and notes on wrappers (“Hold for Legal Research”), but a
good copy, internally very good. Department routing slip paper-clipped to upper wrapper.
An unspecified but early revised pre-production draft of this screenplay, loosely based on
Oscar Wilde’s 1887 story, with a portion of the narrative transposed to a contemporary
WWII setting. This draft differs from that directly above. The wrapper bears stamps indicating
this is a “Temporary Complete” draft, retained as a “File Copy,” as well as the characteristic
wartime conservation directives. The script went through further revisions well into the third
quarter of 1943, and likely beyond.                                                     $600.

584. [Wilde, Oscar]: Blum, Edwin [screenwriter]: THE CANTERVILLE GHOST. Culver City:
Loew’s Incorporated / Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Pictures, 3 August 1943 - 15 January 1944.
135 leaves amended by lettered and spanning leaves. Quarto. Mimeographed typescript,
printed on rectos only of white and pink stock. Bradbound in stencil printed wrappers, paper
label. Some mild creasing, label chipped along lower edge, some relevant pencil and colored
pencil annotations and notes on wrappers (“Hold for Legal Research”), lower wrapper torn
and chipped, but a good copy, internally very good.
An unspecified but very heavily revised pre-production draft of this screenplay, loosely based
on Oscar Wilde’s 1887 story, with a portion of the narrative transposed to a contemporary
WWII setting. More than half of the text in this draft is on pink paper as dated revises
spanning the five month period noted above, and it differs markedly from the earlier drafts
above. The wrapper bears stamps indicating this is a “Complete” draft, retained as a “File
Copy,” as well as the characteristic wartime conservation directives.                $600.

585. Wilder, Thornton: THE BRIDGE OF SAN LUIS REY ... ILLUSTRATED BY ROCKWELL
KENT. New York: Albert & Charles Boni, 1929. Quarto. Pictorial cloth, leather spine label.
Cloth very slightly darkened toward edges, else about fine, without publisher’s board slipcase,
but enclosed in cloth custom clamshell box.
First illustrated edition. One of one thousand numbered copies (of 1100), signed by the
author and illustrator, Rockwell Kent, whose contributions to this venture are atypical three-
color lithographs.                                                                      $550.

586. [Wilder, Thornton]: “THE BRIDGE OF SAN LUIS REY.” [Sydney]: United Artists, [ca.
1944]. Original full color stone lithographed Australian day-bill poster (approx. 13x30").
Folded (as issued), one horizontal crease, otherwise a very attractive and colorful poster.
An original poster for the Australian release of the second film adaptation of Thornton Wilder’s
novel, based on a screenplay by Howard Estabrook and Hermann Weissman, directed by
Rowland V. Lee, starring Lynn Bari, Akim Tamiroff, Francis Lederer, Nazimova and Louis
Calhern. The film is noted as “Not Suitable for General Exhibition,” and the emphasis of
the artwork is on the semi-sensational: “She Gloried in the Hearts She Broke!” Scarce.
                                                                                         $150.

587. Wilder, Thornton: OUR TOWN A PLAY IN THREE ACTS. Avon, CT: Limited Editions
Club, 1974. Quarto. Corduroy over boards, gilt spine label. Fine in slipcase.
One of two thousand numbered copies, printed by Meriden Gravure, and signed by the author
and the artist. Illustrations and plates by Robert J. Lee. Introduction by Brooks Atkinson.
                                                                                     $225.

588. Williams, C.K.: LIES. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1969. Cloth and boards. First edition
of the poet’s second book. Fine in faintly edgeworn dust jacket.                    $125.
                       Uncommon First State of the Title-Page
589. Williams, Tennessee: ONE ARM AND OTHER STORIES. [Norfolk]: New Directions,
[1948]. Cloth and decorated paper over boards. Spine a bit sunned, otherwise a very good
or better copy in somewhat battered and cracked slipcase with printed paper label.
First “limited edition,” with the uncommon first state of the title-page, present integral. One
of 1500 copies. Copyright was initially taken in the name of New Directions; the author
and his attorney were displeased with this, and insisted on copyright in Williams’s name.
The first title leaf was cancelled, and a corrected title-leaf tipped in the copies which were
offered for sale. The number of copies with the first title-leaf is quite small, one source
suggesting that as few as between twenty and fifty copies exist.
CRANDALL A8.I.a.                                                                         $1000.

590. Williams, Tennessee: GRAND. New York: House of Books, 1964. Cloth. Fine in torn
glassine dust jacket.
First edition. One of three hundred numbered copies (of 326), signed by the author, issued
as Crown Octavo fifteen.                                                             $350.

591. Williams, Tennessee: MOISE AND THE WORLD OF REASON. New York: Simon &
Schuster, [1975]. Full publisher’s navy-blue textured semi-leather, t.e.g. Fine.
First edition, limited issue. One of three hundred and fifty numbered copies, specially bound,
and signed by the author.                                                                $350.

592. [Williams Tennessee]: Windham, Donald: AS IF...A PERSONAL VIEW OF TENNESSEE
WILLIAMS. Verona [i.e. New York: Printed for Sandy Campbell], 1985. Pictorial wrapper.
Portrait and photographs. First edition, signed issue. One of fifty press-numbered copies
printed on Vava paper, signed by the author, from a total edition of three hundred copies
printed at the Stamperia Valdonega. Small spot on spine panel, else about fine in lightly
smudged slipcase.                                                                   $175.

                                      Association Copy
593. Wolfe, Thomas: LOOK HOMEWARD, ANGEL A STORY OF THE BURIED LIFE. New
York: Scribner, 1929. Gilt cloth. Neat ownership inscription on endsheet (see below), front
jacket flap and rear panel mounted to rear endsheets, contemporary review affixed to terminal
blank and offset opposite, tips bumped and frayed; a well-read, but sound copy.
First edition of the author’s first trade publication. The first printing consisted of 5540 copies.
An interesting and important association copy, with the ownership signature of novelist
/ activist / feminist Margery Latimer (1889 - 1932) on the front free endsheet. Latimer’s
early review of this novel for the New York Herald Tribune (preserved in the back of this
copy), along with Margaret Wallace’s for the Times, were the positive notices that set
the pattern for the critical reception of Wolfe’s fiction debut.                             $750.

594. [Woolrich, Cornell]: Original Studio Publicity Campaign Pressbook for BLACK
ANGEL. [Hollywood]: Universal Pictures, 1946. 12pp., plus [10] ff. supplementary insert.
Pictorial self wrappers, printed with atmospheric dark green highlights and backgrounds,
Horizontal fold, as distributed, stamp on upper wrapper (“File Copy Return to Still Dept.”),
a couple tiny edge-tears, otherwise near fine.
A striking pressbook for the original release of this adaptation to film of Woolrich’s 1943
novel, based on a script by Roy Chanslor, directed by Roy William Neill, and starring Dan
Duryea, June Vincent, Broderick Crawford and Peter Lorre. Uncommon.                   $350.

                                         Classic Noir
595. [Woolrich, Cornell (William Irish)]: Turney, Catherine [screenwriter]: I MARRIED A
DEAD MAN. [Hollywood]: Paramount Pictures, 25 - 31 May 1949. [5],[1]-131 leaves, plus
lettered insert. Quarto. Mimeographed typescript, printed on rectos only, with revises on
yellow and blue stock. Bradbound in stenciled self-wrapper. Ink annotations on upper leaf,
some highlighting in text, edges a bit worn, with fraying to outer leaves and tape mend
at one brad; a good copy.
A “Final White” draft of Turney’s adaptation to the screen of Woolrich’s pseudonymously
published 1948 novel, though showing additional revisions via the yellow and blue leaves.
The film was finally released under the title No Man of Her Own in 1950, starring Barbara
Stanwyck and John Lund, under the direction of Mitchell Leisen, and is a staple of film
noir. We’ve handled a slightly earlier draft, dated 16 April. Scarce.               $650.

596. [World War I]: Raemaekers, Louis: THE LAND & WATER EDITION OF RAEMAEKERS
CARTOONS. [London]: “Land & Water,” [17 February 1916 through 2 February 1917]. Twenty-
six biweekly parts. Quarto. Pictorial wrappers, bound up in two volumes in undistinguished
buckram, with original pictorial wrappers bound in. Heavily illustrated throughout with tinted
plates. Cloth rather spotted and soiled, internally in very good order.
A complete run of the serial parts issue of this presentation of the noted Dutch artist’s
anti-German illustrations and cartoons, accompanied by text by G. K. Chesterton, Arthur
Morrison, Herbert Warren, Eden Phillpotts, Edmund Gosse, et al.                   $150.
597. Young, Whitney M., Jr.: TO BE EQUAL. New York: McGraw-Hill, [1964]. Gilt boards.
First edition of the first trade book by the Executive Director of the National Urban League.
With the author’s warm half-page presentation inscription. Fine in very good, lightly edge
worn dust jacket.                                                                       $250.

598. Yunkers, Adja [collaborator & illustrator]: CRÉATION. Stockholm. 1941. Volume one,
number one (all published). Folio. Original sewn screen-printed wrappers. Text and plates
tipped to larger sheets. Wrappers darkened along spine and lower edge, with a few small
spots, otherwise very good. Enclosed in a custom board slipcase.
Edited by Birgit Akesson and Adja Yunkers. A handsome, lavish and elusive periodical,
published in an edition of only 250 numbered copies, featuring an original two color woodblock
by Yunkers (34 x 26 cm), another woodblock by the editor Birgit Akesson, an original pencil
and water color drawing by a child (the examples vary from copy to copy), and an original
collage (signed) by Egon Møller-Nielson. Other illustrations include reproductions of photos
and paintings. Contributors to the text include T.S. Eliot (“Death by Water” in English),
Paul Eluard (“Facile est Bien”) and Pär Lagerkvist. Latvian-born Yunkers left Paris in 1939
at the onset of the war and settled in Stockholm, where he also edited/contributed to ARS.
In 1947 he moved to New York, where he remained until his death in 1983. Early on he
became a master of the woodcut, and in the 1960s expanded to include lithography. OCLC/
Worldcat locates but one copy: the National Library of Sweden.                          $600.
599. [Zephyrus Image]: Johnston, Alastair: ZEPHYRUS IMAGE A BIBLIOGRAPHY. Berkeley:
Poltroon Press, 2003. Cloth. Illustrated with facsimiles and photographs (the latter chiefly
by Rob Rusk). New in dust jacket.
First edition. A case-study of print and art in the service and spirit of revolution (of various
orders) in the Bay Area in the space of slightly over a decade. History, anecdote, narrative,
bibliography — often inseparable.                                                          $40.

600. Zukofsky, Louis: PREPOSITIONS THE COLLECTED CRITICAL ESSAYS.... London:
Rapp & Carroll, [1967]. Gilt cloth. First edition, limited issue. One of 150 numbered copies,
signed by the author. Usual tan offsetting to endsheets from the glue utilized by the binder,
otherwise fine in lightly dust-smudged jacket from which the trade issue price has been
clipped, as issued.                                                                    $125.

				
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