Grade 8 Comprehensive Science Curriculum Guide by v1Nibn1t

VIEWS: 8 PAGES: 11

									                8th Grade Comprehensive Science Pacing Guide 2012-2013
                                 Leon County Schools

FIRST NINE WEEKS: Nature of Science (Big Ideas 1, 2, 3, 4)
                                Baseline Assessment: Data Director
                           (Assesses benchmarks taught in 2012-2013)
Big Idea 1: The Practice of Science
       A. Scientific inquiry is a multifaceted activity; The processes of science include the
          formulation of scientifically investigable questions, construction of investigations into
          those questions, the collection of appropriate data, the evaluation of the meaning of those
          data, and the communication of this evaluation.
       B. The processes of science frequently do not correspond to the traditional portrayal of “the
          scientific method.”
       C. Scientific argumentation is a necessary part of scientific inquiry and plays an important
          role in the generation and validation of scientific knowledge.
       D. Scientific knowledge is based on observation and inference; it is important to recognize
          that these are very different things. Not only does science require creativity in its
          methods and processes, but also in its questions and explanations.

 SC.8.N.1.1 Define a problem from the 8th grade curriculum using appropriate reference materials to
support scientific understanding, plan and carry out scientific investigations of various types, such as
systematic observations or experiments, identify variables, collect and organize data, interpret data
in charts, tables and graphics, analyze information, make predictions, and defend conclusions.
        Essential Question:
        1. How is scientific inquiry used in a real-life scientific investigation?
        2. What are the results of scientific inquiry?
SC.8.N.1.2 Design and conduct a study using repeated trials and replication.
        Essential Questions:
        1. Why do scientists conduct multiple trials in an experiment?
        2. Why does a scientist replicate an experiment?
SC.8.N.1.3 Use phrases such as “results support” or “fail to support” in science, understanding that
science does not offer conclusive “proof” of a knowledge claim.
        Essential Questions:
        1. How do scientists develop explanations?
        2. What do scientists use to support conclusions?
SC.8.N.1.4 Explain how hypothesis are valuable if they lead to further investigations, even if they
turn out not to be supported by the data.
        Essential Questions:
        1. How do scientists make discoveries?
SC.8.N.1.5 Analyze the methods used to develop a scientific explanation as seen in different fields
of science.
        Essential Questions:
        1. What are the methods used in developing scientific explanations?
SC.8.N.1.6 Understand that scientific investigations involve the collection of relevant empirical
evidence, the use of logical reasoning, and the application of imagination in devising hypotheses,
predictions, explanations and models to make sense of the collected evidence.
        Essential Questions:
        1. How do scientists show the results of investigations?


                                                   1
                8th Grade Comprehensive Science Pacing Guide 2012-2013
                                 Leon County Schools

Vocabulary:
experiment, hypothesis, investigation, observation, sense, variable
Textbook Correlation:
Pages NOS 1-30
Assessments:
    1. Benchmark Mini Assessments NOS Lessons 1, 2, 3
Big Idea 2: The Characteristics of Scientific Knowledge
    A. Scientific knowledge is based on empirical evidence, and is appropriate for understanding the
        natural world, but it provides only a limited understanding of the supernatural, aesthetic, or
        other ways of knowing, such as art, philosophy, or religion
    B. Scientific knowledge is durable and robust, but open to change.
    C. Because science is based on empirical evidence it strives for objectivity, but as it is a human
        endeavor the processes, methods, and knowledge of science include subjectivity, as well as
        creativity and discovery.
SC.8.N.2.1 Distinguish between scientific and pseudoscientific ideas.
        Essential Questions: Not assessed
        1. What is science?
        2. What is NOT science?
SC.8.N.2.2 Discuss what characterizes science and its methods.
        Essential Questions: Not assessed
        1. Why can scientific concepts be modified over time?
Vocabulary:
 theory, replication, pseudoscientific
Textbook Correlation:
Pages NOS 1-30
Assessments:
    1. Benchmark Mini Assessments NOS Lessons 1, 2, 3
Big Idea 3: The Role of Theories, Laws, Hypotheses, and Models
    A. The terms that describe examples of scientific knowledge, for example; “theory”, “law”,
        “hypothesis”, and “model” have very specific meanings and functions within science.
SC.8.N.3.1 Select models useful in relating the results of their own investigations.
        Essential Questions: (not assessed)
        1. How are models used?
        2. Why are models used in science?
SC.8.N.3.2 Explain why theories may be modified but are rarely discarded.
        Essential Questions:
        1. Why are theories modified?
        2. How do scientists develop explanations?
Vocabulary:
 law, model, replication, theory
Big Idea 4: Science and Society
        A. As tomorrow’s citizens, students should be able to identify issues about which society
            could provide input, formulate scientifically investigable questions about those issues,
            construct investigations of their questions, collect and evaluate data from their
            investigations, and develop scientific recommendations based upon their findings.


                                                  2
               8th Grade Comprehensive Science Pacing Guide 2012-2013
                                Leon County Schools
SC.8.N.4.1 Explain that science is one of the processes that can be used to inform decision making
at the community, state, national, and international levels.
        Essential Questions: not assessed
        1. How do science and society work together?
SC.8.N.4.2 Explain how political, social, and economic concerns can affect science, and vice versa.
Essential Questions: not assessed
        1. How do politics affect science?
        2. How does the economy affect science?
        3. How do social concerns affect science?
Textbook Correlation:
Pages NOS 1-30
Assessments:
     1. Benchmark Mini Assessments NOS Lessons 1, 2, 3
Gizmos: Growing Plants
Brainpops: Scientific Method, Precision and Accuracy, Standard and Scientific Notation, Science
projects

Earth Space Science (Big Idea 5)
Big Idea 5: Earth in Space and Time
        The origin and eventual fate of the Universe still remains one of the greatest questions in
science. Gravity and energy influence the formation of galaxies, including our own Milky Way
Galaxy, stars, the planetary systems, and Earth. Humankind’s need to explore continues to lead to
the development of knowledge and understanding of the nature of the Universe.
SC.8.E.5.1 Recognize that there are enormous distances between objects in space and apply our
knowledge of light and space travel to understand this distance.
    Essential Questions:
    1. What is an astronomical unit?
    2. What is a light year?
    3. How do scientists use astronomical units?
SC.8.E.5.2 Recognize that the universe contains many billions of galaxies and that each galaxy
contains billions of stars.
        Essential Questions:
        1. What makes up a Universe?
        2. What makes up a galaxy?
SC.8.E.5.3 Distinguish the hierarchical relationships between planets and other astronomical bodies
relative to solar system, galaxy, and universe, including distance, size, and composition.
        Essential Questions:
        1. What is the relationship of astronomical bodies and the solar system?
        2. What is the relationship of astronomical bodies and the galaxy?
        3. What is the relationship of astronomical bodies and the universe?
SC.8.E.5.4 Explore the Law of Universal Gravitation by explaining the role that gravity plays in the
formation of planets, stars, and solar systems and in determining their motions.
        Essential Questions:
        1. Why is gravity important in the solar system?
        2. Explain the role that gravity plays in the formation of the planets.
        3. Explain the role that gravity plays in the formation of stars.
                                                  3
               8th Grade Comprehensive Science Pacing Guide 2012-2013
                                Leon County Schools
SC.8.E.5.5 Describe and classify specific physical properties of stars: apparent magnitude
(brightness), temperature (color), size, and luminosity (absolute brightness).
        Essential Questions:
        1. What are physical properties of stars?
        2. Describe apparent magnitude as it relates to stars.
        3. Describe temperature as it is related to stars.
        4. Describe luminosity.
SC.8.E.5.6 Create models of solar properties including: rotation, structure of the Sun, convection,
sunspots, solar flares, and prominences.
        Essential Questions:
        1. What are the properties of the sun.
        2. What causes sun spots?
        3. What causes solar flares?
        4. What causes prominences?
        5. Describe the layers of the sun?
SC.8.E.5.7 Compare and contrast the properties of objects in the Solar System including the Sun,
planets, and moons to those of Earth, such as gravitational force, distance from the Sun, speed,
movement, temperature, and atmospheric conditions.
        Essential Questions:
        1. How do the properties of the sun compare to those of earth?
        2. How do the properties of moons compare to those of earth?
        3. How do the properties of other planets compare to those of earth?
SC.8.E.5.8 Compare various historical models of the Solar System, including geocentric and
heliocentric.
        Essential Task:
        1. Create a model of the geocentric solar system
        2. Create a model of the heliocentric solar system
Textbook Correlation:
    1. Chapter 1 Lessons 1, 2, 3
    2. Chapter 2 Lessons 1, 2, 3, 4
Assessments:
    1. Benchmark Mini Assessments Chapter 1 Lessons 1, 2, 3
    2. Benchmark Mini Assessment Chapter 2 Lessons 1, 2, 3,4
Gizmos: Solar System, Solar System Explorer, Comparing Earth to Venus, Gravity Pitch, H-R
Diagram, Star Spectra, Gravitational Force, Orbital Motion – Kepler's Laws, Herschel Experiment
Brainpops: Big Bang, Galaxies, Milky Way, Solar system, Outer Solar System, Uranus, Neptune,
Mercury, Jupiter, Venus, Mars, Pluto, Saturn, Gravity, Sun, Seasons, Life Cycle of Stars, Solar
Energy, Moon, Galileo, Telescopes, Black Holes, Asteroids, Constellations
Brainpop Games: Build a Solar System, Fly to Mars, Chronopticon
Also Brainpop Support Pages




                                                  4
                8th Grade Comprehensive Science Pacing Guide 2012-2013
                                 Leon County Schools

2nd NINE WEEKS: Earth Space Science (Big Idea 5)
Big Idea 5: Earth in Space and Time
       The origin and eventual fate of the Universe still remains one of the greatest questions in
science. Gravity and energy influence the formation of galaxies, including our own Milky Way
Galaxy, stars, the planetary systems, and Earth. Humankind’s need to explore continues to lead to
the development of knowledge and understanding of the nature of the Universe.
SC.8.E.5.9 Explain the impact of objects in space on each other including:
       1. the Sun on the Earth including seasons and gravitational attraction
       2. the Moon on the Earth, including phases, tides, and eclipses, and the relative position of
            each body
       Essential Questions:
       1. How are days, years, and seasons related to how earth moves in space?
       2. How do Earth, the moon and the sun affect each other?
       3. What causes tides?
SC.8.E.5.10 Assess how technology is essential to science for such purposes as access to outer
space and other remote locations, sample collection, measurement, data collection and storage,
computation, and communication of information.
       Essential Questions:
       1. What can we learn from space images?
       2. How do people explore space?
SC.8.E.5.11 Identify and compare characteristics of the electromagnetic spectrum such as
wavelength, frequency, use, and hazards and recognize its application to an understanding of
planetary images and satellite photographs.
       Essential Questions:
       1. What is the relationship between wavelength and frequency of waves within the
            electromagnetic spectrum?
       2. How are electromagnetic waves used to study celestial bodies?
SC.8.E.5.12 Summarize the effects of space exploration on the economy and culture of Florida.
       Essential Questions: not assessed
       1. How has space exploration affected Florida?
Vocabulary:
convection, eclipse, electromagnetic spectrum, force, frequency, galaxy, geocentric, gravity,
heliocentric, light, magnetic, mass, matter, moon, planet, season, solar system, space, sun, tide,
wavelength, weight
Textbook Correlation:
    1. Chapter 3 Lessons 1,2 ,3, 4
    2. Chapter 4 Lessons 1, 2, 3
Assessments:
    1. Benchmark Mini Assessment Chapter 3 Lessons 1, 2,3, 4
    2. Benchmark Mini Assessment Chapter 4 Lessons 1, 2, 3
Gizmos: Phases of the Moon, 2D Eclipse, 3D Eclipse, Moonrise, Moonset, and Phases, Tides,
Ocean Tides, Seasons: Earth, Moon, and Sun
Brainpops: Big Bang, Galaxies, Milky Way, Solar system, Outer Solar System, Uranus, Neptune,
Mercury, Jupiter, Venus, Mars, Pluto, Saturn, Gravity, Sun, Seasons, Life Cycle of Stars, Solstice
and Equinox, Solar Energy, Moon, Moon Phases, Galileo, Telescopes, Black Holes, Asteroids,


                                                  5
                8th Grade Comprehensive Science Pacing Guide 2012-2013
                                 Leon County Schools
Constellations, International Space Station, Space Flight, Apollo Project, Sally Ride,
Electromagnetic Spectrum
Brainpop Games: Build a Solar System, Fly to Mars, Chronopticon
Also Brainpop Support Pages

Physical Science (Big Ideas 8, 9)
Big Idea 8: Properties of Matter
    A. All objects and substances in the world are made of matter. Matter has two fundamental
        properties; matter takes up space and matter has mass which give it inertia.
    B. Objects and substances can be classified by their physical and chemical properties. Mass is
        the amount of matter (or “stuff”) in an object. Weight, on the other hand, is the measure of
        force attraction (gravitational force) between and object and Earth.
    C. The concepts of mass and weight are complicated and potentially confusing to elementary
        students Hence, the more familiar term “weight” is recommended for use to stand for both
        mass and weight in grades K-5. By grade 6-8, students are expected to understand the
        distinction between mass and weight, and use them appropriately.
SC.8.P.8.1 Explore the scientific theory of atoms (also known as atomic theory) by using models to
explain the motion of particles in solids, liquids, and gases.
        Essential Questions:
        1. Describe the motion of particles in a solid.
        2. Describe the motion of particles in a liquid.
        3. Describe the motion of particles in a gas.
        4. What is a particle and what is it made up of?
        5. Describe the motion of particles at absolute zero.
SC.8.P.8.2 Differentiate between weight and mass recognizing that weight is the amount of
gravitational pull on an object and is distance from, though proportional to, mass.
        Essential Questions:
        1. What properties define matter?
        2. What type of force is gravity?
        3. Compare and contrast weight and mass.
        4. How does weight change as elevation changes on a planet?
        5. What causes an object to weigh more on one planet (or moon) than another?
        6. Describe mass and explain why it does not change when an object is moved from place to
            place.
SC.8.P.8.3 Explore and describe the densities of various materials through measurement of their
masses and volumes.
        Essential Questions:
        1. Describe the relationship between mass, volume and density.
SC.8.P.8.4 Classify and compare substances on the basis of characteristic physical properties that
can be demonstrated or measured; for example, density, thermal or electrical conductivity, solubility,
magnetic properties, melting and boiling points, and know that these properties are independent of
the amount of the sample.
        Essential Questions:
        1. What are the physical properties of matter?
        2. Describe the physical properties that identify an unknown sample of matter?


                                                  6
               8th Grade Comprehensive Science Pacing Guide 2012-2013
                                Leon County Schools
SC.8.P.8.5 Recognize that there are a finite number of elements and that their atoms combine in a
multitude of ways to produce compounds that make up all of the living and nonliving things that we
encounter.
        Essential Questions:
        1. What is an element?
        2. What is the relationship among atoms, elements and compounds?
        3. What is the basic unit of all living and non-living things?
SC.8.P.8.6 Recognize that elements are grouped in the periodic table according to similarities of
their properties.
        Essential Questions:
        1. How are elements arranged on the periodic table?
        2. What can you learn about elements from the periodic table?
SC.8.P.8.7 Explore the scientific theory of atoms (also known as atomic theory) by recognizing that
atoms are the smallest unit of an element and are composed of sub-atomic particles (electrons
surrounding a nucleus containing protons and neutrons).
        Essential Questions:
        1. Describe the structure of an atom.
        2. How are elements and atoms related?
SC.8.P.8.8 Identify basic examples of and compare and classify the properties of compounds,
including acids, bases and salts.
        Essential Questions:
        1. How do elements differ from the compounds they form?
        2. Compare and contrast the properties of acids and bases?
        3. Identify the properties of salts.
SC.8.P.8.9 Distinguish among mixtures (including solutions) and pure substances.
        Essential Questions:
        1. How do pure substances and mixtures compare?
Vocabulary:
acid, atom, base, boil, compound, concentration, conductivity, convection, density, electron, gas,
liquid, mass, matter, melt, molecule, motion, neutron, nucleus, periodic table, pH, proton, solid,
solubility, volume
Textbook Correlation:
    1. Chapter 5 Lesson 1
    2. Chapter 6 Lessons 1, 2
    3. Chapter 7 Lessons 1, 2, 3
    4. Chapter 8 Lessons 1, 2, 3
    5. Chapter 9 Lessons 1, 2, 3
    6. Chapter 10 Lessons 1, 2
Assessments:
    1. Benchmark Mini Assessments Chapter 5 Lesson 1
    2. Benchmark Mini Assessments Chapter 6 Lessons 1, 2
    3. Benchmark Mini Assessments Chapter 7 Lessons 1, 2, 3
    4. Benchmark Mini Assessments Chapter 8 Lessons 1, 2, 3
    5. Benchmark Mini Assessments Chapter 9 Lessons 1, 2, 3
    6. Benchmark Mini Assessments Chapter 10 Lessons 1, 2


                                                 7
               8th Grade Comprehensive Science Pacing Guide 2012-2013
                                Leon County Schools
Gizmos: pH Analysis, pH Analysis: Quad Color Indicator, Temperature and Particle Motion,
Freezing Point of Salt Water, Bohr Model of Hydrogen, Bohr Model: Introduction, Electron
Configuration, Element Builder, Ionic Bonds, Covalent Bonds
Brainpops: Atoms, Isotopes, Atomic Model, Periodic Table of Elements, Moles, Ions, Chemical
Bonds, Matter Changing States, States of Matter, Measuring Matter, Law of Conservation of Mass,
Property Changes, pH Scale, Acids and Bases, Chemical Equations,
Brainpop Games: Matter Sorter
Also Brainpop Support Pages

                          End of the Nine Weeks Assessment: Unit 1
                             Mid Year Assessment: Data Director
                   (Assesses benchmarks from 1st and 2nd Nine Weeks Only)




                                               8
               8th Grade Comprehensive Science Pacing Guide 2012-2013
                                Leon County Schools


3rd NINE WEEKS: Physical Science (Big Ideas 9)
Big Idea 9: Changes in Matter
    A. Matter can undergo a variety of changes
    B. When matter is changed physically, generally no changes occur in the structure of the atoms
        or molecules composing the matter.
    C. When matter changes chemically, a rearrangement of bonds between the atoms occurs. This
        results in new substances with new properties.
SC.8.P.9.1 Explore the Law of Conservation of Mass by demonstrating and concluding that mass is
conserved when substances undergo physical and chemical changes.
        Essential Questions:
        1. Demonstrate how mass is conserved during a physical or chemical change.
SC.8.P.9.2 Differentiate between physical changes and chemical changes.
        Essential Questions:
        1. What are some signs that a physical change has occurred?
        2. What are some signs that a chemical change has occurred?
SC.8.P.9.3 Investigate and describe how temperature influences chemical changes.
        Essential Questions:
        1. What factors can affect the rate of a chemical change?
Vocabulary:
catalyst, chemical change, compound, conservation of mass, convection, electron, gas, mass, matter,
molecule, physical change, solubility
Textbook Correlation:
    1. Chapter 5 Lesson 2
    2. Chapter 10 Lessons 1, 2, 3
Assessments:
    1. Benchmark Mini Assessments Chapter 5 Lesson 2
    2. Benchmark Mini Assessments Chapter 10 Lessons 1, 2, 3
Gizmos: Weight and Mass, Triple Beam Balance, Beam to Moon (Ratios and Proportions),
Gravitational Force, Density Experiment: Slice and Dice, Density Laboratory
Determining Density via Water Displacement, Archimedes' Principle, Magnetism, Weight and Mass,
Phase Changes, Phases of Water, Water Cycle
Brainpops: Matter Changing States, States of Matter, Measuring Matter, Property Changes, Law of
Conservation of Mass, Atoms, Dark Matter, Chemical Bonds, Compounds and Mixtures, Ions,
Chemical Equations, Isotopes, Carbon Cycle, Temperature, Heat, Forms of Energy, Energy Sources,
Cellular Respiration, Photosynthesis
Brainpop Games: Matter Sorter

Big Idea 18: Matter and Energy Transformations
   A. Living things all share basic needs for life.
   B. Living organisms acquire the energy they need for life processes through various metabolic
       pathways (photosynthesis and cellular respiration).
   C. Matter and Energy are recycled through cycles such as the carbon cycle.
SC.8.L.18.1 Describe and investigate the process of photosynthesis, such as roles of light, carbon
dioxide, water and chlorophyll; production of food; release of oxygen.
       Essential Questions:
                                                 9
               8th Grade Comprehensive Science Pacing Guide 2012-2013
                                Leon County Schools
        1. Describe the products of photosynthesis.
        2. How do cells get and use energy?
SC.8.L.18.2 Describe and investigate how cellular respiration breaks down food to provide energy
and releases carbon dioxide.
        Essential Questions:
        1. What are the products of cellular respiration?
SC.8.L.18.3 Construct a scientific model of the carbon cycle to show how matter and energy are
continuously transferred within and between organisms and their physical environment.
        Essential Questions:
        1. How do energy and matter move through ecosystems?
        Essential Task:
        2. Create a drawing tracing carbon through an ecosystem.
SC.8.L.18.4 Cite evidence that living systems follow the Laws of Conservation of Mass and Energy.
        Essential Task:
        1. Apply the laws of conservation of mass and energy in a scientific investigation.
Vocabulary:
aerobic, anaerobic, conservation of mass, energy, environment, organism, photosynthesis
Textbook Correlation:
    1. Chapter 11 Lessons 1, 2
    2. Chapter 12 Lessons 1, 2, 3
Assessments:
    1. Benchmark Mini Assessments Chapter 11 Lessons 1, 2
    2. Benchmark Mini Assessments Chapter 12 Lessons 1, 2, 3
Gizmos: Photosynthesis Lab, Cell Energy Cycle, Plants and Snails, Cell Structure, Greenhouse
Effect, Prairie Ecosystem
Review for FCAT: Rock Cycle, Building Pangaea, Plate Tectonics, Weather Maps, Coastal Winds
and Clouds, Greenhouse Effect, Longitudinal Waves, Refraction, Energy Conversions, Force and
Fan Carts, Free Fall Tower, Free-Fall Laboratory, Cell Structure, Mouse Genetics (One Trait),
Circulatory System, Human Homeostasis, DNA Fingerprint Analysis, Mouse Genetics (One Trait),
Mouse Genetics (Two Traits)
Brainpops: Photosynthesis, Nitrogen Cycle, Plant Growth, Carbon Cycle, Greenhouse Effect,
Ecosystems, Food Chains, Law of Conservation of Mass, Cellular Respiration,
Brainpop Games: Food Chain Game, Close-Knit Neighbors
Also Brainpop Support Pages

                       End of the Nine Weeks Assessment: Unit 2 & Unit 3




                                               10
              8th Grade Comprehensive Science Pacing Guide 2012-2013
                               Leon County Schools


4th NINE WEEKS: Life Science (Big Idea 18 (before FCAT)), Human Growth
                    and Development, Clean Energy (After FCAT)
Human Growth and Development
Clean Energy Curriculum

                        End of the Nine Weeks Assessment: Unit 4
                          End of Year Assessment: Data Director
                   (Assesses benchmarks taught throughout school year)


Useful teacher resources: www.FLStandards.org, www.explorelearning.com, www.brainpop.com,




                                            11

								
To top