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									               A Biosecurity Strategy
                for South Australia




SA Biosecurity Strategy_26th September 2005   Page 1
        TABLE OF CONTENTS
                                              Executive Summary
                                              A message from the Chairs

                                              What is Biosecurity?
                                              Introduction

                                              South Australia’s Approach
                                              Involvement in National and State Biosecurity

                                              Development of Biosecurity Strategies
                                              National Biosecurity System
                                              Biosecurity Strategy for SA – Scope and
                                              Outcomes

                                              Identifying the Gaps
                                              Arrangements and Processes

                                              Closing the Gaps
                                              Objectives and Strategies
                                              Taking the Strategy Forward


                                              Glossary
                                              Acronyms and Abbreviations
                                              References



                                              Appendices
                                              Summary of Current Programs
                                              Gap Analysis




SA Biosecurity Strategy_26th September 2005                                     Page 2
Executive Summary                                outcomes from the draft National Biosecurity
                                                 System. A number of key objectives were
Protecting primary industries, the               identified to enhance biosecurity for South
environment and the community is of vital        Australia.
importance to South Australia. Biosecurity is
of strategic importance in contributing to a     Government Agencies have significant
wide range of outcomes for the economy,          strengths built through the experience
biodiversity, human health and society.          developed to protect primary production, but
                                                 these need to be extended to address all
South Australia has had a historical             biosecurity threats in a much more integrated
involvement in biosecurity at a local, state     manner. This may require changes in systems
and national level. This involvement has         and processes and enhanced linkages and
become essential for protection from the         networks.
increased risk of exotic pest, disease and
weed incursions and for maintaining market       This strengthened, focused and strongly led
access. A wide range of pests, diseases and      approach to biosecurity will enable South
weeds have been successfully contained and       Australia to respond more effectively to
eradicated, while prevention programs have       existing and emerging threats.
decreased the risk of their introduction,
establishment and spread.

A Biosecurity Strategy for South Australia
will complement the National Biosecurity         Don Plowman
System, establishing high-level directions for   Executive Director
state policy and biosecurity activities. The     Primary Industries and Resources South
Strategy will provide guidance to meet           Australia
challenges of the future and deliver the level
of biosecurity appropriate to protect South
Australia’s people, environment and
economy.                                         Roger Wickes
                                                 Executive Director
An Interagency Committee reviewed and            Department of Water Land and Biodiversity
benchmarked current biosecurity                  Conservation
arrangements and processes against the




SA Biosecurity Strategy_26th September 2005                                         Page 3
What is Biosecurity?
                                                   Introduction

                                                   Biosecurity is a crosscutting issue,
                                                   contributing to a wide range of outcomes for
                                                   the economy, biodiversity, human health and
                                                   society. Biosecurity programs identify, assess
                                                   and respond to all pests, diseases and weeds
                                                   posing a significant threat to primary
                                                   industries, native biodiversity and human
                                                   health.
“Biosecurity is defined as the protection of
the economy, environment and public health         Protecting the favourable health status of
from negative impacts associated with pests,       primary industries and the environment is of
diseases and weeds.”                               prime importance to South Australia. While
                                                   increasing travel, world trade and demand for
“It must include measures to:                      environmentally and socially responsible
    - prevent new pests, diseases and weeds        production systems offer South Australia
       entering and establishing;                  major opportunities, they also present new
    - manage established pests, diseases           challenges including increased risks from
       and weeds to eradicate where feasible       exotic pests, diseases and weeds. It is
       or mitigate impact;                         estimated that Australia gains 20 new pests or
    - ensure appropriate preparedness and          diseases each year (CSIRO, 2003).
       response capacity which is
       internationally recognised and meets        It is clear that South Australia faces a growing
       our trading obligations and                 number of challenges from invasive pests,
       international treaties; and                 weeds and diseases. Government Agencies,
    - maintain or improve the status of            industry and the community must start to
       Australia’s biosecurity systems.”           address threats in a more integrated manner to
                                                   improve effectiveness and efficiency of
(From An Australian Biosecurity System, 20/7/05)   biosecurity systems in order to exclude,
                                                   eradicate and effectively manage risks posed
                                                   by existing and potential pests, weeds and
                                                   diseases to the economy, environment and
                                                   human health.




SA Biosecurity Strategy_26th September 2005                                             Page 4
A ‘snapshot’ of Biosecurity in South Australia

South Australia has a long history of preventing, eradicating and managing terrestrial and aquatic
pests, weeds and diseases to protect production, environment and the community and maintain
market access.

South Australia has participated in the successful national eradication of the animal diseases
contagious bovine pleuropneumonia and bovine tuberculosis. Significant endemic diseases and
invasive pests of terrestrial animals, such as enzootic bovine leucosis, lice, footrot and Johnes
disease, are actively controlled to minimise their impact. Analyses of costs, risks and benefits
demonstrate the value of these programs in supporting the sustainability of the State’s livestock
industries.

Biosecurity programs, such as animal disease surveillance, are critical for demonstrating absence or
prevalence and assessing impact to inform policy and support trade access and public health.
Biosecurity programs are also critical in preventing, detecting and responding to incursions of
emergency animal diseases and pests such as foot and mouth disease and bovine spongiform
encephalopathy (BSE). It is estimated that an outbreak of foot and mouth disease could cost the
nation $12 billion in eradication activities and interruption to market access. The current costs of
control and the value of production foregone for animal diseases and invertebrate pests of animals
nationally are estimated to be at least $1.2 billion annually (Agtrans Research, 2005).

The current costs of control and the value of production foregone for diseases and invertebrate pests
of plants nationally are estimated to be at least $0.7 billion annually and possibly as high as $2
billion per annum (Agtrans Research, 2005). South Australia’s $480 million horticulture industries
are protected from fruit fly by the $3 million SA fruit fly prevention program. Import regulations
and verification, early detection surveillance and communication strategies have assisted in
reducing fruit fly outbreaks in SA over the past 5 years, protecting market access and allowing
expansion into new markets such as Japan.

In forestry, the accidental introduction of the Sirex wood wasp destroyed millions of pines in South-
Eastern Australia in the late 1980s, affecting up to 80% of Pinus radiata trees in the Green Triangle
Region. Biological control of Sirex has been estimated to save the Australian pine industry $1 to $4
billion per rotation. More recently, the Monterey Pine Aphid has become established in Australia as
a pest of Pinus radiata. A biological control program is being undertaken to provide an efficient
and cost-effective method of controlling this pest, which has been estimated to cost the Australian
forest industry approximately $21 million per year in lost production.

The annual estimated cost of weeds to agriculture in South Australia is $650 million (State of
Environment SA, 2003) and $4 billion nationally (Sinden, 2004). These figures primarily represent
production losses and control costs, as the cost of weeds to the environment and biodiversity is
largely incalculable (Senate Committee on the Environment, 2004). Early detection and control is
essential for successful eradication. A quarantine and eradication program has been successful in
containing the spread of branched broomrape in South Australia and is enabling gradual eradication.
The eradication of branched broomrape provides a return on investment of 8:1, while protecting
natural resources, primary industries and export markets (EconSearch, 2003).

Pest animals are estimated to cost Australia $420 million annually (Hart, 2002). Some biosecurity
programs focus on reducing the impact of established species. For example, biocontrol has reduced
the impact of rabbits but nationally they still cost agriculture $113.1 million annually (McLeod,


SA Biosecurity Strategy_26th September 2005                                                Page 5
2004). Other programs focus on preventing incursions of new species, such as the cane toad, into
South Australia.

Many fish have been introduced for recreational and commercial purposes and a number of these
species have become pests. The national economic impact of carp is at least $4 million annually,
not including losses to fisheries and other industries, while the environmental impacts have been
estimated at $11.8 million annually (McLeod, 2004). World trade and tourism traffic has increased
the movement of exotic marine organisms. Between 250 and 750 exotic marine species have
established in Australia over the past 100 years (CSIRO, 2003), and some of these have had
significant environmental and economic impacts. The successful eradication of the Black Striped
Mussel from Darwin Harbour in 1999 was the result of an effective awareness and surveillance
program and prompt emergency response to protect the marine environment and the pearling and
aquaculture industry. A national control plan aims to reduce the risk of another exotic species, the
North Pacific seastar, spreading to new areas from established populations in Port Phillip Bay and
Hobart. In South Australia, the invasive seaweed Caulerpa taxifolia has been eradicated from West
Lakes but has continued to spread down the Port River.

South Australia has been fortunate that no exotic diseases or pests have resulted in economic losses
to the aquaculture industry, however some sectors remain vulnerable to significant impacts should
an incursion occur. Tuna farming is geographically restricted to a small area, finfish fishing is
clustered, whilst pacific oyster farming relies on the movement of spat and animals between bays.
These sectors, jointly worth $338 million in direct sales, $564 million in additional flow on and
value adding and an estimated 2,644 jobs, could be impacted heavily as a result of an exotic pest or
disease incursion. With aquaculture now contributing more than 60% of South Australia’s seafood
production, the biosecurity of the aquaculture industry is more important than ever.

Early intervention and eradication of invasive plants provides more affordable solutions than
waiting until environmental problems are acute (Senate Committee on the Environment, 2004). The
cost of repairing natural systems is $2-6 billion annually. Although many gaps exist in our
knowledge of the major environmental impacts, it is clear the cost of exotic diseases, weeds and
pests on biodiversity and the natural environment is a significant proportion of this. Weeds, pests
and diseases are known to be key threatening processes for many native species. Fox and cat
predation is a major threat to the survival of small terrestrial mammals and ground-nesting birds.
Feral rabbits, goats and camels compete with native fauna for food, water and shelter. The area of
native vegetation affected by Phytophthora cinnamoni, a plant pathogen that causes the roots of
susceptible plants to rot, exceeds tens of thousands of hectares in South Australia alone.

Many invasive species have social impacts such as the European Wasp, European House Borer, and
Red Imported Fire Ant (RIFA). If RIFA was not controlled the cost is estimated to be $8.9 billion
over a 30 year period (ABARE, 2001). An eradication program by the QLD Government costing
$124 million provides a benefit cost ratio of 25:1 (QLD Government, 2003). A recent incursion of
European House Borer in Western Australia threatens seasoned pine in houses and buildings,
furniture, plantations and amenity plantings as well as the trade of soft wood timber and products.
An active monitoring, surveillance and containment program is being undertaken while the
feasibility of eradication is being determined.




SA Biosecurity Strategy_26th September 2005                                               Page 6
South Australia’s Approach
Biosecurity success depends on Government,               the risk and impact of incursions, promotes
industry and the community having a clear                early detection and assists in the management
understanding, commitment and integrated                 and eradication of pests, weeds and diseases
approach to biosecurity issues and programs.             that could damage production systems and
                                                         biodiversity. Biosecurity processes are also
                                                         essential to ensure access to existing and new
Government’s Role in Biosecurity                         markets both domestically and internationally.

South Australian Government Agencies take                Biosecurity is integral to the Agencies core
lead roles in biosecurity by undertaking a               business. Corporate Plans have strategic
wide range of activities in planning,                    priorities that support the State’s biosecurity
preparedness, response and recovery. The                 system and provide future direction as defined
development and review of biosecurity                    in Table 1.
policies, procedures and legislation minimises


Table 1: Biosecurity links to Government Strategic Directions

 Strategic Plans                    Strategic Directions / Objectives / Goals and Priorities
 State Strategic Plan               - Growing prosperity;
 2004                               - Improving wellbeing;
                                    - Attaining sustainability;
                                    - Fostering creativity; and
                                    - Building communities.
 Beyond local, Towards              - Trebling South Australian exports;
 Global: Building South             - Doubling the number of exporting firms; and
 Australia’s export culture         - Diversifying South Australia’s export base.
 2004
 State NRM Plan                     -   Control of terrestrial and aquatic pest animals and plants;
 2005                               -   People and communities;
                                    -   Biodiversity and natural heritage; and
                                    -   Monitoring and evaluation
 PIRSA Strategic Directions:        -   Industry development;
 2003-2006                          -   Risks and biological contamination threats;
                                    -   Integrated policy framework regulation and compliance;
                                    -   Sustainable development;
                                    -   Building community capacity;
                                    -   Partnerships;
                                    -   Access to information and services;
                                    -   Business processes; and
                                    -   Relationship management.

 DWLBC Corporate Plan:              -   SA’s natural resources are managed in an integrated and
 2005-2010                              holistic way;
                                    -   Community, industry, Government and other stakeholders
                                        working together to achieve high quality NRM outcomes;
                                    -   Halt the decline in the quality and extent in biodiversity;
                                    -   Protect and enhance the natural resources of the Mt. Lofty


SA Biosecurity Strategy_26th September 2005                                                   Page 7
                                        Ranges; and
                                    -   Sustainable agricultural landscapes.

 DEH Corporate Plan: 2004           -   Move SA towards a sustainable future;
                                    -   Conserve, value and celebrate natural and cultural heritage;
                                    -   Secure the future of SA’s coastal and marine environments;
                                    -   Foster debate on the environment and engage the community;
                                        and
                                    -   Maximise organisational performance.

 ForestrySA Corporate Policy        -   Manage forest insects, diseases, weeds and other pests to
 for Pest Management                    minimise their impact on the plantation forest estate, native
                                        forests and the community;
                                    -   Support national strategies for incursions of exotic pests,
                                        diseases and weeds;
                                    -   Prevent the introduction and spread of pests, diseases and
                                        weeds within and from ForestrySA land;
                                    -   Reduce the impact of existing pest, disease and weed problems
                                        through IPM practices;
                                    -   Improve management practices; and
                                    -   Work with the community to manage pests and diseases
 DPC Corporate Strategic            -   Growing prosperity;
 Objectives (2004-2005)             -   Improve wellbeing;
                                    -   Building communities;
                                    -   Leading policy implementation;
                                    -   Leading public sector reform; and
                                    -   Improving systems and support services.



Several Government Agencies have direct
responsibility for biosecurity in South                  Plant Health Operations is responsible for
Australia. A summary of the responsibilities             implementing and monitoring plant
and linkages are below.                                  biosecurity management arrangements, such
                                                         as the movement of material into and out of
                                                         South Australia, and plant pest surveillance.
Plant Health, PIRSA
                                                         State Links
The Plant Health program in PIRSA is                     - SARDI
responsible for the development and                      - DWLBC
implementation of plant health policy within             - DEH
the State, contributing to National policy               - Forestry SA
development and the provision of operational             - Other state agencies
response capability.                                     - LGA
                                                         - NRM Council
The program has a focus on protection of                 - NRM Boards
South Australia’s food and fibre industries
and addresses declared plant pests and                   National Links
diseases such as fruit fly, locusts and                  - PIMC/ PISC/ PIHC/ PHC
phylloxera.


SA Biosecurity Strategy_26th September 2005                                                  Page 8
-   Consultative Committee on Emergency           Fisheries, PIRSA
    Plant Pests
-   Domestic Quarantine and Market Access         The Fisheries Division in PIRSA is
    Working Group                                 responsible for prevention and management
-   Plant Health Australia                        of aquatic pest invasions into South
-   DAFF / OCPPO / BA / AQIS                      Australia’s marine and fresh waters.
-   CRC for National Plant Biosecurity            Introduced pests pose a significant threat to
                                                  native species, fisheries and aquaculture
                                                  industries and the environment.
Animal Health, PIRSA
                                                  Under the Living Coast Strategy, PIRSA has
The Animal Health program in PIRSA is             responsibility to develop and implement
responsible for overseeing and assistance to      coordinated national management
industry on matters relating to both national     arrangements at the State level for barrier
and state based disease control, disease          control, emergency response, management
surveillance and animal welfare programs.         and control of existing or new pest species.
                                                  PIRSA develops and supports community and
Through membership of appropriate national        stakeholder groups with an early warning
and state bodies, and through regulatory and      system to report marine pest incursions and
other field activities, the program assists in    formalises local response plans and local
export market success and the supply of           emergency management practices. Research
quality livestock and livestock products to the   capabilities are developed in the State to
Australian community.                             provide information on the management and
                                                  eradication of existing and potential marine
A Biosecurity Statement is in place and is        pest species in SA waters.
being communicated to relevant parts of
industry and the community.                       State Links
                                                  - SARDI
State Links                                       - DWLBC
- DEH                                             - DEH
- DWLBC                                           - EPA
- Health                                          - LGA
- SAPOL                                           - NRM Council
- CFS                                             - NRM Boards
- EPA
- SAFF                                            National Links
- ABA                                             - DAFF / BA/ AQIS
- Industry Advisory Groups                        - CSIRO Marine Research
- LGA                                             - NRM MC/ NRMSC/ MACC
- NRM Council                                     - PIHC/ PISC/ PIMC
- NRM Boards                                      - National Introduced Marine Pest Co-
                                                     ordination Group
National Links                                    - Consultative Committee on Introduced
- AHA                                                Marine Pests
- PIMC / PISC / PIHC / AHC
- Australian Biosecurity CRC                      Aquaculture, PIRSA
- CCEAD / NMG
                                                  Under the Living Coast Strategy PIRSA
                                                  Aquaculture has the responsibility to maintain
                                                  and update the State Response Plan for


SA Biosecurity Strategy_26th September 2005                                            Page 9
management of aquatic animal diseases in          -   CSIRO Australian Animal Health
aquaculture, to develop risk based                    Laboratory
surveillance programs and to support research     -   NRM MC / NRMSC / MACC
to better identify and control pathogens of       -   NAAHTWG / AAHC/ PIHC / PISC /
aquatic animals. PIRSA Aquaculture liaises            PIMC
with PIRSA Fisheries in the response to wild      -   National Introduced Marine Pest Co-
fish kills. PIRSA Aquaculture also reviews            ordination Group
the effectiveness of aquaculture stock            -   Consultative Committee on Introduced
recovery plans and escape minimisation plans          Marine Pests
and investigates environmental risks arising      -   Aquatic Consultative Committee on
from the escape of farmed species.                    Emergency Animal Disease
                                                  -   University of Tasmania
The Aquatic Health Working Group, chaired
by PIRSA Aquaculture, is a joint
government/industry body that considers the       Emergency Management Co-ordination
State aquatic animal health strategy including    Unit, PIRSA
emergency planning and surveillance. PIRSA
Aquaculture also works closely with the State     EMCU provides revision and maintenance of
Emergency Management Office (SEMO) in             PIRSA Emergency Management, Disaster and
planning the operational response to aquatic      Incident Response Planning and ensures
animal disease emergencies and seeks to           commonality of the methodology and
continually develop the State aquatic disease     structure as appropriate. The Unit enhances
diagnostic capacity, in both the public and       capacity by co-ordinating training for
private sectors. PIRSA Aquaculture is             Emergency Response, maintaining
represented on the Aquatic Consultative           equipment, assessing facilities, maintaining
Committee on Emergency Animal Disease             networks with other Agencies and industry
and the Aquatic Animal Health Committee,          leaders and mobilising resources to support
which determine the technical and policy          emergency management.
positions respectively with regards to national
emergency preparedness and response               State Links
procedures.                                       - State Emergency Management Committee
                                                  - Emergency Management Council
State Links                                       - State Crisis Centre
- EPA                                             - State Emergency Operations Centre
- SARDI                                           - State Protective Security and Advisory
- DWLBC                                               Group
- DEH                                             - SAPOL and Commissioner of Police
- PIRSA Animal Health                             - DWLBC
- VetLab                                          - DEH
- SEMO                                            - ForestrySA
- PIRSA Fisheries                                 - Health
- University of Adelaide                          - SA Water
- LGA                                             - CYFS
- NRM Council                                     - CFS
- NRM Boards                                      - SES
                                                  - MFS
National Links                                    - LGA
- DAFF / BA / AQIS                                - NRM Council
- CSIRO Marine Research                           - NRM Boards



SA Biosecurity Strategy_26th September 2005                                         Page 10
National Links                                   -   DEH
- National Counter – Terrorism Committee         -   ForestrySA
- Protective Security Co-ordination Centre       -   NRM Council
- Council of Australian Governments              -   NRM Boards
- PIMC                                           -   LGA
- Bureau of Meteorology
- DAFF                                           National Links
- AHA                                            - NRM MC / NRMSC
- PHA                                            - DAFF / AQIS / BA
                                                 - DEH
                                                 - AWC
Department of Water, Land and                    - VPC
Biodiversity Conservation                        - CRC Australian Invasive Animals
                                                 - CRC Australian Weed Management
The Department of Water, Land and
Biodiversity Conservation (DWLBC) is
responsible for the administration of the NRM    ForestrySA
Act 2004, provides advice and regulatory
support and facilitates the sustainable          ForestrySA is responsible for the protection
allocation and use of the State’s natural        of the state forest resource from pests and
resources.                                       diseases (both native and exotic) and for
                                                 minimising the risks to plantations and the
The Animal and Plant Control group co-           environment associated with these pests and
ordinates state-wide responses to incursions     diseases.
and management of existing pest plant and
animal species to minimise the impact of pest    ForestrySA, in conjunction with PIRSA,
animals and plants on primary industries,        AQIS and other relevant organisations, is
natural ecosystems and public safety. The        responsible for the management of incursions
group conducts research on control               of forest pests and diseases.
techniques, provides policy advice and
support to regulatory activities and has input   ForestrySA provides information and advice
into the State NRM Plan, which outlines the      to industry and the public on all matters of
priorities and policies for animal and plant     forest health. It also provides a diagnostic
control in South Australia.                      service for forest insects and diseases.

NRM Council advises the Minister on the          Biosecurity threats to forestry are usually on a
administration and operation of the NRM Act      national scale. ForestrySA contributes to
2004, monitors and evaluates the condition of    national forest health and biosecurity issues
natural resources across the State and           and is part of national network of forest health
prepares and reviews the State NRM Plan.         specialists. It is a member of various national
                                                 committees on forest health.
NRM Boards are responsible for controlling
pest plants and animals within their regions     State Links
and enforcing controls of proclaimed species     - PIRSA
on private property in accordance with           - SARDI
regional plans.                                  - DWLBC
                                                 - DEH
State Links                                      - State Forest Health Advisory Committee
- PIRSA                                          - LGA
- SARDI                                          - NRM Council


SA Biosecurity Strategy_26th September 2005                                           Page 11
-   NRM Boards                                    -   PIRSA
                                                  -   SARDI
National Links                                    -   DWLBC
- DAFF / OCPPO/ BA/ AQIS                          -   ForestrySA
- PHC / PIHC / PISC / PIMC                        -   RSPCA
- CSIRO                                           -   IDCGM
- CRC Sustainable Forest Production               -   LGA
- Research Working Group 7 (Forest                -   NRM Council
   Health)                                        -   NRM Boards
- Consultative Committee on Emergency
   Plant Pests                                    National Links
                                                  - NRM MC/ NRMSC
                                                  - DEH
Department for Environment and Heritage           - DAFF / BA
The Department for Environment and
Heritage (DEH) has a primary role in              Security and Emergency Management
biodiversity conservation policy and              Office, Department the of Premier and
managing re-introductions and translocations      Cabinet
of native fauna and flora.
                                                  The Security and Emergency Management
The Department undertakes and contributes to      Office (SEMO) in the Department of the
risk assessments to identify the threats to       Premier and Cabinet coordinates the whole-
native species and ecosystems and assess the      of-government strategic policy work for
likelihood and consequences of their impact       security and emergency management and to
on native flora and fauna.                        contribute to optimal levels of security,
                                                  mitigation and emergency preparedness in
To reduce the impact of identified risks to       South Australia.
native flora and fauna the Department
coordinates Threatened Species Recovery and       The Office is responsible for the
Threat Abatement Planning across the State.       implementation of key reviews, such as the
DEH also manages the State’s public land –        COAG Review of Hazardous Materials, the
land held in the conservation reserve system,     review of the State Disaster Plan and the
botanic gardens and as crown lands.               Review of Government Building Security.
DEH is a major custodian of information and       The group provides an ongoing strategic
knowledge about the State’s environment,          policy function and across-government
conducting systematic biological surveys of       coordination and support on security and
the vegetation and vertebrate fauna of South      emergency management matters. This
Australia. Through the State Herbarium,           includes supporting the Emergency
DEH is the major provider of data,                Management Council.
information and identification of plants, algae
and fungi.                                        SEMO also has a broad ongoing planning
                                                  function (for example, for the Emergency
The Department also promotes and regulates        Management Act and the State Counter
the humane treatment of animals through the       Terrorism Plan).
administration of the Prevention of Cruelty to
Animals Act, 1985.                                The Office is a key source of advice to the
                                                  Premier and the Cabinet on disaster and
State Links                                       emergency management issues.


SA Biosecurity Strategy_26th September 2005                                           Page 12
                                                  There is a need to increase industry awareness
State Links                                       of their roles and responsibilities in regard to
- Premier                                         biosecurity and to encourage an increased
- Cabinet                                         level of industry funding contribution,
- Emergency Management Council                    responsibility and involvement in South
- State Emergency Management Committee            Australia’s biosecurity.
- State Emergency Operations Centre
- State Protective Security and Advisory
    Group                                         Community’s role in Biosecurity
- SAPOL and Commissioner of Police
- All State government agencies                   The community are beneficiaries of
- CFS                                             biosecurity through protection of the local
- SES                                             economy, provision of quality produce and
- MFS                                             management of pests and diseases that
- LGA                                             threaten the natural environment, human
- NRM Council                                     health and way of life.
- NRM Boards
                                                  An informed community with a clear
National Links                                    understanding of biosecurity issues,
- National Counter – Terrorism Committee          responsibilities and networks is critical for
- Council of Australian Governments               successful biosecurity.
- Protective Security Co-ordination Centre
- Department of the Prime Minister and            Community support and commitment to
   Cabinet                                        quarantine and other biosecurity measures
- Australian Emergency Management                 assist in minimising incursions. Effective
   Committee                                      passive surveillance systems also rely on the
                                                  community reporting suspect pests, diseases
                                                  and weeds to the appropriate authority.
Industry’s role in Biosecurity
Industry plays an essential role in biosecurity
by being responsible and accountable for
protecting their industries.

They have a responsibility for biosecurity at
an individual level including implementing
biosecurity plans, compliance with quarantine
regulations, notifying the relevant government
authorities of suspect pests and diseases,
maintaining an awareness of biosecurity and
collaborating with Government Agencies to
ensure optimal biosecurity outcomes.

As major beneficiaries of biosecurity
programs, industry have a wider role,
including providing input into the
development of biosecurity policies, plans
and activities, data management and funding.




SA Biosecurity Strategy_26th September 2005                                             Page 13
Development of Biosecurity Strategies
South Australia has developed a biosecurity         incursions of exotic pests, disease
strategy that nests within the national             pathogens and weeds in Australia.
biosecurity system framework to achieve an       3. Eradicate where practical, or contain and
integration of biosecurity outcomes.                control and mitigate the impact of
                                                    established invasive organisms that have a
                                                    major economic, social, health or
National Biosecurity System                         environmental impact, and including
                                                    established “sleeper” organisms that have
Primary Industries Ministerial Council and          the potential for major impact.
Natural Resource Management Ministerial          4. Manage the impact of, or contain or
Council are developing a National Biosecurity       control at jurisdictional, regional, industry
System for primary production and natural           sector or local levels other pest, disease
resource management1.                               pathogens and weeds that have established
                                                    in Australia.
The policy principles for system                 5. Manage the impact of exotic species
implementation address the following key            introduced for production and other
areas1:                                             beneficial purposes.
- Whole of government approach to
    delivery;
- Risk-based approach;                           Biosecurity Strategy for South Australia
- Roles and Responsibilities;
- Decision making;                               The Biosecurity Strategy for South Australia
- Resourcing and cost sharing;                   will assist Government Agencies and other
- Communication and awareness; and               stakeholders to exclude, eradicate and
- Innovation.                                    effectively manage risks posed by pests and
                                                 diseases to the economy, environment and
The goal of the Australian Biosecurity System    human health.
for primary production and the environment is
a cost-effective, risk based approach to         The management of South Australia’s
minimise the number of biosecurity breaches      biosecurity will be enhanced by a statewide
and mitigate the deleterious economic, social    approach to biosecurity that defines roles,
and environmental impacts of new and             responsibilities and decision-making
existing breaches on Australia’s natural and     processes for applying the strategies,
built environments, and primary production       legislation and operational procedures.
sector, including zoonoses with implications
for human health and for stored foods1.          An overarching framework will strengthen
                                                 cross portfolio and intergovernmental
The Objectives of the National Biosecurity       linkages designed to maintain and improve
           1
System are :                                     South Australia’s biosecurity status. This
1. Prevent the entry and establishment of        applies to preparedness, prevention, response
   identified target exotic pests, disease       and recovery in pre-border, border and post
   pathogens and weeds that pose a major         border areas.
   biosecurity threat to Australia.
2. Cost effectively minimise the likelihood      Development of the South Australian
   of entry and establishment of other new       Biosecurity Strategy

1
                                                 An Interagency Committee consisting of
    An Australian Biosecurity System July 2005   members from Primary Industries and


SA Biosecurity Strategy_26th September 2005                                           Page 14
Resources South Australia, Department of            Bioterrorism is not addressed specifically in
Water, Land and Biodiversity Conservation,          this strategy, as conceptually, bioterrorism is
the South Australian Forestry Corporation,          another vector for introduction of unwanted
Department for Environment and Heritage             pests and species, although the intent and
and Department of Premier and Cabinet was           scale of damage are quite different. There are
established in December 2004 to develop a           also links with bioterrorism through the State
Biosecurity Strategy for South Australia.           Emergency Management Committee and
                                                    Emergency Management Council (sub
The Terms of Reference for the Committee            Cabinet).
were:
1. Describe the current arrangements in
   place for biosecurity in South Australia         Outcomes of the South Australian
   and relationship with national biosecurity       Biosecurity Strategy
   policies and activities;
2. Identify the range of biosecurity issues         The outcomes across the biosecurity
   that may impact on South Australia;              continuum of the SA Biosecurity Strategy are
3. Assess South Australia’s preparedness            based on those of the Australian Biosecurity
   and programs required to meet biosecurity        System2,3 and include:
   requirements in South Australia and
   interactions nationally and identify gaps;       Preparedness
   and                                              - Incursion Contingency planning
4. Develop a plan for maintaining and               - Emergency response agreements
   improving biosecurity systems in South           - Incursion impact mitigation strategies
   Australia.                                       - Biosecurity plans
                                                    - Communications planning
Scope of the South Australian Biosecurity           - Legislative capability
Strategy                                            - Processes
                                                    - Databases and information management
The scope of the South Australian Biosecurity           systems
Strategy was kept in alignment with the             - Diagnostic capability network
National Biosecurity System to include:             - Resourcing and Training
- pests and pathogens of terrestrial animals;       Pre Border
- pests and pathogens of terrestrial plants;        - Import risk assessment
- aquatic pests and pathogens;                      Border
- terrestrial and aquatic weeds; and                - Quarantine surveillance and risk
- invasive vertebrate and invertebrate                  management
    animal species.                                 - Bioterrorism security
which impact on primary industries, the             - Quarantine facilities and procedures for
natural and the built environments3.                    new accessions
                                                    Post Border
The Strategy interfaces with public health, in      - Monitoring and surveillance
relation to stored foods and zoonotic diseases,     - Early detection and reporting
through linkages with State Emergency               - Diagnosis and confirmation capability
Management Committee and Emergency                  - Response plans
Management Council (sub Cabinet).                   - Recovery plans
                                                    - Eradication protocols
                                                    - Management plans and responsibilities for
2                                                       endemic incursion3
  Towards a National Primary Industry and Natural
Resource Biosecurity System, July 2004              - Research and development2
3
  Towards a National Primary Industry and Natural
Resource Biosecurity System, June 2005


SA Biosecurity Strategy_26th September 2005                                             Page 15
Identifying the Gaps
Current biosecurity arrangements and                   The main gaps identified across Agencies
processes were benchmarked in each Agency              include interagency arrangements, risk
against the outcomes described in the scoping          management, training, communication and
paper “Towards a National Primary Industry             awareness, monitoring and surveillance,
and Natural Resource Biosecurity System”               management of data, capacity building,
(DAFF, June 2005) and gaps were identified.            recovery plans, research and funding and
                                                       resources.
A detailed audit of each Agencies biosecurity
arrangements and processes was undertaken              Table 2 below summarises the main gaps
and used to develop the gap analysis.                  identified across Agencies that are applicable
                                                       to the Biosecurity Strategy.
Different Agencies are at different stages of
development in biosecurity. Some                       Additional gaps related to specific Agencies
biosecurity programs have been in place for a          will be addressed separately by individual
long time and are working well, while other            Agencies.
areas require development.


Table 2: Gaps identified across Agencies from strategic analysis and agency consultation

Gap Identified        Details of Gap Identified                Issue with Gap Identified
Interagency           - Lack of formal interagency             Lack of clear distinction of roles and
Arrangements             agreements regarding roles and        responsibilities between agencies can
                         responsibilities in the areas of      sometimes lead to duplication,
                         contingency planning and              uncoordinated service delivery and
                         preparedness, emergency response      inefficiency. Opportunities for
                         agreements, implementation of         synergistic and efficiency
                         biosecurity plans, involvement in     improvements, through sharing of
                         import risk assessments and           knowledge, capabilities and resources
                         response plans.                       between Agencies may be missed. The
                      - Responsibilities regarding pests,      current goodwill arrangements
                         diseases and weeds with largely       between some agencies may not be
                         social impacts are unclear.           adequate to deal with biosecurity.
                      - Conflicts between objectives of
                         some Acts inhibit emergency
                         management.
                      - Lack of intergovernmental and
                         interagency agreements where
                         administration of risk mitigation
                         strategies is completed under other
                         Agencies acts.
                      - Inadequate knowledge and use of
                         other Agencies capabilities.
Risk                  - Lack of appropriate risk analysis      The risk ‘framework’ applied to
Assessments              of threats and pathways used in       biosecurity is not consistent across
                         contingency planning and              Agencies hindering the identification,
                         preparedness.                         prioritisation and management of
                      - The value of the environment is        threats.


SA Biosecurity Strategy_26th September 2005                                                 Page 16
                          not incorporated in all risk
                          assessments and subsequently not
                          reflected in all biosecurity plans,
                          strategies for incursion impact
                          mitigation and monitoring and
                          surveillance.
                      -   Pests, diseases and weeds with
                          largely social impacts have tended
                          to be given less attention in
                          relation to detection, surveillance,
                          research and control.
Training              -   Lack of appropriate training in        Deficiencies in training may
                          emergency response, identification     compromise Agencies ability to be
                          (Government and industry) and          effective and efficient in planning,
                          diagnosis of high risk threats.        preparedness, response and recovery in
                                                                 biosecurity.
Communication         -   Limited awareness and                  The potential roles and responsibilities
                          involvement of community, non-         of Government, industry and
                          government organisations and           community in biosecurity are limited
                          industry in biosecurity plans,         by ineffective communication.
                          strategies for incursion impact
                          mitigation, monitoring and
                          surveillance and early detection
                          and reporting.
                      -   Limited awareness and
                          commitment of government and
                          industry leaders to implementing
                          biosecurity strategies.
                      -   Lack of an integrated government
                          pest and disease-reporting
                          network.
                      -   Uninformed community during
                          emergency responses.
                      -   Lack of formal arrangements with
                          media and communication units.
                      -   Interagency communication links
                          are not well developed.
Monitoring and        -   Limited review of efficiency and       Lack of active and passive surveillance
Surveillance              effectiveness of surveillance.         limits probability of early detection,
                      -   Limited active surveillance and        effective containment and eradication.
                          diminished capacity for passive
                          surveillance.
                      -   Reliance on Plant Health
                          roadblocks with no formal
                          agreement, funding or resources
                          from other Agencies.




SA Biosecurity Strategy_26th September 2005                                                   Page 17
Management of         -   Lack of a common system or co-         Biosecurity data is stored in a range of
Data                      ordination between Agencies for        information systems resulting in gaps
                          managing information.                  and duplication, inconsistency and
                      -   No diagnostic database to capture      poor accessibility which inhibits
                          information in many Agencies.          quality decision making.
                      -   Limited up-to-date information
                          management systems to assist
                          decision-making.
Capacity              -   Critical loss of diagnostic capacity   Loss of diagnostic capacity, minimal
Building                  at the state and national level with   succession planning and lack of
                          low numbers of functional              appropriate infrastructure limits
                          personnel with specialist              Agencies capability to deliver
                          knowledge.                             biosecurity responsibilities.
                      -   Limited succession planning in
                          diagnostics and other areas that
                          are critical for biosecurity.
                      -   Appropriate infrastructure is not
                          always readily available for an
                          emergency response.
Recovery Plans        -   Lack of formal recovery plans in       Lack of clarity in roles and
                          most Agencies.                         responsibilities of Agencies and
                      -   Socio-economic needs are not           linkages to NGO’s, charities, role of
                          integrated into recovery plans.        volunteers etc. may impede recovery.
Research              -   Research organisations, industry        Lack of an alignment of research
                          and funding organisations do not        priorities can hinder the development
                          always agree on research priorities     of biosecurity policies, procedures
                          relating to biosecurity.                and protocols.
Funding and           -   General lack of funding and             Funding and resources limit
Resources                 resources for a wide range of           biosecurity policy, planning,
                          biosecurity activities.                 operations and incident response
                                                                  functions.




SA Biosecurity Strategy_26th September 2005                                                    Page 18
Closing the Gaps – Objectives and                Strategy 1.4
Strategies                                       Achieve greater flexibility in the utilisation of
                                                 specialist human resources across Agencies.
Current biosecurity arrangements and
processes in each Agency were benchmarked
against the outcomes described in the scoping    Objective Two
paper “Towards a National Primary Industry       Risk Management
and Natural Resource Biosecurity System”         A consistent risk-based framework needs to
(June 2005) and gaps were identified.            underpin the delivery of biosecurity. The use
Strategies to address the gaps were developed    of risk assessments is essential to identify
by the Agencies and these will form the basis    risks, assess the likelihood and consequences
of Business Plans and the development of         of their impact, set priorities and institute
programs.                                        appropriate and scientifically based steps to
                                                 either reduce that likelihood of risk and/or the
                                                 severity of their impacts on primary
Objective One                                    industries, the environment and the
Interagency Arrangements                         community.
Seamless integration between appropriate
Agencies, NRM bodies and local                   Objective 2: Adopt and implement an
Government, each with clear roles and            appropriate risk management framework
responsibilities, will ensure the biosecurity    that is consistent across Agencies.
system operates efficiently and effectively.
                                                 Strategy 2.1
Objective 1: Establish and formalise             Adopt a national standard risk assessment
Interagency Arrangements, where                  model and implement at a State level.
applicable.
                                                 Strategy 2.2
Strategy 1.1                                     Incorporate environmental impacts in risk
Identify and formalise interagency roles,        assessment models.
responsibilities and resourcing to improve co-
ordination and management.
                                                 Strategy 2.3
Strategy 1.2                                     Incorporate pests, diseases and weeds with
Develop formal Memoranda of                      social impacts into risk assessments and
Understanding and other administrative           priorities.
arrangements between relevant Agencies
where compliance is completed under another      Strategy 2.4
Agencies Act.                                    Set State priorities through the consistent
                                                 application of National risk management
Strategy 1.3                                     framework.
Develop formal Memoranda of
Understanding between relevant State and
National Agencies where Acts conflict or         Objective Three
inhibit emergency management and                 Capability
compliance.                                      Access to infrastructure, expertise and
                                                 capacity is essential for biosecurity and to
                                                 respond immediately to high impact
                                                 incursions. Relevant training will ensure staff



SA Biosecurity Strategy_26th September 2005                                            Page 19
understand their roles and responsibilities,
command and control structures and                  Objective 4: Development and
information management. There is a need to          implementation of communication
ensure that the State has access to expertise       strategy.
such as diagnostic services interstate or
overseas for pests and pathogens for which          Strategy 4.1
the State lacks the capability. Appropriate         Development of a communication strategy
succession planning will ensure Agencies can        that includes:
meet future biosecurity responsibilities.           - Advising industry and community of their
                                                        responsibilities;
Objective 3: Identify and ensure                    - Measures to increase awareness and
biosecurity capability with regard to                   participation of Government, industry and
human resources and infrastructure                      community;
                                                    - Increasing linkages / networks with
Strategy 3.1                                            Government, Non-Government
Undertake an audit across the Agencies and              organisations and stakeholders; and
externally of expertise, skills and capabilities.   - Dissemination of biosecurity information.
Maintain a ‘skills register’ and ensure
linkages to external service providers.
                                                    Objective Five
Strategy 3.2                                        Monitoring and Surveillance
Develop and deliver training programs to            Monitoring and surveillance systems support
meet skill and capability requirements.             the detection and early intervention of pests,
                                                    weeds and disease incursions, and are an
Strategy 3.3                                        important aspect of managing biosecurity
Address critical loss of access to diagnostic       threats and protecting market access. They
capacity at a State level following                 need to be based on optimum science,
assessments undertaken at a National level          technology and sampling methodologies
(i.e. Animal Health Australia and Plant Health      within the economic and environmental
Australia).                                         context. There may be opportunities to
                                                    consolidate active surveillance operations.
Strategy 3.4                                        Increasing the awareness and involvement of
Implement succession planning in areas              industry and community will enhance passive
critical to biosecurity where expertise is          surveillance.
unavailable outside the Agency.
                                                    Objective 5: Establish efficient monitoring
Strategy 3.5                                        and surveillance systems to encourage
Ensure appropriate capital infrastructure is        early detection.
available for an emergency response.
                                                    Strategy 5.1
                                                    Review efficiency and effectiveness of active
Objective Four                                      surveillance to target high priorities (based on
Communication and Awareness                         risk assessment).
The success of biosecurity depends on
Government, industry and community having           Strategy 5.2
clear understanding of issues, responsibilities     Identify opportunities for synergies / co-
and networks. An effective communication            ordination in monitoring and surveillance.
strategy will increase industry and community
awareness and involvement in surveillance,
detection, containment and control.


SA Biosecurity Strategy_26th September 2005                                              Page 20
Strategy 5.3                                      recovery phase must include consideration of
Improve and support passive surveillance          economic, environmental and social
systems by increasing awareness and               rehabilitation.
involvement of industry and community.
                                                  Objective 7: Development and review of
Strategy 5.4                                      biosecurity plans.
Develop an integrated Government / industry
/ community reporting network for                 Strategy 7.1
biosecurity threats.                              All Agencies to ensure Preparedness and
                                                  Response Plans are prepared, in place, widely
                                                  available and regularly reviewed.
Objective Six
Management of Data                                Strategy 7.2
A strong co-ordination of and wide access to      All Agencies to develop specific recovery
compatible databases will enhance Agencies        plan(s), based on a generic framework, to
biosecurity capabilities and support quality      assist individuals, families and communities
decision-making. Databases should operate         affected by an Emergency Response.
efficiently to provide all relevant information
and spatial capability.                           Strategy 7.3
                                                  Ensure consistency between priorities of the
Objective 6: Adoption of database and             State Biosecurity Strategy and Regional NRM
information systems that are compatible           Plans.
nationally and between Agencies.

Strategy 6.1                                      Objective Eight
Adopt common platforms for database and           Science Based Decision Making
information systems.                              Research informs the development of
                                                  biosecurity priorities, policies, procedures and
Strategy 6.2                                      protocols and ensures decisions are based on
Identify key diagnostic databases and develop     sound scientific evidence.
capacity for compatibility.
                                                  Objective 8: Ensure science based decision
Strategy 6.3                                      making.
Move to web based systems and incorporate
GIS and other relevant information to             Strategy 8.1
enhance management of data.                       Ensure that sound scientific information is an
                                                  integral part of risk assessment and response
                                                  strategies.
Objective Seven
Planning Processes                                Strategy 8.2
For effective biosecurity risk management         Review current and potential research
plans must be in place and regularly reviewed     priorities based on risk framework in
and evaluated. Biosecurity plans at State and     collaboration with appropriate Stakeholders.
regional levels should complement those used
or being developed at the national level.         Strategy 8.3
Planning for preparedness, response and           Engage in national and international forums
recovery must take into account                   to ensure access to science-based capability
environmental, economic and social impacts        through linkages and participation with
and allow for foresight and flexibility. The      research organisations including cooperative
                                                  research centres.


SA Biosecurity Strategy_26th September 2005                                            Page 21
                                                  Access to funding and resources is essential
                                                  for priority areas in biosecurity building
Objective Nine                                    capability and early intervention across the
Social and Community Pest Impacts                 system.
Pests and diseases with a largely social impact
have tended to be given less attention in         Objective 10: Direct funding and resources
relation to detection, surveillance, research     to areas of highest priority.
and control. Responsibilities and the
management of community pests need to be          Strategy 10.1
formalised.                                       Agencies to target funding and resources to
                                                  areas of high priority based on a risk
                                                  assessment.
Objective 9: Address and formalise
arrangements relating to community pests.
                                                  Strategy 10.2
                                                  Identify areas in all aspects of biosecurity that
Strategy 9.1                                      are inadequately resourced for effective
Formalise roles, responsibilities and resources   response.
relating to pests, diseases and weeds which
impact on the community.                          Strategy 10.3
                                                  Evaluate management and wider access to
                                                  biosecurity funding.
Objective Ten
Funding and Resources




SA Biosecurity Strategy_26th September 2005                                             Page 22
Prioritisation of Strategies
                                                       Objective         Lead Responsibility
Short Term Strategic Priorities
0 – 1 years
Strategy 1.1                                           Interagency       Committee
Identify and formalise interagency roles,              Arrangements
responsibilities and resourcing to improve co-
ordination and management.

Strategy 2.1                                           Risk Management   Program Leaders
Adopt a national standard risk assessment model
and implement at a State level.

Strategy 5.2                                           Monitoring and    Committee
Identify opportunities for synergies / co-ordination   Surveillance
in monitoring and surveillance.

Medium Term Strategic Priorities
0 – 2 years
Strategy 1.2                                           Interagency       Committee
Develop formal Memoranda of Understanding and          Arrangements
other administrative arrangements between
relevant Agencies where compliance is completed
under another Agencies Act.

Strategy 1.4                                           Interagency       Committee
Achieve greater flexibility in the utilisation of      Arrangements
specialist human resources across Agencies.

Strategy 2.4                                           Risk Management   All Agencies
Set State priorities through the consistent
application of National risk management
framework.

Strategy 3.1                                           Capability        Committee
Undertake an audit across the Agencies and
externally of expertise, skills and capabilities.
Maintain a ‘skills register’ and ensure linkages to
external service providers.




SA Biosecurity Strategy_26th September 2005                                          Page 23
Strategy 3.2                                            Capability           Committee
Develop and deliver training programs to meet
skill and capability requirements.
Strategy 4.1                                            Communication and    Committee
Development of a communication strategy that            Awareness
includes:
- Advising industry and community of their
    responsibilities;
- Measures to increase awareness and
    participation of Government, industry and
    community;
- Increasing linkages / networks with
    Government, Non-Government organisations
    and stakeholders; and
- Dissemination of biosecurity information.
Strategy 5.1                                            Monitoring and       All Agencies
Review efficiency and effectiveness of active           Surveillance
surveillance to target high priorities (based on risk
assessment).
Strategy 5.3                                            Monitoring and       All Agencies
Improve and support passive surveillance systems        Surveillance
by increasing awareness and involvement of
industry and community.
Strategy 6.1                                            Management of Data   Committee
Adopt common platforms for database and
information systems.
Strategy 7.2                                            Planning Processes   All Agencies
All Agencies to develop specific recovery plan(s),
based on a generic framework, to assist
individuals, families and communities affected by
an Emergency Response.
Strategy 7.3                                            Planning Processes   DWLBC
Ensure consistency between priorities of the State
Biosecurity Strategy and Regional NRM Plans.
Strategy 9.1                                            Social and           Committee
Formalise roles, responsibilities and resources         Community Pest
relating to pests, diseases and weeds which impact      Impacts
on the community.
Strategy 10.2                                           Funding and          Committee
Identify areas in all aspects of biosecurity that are   Resources
inadequately resourced for effective response.
Strategy 10.3                                           Funding and          Committee
Evaluate management and wider access to                 Resources
biosecurity funding.
Long Term Strategic Priorities
0-5 years
Strategy 1.3                                            Interagency          Committee
Develop formal Memoranda of Understanding               Arrangements
between relevant State and National Agencies
where Acts conflict or inhibit emergency


SA Biosecurity Strategy_26th September 2005                                              Page 24
management and compliance.
Strategy 2.2                                         Risk Management      DEH
Incorporate environmental impacts in risk
assessment models.
Strategy 2.3                                         Risk Management      Committee
Incorporate pests, diseases and weeds with social
impacts into risk assessments and priorities.
Strategy 3.3                                         Capability           PIRSA
Address critical loss of access to diagnostic
capacity at a State level following assessments
undertaken at a National level (i.e. Animal Health
Australia and Plant Health Australia).
Strategy 3.4                                         Capability           Committee
Implement succession planning in areas critical to
biosecurity where expertise is unavailable outside
the Agency.
Strategy 3.5                                         Capability           PIRSA
Ensure appropriate capital infrastructure is
available for an emergency response.
Strategy 5.4                                         Monitoring and       Committee
Develop an integrated Government / industry /        Surveillance
community reporting network for biosecurity
threats.
Strategy 6.2                                         Management of Data   Agencies
Identify key diagnostic databases and develop
capacity for compatibility.
Strategy 6.3                                         Management of Data   Agencies
Move to web based systems and incorporate GIS
and other relevant information to enhance
management of data.
Strategy 7.1                                         Planning Processes   DWLBC / DEH /
All Agencies to ensure Preparedness and Response                          Forestry
Plans are prepared, in place, widely available and
regularly reviewed.

Strategy 8.1                                         Science Based        Agencies
Ensure that sound scientific information is an       Decision Making
integral part of risk assessment and response
strategies.
Strategy 8.2                                         Science Based        Agencies
Review current and potential research priorities     Decision Making
based on risk framework in collaboration with
appropriate Stakeholders.
Strategy 8.3                                         Science Based        Agencies
Engage in national and international forums to       Decision Making
ensure access to science-based capability through
linkages and participation with research
organisations including cooperative research
centres.



SA Biosecurity Strategy_26th September 2005                                           Page 25
Strategy 10.1                                       Funding and   Agencies
Agencies to target funding and resources to areas   Resources
of high priority based on a risk assessment.




SA Biosecurity Strategy_26th September 2005                                  Page 26
                                               integrated and coordinated approach is
Taking the Strategy forward                    required.

Achieving Objectives                           It is recommended that a State Biosecurity
                                               Committee is established to develop and
A Business Plan will need to be developed to   facilitate the Business Plan and manage future
achieve objectives through the                 requirements. This approach has been
implementation of recommended strategies.      initiated in Tasmania where membership has
                                               been drawn across all Agencies involved in
To address current and future biosecurity      biosecurity.
issues that all jurisdictions are facing an




SA Biosecurity Strategy_26th September 2005                                       Page 27
Glossary                                           CSIRO   Commonwealth Scientific and
Establishment            When an exotic                    Industrial Research
                         organism has                      Organisation
                         established a             EPA     Environment Protection
                         sustainable reproducing           Agency
                         population within an      GMO     Genetically Modified
                         area.                             Organisms
Incursion                An occurrence of an       Health  Department of Health
                         organism not              IDCGM   SA Interdepartmental
                         previously known to be            Committee on Gene
                         established in South              Technology
                         Australia. Does not       LGA     Local Government Association
                         include interceptions.    MACC    Marine and Coastal Committee
Interception             Detection of an exotic    MFS     Metropolitan Fire Service
                         organism at the border    NAAHTWG National Aquatic Animal
                         before it enters South            Health Technical Working
                         Australia and becomes             Group
                         an incursion.             NGO     Non-Government
Zoonotic                 Diseases transmitted to           Organisations
                         humans from animals.      NMG     National Management Group
                                                   NRM     Natural Resource Management
Acronyms and Abbreviations                         NRMMC   Natural Resource Management
AAHC            Aquatic Animal Health                      Ministerial Council
                Committee                          NRMSC   Natural Resource Management
ABA             Advisory Board of Agriculture              Standing Committee
AHA             Animal Health Australia            OCPPO   Office of the Chief Plant
AHC             Animal Health Committee                    Protection Officer
AQIS            Australian Quarantine and          PHA     Plant Health Australia
                Inspection Services                PHC     Plant Health Committee
AWC             Australian Weeds Committee         PIHC    Primary Industries Health
BA              Biosecurity Australia                      Committee
CCEAD           Consultative Committee on          PIMC    Primary Industries Ministerial
                Emergency Animal Diseases                  Council
CFS             Country Fire Service               PISC    Primary Industries Standing
CRC             Co-operative Research Centre               Committee
CYFS            Community, Youth and Family        PIRSA   Primary Industries and
                Services                                   Resources South Australia
DAFF            Department of Agriculture,         RSPCA   Royal Society for the
                Fisheries and Forestry                     Prevention of Cruelty Animals
DEH             South Australian Department        SAFF    South Australian Farmers
                for Environment and Heritage               Federation
DEH             Australian Department of           SAPOL   South Australian Police
                Environment and Heritage           SARDI   South Australian Research and
DPC             Department of Premier and                  Development Institute
                Cabinet                            SEMO    State Emergency Management
DWLBC           Department of Water, Land                  Office
                and Biodiversity and               VPC     Vertebrate Pest Committee
                Conservation



SA Biosecurity Strategy_26th September 2005                                     Page 28
References
ABARE, 2003, Commodity Statistics,             managing emergency plant pests, PIRSA,
Canberra.                                      Adelaide.

Agtrans Research, 2005, Review of progress     Queensland Government, 2003, Submission to
on Invasive Species, Report to Department of   the Federal Senate inquiry into the
Environment and Heritage, April 2005,          regulation, control and management of
Brisbane.                                      invasive species and the Environment
                                               Protection and Biodiversity Conservation
CSIRO, 2003, Submission to the Federal         Amendment (Invasive Species) Bill 2002,
Senate inquiry into the regulation, control    Parliament of Australia.
and management of invasive species and the
Environment Protection and Biodiversity        Senate Committee on the Environment, 2004,
Conservation Amendment (Invasive Species)      Turning back the tide-the invasive species
Bill 2002, Parliament of Australia.            challenge: Report on the regulation, control
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DAFF, July 2004, Towards a National            Environment Protection and Biodiversity
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Biosecurity System, Canberra.                  C, James R, and Cactro O, 2004, The
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EconSearch Pty Ltd, 2003, Economic
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Adelaide.

EPA, 2003, State of the Environment Report
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Hart R, 2002, Managing Pest Animals in
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McLeod R, 2004, Counting the Cost: Impact
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PIRSA Plant Health, 2005, Performance
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SA Biosecurity Strategy_26th September 2005                                      Page 29

								
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